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Sample records for williams fork formation

  1. William Tang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    William Tang William Tang FES Requirements Worksheet 1.1. Project Information - Title Document Prepared By William Tang Project Title Title Principal Investigator William Tang Participating Organizations Funding Agencies DOE SC DOE NSA NSF NOAA NIH Other: 2. Project Summary & Scientific Objectives for the Next 5 Years Please give a brief description of your project - highlighting its computational aspect - and outline its scientific objectives for the next 3-5 years. Please list one or two

  2. Ben Williams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2015, Ben Williams began serving as the interim senior communications specialist for the Office of Technology Transitions for the Department of Energy.Prior to his detail in the office,...

  3. Williams named ASA Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May Williams named ASA Fellow Williams named ASA Fellow The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Brian Williams with the title of Fellow. May 27, 2015 Brian...

  4. Williams named ASA Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Williams named ASA Fellow May 27, 2015 The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Brian Williams of LANL's Statistical Sciences group with the title of Fellow. Williams...

  5. William Brinkman

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. William F. Brinkman was confirmed by the Senate on June 19, 2009 and sworn in on June 30, 2009 as the Director of the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy. He joins the Office of...

  6. Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fork Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spanish Fork Wind Farm Facility Spanish Fork Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  7. William Perry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    William Perry About Us William Perry - Former Secretary of Defense, Stanford University Professor Photo of William Perry William Perry is the Michael and Barbara Berberian ...

  8. East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fork Biodiesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: East Fork Biodiesel, LLC Place: Algona, Iowa Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Biodiesel producer and co-developer, with...

  9. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - William Nemeth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of William Nemeth William Nemeth Research Engineer On staff since: 2008 Phone number: 303-384-7801 Email William Nemeth Primary Research Interests Silicon solar cell...

  10. Tommy Williams | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tommy Williams Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tommy Williams Place: Gainesville, FL Website: www.tommywilliams.com References: Tommy Williams1 Information About Partnership...

  11. William Brocker | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    William Brocker ESH/QA Coordinator - EGS E-mail wbrocker

  12. Roy Williams as recalled by Margaret Morrow ? Or: Roy Williams...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Margaret Morrow - Or: Roy Williams, a man with great presence and leadership (title as it appeared in The Oak Ridger) The series on Roy Williams has created a great response from...

  13. Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of William H. Goldstein Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of N. Nicole Nelson - Jean Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer

  14. Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Spanish Fork City Corporation Place: Utah Phone Number: 801-804-4450 Website: www.spanishfork.org...

  15. William J. Clinton, 1998

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    99 Administration of William J. Clinton, 1998 / June 11 somehow going there would absolve the Chi- nese Government of its responsibility for the terrible killings at Tiananmen Square 9 years ago, or indicate that America is no longer concerned about such conduct. They are wrong. Protocol and honoring a nation's tradi- tional practices should not be confused with principle. China's leaders, as I have repeat- edly said, can only move beyond the events of June, 1989, when they recognize the re-

  16. William J. Clinton, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    30 May 26 / Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 We intend to establish ecological reserves in the most fragile areas to keep them off- limits to fishing, drilling, and other damaging uses. I'm also directing the EPA to strength- en water quality standards all along our coasts and provide stronger protections for the most vulnerable ocean waters, to reduce pollution of beaches, coasts, and oceans. Second, I'm announcing today our com- mitment to permanently protect coral reefs of the

  17. William J. Clinton, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    06 Nov. 6 / Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 Statement on Signing the Executive Order on Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments November 6, 2000 Today I am pleased to sign a revised Exec- utive order on consultation with Indian tribal governments. This Executive order, itself based on consultation, will renew my admin- istration's commitment to tribal sovereignty and our government-to-government relation- ship. The first Americans hold a unique place in our

  18. William T. Yardley

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 Statement for the Record William T. Yardley President of U.S. Transmission and Storage Spectra Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting Panel on Infrastructure Needs: Electricity and Natural Gas Interdependencies Hartford, CT -- April 21, 2014 Introduction Good afternoon Secretary Moniz, Governor Malloy and members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force. I am Bill Yardley, President of U.S. Transmission and Storage at Spectra Energy, one of North America"s leading pipeline and

  19. Mr. William Steuteville

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    45 DEC 18 13% Mr. William Steuteville 3 HW 33 EPA Region III 841 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 Dear Mr. Steuteville: I am enclosing for your information a copy of the radiological survey report for the former Aeroprojects Facility in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Only background levels of radioactivity were found during the course of the survey. A copy of the survey has been

  20. Upper East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Upper East Fork Poplar Creek This document discusses the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek. Topics include: * The area's safety * Any use limitations for the area * History and cleanup background for this area * How DOE's cleanup program addressed the problem PDF icon Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Watershed fact sheet More Documents & Publications Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Recommendation 229: Recommendation on the Preferred Alternative for the Proposed Plan for

  1. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    East Fork Poplar Creek Lower East Fork Poplar Creek This document discusses the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek. Topics include: * The area's safety * Any use limitations for the area * History and cleanup background for this area * How DOE's cleanup program addressed the problem PDF icon Lower East Fork Poplar Creek fact sheet More Documents & Publications Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek Recommendation 229: Recommendation on the Preferred

  2. Bradley Williams | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bradley Williams - Team Lead, Nuclear Energy University Programs Most Recent New Nuclear Energy Awards Give Students Hands-On Research Experience September 28...

  3. William J. Clinton, 1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    97 Administration of William J. Clinton, 1995 / Aug. 8 for an egg would you give him a scorpion? Today we must ask, if our child asked about the future, will we give him or her dirty air, poison water; would we keep them from knowing what chemicals are being released into their neighborhoods and keep their par- ents from protecting them? We all know what the answer is. It's no. It seems simple here in this wonderful neighborhood. Why don't you help us make it simple in Washington, DC? Thank you

  4. William J. Clinton, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 / Apr. 22 have the vehicles they want with the effi- ciency they deserve. More than 100 years ago, the great Amer- ican poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow re- minded us that ''nature is a revelation of God.'' This Earth Day, let us remember that we are only stewards, in our time, of the Earth God gave us for all time. And let us strengthen our resolve to preserve the beauty and the natural bounty that sustains us and must sustain generations yet to come.

  5. Williams Stone Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stone Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Williams Stone Wind Turbine Facility Williams Stone Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status...

  6. Trish Williams, Communications Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Trish Williams, Communications Specialist About Us Trish Williams, Communications Specialist Most Recent Energy Department Solid-State Lighting Efforts Spark New Paradigm March 4

  7. Williams Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Services Jump to: navigation, search Name: Williams Energy Services Place: Tulsa, OK Website: www.williamsenergyservices.com References: Williams Energy Services1...

  8. William Alexander | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    William Alexander - Technical Programs and Outreach/Website Administrator William Alexander Mr. Alexander is a graduate of New Mexico Mining and Technology Institute, in Socorro New Mexico. He has been working in the Los Alamos area since 2007, where he started with Shaw Environmental Inc. During his time at Los Alamos National Laboratory Mr. Alexander worked in the Associate Directorate for Environmental Programs Division. In 2012 Mr. Alexander took a job with the Northern New Mexico Citizens

  9. William Weaver | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    William Weaver - Operational Readiness Authorization Basis William W. Weaver is a Nuclear Facilities and Tritium Risk Specialist in the Office of Chief Nuclear Safety, experienced with operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and tritium processing, handling, storage, recovery and disposition. He previously was the point of contact for Readiness Reviews for the Department with Office of Primary Interest responsibilities for DOE Order 425.1, STD-3006, and Handbook 3012. He has 39 years

  10. Melvin G. Williams, Jr. | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Melvin G. Williams, Jr. About Us Melvin G. Williams, Jr. - Former Associate Deputy Secretary Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Melvin G. Williams Jr., Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy (retired), served as the Associate Deputy Secretary of Energy until February 2013. As a Presidential Appointee at the U.S. Department of Energy, he served as the key leader responsible for the Department's management and operational excellence. He reported directly to the Secretary of Energy and the Deputy Secretary, and drove

  11. Longwall mining thrives in Colorado's North Fork Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2006-08-15

    With mining units poised for record-setting capacity and rail service restored, these mines in Colorado's North Fork valley are ready to cut coal. 4 photos.

  12. Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2250114, -112.4840675 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  13. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  14. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  15. William A. Goddard III - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People Profiles Harry A. Atwater Theodor Agapie Joel W. Ager III Alexis T. Bell Marco Bernardi Bruce Brunschwig Walter Drisdell William A. Goddard III John Gregoire Robert Howard Grubbs Joel A. Haber Martin P. Head-Gordon John C. Hemminger Frances A. Houle Thomas Jaramillo Clifford P. Kubiak Hans Joachim Lewerenz Nathan S. Lewis Daniel J. Miller Thomas Francis Miller III Jeffrey B. Neaton Jens K. Norskov Kristin A. Persson Jonas C. Peters Ian D. Sharp Manuel P. Soriaga Francesca Maria Toma F.

  16. The .Hoiorable William S. Cohen'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Secretary of Energy' Washington, bC 20585 October 10, 1997 ' . , :. . The .Hoiorable William S. Cohen' Secretary of' eefense Washing+, D.C. 203Oi .' Dear Mr. Se&etm: ,_ -_ . . ' ,I. ' . a- / 4 ' . \ ' . The Congr&s recently se$ tp the President for signature the' Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provi$ions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility forthe Formerly:U&zed Sites Remedial Action . Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy

  17. The Honorable, William S . Cohen

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c - . .' 0 -- .' . . - . . The Honorable, William S . Cohen . : Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -. , 1. .' .- - I &karMr. Secretary: . ' The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program @USRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Assuming that

  18. The Honorable, William S . Cohen

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' The Skcretary of Energy _ Washington. bC 20585 ' -. October 10, 1997 ' 0 -- .' . . The Honorable, William S . Cohen ' Secretary 0f' Defense Washington, D.C. 20301 .' Jhr Mr. Secretary: ,I ' . ,.. *- . : . ' . The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water . Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would ' . immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actron Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of

  19. William Fowler and Elements in the Stars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    William Fowler and Elements in the Stars Resources with Additional Information William A. Fowler Courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives 'William A. Fowler ... shared the 1983 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into the creation of chemical elements inside stars ... . During his career in nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, which spanned more that 60 years, Fowler was primarily concerned with studies of fusion reactions--how the nuclei of lighter chemical elements fuse to create

  20. William E. Murphie | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    William E. Murphie - Manager of Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office William E. Murphie William Murphie was appointed in 2003 to manage the activities of the U.S. Department of Energy's newly created Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky to provide leadership and focus to the specific cleanup challenges at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants. Bill's management and oversight responsibilities encompass environmental remediation, waste management, and facility

  1. Williams Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA Biomass National Map Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWilliamsBiomassFacility&oldid398342" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  2. Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, William; Mills,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest; Hargrove, William; Mills, Richard 54 Environmental Sciences Ecoregions; Representativeness;...

  3. Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ----- Inventors William Evans (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of incandescent light bulbs that...

  4. Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2494566, -112.1910031 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  5. William R. Harvey | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    William R. Harvey About Us William R. Harvey, Ph.D. - President, Hampton University Dr. William R. Harvey Dr. William R. Harvey is President of Hampton University and 100% owner of the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company of Houghton, Michigan. Since 1978, he has served with distinction as President of Hampton University and created a monumental legacy during his thirty year tenure-one of the longest tenures of any sitting president of a college or university in the country. Dr. Harvey is described as

  6. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  7. William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. Spicer (1929-2004) was an esteemed member of the...

  8. Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dakota. Its FIPS County Code is 035. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Grand Forks County, North...

  9. Spanish Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Spanish Fork is a city in Utah County, Utah. It falls under Utah's 3rd congressional...

  10. Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cherry Fork is a village in Adams County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 2nd congressional district.12 References ...

  11. Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Coal Fork is a census-designated place in Kanawha County, West Virginia.1 References ...

  12. American Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Fork is a city in Utah County, Utah. It falls under Utah's 2nd congressional...

  13. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wins William G. Hunter Award November 6, 2012 Christine Anderson-Cook of LANL's Statistical Sciences group has received the 2012 William G. Hunter Award from the American...

  14. Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, ...

  15. Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Place: North Dakota Phone Number: Williston Office- 701-577-3765 -- Stanley Office-...

  16. City of Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Williams - AZ Place: Arizona Phone Number: 928-635-2667 or 928-635-4451 Website:...

  17. EA-158 Williams Energy Services Company | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 Williams Energy Services Company EA-158 Williams Energy Services Company Order authorizing Williams Energy Services Company to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-158 Williams Energy Services Company More Documents & Publications EA-162 PP&L, Inc EA-164 Constellation Power Source

  18. William Bryan, OE-30 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    William Bryan, OE-30 About Us William Bryan, OE-30 - Deputy Assistant Secretary, Infrastructure Security & Energy Restoration Mr. Bryan is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). The office of Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) works with the National Security Staff, other U.S. government agencies, and international partners to

  19. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster, John

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad, William Turnbull and Steven White | Department of Energy William Kuster, John McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad, William Turnbull and Steven White Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster, John McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad, William Turnbull and Steven White PDF icon fewm13_acclangley_highres.pdf PDF icon fewm13_acclangley.pdf More Documents & Publications October 2009 Seismic Lessons-Learned panel Meeting Implementation of DOE NPH Requirements at

  20. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tommy Williams...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida Case study of Tommy Williams Homes who ...

  1. EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

  2. Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida Case ...

  3. Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Williams & Reed, 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anderson-Cook Wins William G. Hunter Award Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award The award is named and presented annually in honor of the Statistics Division's founding chair, William G. Hunter. November 6, 2012 Christine Anderson-Cook Christine Anderson-Cook Christine Anderson-Cook of LANL's Statistical Sciences group has received the 2012 William G. Hunter Award from the American Society for Quality-Statistics Division. The award is named and presented annually in honor of the Statistics

  5. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight Tommy Williams Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-05

    Builders Challenge fact sheet highlighting performance and energy-efficiency features of Tommy Williams Homes, Longleaf case study, Gainesville, FL

  6. Roy Williams as recalled by his son and family ? Or: Roy Williams...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    his son and family - Or: Roy Williams: A leader among many (title at it appeared The Oak Ridger) The rewards for writing stories about Y-12 history come in many and varied formsl...

  7. John J. MacWilliams | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. MacWilliams About Us John J. MacWilliams - Associate Deputy Secretary John J. MacWilliams John J. MacWilliams was appointed in August 2015 as Associate Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy. He also serves as the Department's Chief Risk Officer and advances Secretarial priorities of enterprise-wide approaches to innovative finance, risk management, project management, nuclear and cyber security. Mr. MacWilliams joined the Department in May 2013 as a Senior Advisor to the

  8. William M. Gausman Vice President - Asset Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    01Ninth Street, NW Washington, DC 20068 202-872-3227 William M. Gausman Vice President - Asset Management February 9, 2007 Lawrence Mansueti Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability US Department of Energy Rm. 8H-033 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D. C. 20585 Re: Potomac River Generating Station Department of Energy, Case No. EO-05-01 Dear Mr. Mansueti: Potomac Electric Power Company ("Pepco") is providing you with the following information regarding the revised plan

  9. The HonorableZ William S. Cohen

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .- . ) p. .' *-. , * . . _ The Secretary of Energy d ' -- ,. Washington. s>C 20585 October 10, 199' 7 ' ./ .- ~ * The HonorableZ William S. Cohen : Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -' Jkar Mr. Secretary: /' . " _,.. .- - z ' The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water . Development Appropriations Act,' 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly' Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

  10. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    findings for its proposal to provide partial funding to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game's (IDFG) Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project. The project would involve...

  11. Lynn Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Williams Northwest Pipeline LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lynn Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Williams Northwest Pipeline LLC Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting Gas-Electricity Interdependence Denver, CO - July 28, 2014 Coordination Efforts, Regional Issues and Remaining Challenges My name is Lynn Dahlberg and I am here on behalf of Williams. I am director of marketing for Williams' Northwest Pipeline LLC. Northwest Pipeline is a primary artery for the transmission of natural gas to the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain Region. Northwest

  12. William & Mary Undergrad Receives JSA Research Assistantship | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab William & Mary Undergrad Receives JSA Research Assistantship Alice Perrin, a senior physics major at The College of William and Mary Alice Perrin, a senior physics major at The College of William and Mary is the recipient of the 2014-15 Jefferson Science Associates Minority/Female Undergraduate Research Assistantship (JSA MFURA) at Jefferson Lab. Her assistantship project involves setting up a testing facility to measure the performance of 3D printed scintillators to be used in a

  13. William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award William E. Spicer (1929-2004) was an esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical engineering, applied physics and materials science. Bill spent the past 40 years as a professor at Stanford where he pioneered the technique ofultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and its subsequent expansion

  14. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award November 6, 2012 Christine Anderson-Cook of LANL's Statistical Sciences group has received the 2012 William G. Hunter Award from the American Society for Quality-Statistics Division. The award is named and presented annually in honor of the Statistics Division's founding chair, William G. Hunter. The award is presented to a person whose qualities mirror those of Hunter. These include substantial contributions to statistical consulting, education for

  15. Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER | Department of Energy Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER This case study summarizes energy efficiency achievements made by Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky,

  16. Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report Roberts, William...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report Roberts, William L 09 BIOMASS FUELS biofuels, glycerin, glycerol,...

  17. Anderson-Cook wins William G. Hunter Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christine Anderson-Cook Christine Anderson-Cook Christine Anderson-Cook of LANL's Statistical Sciences group has received the 2012 William G. Hunter Award from the American...

  18. Barnes, Cris William [Los Alamos National Laboratory]; Kippen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale Barnes, Cris William Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kippen, Karen Elizabeth Los Alamos National...

  19. Challenge of Dynamic Mesoscale Imaging Barnes, Cris William ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project, and the Challenge of Dynamic Mesoscale Imaging Barnes, Cris William Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barber, John L. Los...

  20. Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region...

  1. Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Williams_Profilers.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2835-MHz Profiler Status of Profiler and Surface Data Sets for TWPICE Christopher.R.Williams@noaa.gov - University of Colorado at Boulder and NOAA Earth Science Research...

  3. MHK Projects/Williams Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Williams Point Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROAD...

  4. Dianne Williams Wilburn-Creating her own destiny

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 11, 2014 Dianne Williams Wilburn Having monitored environmental compliance for New Mexico State and analyzed water chemistry for a nuclear power plant in Virginia, Wilburn...

  5. William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    these subjects, I would like to provide some background information on the Department's financial information management system. PDF icon TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM S. MAHARAY DEPUTY...

  6. Albert "Al" J. Williams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Albert "Al" J. Williams About Us Albert "Al" J. Williams - President, Chevron Pipe Line Company (CPL) Albert “Al” J. Williams Albert (Al) J. Williams is president of Chevron Pipe Line Company (CPL), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Chevron Corporation, a role he assumed in May 2014. He is responsible for managing an extensive network of crude oil, natural gas and refined product pipelines, as well as storage facilities in North America. CPL also provides technical,

  7. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lemonick, Michael [Princeton University and Time Magazine, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2010-01-08

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus?the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  8. Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II Facility Camp William Utah National Guard Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility...

  9. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams &...

  10. Signature of George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams Signature of Alice Williams Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson Signature of Homer Williamson

  11. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  12. EIS-0353: South Fork Flathead Watershed/Westlope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In cooperation with Montana, Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage.

  13. EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

  14. TBU-0045- In the Matter of William Cor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    William Cor (the complainant or the employee), appeals the dismissal of his complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection...

  15. King William County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. King William County is a county in Virginia. Its FIPS County Code is 101. It is classified...

  16. John William (Bill) Ebert Jr. ? Longtime Y-12 Maintenance Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John William (Bill) Ebert Jr. - Longtime Y-12 Maintenance Manager I knew him as "Mr. Ebert" when his office was in Building 9734. I used to park my bicycle in the hallway just...

  17. Williams County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Williams County is a county in Ohio. Its FIPS County Code is 171. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  18. Williams Creek, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Williams Creek is a town in Marion County, Indiana. It falls under Indiana's 5th congressional...

  19. Williams County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Williams County is a county in North Dakota. Its FIPS County Code is 105. It is classified as...

  20. Y-12s Moon Rocks and Jim Williams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moon Rocks and Jim Williams Often I am stopped and given suggestions about what would be good information to include in the history of Y-12 being published weekly in The Oak...

  1. Roy Williams as recalled by Bill Wilcox and others

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    worked for Roy, calling him a "wonderful boss that everyone liked." I also asked Ken Brady to comment on Roy Williams. I believe his insight is helpful to demonstrate a...

  2. VBH-0079- In the Matter of William Cor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by William Cor under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From August 1998 to September 2001, Mr. Cor was...

  3. Principal Deputy Chief William A. Eckroade's Written Testimony Before the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (March 11, 2014) | Department of Energy Principal Deputy Chief William A. Eckroade's Written Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (March 11, 2014) Principal Deputy Chief William A. Eckroade's Written Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland

  4. The Honorable Robert E. Williams 44 W. Washington Street

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SEC ; : ' ,-<- I ;;;s The Honorable Robert E. Williams 44 W. Washington Street Shelbyville, Indiana 46176 Dear Mayor Williams: Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former General Electric Co. site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. This

  5. William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House | Department of Energy William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House March 20, 2007 Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization

  6. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  7. February 8, 2014: Prof. William C. Jones, Princeton University: Uncovering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    our Cosmic Origins: What We Know, What We Can Know, and What Limits We May Face. | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 8, 2014, 9:30am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium February 8, 2014: Prof. William C. Jones, Princeton University: Uncovering our Cosmic Origins: What We Know, What We Can Know, and What Limits We May Face. Professor William Jones, Assistant Professor of Physics Princeton University, Department of Physics Presentation: PDF icon Presentation Abstract: PDF icon 05

  8. W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    March 20, 1995 W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager EM-421 Quince Orchard U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585-0002 L -=kj SUBJECT: FINAL REPORT-RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE F AMERICAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY OF TEXA WORTH, TEXAS I ,d Sl I lRMER , FORT Dear Dr. Williams: The Environmental,Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the C for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted radiological survey activii American Manufacturing Company of Texas Site in

  9. KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company Address: 101Prospect...

  10. EA-208 Williams Energy Marketing and Trading Company | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 Williams Energy Marketing and Trading Company EA-208 Williams Energy Marketing and Trading Company Order authorizing Williams Energy Marketing and Trading Company to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-208 Williams Energy Marketing and Trading Company More Documents & Publications EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C

  11. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes, Longleaf Village & Belmont, Gainesville, FL

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The market has spoken. Energy efficiency sells," said Todd Louis, vice-president of Tommy Williams Homes in Gainesville, Florida. Since partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program in 2004, Tommy Williams' production homes have outsold the competition, with sales increasing year after year in spite of the recession. All Tommy Williams' homes achieve HERS scores of under 60, while homes built to Florida's state energy code have scores as high as 85. Tommy Williams

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tommy Williams Homes,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gainesville, Florida | Department of Energy Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida Case study of Tommy Williams Homes who partnered with Building America to build HERS-58 homes with foam gaskets at sill and top plates, fresh air intakes, SEER 16/HSPF 9.5 heat pumps, and tight air sealing of 2.7 ACH50. PDF icon Tommy Williams Homes: Longleaf Village & Belmont - Gainesville, FL More

  13. Best Practices Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes -Gainesville, FL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study of Tommy Williams Homes who has continued to outsell the competition with sales increasing despite the recession thanks to a systems-engineering approach developed with DOEs Building America that yields high energy efficiency, comfort, and indoor air quality. The company offers to pay buyers energy bills for the first year.

  14. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, Česlovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteinsmore » retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.« less

  15. Two NNSA Awards for LSO's Alice Williams | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Two NNSA Awards for LSO's Alice Williams | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  16. Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the information furnished in Aerospace's Review of the.subject site (Attachment 1) and the ORKL/RASA (Attachment 2), it Is requested that designation survey of the Palmerton Ore Storage Pennsylvania. The survey should be detailed to and subsurface data to make up for the lack of the previous AEC surveys and in keeping with ORNL/RASA group should furnish a draft survey approval prior to

  17. William A. Eckroade Principal Deputy Chief for Mission Support Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    William A. Eckroade Principal Deputy Chief for Mission Support Operations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs U.S. Senate March 11, 2014 Madam Chairman, Ranking Member Johnson and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to provide testimony regarding safety culture and related issues at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site Waste

  18. Mr. William E. Mott, Acting Director Environmental Control Technology Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7, I979 Mr. William E. Mott, Acting Director Environmental Control Technology Division Department of Energy Washington, D. C. 2Q545 Dear Mr. Mott: In response to your March 13, 1979 inquiry soliciting additional information regarding facilities involved in the feed materials program of MED/AEC, the following supplementary information is provided with respect to the Hood Building located at 155 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The facility known as the Hood Building was built about

  19. Mr. William f. Crow, Acting Director . Uranium Fuel Licensing Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mr. William f. Crow, Acting Director . Uranium Fuel Licensing Branch U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 7915 Eastern Avenue Silver Spring, Maryland 20555 Dear Mr. Crow: The Department of Energy (DOE), as a part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is conducting efforts to identify all sites and facilities, primarily in the private sector, where radioactive materials were handled, processed or used in District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission sup (AEC f ort of

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Briefings_Williams [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST) Program Status Jeff Williams Project Director National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Bloomington, Minnesota May 13-15, 2014 NFST Established to Plan for Interim Storage and Transportation  Mission  Lay the groundwork for implementing interim storage, including associated transportation, per the Administration's Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste, and develop a

  1. Little Boy weaponeer William "Deak" Parsons, wartime Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    division leader, focus of next 70th anniversary lecture 70th anniversary lecture Little Boy weaponeer William "Deak" Parsons, wartime Los Alamos division leader, focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Former Laboratory historian Roger Meade to present lecture. August 8, 2013 William S. "Deak" Parsons William S. "Deak" Parsons Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Josh Dolin Communications Office (505) 665-4803 Email Meade said Los

  2. Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tampa, Florida | Department of Energy Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida Case study of William Ryan Homes, who worked with Building America research partner CARB to design HERS-65 homes with energy-efficient heat pumps and programmable thermostats with humidity controls, foam-filled concrete block walls, draining house wrap, and airsealed kneewalls. PDF

  3. Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tampa, Florida | Department of Energy Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida Buildng America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida Case study of William Ryan Homes, who worked with Building America research partner CARB to design HERS-65 homes with energy-efficient heat pumps and programmable thermostats with humidity controls, foam-filled concrete block walls, draining house wrap, and airsealed kneewalls. PDF

  4. 10 CFR 850, Request for Information- Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP- William R. Kleem

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commenter: William R. Kleem 10 CFR 850 - Request for Information Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP Comment Close Date: 2/22/2011

  5. W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary News &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events) | Jefferson Lab wm.edu/news/stories/2012/william--mary-hosts-international-neutrino-workshop123.php Submitted: Thursday, July 19

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity...

  7. Dr. Ellen Williams Confirmed as Director of ARPA-E | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ellen Williams Confirmed as Director of ARPA-E Dr. Ellen Williams Confirmed as Director of ARPA-E December 8, 2014 - 6:30pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Dr. Ellen Williams Confirmed as Director of ARPA-E WASHINGTON - Dr. Ellen Williams was confirmed by the United States Senate on Monday, December 8, 2014 as the Director of the Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E). "ARPA-E is central to the Department's advancement of energy technology

  8. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Thursday, June 04, 2015 10:17 AM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John; Exparte Communications Subject: RE: EERE-2014-BT-STD-0031 Dan: thanks, again, for the heads-up. Bud From: Cohen, Daniel [mailto:Daniel.Cohen@hq.doe.gov] Sent: Thursday, June 04, 2015 9:56 AM To: Miller, William Cc: Cymbalsky, John; Exparte Communications Subject: RE: EERE-2014-BT-STD-0031 Bud, The LCC spreadsheets originally submitted to the DFR docket (EERE-2011-BT-STD-0011) were copied to the current Residential Furnaces

  9. Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    h :.:, \ i 5 , Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 t 7-c I-..._ .' , Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Department of the Army Washington. D.C. 203 14- 1000 Dear Mr. Augustine: I am writing to you as a follow-up to discussions our staffs have had regarding two former Department of the Army facilities in the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program where the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) also conducted activities. These

  10. Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    )N i-i 5 - "i Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Department of the Army Washington, D. C. 203 14- 1000 -' . UC-i -, :? . -0' /, \ ._ ' .;' Dear Mr. Augustine: I am writing to you as a follow-up to discussions our staffs have had regarding two former Department of the Army facilities in the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program where the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) also

  11. TO: Alexander Williams FROM: Ed MitchelfiM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    420 OTS NOTE . DATE: September 13, 1990 TO: Alexander Williams FROM: Ed MitchelfiM NY 463 fusrap7 SUBJECT: Elimination Recommendation for American Machine and Foundry in Buffalo The purpose of this note is to provide the following with respect to the former American Machine and Foundry Company (AMF) in Buffalo, New York-- FUSRAP Considered Site Recommendation (g/13/90). The recommendation is to eliminate the AMF Buffalo site. If you agree, then please return an "approved" and dated

  12. Photo-thermal quartz tuning fork excitation for dynamic mode atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Teyssieux, Damien; Thiery, Laurent; Hermelin, Damien; Vairac, Pascal; Friedt, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-13

    A photo-thermal excitation of a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) for topographic studies is introduced. The non-invasive photo-thermal excitation presents practical advantages compared to QTF mechanical and electrical excitations, including the absence of the anti-resonance and its associated phase rotation. Comparison between our theoretical model and experiments validate that the optical transduction mechanism is a photo-thermal rather than photo-thermoacoustic phenomenon. Topographic maps in the context of near-field microscopy distance control have been achieved to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  13. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spajer, M. Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D.; Jalocha, A.

    2013-11-11

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  14. ALCF Future Systems Tim Williams, Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Systems Tim Williams, Argonne Leadership Computing Facility DOE Exascale Requirements Review: High Energy Physics June 11, 2015 Production Systems (ALCF-2) 2 Mira - IBM Blue Gene/Q ¥ 49,152 nodes ¡ PowerPC A2 cpu - 16 cores, 4 HW threads/core ¡ 16 GB RAM ¥ Aggregate ¡ 768 TB RAM, 768K cores ¡ Peak 10 PetaFLOPS ¥ 5D torus interconnect Cooley - Viz/Analysis cluster ¥ 126 nodes: ¡ Two 2.4 GHz Intel Haswell 6-core - 384 GB RAM ¡ NVIDIA Tesla K80 (two

  15. FIA-12-0049 - In the Matter of William B. Ray | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 - In the Matter of William B. Ray FIA-12-0049 - In the Matter of William B. Ray On October 1, 2012, OHA denied an Appeal filed by William B. Ray under the Freedom of Information and Privacy Act. Mr. Ray was appealing from a determination issued by the DOE's Oak Ridge Office (ORO), in which it withheld a document requested by Mr. Ray, citing exemptions under both the Privacy Act and the FOIA. OHA found that ORO had a proper basis for the withholding of the document under the FOIA Exemption 5

  16. Optimizing Data Locality for Fork/Join Programs Using Constrained Work Stealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2014-11-16

    We present an approach to improving data locality across different phases of fork/join programs scheduled using work stealing. The approach consists of: (1) user-specified and automated approaches to constructing a steal tree, the schedule of steal operations and (2) constrained work stealing algorithms that constrain the actions of the scheduler to mirror a given steal tree. These are combined to construct work stealing schedules that maximize data locality across computation phases while ensuring load balance within each phase. These algorithms are also used to demonstrate dynamic coarsening, an optimization to improve spatial locality and sequential overheads by combining many finer-grained tasks into coarser tasks while ensuring sufficient concurrency for locality-optimized load balance. Implementation and evaluation in Cilk demonstrate performance improvements of up to 2.5x on 80 cores. We also demonstrate that dynamic coarsening can combine the performance benefits of coarse task specification with the adaptability of finer tasks.

  17. Redelegation/Designation Order No. 00-022.02A to William C. Gibson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No. 00-022.02A to William C. Gibson, Jr as Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office by johnsonmd Functional areas:...

  18. Best Practices Case Study: William Ryan House - Tampa Division, Tampa, FL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study of William Ryan Homes, who cut energy use to achieve HERS scores of 65 to 70 on nine floor plans that will be featured in 277 homes in central Florida.

  19. OSTIblog Posts by Dr. William Watson | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    William Watson's picture Physicist Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity - ChemCam NASAJPL-Caltech Published on Sep 12, 2012 How do you run chemical tests at a geologic site millions ...

  20. Roy Williams and others ? keys to Y-12s success Or: People...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in The Oak Ridger) Gordon Fee sent me an e-mail on December 23, 2009, noting that Roy Williams had just died. He went on to say that he sure hoped the history of Y-12 would include...

  1. William A. Lokke, 1975 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    William A. Lokke, 1975 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Weapons: For original and creative computer calculations of nuclear weapon outputs, for the development of methods ...

  2. L3:VUQ.VVDA.P2-2.03 William Rider SNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 William Rider SNL Completed: 3/28/11 CASL-U-2011-0060-000 1 SAND2010-234P Unlimited Release December 2010 Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification Workflow in CASL William J. Rider Computational Shock and MultiPhysics Department James R. Kamm and V. Gregory Weirs Optimization and Uncertainty Quantification Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 Dan G. Cacui Department of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC

  3. William Morris | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome William Morris Previous Next List Morris William Morris Formerly: PhD Student, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry University of California, Los Angeles Presently: Posdoctoral Fellow, Northwestern University MSc in Chemistry, Manchester University, UK EFRC research: Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials, comprised of organic struts and metal oxide secondary building units. My research in the area of carbon capture is two fold.

  4. William H. Goldstein named director of LLNL | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Enterprise support nation's preparedness NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer NASA features LLNL star-formation simulations Consortium Led by University of...

  5. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

  6. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

  7. William Dorland, 2009 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    William Dorland, 2009 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2000's William Dorland, 2009 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Nuclear Technologies (Fission

  8. William H. Miller, 1985 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    William H. Miller, 1985 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1980's William H. Miller, 1985 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Chemistry: For the

  9. William J. Bair, 1970 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    William J. Bair, 1970 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1970's William J. Bair, 1970 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Life Sciences: For his

  10. William L. Russell, 1976 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    William L. Russell, 1976 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1970's William L. Russell, 1976 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Citation For his outstanding contributions during a

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker and Williams Co (NJ 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Baker and Company, Inc. Engelhard Industries, Baker Platinum Division NJ.13-8 NJ.13-1 Location: 113 Astor Street , Newark , New Jersey NJ.13-1 NJ.13-8 Evaluation Year: 1990 NJ.13-2 NJ.13-7 Site Operations: From 1943 through the mid-1950s, the facility processed spent catalyst (contaminated platinum) to recovery the

  12. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    Tommy Williams Homes worked with PNNL, Florida HERO, Energy Smart Home Plans, and Florida Solar Energy Center to design and test two zero energy homes. Energy use was 30% lower in one home and 60% lower in the other.

  13. Speakers: Eric M. Lightner, U.S. Department of Energy William M. Gausman, Pepco Holdings, Inc.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8: "Smart Grid: Impacts on Electric Power Supply and Demand" Speakers: Eric M. Lightner, U.S. Department of Energy William M. Gausman, Pepco Holdings, Inc. Christian Grant, Booz & Company, Inc. F. Michael Valocchi, IBM Global Business Services [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Eric Lightner: Well, good morning, everybody. My name is Eric Lightner. I work at the U.S. Department of

  14. TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM S. MAHARAY DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR AUDIT SERVICES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM S. MAHARAY DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR AUDIT SERVICES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON D.C. BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT MANAGEMENT, ORGANIZATION AND PROCUREMENT COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 20,2007 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on issues associated with the FY 2005 and 2006 Audits of the Department of Energy's Financial Statements. Over the

  15. Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist Chin Guok, Evangelos Chaniotakis, Kevin Oberman, Eli Dart, Joe Metzger and Mike O'Conner, Core Engineering, Brian Tierney, Advanced Development, Mike Helm and Dhiva Muruganantham, Federated Trust Steve Cotter, Department Head wej@es.net, this talk is available at www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the

  16. The meeting was called to order by Chairman William Martin at 8:59 a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting April 29, 2010 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Washington, D.C. Committee Members Participating John Ahearne Susan Ion (by telephone) Brew Barron Raymond Juzaitis Ashok Bhatnagar William Martin, Chair Dana Christensen Carl Paperiello Thomas Cochran Burton Richter Michael Corradini (by telephone) John Sackett Marvin Fertel Allen Sessoms Donald Hintz Neil Todreas Committee Members Absent None Other Participants: Keith S. Bradley, NEAMS Program Manager, Lawrence

  17. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  18. THERMAL EXPANSION AND PHASE INVERSION OF RARE-EARTH OXIDES By Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EXPANSION AND PHASE INVERSION OF RARE-EARTH OXIDES By Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell * * * * * * * * * * * report of investigations 5847 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Stewart L. Udall, Secretary BUREAU OF MINES Marling J. Ankeny, Director DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED This publication has been cataloged as follows: Stecura, Stephan Thermal expansion and phase inversion of rare-earth oxides, by Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell. [Washington] U. S. Dept. of

  19. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  20. Largest On-Campus Solar Facility Being Installed at William Paterson |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Solar arrays at parking lots and photovoltaic cells on the rooftops of campus buildings should provide about 15 to 20 percent of our energy needs on the campus. Cranes place solar panels on roofs and the screech of drills can be heard throughout the campus of William Paterson University as workers begin installing a massive solar farm, the largest on a U.S. college

  1. West Windsor-Plainsboro South High School &amp; William Annin Middle School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    win N.J. Regional Science Bowl at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab West Windsor-Plainsboro South High School & William Annin Middle School win N.J. Regional Science Bowl at PPPL Top science whizzes will go to national contest in Washington, D.C. By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 23, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The West Windsor-Plainsboro South High School team buzzes in an answer as they compete against Millburn High School in Round 12 of the New Jersey Regional

  2. Business Solutions Case Study: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    Building America research has shown that high-performance homes can potentially give builders an edge in the marketplace and can boost sales, but it doesn't happen automatically. It requires a tailored, easy-to-understand marketing campaign, and sometimes a little flair. This case study highlights the successful marketing approach of Tommy Williams Homes, which devotes resources to advertising, targeted social media outlets and blogs, realtor education seminars, and groundbreaking and open house celebrations. As a result, in one community, 2013 property sales records show that TWH outsells the only other builder in the development at a higher price, with fewer days on the market.

  3. Building America Business Solutions for New Homes: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building America research has shown that high-performance homes can potentially give builders an edge in the marketplace and can boost sales, but it doesn't happen automatically. It requires a tailored, easy-to-understand marketing campaign, and sometimes a little flair. This case study highlights the successful marketing approach of Tommy Williams Homes, which devotes resources to advertising, targeted social media outlets and blogs, realtor education seminars, and groundbreaking and open house celebrations. As a result, in one community, 2013 property sales records show that TWH outsells the only other builder in the development at a higher price, with fewer days on the market.

  4. L3:VUQ.SAUQ.P2-2.01 Brian Williams LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P2-2.01 Brian Williams LANL Completed: 4/25/11 CASL-U-2011-0059-000 Form 836 (7/06) LA-UR- Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. By acceptance of this article, the publisher recognizes that the U.S. Government retains a

  5. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Changes in the Florida Building Code and a company-wide "green" initiative launched in the fall of 2008 gave William Ryan Homes' Tampa Division the push it needed to implement energy-efficient measures as standard practice in all of its new homes. Building America's Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) analyzed nine new house designs by the builder and found all of the designs would achieve home energy rating (HERS) scores of 65 to 70. The homes also meet the

  6. William Johnston

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    During his tenure Johnston led the effort to develop a new network, ESnet4, to accommodate massive scientific data flows of petabytesyear from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at ...

  7. An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

  8. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Adams, S.M.; Black, M.C.

    1993-06-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  9. Final report for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    IT Corporation (IT) was contracted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the effectiveness of thermal desorption as a remedial technology for removing mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain soil. Previous laboratory studies by Energy Systems suggested that this technology could reduce mercury to very low levels. This pilot-scale demonstration study was initiated to verify on an engineering scale the performance of thermal desorption. This report includes the details of the demonstration study, including descriptions of experimental equipment and procedures, test conditions, sampling and analysis, quality assurance (QA), detailed test results, and an engineering assessment of a conceptual full-scale treatment facility. The specific project tasks addressed in this report were performed between October 1993 and June 1994. These tasks include soil receipt, preparation, and characterization; prepilot (bench-scale) desorption tests; front-end materials handling tests; pilot tests; back-end materials handling tests; residuals treatment; and engineering scale-up assessment.

  10. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant fish kill for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etnier, E.L.; Opresko, D.M.; Talmage, S.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the monitoring of fish kills in upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) from July 1990 to June 1993. Since the opening of Lake Reality (LR) in 1988, total numbers of fish inhabiting upper EFPC have increased. However, species diversity has remained poor. Water quality data have been collected in upper EFPC during the time period covered in this report. Total residual chlorine (TRC) levels have exceeded federal and state water quality criteria over the years. However, with the installation of two dechlorination systems in late 1992, TRC levels have been substantially lowered in most portions of upper EFPC. By June 1993, concentrations of TRC were 0.04 to 0.06 mg/L at the north-south pipes (NSP) and below detection limits at sampling station AS-8 and were 0 to 0.01 mg/L at the inlet and outlet of LR. The daily chronic fish mortality in upper EFPC has been attributed to background stress resulting from the continuous discharge of chlorine into upper EFPC. Mean daily mortality rates for 22 acute fish kills were three fold or more above background and usually exceeded ten fish per day. Total number of dead fish collected per acute kill event ranged from 30 to over 1,000 fish; predominant species killed were central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) and striped shiners (Luxilus chrysocephalus). Spills or elevated releases of toxic chemicals, such as acids, organophosphates, aluminum nitrate, ammonia, or chlorine, were identified as possible causative agents; however, a definitive cause-effect relationship was rarely established for any acute kills. Ambient toxicity testing, in situ chemical monitoring, and streamside experiments were used to examine TRC dynamics and ambient toxicity in EFPC.

  11. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service: A Case Study on Leadership: Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (Presentation); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) represents a series of unique successes in alternative fuel deployment by pushing the envelope with innovative solutions. In the last year, RFTA demonstrated the ability to utilize compressed natural gas buses at a range of altitudes, across long distances, in extreme weather conditions and in a modern indoor fueling and maintenance facility - allwhile saving money and providing high-quality customer service. This case study will highlight how the leadership of organizations and communities that are implementing advances in natural gas vehicle technology is paving the way for broader participation.

  12. Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a

  13. Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Loar, James M; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  14. The Prince William Sound herring fishery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hose, J.E.; Brown, E.; Marty, G.D.; McGurk, M.D.; Norcross, B.L.; Short, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Exxon Valdez oil (EVO) spill of 1989 occurred a few weeks before herring spawned in Prince William Sound (PWS), AK. An estimated 40% to 50% of the egg biomass sustained exposure during early development, and the majority of pelagic larvae were collected within the oil trajectory path. Sublethal effects observed at hatch (morphologic defects and genetic damage) were related to ambient EVO concentrations. Reduced survival rates, decreased growth, genetic damage and histopathological changes were measured in pelagic larvae from oiled areas. However, because the 1989 year class is one of the smallest cohorts now in PWS, population effects are difficult to assess. From 1990 to 1992, population abundance and reproductive potential remained high. When the 1989 year class was fully recruited (1993--1994), the spawning population decreased by 50% to 75% of the expected abundance. Many of the surviving fish were infected with viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) and failed to spawn. Proposed causes for the VHS epizootic include previous oil exposure, density-dependent effects following the 1989 fishery closure, and reduced food availability from 1990 to 1994.

  15. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oiko, V. T. A. Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Martins, B. V. C.; Silva, P. C.

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 540 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  16. Sherwin-Williams Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C L E A N C I T I E S Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, Facility Achieves 26% Energy Intensity Reduction; Leads to Corporate Adoption of Save Energy Now LEADER When Sherwin-Williams' Richmond, Kentucky, manufacturing plant made the decision to advance its energy effciency efforts, the company capitalized on the resources made available to industry by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In 2008, ITP conducted an assessment on the site's steam system

  17. Building America Case Study: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: Tommy Williams Homes, Gainesville, Florida (Fact Sheet), Business Solutions for New Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tommy Williams Homes Gainesville, Florida PARTNER INFORMATION Builder: Tommy Williams Homes Location: Florida Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, ba-pirc.org Application: New, single-family Partnership Period: 2004-present Climate Zone: Hot-humid PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Score: 57 Cost of energy efficiency measures (including labor): $3,138 Projected annual source energy savings: 31% Projected annual energy cost savings: $430 Projected first-year positive cash

  18. SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

    2011-10-31

    Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

  19. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  20. Particulate Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  1. M E M O R A N D U M To: DOE Office of General Counsel From: William T. Miller

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    E M O R A N D U M To: DOE Office of General Counsel From: William T. Miller Date: August 20, 2014 Re: August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces This memorandum provides an overview of the meeting between representatives of the American Public Gas Association (APGA) and of the Department of Energy (DOE). Present for APGA were Dave Schryver and Dan Lapato and its General

  2. Microsoft Word - RUL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_18Wells.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 July 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 18 gas wells sampled are within 1.1 miles of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background:

  3. Subtask 1.8 - Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethany Kurz; Darren Schmidt; Steven Smith Christopher Beddoe; Corey Lindeman; Blaise Mibeck

    2012-07-31

    Given the importance of hydraulic fracturing and proppant performance for development of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations within the Williston Basin, a study was conducted to evaluate the key factors that may result in conductivity loss within the reservoirs. Various proppants and reservoir rock cores were exposed to several different fracturing and formation fluids at reservoir conditions. The hardness of the rock cores and the strength of the proppants were evaluated prior to and following fluid exposure. In addition, the conductivity of various proppants, as well as formation embedment and spalling, was evaluated at reservoir temperatures and pressures using actual reservoir rock cores. The results of this work suggest that certain fluids may affect both rock and proppant strength, and therefore, fluid exposure needs to be considered in the field. In addition, conductivity decreases within the Bakken Formation appear to be a function of a variety of factors, including proppant and rock strength, as well as formation embedment and spalling. The results of this study highlight the need for advanced conductivity testing, coupled with quantification of formation embedment and spalling. Given the importance of proppant performance on conductivity loss and, ultimately, oil recovery, better understanding the effects of these various factors on proppant and rock strength in the field is vital for more efficient production within unconventional oil and gas reservoirs.

  4. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  5. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  6. Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Stewart, Arthur J; Loar, James M

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  7. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is safe for limited water-contact recreational uses, such as wading in footwear. Eating fish from the creek is not recommended based upon the level of mercury in the fish. Are...

  8. Microsoft Word - 3Q2012_Samp_Results.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Third Quarter 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: September 20, 2012 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a

  9. Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2012_Gas_Samp_Results_8G1Iwells.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    12 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 23 March 2012 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation a series of production tests

  10. Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2012_GasPW_Samp_Results_19June2012.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Second Quarter 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 19 June 2012 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of

  11. Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado,

  12. Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what

  13. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Description These high-performance homes in northern Florida are two that have achieved Home Energy Rating System (HERS) ratings of less than zero since Building America (BA) builders started building them in 2010. The homes (TW1 and TW2) were built in the Gainesville area by Tommy Williams Homes (TW), with technical assistance from Florida H.E.R.O. and energy-efficient home design input provided by Energy Smart Home Plans. The homes are being metered by the Florida Solar Energy Center

  14. Williams_1992.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. Williams, Joel F Jr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    happening or, May 20, 2011. I am sending you this email as well because in ar email fromr John Price today, he indicated that vou will be accompanying her at this meeting and to...

  16. photos-williams.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  18. Sparse Image Format

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  19. I/O Formats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like

  20. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Which format should I use? There is no clear-cut answer to this question -- different solutions work better in different situations. In an effort to help you decide which will work best for you, we provide a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the three available formats. GIF: GIF stands for Graphic Interchange Format. It was developed by CompuServe as a device-independent way to store pictures. The files are well-compressed, so download time is relatively short. Most web browsers

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Rulison Monitoring Report-Third Quarter 2014

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 January 2015 Doc. No. S12193 Page 1 of 6 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: July 1, 2014 Background Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork

  2. Microsoft Word - 4Q2012_Gas PW_Samp_Results.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells near Project Rulison Fourth Quarter 2012 and First Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: January 10, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork

  3. Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second

  4. formatting | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(88) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki...

  5. BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

    The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 200 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

  6. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  11. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2008-03-18

    This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

  12. Title: Operon Formation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Operon Formation is Driven by Co-Regulation and Not by Horizontal Gene Transfer Authors: Morgan N. Price, Katherine H. Huang, Eric Alm, and Adam P. Arkin Author affiliation: Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Berkeley CA, USA. A.P.A. is also affiliated with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the UC Berkeley Dept. of Bioengineering. Corresponding author: Eric Alm, ejalm@lbl.gov, phone 510-843-1794, fax 510-486-6059, address Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 939R704, Berkeley, CA

  13. Tribal Utility Formation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Tribal Utility Formation in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory Ken Johnston Acting Tribal Affairs Manager BPA TRIBAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT JULY 2015 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 The Basics  BPA markets power from 31 Federal dams, the Columbia Generating Station Nuclear Plant, and several small non- Federal power plants  About 80% of the power BPA sells is hydroelectric  BPA accounts for about

  14. Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character...

  15. QER- Comment of William Garrett

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Sir or Madam, Please accept the attached QER submission and direct to appropriate persons. Questions or issues with attachment: 203-449-4614 --thanks much, Bill Garrett, President, American Hydrogen Northeast

  16. Women @ Energy: Dianne Williams Wilburn

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Many STEM career paths are dominated by males. Women need mentors, both male and female, to encourage them to pursue STEM career paths. A lot of times someone just needs to be asked, have they ever thought of taking this class or applying to this school or considering a career in this area?"

  17. Statement of Ellen D. Williams

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and as a result my subsequent career in science has spanned the disciplines of chemistry, chemical engineering, physics and materials science. After my doctoral and post-doctoral...

  18. NREL: Energy Sciences - William Tumas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Chemistry, summa cum laude, from Ithaca College in 1980. He received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Stanford University in 1985 as an NSF Graduate Fellow and a Hertz...

  19. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  20. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  1. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  2. Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation Title Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

  3. Investigating Processes of Nanocrystal Formation and Transformation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Investigating Processes of Nanocrystal Formation and Transformation via Liquid Cell TEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigating Processes of Nanocrystal Formation...

  4. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, III, Henry Grady

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  5. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  6. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, Thomas P. (Livermore, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA); Patterson, Ralph W. (Livermore, CA); Sawicki, Richard H. (Danville, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  8. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  9. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  10. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  11. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  12. Format for Federal Register Notice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Format for Federal Register Notice Billing Code must appear at the top of the document. This code (6450-01-P) is the same for all Departmental submissions. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW SYSTEM OF RECORDS AGENCY United States Department of Energy. ACTION Proposed Establishment a New Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY The summary paragraph should state briefly what action is being proposed in the notice, why the action is necessary, and the intended

  13. XML Format for SESAME and LEOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrenberger, J K; Neely, J R; Sterne, P A

    2009-04-29

    The objective of this document is to describe the XML format used by LLNL and LANL to represent the equation-of-state and related material information in the LEOS and SESAME data libraries. The primary purpose of this document is to describe a specific XML format for representing EOS data that is tailored to the nature of the underlying data and is amenable to conversion to both legacy SESAME and LEOS binary formats. The secondary purpose is to describe an XML format that lends itself to a 'natural' representation in a binary file format of the SESAME, pdb or hdf5 form so that this format and related tools can be used for the rapid and efficient development and implementation of prototype data structures. This document describes the XML format only. A working knowledge of LEOS and SESAME formats is assumed.

  14. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybysfast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halosare surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ? 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ?5Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  15. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Coke formation in visbreaking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1987-04-01

    Visbreaking is a mild cracking process primarily used to reduce residual oil viscosity and thus decrease the amount of cutter stock required for blending to heavy fuels specification. It can also be used to produce incremental quantities of gasoline, middle distillates and catalytic cracker feeds. This process was widely used in the 1930s and 1940s and became obsolete until a few years ago. When the need for increased conversion of residues to light products became desirable, visbreaking offered economic advantages to many refining schemes - especially in Western Europe. Between 1978-1981, Exxon brought on stream seven visbreakers ranging from 1900 to 9100 tons/SD capacity. In January 1983, the world-wide visbreaking capacity was over 2 MM B/SD. The visbreaking process and its application in refinery operations have been well described. In general, the process economics improve as the process severity is increased but it is limited by coke formation in the process. For this reason, they have studied the kinetics of coke formation in the visbreaking process.

  17. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  18. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  19. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  20. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  1. Engineering Model for Ash Formation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-02

    Ash deposition is controlled by the impaction and sticking of individual ash particles to heat transfer surfaces. Prediction of deposition therefore requires that the important factors in this process be predictable from coal and operational parameters. Coal combustion, boiler heat transfer, ash formation, ash particle aerodynamic, and ash particle sticking models are all essential steps in this process. The model described herein addresses the prediction of ash particle size and composition distributions based upon combustionmore » conditions and coal parameters. Key features of the model include a mineral redistribution routine to invert CCSEM mineralogical data, and a mineral interaction routine that simulates the conversion of mineral matter into ash during coal burning and yields ash particle size and composition distributions.« less

  2. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  3. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

  4. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  5. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation PDF icon RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents & Publications REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING ...

  6. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  7. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  8. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  9. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  10. Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

  11. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  12. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, JN; McMurry, PH

    2015-01-01

    The scientific foci of the New Particle Formation Study were the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols and the impacts of newly formed particles on cloud processes. Specifically, we planned to: (1) to identify the species and mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of new particle formation, i.e., the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters; (2) investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth; (4) create a comprehensive dataset related to new particle formation and growth that can be used as input for our own thermodynamic models as well as the modeling efforts by our Department of Energy (DOE) Aerosol Life Cycle working group collaborators; (5) characterize the increase of the number and activity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) due to particle formation and growth; (6) determine the regional extent of new particle formation to address the role that atmospheric transport plays in determining the impacts, if any, of new particle formation on cloud number and properties.

  13. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.

    2014-03-31

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  14. Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY ... FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH ...

  15. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  16. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Jr., Allen D. (Athens, GA); King, Robert B. (Athens, GA); Sailers, III, Earl L. (Athens, GA)

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  17. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ?0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup ?3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 ?G. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  18. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-07-14

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures.

  19. result formats | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or...

  20. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 ... further results ask:Category:Tools...

  2. The NeXus data format

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; et al

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitionsmore » for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.« less

  3. Extragalactic Background Light from Hierarchical Galaxy Formation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  4. EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION UP TO THE EPOCH OF COSMIC REIONIZATION AND THE FIRST STARS (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION: GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION UP TO THE EPOCH OF COSMIC REIONIZATION AND THE FIRST STARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION: GAMMA-RAY ATTENUATION UP TO THE EPOCH OF COSMIC REIONIZATION AND THE FIRST STARS We present a new model of the

  5. Situ microbial plugging process for subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-12-17

    Subterranean paths of water flow are impeded or changed by the facilitation of microbial growth therein. Either indigenous bacterial growth may be stimulated with nutrients or the formation may be first seeded with bacteria or their spores which inhibit fluid flow after proliferation. These methods and bacteria are usable to alter the flow of water in a waterflooded oil formation and to impede the outflow of contaminated water.

  6. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Beitsch, Peter D.; Shah, Chirag; Arthur, Doug; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wazer, David E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Lyden, Maureen; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort.

  7. QER- Comment of William Pickard 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It seems obvious that America needs massive electricity storage if it is going to transition successfully from the Age of Fossil Fuels to the Age of Renewables. The recent DOE report prepared at the insistence of Senator Wyden barely scratched the surface. A critique is attached. If the QER does not confront these issues squarely and does not issue a call for Immediate and Massive Action, the Public shall have been short-changed.

  8. Geisha Williams Executive Vice President, Electric Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    levels of solar capacity are coming from smaller applications - e.g., rooftop solar PV. In our service area alone, PG&E has connected more than 120,000 solar rooftops to...

  9. QER- Comment of William Pickard 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The data and derivations set forth in the appended PDF file constitute at least several scintillae of evidence, probably a preponderance of evidence, and possibly even prima facie evidence that, by the close of this century: 1) the world will be approaching exhaustion of its recoverable fossil-fuel supplies; 2) the energy shortages engendered thereby can reliably be avoided only if immediate massive steps are taken to actualize the development and manufacture of the many unproven components of a global smart energy system; and 3) the world over, there is precious little evidence (as measured in G$ y ̶ 1 of new funding for development and demonstration) that world governments are seriously concerned.

  10. Testimony of John MacWilliams

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to appear before you today to discuss the Department of Energy's efforts at improving the management of its capital asset projects, which is a topic of great importance to the...

  11. William Fowler and Elements in the Stars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the early stages of its evolution, even during the first three minutes of its existence," observed Fowler several years ago. Fowler's research was of two kinds: theoretical...

  12. William Scullin | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scullin HPC Systems Administration Specialist Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 3122 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-6412 wscullin...

  13. William F. Hederman, Jr. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dame and a professional degree (M.P.P.) from the University of California at Berkeley. He is the father of four, grandfather of two, and a member of the IEEE and the Cosmos Club

  14. Dianne Williams Wilburn-Creating her

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has touched her life, she does not mention the fact that she recently battled breast cancer. Instead, she focuses on the positive, focuses on the achievements of others. - 2 -...

  15. William Bricker | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Cynthia Lo. After serving as an adjunct instructor in the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis for a year, Dr....

  16. Timothy Williams | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    His Ph.D. Physics research was in statistical turbulence theory, and he conducted ... a nine-year interlude writing pricing and risk codes in the financial industry. ...

  17. William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... sequestration in geologic media; battery and fuel cell energy storage materials; and catalyst, nanomaterialsnanostructures, and chemical sensor performance and optimization. ...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Engaging_Williams

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atlanta, Georgia Nuclear Transportation Management Services Training Shipper, Transportation Agent & Transport Crews trained to 49CFR 172.700 requirements Familiarization with TS-R-1, IMDG Code, & 49 CFR Ensures Safety & Compliance Transportation & Security Plans NRC Requires Project Specific TSP's for Each Shipment Safeguards Information DOE Guidelines Notifications Requirements set out in 10 CFR Federal, State & Tribal Armed Escort Requests Spent

  19. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  20. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy FORMAT REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT PDF icon RCC Workplan PDF EN FR.PDF More Documents & Publications REGULATORY PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation

  1. TEMPORAL SELF-ORGANIZATION IN GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-20

    We report on the discovery of a relation between the number of star formation (SF) peaks per unit time, ?{sub peak}, and the size of the temporal smoothing window function, ?t, used to define the peaks: ?{sub peak}??t {sup 1} {sup } {sup ?} (? ? 1.618). This relation holds over the range of ?t = 10-1000Myr that can be reliably computed here, using a large sample of galaxies obtained from a state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. This means that the temporal distribution of SF peaks in galaxies as a population is fractal with a Hausdorff fractal dimension equal to ? 1. This finding reveals, for the first time, that the superficially chaotic process of galaxy formation is underlined by temporal self-organization up to at least one gigayear. It is tempting to suggest that, given the known existence of spatial fractals (such as the power-law two-point function of galaxies), there is a joint spatio-temporal self-organization in galaxy formation. From an observational perspective, it will be urgent to devise diagnostics to probe the SF histories of galaxies with good temporal resolution to facilitate a test of this prediction. If confirmed, it would provide unambiguous evidence for a new picture of galaxy formation that is interaction driven, cooperative, and coherent in and between time and space. Unravelling its origin may hold the key to understanding galaxy formation.

  2. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  3. Inhibition of coke formation in pyrolysis furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, Y.; Poindexter, M.K.; Rowe, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    Coke formation in pyrolysis furnaces, which thermally convert hydrocarbons to ethylene as well as other useful products, adversely affects product yields, causes furnace down time for coke removal, and shortens furnace coil life. A phosphorus-based chemical treatment program was developed to inhibit the coke formation. The anticoking performance of the phosphorus-based treatment program was studied using a bench scale coking rate measurement apparatus. The programs`s influence on coke morphology and reactor surface was addressed using SEM/EDX surface characterization techniques. For comparison, similar studies were carried out with sulfur-containing species which are conventionally used in industrial practice as furnace additives. The present work demonstrated that the phosphorus-based treatment program provided an efficient and durable surface passivation against coke formation.

  4. In situ oxidation of subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

    2011-01-11

    Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

  5. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Jzsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = 22 to 23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep H? images. We combine these H? images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. H? traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of H? further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  6. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

  7. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

  8. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis News Media ...

  9. Patent: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEpatents Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation Citation Details Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

  10. Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Presentation...

  11. Category:Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Formation Testing Techniques page? For detailed...

  12. Metal Nanostructure Formation on Graphene: Weak versus Strong...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metal Nanostructure Formation on Graphene: Weak versus Strong Bonding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal Nanostructure Formation on Graphene: Weak versus Strong...

  13. On the Lack of Evolution in Galaxy Star Formation Efficiency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: On the Lack of Evolution in Galaxy Star Formation Efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Lack of Evolution in Galaxy Star Formation...

  14. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  15. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  16. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  17. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  18. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  19. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  20. Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Devinder (Selden, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

  1. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through viscous relaxation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2014-05-15

    According to Parker's magnetostatic theorem, tangential discontinuities in magnetic field, or current sheets (CSs), are generally unavoidable in an equilibrium magnetofluid with infinite electrical conductivity and complex magnetic topology. These CSs are due to a failure of a magnetic field in achieving force-balance everywhere and preserving its topology while remaining in a spatially continuous state. A recent work [Kumar, Bhattacharyya, and Smolarkiewicz, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112903 (2013)] demonstrated this CS formation utilizing numerical simulations in terms of the vector magnetic field. The magnetohydrodynamic simulations presented here complement the above work by demonstrating CS formation by employing a novel approach of describing the magnetofluid evolution in terms of magnetic flux surfaces instead of the vector magnetic field. The magnetic flux surfaces being the possible sites on which CSs develop, this approach provides a direct visualization of the CS formation, helpful in understanding the governing dynamics. The simulations confirm development of tangential discontinuities through a favorable contortion of magnetic flux surfaces, as the magnetofluid undergoes a topology-preserving viscous relaxation from an initial non-equilibrium state with twisted magnetic field. A crucial finding of this work is in its demonstration of CS formation at spatial locations away from the magnetic nulls.

  2. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  3. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  4. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  5. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation | Department of Energy FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation PDF icon RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents & Publications REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT

  6. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  7. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  8. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  9. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  10. Nanodot formation induced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abere, M. J.; Kang, M.; Goldman, R. S.; Yalisove, S. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, C. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Rittman, D. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Phillips, J. D. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The femtosecond laser generation of ZnSe nanoscale features on ZnSe surfaces was studied. Irradiation with multiple exposures produces 10100?nm agglomerations of nanocrystalline ZnSe while retaining the original single crystal structure of the underlying material. The structure of these nanodots was verified using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The nanodots continue to grow hours after irradiation through a combination of bulk and surface diffusion. We suggest that in nanodot formation the result of ultrafast laser induced point defect formation is more than an order of magnitude below the ZnSe ultrafast melt threshold fluence. This unique mechanism of point defect injection will be discussed.

  11. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, Gerald Charles (Kingsport, TN); Dickson, Todd Jay (Kingsport, TN)

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  12. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

    1998-04-28

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  13. Marbled murrelet abundance and breeding activity at Naked Island, Prince William Sound, and Kachemak Bay, Alaska, before and after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Bird study number 6. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuletz, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The author compared pre- and post-spill abundance and breeding activity of murrelets near the Naked Island group in central Prince William Sound, and in Kachemak Bay in lower Cook Inlet. Murrelet numbers at Naked Island were lower in 1989 than in 1978-1980 but not in 1990-1992. At Kachemak Bay, where oiling was minimal, murrelet densities did not change between 1988 and 1989. The results suggest that the murrelet population at Kachemak Bay, further removed temporally and spatially from the spill epicenter, was not affected as the Naked Island populations in 1989. Murrelet numbers were negatively correlated to numbers of boats at both study sites, and cleanup activities likely contributed to disruption in 1989.

  14. Petroleum hydrocarbons in near-surface seawater of Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill II: Analysis of caged mussels. Air/water study number 3. Subtidal study number 3a. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, J.W.; Harris, P.M.

    1995-07-01

    Mussels (Mytilus trossulus) were deployed at 22 locations inside Prince William Sound and 16 locations outside the Sound at depths of 1, 5 and 25 m for 2 to 8 weeks to determine the biological availability and persistence of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons from the Exxon Valdez Oil (EVO) spill. Four successive deployments were made in 1989, and two each in 1990 and 1991. Mussels were analyzed for 27 alkane and 43 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analytes. PAH concentrations derived from EVO in mussels decreased with depth, time, and distance from heavily oiled beaches. Hydrocarbon accumulation derived from EVO by deployed mussels indicates petroleum hydrocarbons were available to subsurface marine fauna the summer following the spill, which may be a route of oil ingestion exposure by fauna at high trophic levels.

  15. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  16. RAPID DUST FORMATION IN NOVAE: THE SPEED CLASSFORMATION TIMESCALE CORRELATION EXPLAINED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, S. C.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Evans, A.; Zubko, V.; Shafter, A. W.

    2013-11-10

    Observations show that the time of onset of dust formation in classical novae depends strongly on their speed class, with dust typically taking longer to form in slower novae. Using empirical relationships between speed class, luminosity and ejection velocity, it can be shown that dust formation timescale is expected to be essentially independent of speed class. However, following a nova outburst the spectrum of the central hot source evolves, with an increasing proportion of the radiation being emitted short-ward of the Lyman limit. The rate at which the spectrum evolves also depends on the speed class. We have therefore refined the simple model by assuming photons at energies higher than the Lyman limit are absorbed by neutral hydrogen gas internal to the dust formation sites, therefore preventing these photons reaching the nucleation sites. With this refinement the dust formation timescale is theoretically dependent on speed class and the results of our theoretical modification agree well with the observational data. We consider two types of carbon-based dust, graphite and amorphous carbon, with both types producing similar relationships. Our results can be used to predict when dust will form in a nova of a given speed class and hence when observations should optimally be taken to detect the onset of dust formation.

  17. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  18. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  19. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  20. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  1. Method For Screening Microcrystallizations For Crystal Formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santarsiero, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL), Stevens, Raymond C. (La Jolla, CA), Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA), Jaklevic, Joseph M. (Lafayette, CA), Yegian, Derek T. (Oakland, CA), Cornell, Earl W. (Antioch, CA), Nordmeyer, Robert A. (San Leandro, CA)

    2003-10-07

    A method is provided for performing array microcrystallizations to determine suitable crystallization conditions for a molecule, the method comprising: forming an array of microcrystallizations, each microcrystallization comprising a drop comprising a mother liquor solution whose composition varies within the array and a molecule to be crystallized, the drop having a volume of less than 1 microliter; storing the array of microcrystallizations under conditions suitable for molecule crystals to form in the drops in the array; and detecting molecule crystal formation in the drops by taking images of the drops.

  2. Interoperability format translation and transformation between IFC architectural design file and simulation file formats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-01-06

    Automatically translating a building architecture file format (Industry Foundation Class) to a simulation file, in one aspect, may extract data and metadata used by a target simulation tool from a building architecture file. Interoperability data objects may be created and the extracted data is stored in the interoperability data objects. A model translation procedure may be prepared to identify a mapping from a Model View Definition to a translation and transformation function. The extracted data may be transformed using the data stored in the interoperability data objects, an input Model View Definition template, and the translation and transformation function to convert the extracted data to correct geometric values needed for a target simulation file format used by the target simulation tool. The simulation file in the target simulation file format may be generated.

  3. Interoperability format translation and transformation between IFC architectural design file and simulation file formats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-02-03

    Automatically translating a building architecture file format (Industry Foundation Class) to a simulation file, in one aspect, may extract data and metadata used by a target simulation tool from a building architecture file. Interoperability data objects may be created and the extracted data is stored in the interoperability data objects. A model translation procedure may be prepared to identify a mapping from a Model View Definition to a translation and transformation function. The extracted data may be transformed using the data stored in the interoperability data objects, an input Model View Definition template, and the translation and transformation function to convert the extracted data to correct geometric values needed for a target simulation file format used by the target simulation tool. The simulation file in the target simulation file format may be generated.

  4. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History You are accessing a document from the...

  5. Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between Phenanthroline Ligands...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between Phenanthroline Ligands Activated by (C5Me5)2Yb Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between ...

  6. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE ...

  7. Age of the Coso Formation Inyo County California | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Coso indicates that the Coso Formation contains strata at least as old as 6.0 m.y. (million years) and no younger than 2.5 m.y. Within the Coso Formation, Blancan fossils...

  8. REVISITING JOVIAN-RESONANCE INDUCED CHONDRULE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasawa, M.; Tanaka, K. K.; Tanaka, H.; Nakamoto, T.; Miura, H.; Yamamoto, T.

    2014-10-10

    It is proposed that planetesimals perturbed by Jovian mean-motion resonances are the source of shock waves that form chondrules. It is considered that this shock-induced chondrule formation requires the velocity of the planetesimal relative to the gas disk to be on the order of ? 7 km s{sup 1} at 1AU. In previous studies on planetesimal excitation, the effects of Jovian mean-motion resonance together with the gas drag were investigated, but the velocities obtained were at most 8 km s{sup 1} in the asteroid belt, which is insufficient to account for the ubiquitous existence of chondrules. In this paper, we reexamine the effect of Jovian resonances and take into account the secular resonance in the asteroid belt caused by the gravity of the gas disk. We find that the velocities relative to the gas disk of planetesimals a few hundred kilometers in size exceed 12 km s{sup 1}, and that this is achieved around the 3:1 mean-motion resonance. The heating region is restricted to a relatively narrowband between 1.5AU and 3.5AU. Our results suggest that chondrules were produced effectively in the asteroid region after Jovian formation. We also find that many planetesimals are scattered far beyond Neptune. Our findings can explain the presence of crystalline silicate in comets if the scattered planetesimals include silicate dust processed by shock heating.

  9. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  10. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  11. The plate is not available in electronic format

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The plate is not available in electronic format. Please email lm.records@lm.doe.gov to request the plate.

  12. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and

  13. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  14. Formation of nanofilament field emission devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device. The process enables the formation of high aspect ratio, electroplated nanofilament structure devices for field emission displays wherein a via is formed in a dielectric layer and is self-aligned to a via in the gate metal structure on top of the dielectric layer. The desired diameter of the via in the dielectric layer is on the order of 50-200 nm, with an aspect ratio of 5-10. In one embodiment, after forming the via in the dielectric layer, the gate metal is passivated, after which a plating enhancement layer is deposited in the bottom of the via, where necessary. The nanofilament is then electroplated in the via, followed by removal of the gate passification layer, etch back of the dielectric, and sharpening of the nanofilament. A hard mask layer may be deposited on top of the gate metal and removed following electroplating of the nanofilament.

  15. Mental Representations Formed From Educational Website Formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth T. Cady; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Tuan Q. Tran; Bernardo de la Garza; Peter D. Elgin

    2006-10-01

    The increasing popularity of web-based distance education places high demand on distance educators to format web pages to facilitate learning. However, limited guidelines exist regarding appropriate writing styles for web-based distance education. This study investigated the effect of four different writing styles on readers mental representation of hypertext. Participants studied hypertext written in one of four web-writing styles (e.g., concise, scannable, objective, and combined) and were then administered a cued association task intended to measure their mental representations of the hypertext. It is hypothesized that the scannable and combined styles will bias readers to scan rather than elaborately read, which may result in less dense mental representations (as identified through Pathfinder analysis) relative to the objective and concise writing styles. Further, the use of more descriptors in the objective writing style will lead to better integration of ideas and more dense mental representations than the concise writing style.

  16. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  17. Observations of solute effects on bubble formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmeier, U.; Yaminsky, V.V.; Christenson, H.K.

    1995-09-01

    The authors have studied the effects of solute, in particular aqueous electrolyte, on bubble formation at capillary orifices and frits at varying gas flow rates. Using a stroboscope, video microscope, and rotating mirror, they have obtained pictures which show how bubble formation involves the interaction of bubbles at the orifice. These interactions depend on the value of the surface elasticity E due to positively (ethanol) or negatively (NaCl) adsorbed solute. At low flow rates consecutive bubbles do not interact. Each bubble detaches and leaves the orifice region before the next one starts forming. A intermediate flow rates the more closely spaced, consecutive bubbles begin to interact. In pure liquids there is no barrier to bubble coalescence and the detached bubble is fed by the subsequent bubble as this starts to grow. The process may be repeated several times before the original bubble has risen out of range. In solutions where E is large enough bubble coalescence is inhibited. Instead of feeding into the detached bubble the following bubble pushes it aside, and the bubbles appear to bounce off each other. Bouncing may give rise to a characteristic sequence of larger and smaller bubbles if the emerging bubbles break off prematurely from the orifice due to the inertia of the original bubble. The transition from feeding to bouncing depends critically on E of the solution and leads to a smaller average bubble size for large E values. At high flow rates detached bubbles are invariably fed by several subsequent ones. At very high flow rates the bubbling becomes chaotic, but the interaction of bubbles after leaving the orifice area produces smaller bubbles in solutions. Bouncing is more likely to occur with narrow and irregular capillaries. The dramatically different appearance of gas-sparged columns in salt water and freshwater has its origin in the difference between assemblies of pores showing mainly feeding (freshwater) or bouncing (salt water).

  18. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martn, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}?110 M{sub ?} yr{sup 1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (? 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (?{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (?{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ?50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ?150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-? relation.

  19. Formate brines -- New fluids for drilling and completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, M.S.; Shipp, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The term ``formate brines`` refers broadly to three primary compounds dissolved in water -- sodium formate (NaCOOH), potassium formate (KCOOH) and cesium formate (CsCOOH). Each is chemically classified as an alkali-metal salt of formic acid. They offer properties that in many respects are superior to their predecessors, halide brines such as zinc bromide and calcium bromide, without the undesirable side effects of those more common halide brine systems. This article introduces the technology and provides an overview of published work to date regarding formates.

  20. Star formation and cosmic massive black hole formation, a universal process organized by angular momenta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    It is suggested that star formation is organized following the same principles as we have applied in a recent explanation of galaxy and massive black hole formation. In this scenario angular momentum is randomly distributed by tidal torquing among condensations, Lyman-{alpha} clouds or cores for star formation during the initial non-linear phase of collapse. This angular momentum is characterized by the parameter, {lambda}, the ratio of the angular momentum of the cloud to that of a Keplerian orbit with the same central mass and radius. This parameter is calculated in very many simulations of structure formation of the universe as well as core formation and appears to be universal and independent of any scale. The specific angular momentum during the collapse of every cloud is locally conserved and universally produces a near flat rotation curve M{sub formation of a flat rotation curve (protostellar) disk of mass M{sub dsk} {sup -}30 M{sub o} of radius R{sub dsk} {approx_equal} 1100 AU or 5.4 x 10{sup -3} pc. In such a disk {Sigma} {proportional_to} 1/R and reaches the RVI condition at R{sub crit} {approx_equal} 40 AU where M{sub

  1. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  2. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}

  3. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  4. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

  5. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  6. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  7. STAR FORMATION AROUND SUPERGIANT SHELLS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Book, Laura G.; Chu Youhua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2009-03-15

    We examine the recent star formation associated with four supergiant shells in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC): LMC 1, 4, 5, and 6, which have been shown to have simple expanding-shell structures. H II regions and OB associations are used to infer star formation in the last few Myr, while massive young stellar objects reveal the current ongoing star formation. Distributions of ionized H I and molecular components of the interstellar gas are compared with the sites of recent and current star formation to determine whether triggering has taken place. We find that a great majority of the current star formation has occurred in gravitationally unstable regions, and that evidence of triggered star formation is prevalent at both large and local scales.

  8. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Fowler, Thomas David; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  9. Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

    2008-10-21

    A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

  10. Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization This research will; confirm the possibility of studying the structure and evolution of star-forming regions of molecular clouds in the laboratory; test the cometary model for the formation of the pillar structures in molecular clouds; assess the effect of magnetic fields

  11. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise:

  12. Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

    2012-06-12

    A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

  13. Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential Means to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control the Impact on DPF Performance and Engine Efficiency | Department of Energy Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential Means to Control the Impact on DPF Performance and Engine Efficiency Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential Means to Control the Impact on DPF Performance and Engine Efficiency Results illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash

  14. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Group | Department of Energy Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Partnership to Deepen Relationship Around Critical Nuclear Energy Issues WASHINGTON-Building on President Obama's commitment to strengthen the government-to-government relationship with

  15. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: I. Structural...

  16. (U) modulator to provide a continuous stepped frequency signal format

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walters, Glenn A. (Escondido, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A modulator provides a continuous signal format composed of discrete freqcy steps and is designed to eliminate frequency overlap or smearing normally associated with filter ringing.

  17. Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Results illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties PDF icon deer12kamp.pdf ...

  18. Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Humeros geothermal field, Mexico, using the Horner and the spherical radial flow (SRF) methods. The results showed that the Horner method underestimates formation temperatures,...

  19. NMR Investigations of Network Formation and Motional Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Well-Defined Model Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NMR Investigations of Network Formation and Motional Dynamics in Well-Define...

  20. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for determining formation quality factor from well log ...

  1. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by MOF Formation for Quantum Yield

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancement | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by MOF Formation for Quantum Yield Enhancement

  2. Integrated Project Team Guide for Formation and Implementation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8A, Integrated Project Team Guide for Formation and Implementation by John Makepeace Functional areas: Project Management The guide provides detailed guidance of the preferred...

  3. Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Statistical Behavior of Formation Process of Magnetic Vortex State in Ni80Fe20 Nanodisks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Statistical Behavior of...

  4. On the Lack of Evolution in Galaxy Star Formation Efficiency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On the Lack of Evolution in Galaxy Star Formation Efficiency Authors: Behroozi, Peter S. ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park SLAC ; Conroy, Charlie ; UC, Santa Cruz, ...

  5. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmez, Gilberto C.; Vzquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ?15 pc and masses ?600 M {sub ?} above density n ? 10{sup 3} cm{sup 3} (?2 10{sup 3} M {sub ?} at n > 50 cm{sup 3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ?0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup 2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ?30 M {sub ?} Myr{sup 1} pc{sup 1}.

  6. Universality in dynamical formation of entanglement for quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubotani, Hiroto; Toda, Mikito; Adachi, Satoshi [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama 221-8686 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nara Women's University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro 152-8550 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Dynamical formation of entanglement is studied for quantum chaotic biparticle systems. We find that statistical properties of the Schmidt eigenvalues for strong chaos are well described by the random matrix theory of the Laguerre unitary ensemble. This implies that entanglement formation for quantum chaos has universal properties, and does not depend on specific aspects of the systems.

  7. UFO (UnFold Operator) default data format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L.; Biggs, F. ); Marking, T.R. )

    1991-05-01

    The default format for the storage of x,y data for use with the UFO code is described. The format assumes that the data stored in a file is a matrix of values; two columns of this matrix are selected to define a function of the form y = f(x). This format is specifically designed to allow for easy importation of data obtained from other sources, or easy entry of data using a text editor, with a minimum of reformatting. This format is flexible and extensible through the use of inline directives stored in the optional header of the file. A special extension of the format implements encoded data which significantly reduces the storage required as compared wth the unencoded form. UFO supports several extensions to the file specification that implement execute-time operations, such as, transformation of the x and/or y values, selection of specific columns of the matrix for association with the x and y values, input of data directly from other formats (e.g., DAMP and PFF), and a simple type of library-structured file format. Several examples of the use of the format are given.

  8. Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-14

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  9. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces, and this reduction can be scaled by the gravitational dimensionless time. Mechanistic simulation of core-scale surfactant brine imbibition matches the experimentally observed imbibition data. In-situ distributions observed through simulation indicate that surfactant diffusion (which depends on temperature and molecular weight) is the rate limiting step. Most of the oil is recovered through gravitational forces. Oil left behind at the end of this process is at its residual oil saturation. The capillary and Bond numbers are not large enough to affect the residual oil saturation. At the field-scale, 50% of the recoverable oil is produced in about 3 years if the fracture spacing is 1 m and 25% if 10 m, in the example simulated. Decreasing fracture spacing and height, increasing permeability, and increasing the extent of wettability alteration increase the rate of oil recovery from surfactant-aided gravity drainage. This dilute surfactant aided gravity-drainage process is relatively cheap. The chemical cost for a barrel of oil produced is expected to be less than $1.

  10. Comment on Ra-Th disequilibria systematics: Timescale of carbonatite magma formation at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gittins, J. )

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses potential flaws in study by Williams, Gill, and bruland (1986) dealing with the extreme disequilibria between uranium and thorium series nuclides in alkalic carbonatite lava specimens. It discusses the apparent discrepencies between chemical compositions of lava which were reported from the same eruption. Clarification is made on the actual timing of eruptions in this volcanic region and the effects this would have on the petrogenesis interpretation of these rocks.

  11. Controlling formation fines at their sources to maintain well productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, P.D.; Weaver, J.D.; Rickman, R.D.; Dusterhoft, R.G.; Parker, M.A.

    2007-05-15

    Migration of formation fines has been shown to cause production decline in many wells. Despite the availability of new downhole tools for use in well stimulation and completion, the ability to sustain desired production levels is often plagued with fines migration problems. The solution to this problem is appropriate treatment to mitigate fines migration at its source. This paper describes the use of an ultra-thin tackifying agent (UTTA) for stabilizing fines in high-rate producing or injection wells. This UTTA is applied as part of an initial prepad in fracturing or gravel-packing operations, as a remedial treatment, or as a post-treatment following acid fracturing or matrix acidizing treatments. The primary purpose of UTTA application is to immobilize formation fines so that they will not detach, migrate with flowing fluids, plug the pore channels, and reduce the flow path permeability. Results of laboratory testing indicate that the UTTA system is applicable to most types of formation fines, including coals, sandstones, and carbonates. Once injected into the formation matrix or proppant pack, the UTTA forms a thin film on formation surfaces, encapsulating the fines. Capillary action helps pull the tackifier into the contact points, fixing the particulate in place without plugging the pore throat. The UTTA does not require a shut-in time after its application. The thin film tackifier does not harden, but remains flexible, enhancing the ability of a formation to withstand stress cycling and allowing the formation to handle high shear stress during high flow rates.

  12. Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-07-21

    A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

  13. Formatting PDFs for the Web | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Websites & Digital Media » PDFs » Formatting PDFs for the Web Formatting PDFs for the Web After you've created or have a PDF, follow these steps to format it according to Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) standards. Check the Fonts Before you begin, make sure that your copy of Adobe is not using local fonts. You only have to do this once: Under Edit > Preferences > Page Display, make sure Use Local Fonts is unchecked. This forces substitution so you can view the

  14. CX-005588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken FormationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/11/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-005597: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Extraction of Formation Water from Carbon Dioxide StorageCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 04/11/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

  17. Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logs (FMI) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Author Shakeel Ahmed Published Publisher Not...

  18. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is ... Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results ...

  19. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETLs 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.

  20. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Stockem, A. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitt Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Narayan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Silva, L. O. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  1. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmore » formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  2. DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Nan; Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 ; Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K.; Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2013-12-15

    We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

  4. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 range (1-2...

  5. Magnetohydrodynamical turbulence in Star and Planet Formation | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab March 7, 2007, 4:15pm to 5:15pm Colloquia Magnetohydrodynamical turbulence in Star and Planet Formation Dr. Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, Department of Astrophysics American Museum of Natural History

  6. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Send to ...

  7. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Miocene...

  8. The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms This report should provide DOE and the general reader with some insight into the workings of the corporate innovation process. The policy implications of our findings apply to the government role, especially to the Department of Energy, in encouraging innovative technologies, in estimating the cost and timing of technology

  9. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is

  10. Planetary formation theory developed, tested: predicts timeline for life

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planetary formation theory developed, tested: predicts timeline for life After the Big Bang: Theory suggests first planets formed after first generations of stars The researchers' calculations predict properties of first planet and timeline for life. May 3, 2012 image description The researchers state that the formation of Earth-like planets is not itself a sufficient prerequisite for life. Early galaxies contained strong sources of life-threatening radiation, such as supernovae and black holes.

  11. Microstructure, Phase Formation, and Stress of Reactively-Deposited Metal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydride Thin Films (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Microstructure, Phase Formation, and Stress of Reactively-Deposited Metal Hydride Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microstructure, Phase Formation, and Stress of Reactively-Deposited Metal Hydride Thin Films This document summarizes research of reactively deposited metal hydride thin films and their properties. Reactive deposition processes are of interest, because desired stoichiometric phases are created in a

  12. NMR Investigations of Network Formation and Motional Dynamics in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Well-Defined Model Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect NMR Investigations of Network Formation and Motional Dynamics in Well-Defined Model Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NMR Investigations of Network Formation and Motional Dynamics in Well-Defined Model Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Elastomers Authors: Lewicki, J P ; Harley, S J ; Bell, C ; Finnie, J A ; Ashmore, M ; Maxwell, R S Publication Date: 2013-05-30 OSTI

  13. Raman and FTIR Studies on Nanostructure Formation on Silicon Carbide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Raman and FTIR Studies on Nanostructure Formation on Silicon Carbide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman and FTIR Studies on Nanostructure Formation on Silicon Carbide No abstract prepared. Authors: Muntele, Iulia C. [1] ; Muntele, C. I. [1] ; Ila, Dr. Daryush [1] ; Poker, David B [2] ; Hensley, Dale K [2] + Show Author Affiliations Alabama A&M University, Normal ORNL Publication Date: 2003-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 978142 DOE Contract Number:

  14. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CELL WALLS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the

  15. Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION We present theoretical predictions of the UV continuum luminosity function (UV LF) and

  16. Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in polymer melts (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 4, 2016 Title: Communication: The simplified generalized entropy theory of glass-formation in polymer melts Authors: Freed, Karl F. [1] + Show Author Affiliations James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  17. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling

  18. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  19. Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas Bifurcation from a streamer to a solitary drift wave is obtained in three dimensional simulation of resistive drift waves in cylindrical plasmas. The solitary drift wave is observed in the regime where the collisional transport is important as well as fluctuation induced transport. The solitary drift

  20. Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film Nested wrinkle structures, hierarchical surface wrinkles of different periodicities of sub-μm and tens-μm, have been fabricated on a

  1. Bowing of the defect formation energy in semiconductor alloys (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | DOE PAGES Bowing of the defect formation energy in semiconductor alloys « Prev Next » Title: Bowing of the defect formation energy in semiconductor alloys Authors: Ma, Jie ; Wei, Su-Huai Publication Date: 2013-06-12 OSTI Identifier: 1102844 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 24; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of

  2. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  3. Finite formation time of hadrons: the QGP signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, S. M.

    2012-07-15

    In order to investigate the possible emergence of guark-gluon plasma, it is necessary to understand the properties of multiparticle production mechanisms in a more simple case than in relativistic collisions of heavy ions. The purpose of this article is to discuss some problems of the role of zone formation effectwhich are under active investigation nowadays. The formation length of hadron from particle-nucleus collision is derived and compared with those from relativistic ion collisions.

  4. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of

  5. EXFOR SYSTEMS MANUAL NUCLEAR REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19

    EXFOR is an exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. This document has been written for use by the members of the Network and includes matters of procedure and protocol, as well as detailed rules for the compilation of data. Users may prefer to consult EXFOR Basics' for a brief description of the format.

  6. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CELL WALLS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analysis of Film Formation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemistry on Silicon Anodes by Advanced In Situ and Operando Vibrational Spectroscopy | Department of Energy Analysis of Film Formation Chemistry on Silicon Anodes by Advanced In Situ and Operando Vibrational Spectroscopy Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analysis of Film Formation Chemistry on Silicon Anodes by Advanced In Situ and Operando Vibrational Spectroscopy Presentation given by UC Berkeley at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office

  8. Self-Organized Pattern Formation in Sedimentary Geochemical Systems. (Book)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Book: Self-Organized Pattern Formation in Sedimentary Geochemical Systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Self-Organized Pattern Formation in Sedimentary Geochemical Systems. Abstract not provided. Authors: Wang, Yifeng Publication Date: 2015-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1228821 Report Number(s): SAND2015-7601B 603562 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Book Publisher: SPEM Publications Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque,

  9. Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter Authors: Han, T Y ; Standermann, M ; Baumann, T F ; Murphy, K E ; Satcher, J H Publication Date: 2011-03-31 OSTI Identifier: 1183517 Report Number(s):

  10. CLSF (Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation) Homepage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catchphrase Our Mission CLSF (Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation) is a DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center focused on developing a detailed understanding of lignocellulose, the main structural material in plants, from cellulose synthesis and fibril formation to a mature plant cell wall, forming a foundation for significant advancement in sustainable energy and materials. > Read more about our Research including our recent publications on our Research page. Latest News Poetry

  11. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

    2002-05-01

    The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

  12. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  13. Delayed star formation in isolated dwarf galaxies: Hubble space telescope star formation history of the Aquarius dwarf irregular

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ?10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ?10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ? 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ?6-8 Gyr ago (z ? 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies.

  14. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS WITH IN SITU STAR FORMATION: NUCLEAR CORES AND AGE SEGREGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear stellar cluster (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: (1) buildup of NSCs from consecutive infall of stellar clusters and (2) continuous in situ star formation. Though the cluster infall scenario has been extensively studied, the in situ formation scenario has been hardly explored. Here we use Fokker-Planck (FP) calculations to study the effects of star formation on the buildup of NSCs and its implications for their long-term evolution and their resulting structure. We use the FP equation to describe the evolution of stellar populations and add appropriate source terms to account for the effects of newly formed stars. We show that continuous star formation even 1-2 pc away from the MBH can lead to the buildup of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky Way NSC. We find that the structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in situ star formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger populations do not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in situ star formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations that are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure toward the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inward, with younger populations having larger core sizes. In principal, such a structure can give rise to an apparent core-like radial distribution of younger stars, as observed in the Galactic center.

  15. Study of spin-polaron formation in 1D systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arredondo, Y.; Navarro, O.; Vallejo, E.

    2014-05-15

    We study numerically the formation of spin-polarons in low-dimensional systems. We consider a ferromagnetic Kondo lattice model with Hund coupling J{sub H} and localized spins interacting antiferromagnetically with coupling constant J. We investigate the ground state phase diagram as a function of the exchange couplings J{sub H} and J and as a function of the band filling, since it has been observed that doping either on the ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic regime lead to formation of magnetic domains [1]. We explore the quasi-particle formation and phase separation using the density-matrix renormalization group method, which is a highly efficient method to investigate quasi-one-dimensional strongly correlated systems.

  16. Bump formation in a binary attractor neural network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koroutchev, Kostadin; Korutcheva, Elka

    2006-02-15

    The conditions for the formation of local bumps in the activity of binary attractor neural networks with spatially dependent connectivity are investigated. We show that these formations are observed when asymmetry between the activity during the retrieval and learning is imposed. An analytical approximation for the order parameters is derived. The corresponding phase diagram shows a relatively large and stable region where this effect is observed, although critical storage and information capacities drastically decrease inside that region. We demonstrate that the stability of the network, when starting from the bump formation, is larger than the stability when starting even from the whole pattern. Finally, we show a very good agreement between the analytical results and the simulations performed for different topologies of the network.

  17. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a spiral startup staged sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-12-15

    Methods for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include treating a first zone of the formation. Treatment of a plurality of zones of the formation may be begun at selected times after the treatment of the first zone begins. The treatment of at least two successively treated zones may begin at a selected time after treatment of the previous zone begins. At least two of the successively treated zones may be adjacent to the zone treated previously. The successive treatment of the zones proceeds in an outward, substantially spiral sequence from the first zone so that the treatment of the zones may move substantially spirally outwards towards a boundary of the treatment area.

  18. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-21

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  19. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  20. REVISITING THE COSMIC STAR FORMATION HISTORY: CAUTION ON THE UNCERTAINTIES IN DUST CORRECTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE CONVERSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Akio K.

    2013-01-20

    The cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) has been observationally investigated out to redshift z {approx_equal} 10. However, most of the theoretical models for galaxy formation underpredict the CSFRD at z {approx}> 1. Since the theoretical models reproduce the observed luminosity functions (LFs), luminosity densities (LDs), and stellar mass density at each redshift, this inconsistency does not simply imply that theoretical models should incorporate some missing unknown physical processes in galaxy formation. Here, we examine the cause of this inconsistency at UV wavelengths by using a mock catalog of galaxies generated by a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We find that this inconsistency is due to two observational uncertainties: the dust obscuration correction and the conversion from UV luminosity to star formation rate (SFR). The methods for correction of obscuration and SFR conversion used in observational studies result in the overestimation of the CSFRD by {approx}0.1-0.3 dex and {approx}0.1-0.2 dex, respectively, compared to the results obtained directly from our mock catalog. We present new empirical calibrations for dust attenuation and conversion from observed UV LFs and LDs into the CSFRD.

  1. Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisemore, Clyde J. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01

    A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.

  2. SNL Wake Imaging System Solves Wind Turbine Wake Formation Mysteries |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy SNL Wake Imaging System Solves Wind Turbine Wake Formation Mysteries SNL Wake Imaging System Solves Wind Turbine Wake Formation Mysteries May 18, 2015 - 4:20pm Addthis Illustration showing a utility-scale wind turbine in a field. A square brown steel shed behind the base of the turbine's tower houses the laser that emits a laser light sheet (illustrated by a green triangle) that travels from the shed to above the turbine downwind of the turbine. A white van parked

  3. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, Mohan

    2001-05-08

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

  4. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Behroozi, Peter S. ;

  5. Fusion Peptides Promote Formation of Bilayer Cubic Phases in Lipid

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dispersions. An X-Ray Diffraction Study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Fusion Peptides Promote Formation of Bilayer Cubic Phases in Lipid Dispersions. An X-Ray Diffraction Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fusion Peptides Promote Formation of Bilayer Cubic Phases in Lipid Dispersions. An X-Ray Diffraction Study Authors: Tenchov, Boris G. ; MacDonald, Robert C. ; Lentz, Barry R. [1] ; UNC) [2] ; Sofia-MED) [2] + Show Author

  6. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

    1995-01-01

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

  7. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, J.W.

    1995-01-17

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

  8. Formation of carbon deposits from coal in an arc plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, B.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, K.

    2007-07-01

    The issue of deposited carbon (DC) on a reactor wall during the production of acetylene by the coal/arc plasma process is a potential obstacle for the industrialization process. The formation mechanism of DC is very difficult to reveal because the high complexity of coal and the volatile matter. Combining with quenching technique, the methane, liquid petroleum gas and benzene were employed as the model materials to roughly act as the light gas, chain and aromatic subcomponents of volatile matter, and then the reasonable formation mechanism of DC was subtly speculated accordingly.

  9. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  10. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Wednesday, 25 June 2008 00:00 The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under

  11. Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio, The Department of Energy (DOE) has records relating to both of these facilities. ... This Army equipment used radioactive sources as part of their mechanism The measured ...

  12. FIA-12-0051- In the Matter of William Berger

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 9, 2012, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy’s National...

  13. Supercomputing Community Dr. William Kramer Blue Waters Director...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems UTK NCARCISL XSEDE (TG) NERSC's Greatest Legacies NERSC is the First Multi-discipline Nationally based HPC resource for Diverse, Open Science * Only localcenter...

  14. Mr. William E. Mott, Acting Director Environmental Control Technology...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    feet. It was an old-fashioned brick and mill con- struction building of the light manufacturing type; foundation wails were in general made of stone, and all exterior walls and...

  15. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 06, 2015 10:06 AM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John; rmurphy@aga.org; Schryver, David Subject: AGAAPGA Questions re Pre-publication Furnace NOPR Dan: I am attaching, on...

  16. MEMORANDUM FOR WILLIAM E. MURPHIE MANAGER FROM: SUBJECT: PORTSMOUTH...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, "Approve Mission Need." You must demonstrate and affirm the ability to perform all duties of an AE as identified in DOE 0 413.3B. As such, your field elementorganization...

  17. Williams Elementary and Middle School Wind Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Yankton School District Wind Project

  18. Little Boy weaponeer William "Deak" Parsons, wartime Los Alamos...

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    at the beginning of World War II, came to the Lab to oversee the engineering of Fat Man and Little Boy to be combat weapons. Parsons also served as one of the first two...

  19. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon fewm13acclangley.pdf More Documents & Publications October 2009 Seismic Lessons-Learned panel Meeting Implementation of DOE NPH Requirements at the Thomas...

  20. Local Company Purchases William & Mary Land Near Jefferson Lab...

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    articles.dailypress.com2010-06-14newsdp-nws-wm-land-20100614-11jefferson-lab-mary-real-estate-foundation-new... Submitted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 12...

  1. William Rees appointed to new Global Security leadership position

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    appointed to new Global Security leadership position A new position that elevates the importance of the Lab's work in key program areas, including non-proliferation,...

  2. Prince William County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Virginia Gainesville, Virginia Haymarket, Virginia Lake Ridge, Virginia Linton Hall, Virginia Loch Lomond, Virginia Montclair, Virginia Nokesville, Virginia Occoquan,...

  3. Via Email Mr. William Hirst Hirst Enterprises Inc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NY 5943 785.66 Unknown A&E SUPPLY 877-2777903, TX 5943 63.50 Unknown CAPITOL SUPPLY 954-4855000, FL 5943 84.20 INC Unknown PREMIER BIZ 909-5939450, CA 5099 59.20 PRODUCTS...

  4. ALCF Early Science Program Tim Williams (ESP Manager) HPC User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highly accurate microscopic model of proteins and complexes-polarizable force field (NAMD). CAD Active Aerodynamic Flow Control Tiny synthetic jet actuators...

  5. Williams, Joel F Jr From: Toebe, Wayne E Sent:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M; Tuott, Lee C; Jackson, Dale E. Subject: 2336W PROCESSING AREA DIFFERENTAL PRESSURE Hello John & John, This message conveys summary information about the discovery of equipment...

  6. EA-208 Williams Energy Marketing and Trading Company | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Trading Company More Documents & Publications EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P...

  7. Principal Deputy Chief William A. Eckroade's Written Testimony...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - January 2012 Review of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, October 2010...

  8. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    March 06, 2015 10:06 AM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John; rmurphy@aga.org; Schryver, David Subject: AGA/APGA Questions re Pre-publication Furnace NOPR Dan: I am attaching, on behalf of the American Public Gas Association and the American Gas Association, a list of technical questions related to the pre-publication furnace NOPR and the underlying Technical Support Document. It is important that these questions be answered as promptly as possible, preferably before the March 27 public

  9. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    November 14, 2014 3:43 PM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John; Schryver, David Subject: DOE Furnace Rule Dan: please see the attached letter; and please call with any questions. Bud

  10. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wednesday, December 03, 2014 7:50 AM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John Subject: RE: DOE Posting Practices Dan: thanks for the prompt response. While we do not agree that adding data to a spreadsheet is not a change to a spreadsheet that warrants notice to the public, we are pleased that DOE at least seems to agree that as to "substantive changes to the spreadsheets," "it will make such changes clear in re- posting the spreadsheets." The problem, of course, is that DOE is

  11. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Monday, December 01, 2014 8:49 AM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John Subject: DOE Posting Practices Dan: it has come to our attention that DOE is revising posted materials with no notice to the public either that a change has been made or what the change is. This practice, an example of which is provided below, is extremely prejudicial and harmful to those trying to understand the basis for DOE actions and needs to be corrected as soon as possible. DOE provided notice on September 22, 2014,

  12. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    March 10, 2015 12:54 PM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Cymbalsky, John; rmurphy@aga.org; Schryver, David; Exparte Communications Subject: RE: AGA/APGA Questions re Pre-publication Furnace NOPR Dan: thank you for the response. Hopefully, it goes without saying that we want our questions and DOE's responses (and all other correspondence) to be in the public domain for use as appropriate by all interested parties. Your email indicates that DOE is "currently reviewing the questions," but does not

  13. From: Miller, William [mailto:wmiller@McCarter.com]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    October 28, 2014 4:59 PM To: Cohen, Daniel Cc: Clay, Kathryn; 'Dave Schryver'; Cymbalsky, John; 'Bert Kalisch'; rmurphy@aga.org; Leslie, Neil (Neil.Leslie@gastechnology.org) Subject: RE: Furnaces Data Dan: per our earlier email exchanges, attached are the initial questions of APGA/AGA regarding the LCC spreadsheets distributed by DOE regarding the furnace rule remand. We anticipate that we will have additional questions by the time of the Nov. 7 meeting, as we are continuing our review; we also

  14. CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), predecessor to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), for short term storage of uranium concentrates. ...

  15. VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), predecessor to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), for short term storage of uranium concentrates. ...

  16. Women @ Energy: Dianne Williams Wilburn | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    how courage has touched her life, she does not mention the fact that she recently battled breast cancer. Instead, she focuses on the positive, focuses on the achievements of...

  17. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, A. Lee, C. J.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-08-07

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80?eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene are not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, partially suspended over holes was irradiated with EUV radiation. By comparing with the Raman results from e-beam irradiation, it is concluded that the photoelectrons, especially those from the valence band, contribute to defect formation in graphene during irradiation.

  18. PROMINENCE FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH AN EMERGING HELICAL FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Tsuneta, Saku; Katsukawa, Yukio; Suematsu, Yoshinori [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Lites, Bruce W.; Kubo, Masahito [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Yokoyama, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Berger, Thomas E.; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto, 607-8471 (Japan); Shimizu, Toshifumi [ISAS/JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp

    2009-05-20

    The formation and evolution process and magnetic configuration of solar prominences remain unclear. In order to study the formation process of prominences, we examine continuous observations of a prominence in NOAA AR 10953 with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. As reported in our previous Letter, we find a signature suggesting that a helical flux rope emerges from below the photosphere under a pre-existing prominence. Here we investigate more detailed properties and photospheric indications of the emerging helical flux rope, and discuss their relationship to the formation of the prominence. Our main conclusions are: (1) a dark region with absence of strong vertical magnetic fields broadens and then narrows in Ca II H-line filtergrams. This phenomenon is consistent with the emergence of the helical flux rope as photospheric counterparts. The size of the flux rope is roughly 30,000 km long and 10,000 km wide. The width is larger than that of the prominence. (2) No shear motion or converging flows are detected, but we find diverging flows such as mesogranules along the polarity inversion line. The presence of mesogranules may be related to the emergence of the helical flux rope. (3) The emerging helical flux rope reconnects with magnetic fields of the pre-existing prominence to stabilize the prominence for the next several days. We thus conjecture that prominence coronal magnetic fields emerge in the form of helical flux ropes that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the prominence.

  19. Exotherm data acquisition in polyurethane foam formation using a microcomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebrard, M.J.; Leroux, J.

    1986-01-01

    An Apple microcomputer was used to collect exotherm data of the reactions leading to the formation of polyurethane foams, to differentiate the curves with respect to time and to measure the position and magnitude of the inflection points. Hardware, software, operations and reproducibility of this automated data acquisition system are described.

  20. On flame kernel formation and propagation in premixed gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisazadeh-Far, Kian; Metghalchi, Hameed [Northeastern University, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Parsinejad, Farzan [Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Richmond, CA 94801 (United States); Keck, James C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Flame kernel formation and propagation in premixed gases have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been carried out at constant pressure and temperature in a constant volume vessel located in a high speed shadowgraph system. The formation and propagation of the hot plasma kernel has been simulated for inert gas mixtures using a thermodynamic model. The effects of various parameters including the discharge energy, radiation losses, initial temperature and initial volume of the plasma have been studied in detail. The experiments have been extended to flame kernel formation and propagation of methane/air mixtures. The effect of energy terms including spark energy, chemical energy and energy losses on flame kernel formation and propagation have been investigated. The inputs for this model are the initial conditions of the mixture and experimental data for flame radii. It is concluded that these are the most important parameters effecting plasma kernel growth. The results of laminar burning speeds have been compared with previously published results and are in good agreement. (author)

  1. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K.; Mondragon, III, Julius J.; Hara, Philip Scott

    2003-04-29

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  2. Effect of gaseous inhibitors on PCDD/F formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruokojaervi, P.H.; Halonen, I.A.; Tuppurainen, K.A.; Tarhanen, J.; Ruuskanen, J.

    1998-10-15

    Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from municipal waste incineration are currently a subject of considerable public concern because of their extreme toxicity. PCDD/F formation in incineration processes is being studied widely, but studies on inhibition are quite sparse, especially in a pilot-plant scale. In this work, the effect of four gaseous inhibitors (sulfur dioxide, ammonia, dimethylamine, and methyl mercaptan) on PCDD/PCDF formation in the combustion of liquid fuel was studied using a pilot-scale plant. The inhibitors were injected into the flue gas stream after the first economizer at a temperature of 670 C and just before the second economizer at 410 C. Both the chlorophenol and PCDD and PCDF concentrations decreased when inhibitors were added. Particle-phase PCDD/F concentrations in particular decreased by up to 98%. The results suggest that the formation of PCDD/Fs is hindered in the particle phase at the early stages of the PCDD/F formation chain, probably even before precursors such as chlorophenols have been formed.

  3. NASA features LLNL star-formation simulations | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration features LLNL star-formation simulations | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  4. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  5. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  6. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrn, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ?1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ?1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ? three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  7. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  8. Solution mining and heating by oxidation for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX)

    2009-06-23

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation. A second fluid is produced from the portion. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. A controlled amount of oxidant is provided to the portion of the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  9. Method of condensing vaporized water in situ to treat tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Fu

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a first portion of the formation. Conditions may be controlled in the formation so that water vaporized by the heaters in the first portion is selectively condensed in a second portion of the formation. At least some of the fluids may be produced from the formation.

  10. Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

    2011-09-06

    A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

  11. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  12. Instability of black hole formation in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-01-15

    We consider here the classic scenario given by Oppenheimer, Snyder, and Datt, for the gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud, and examine its stability under the introduction of small tangential stresses. We show, by offering an explicit class of physically valid tangential stress perturbations, that an introduction of tangential pressure, however small, can qualitatively change the final fate of collapse from a black hole final state to a naked singularity. This shows instability of black hole formation in collapse and sheds important light on the nature of cosmic censorship hypothesis and its possible formulations. The key effect of these perturbations is to alter the trapped surface formation pattern within the collapsing cloud and the apparent horizon structure. This allows the singularity to be visible, and implications are discussed.

  13. FORMATION OF FULLERENES IN H-CONTAINING PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GarcIa-Hernandez, D. A.; Manchado, A.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Villaver, E.; Szczerba, R.; Perea-Calderon, J. V. E-mail: amt@iac.e E-mail: shaw@noao.ed E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.e E-mail: Jose.Perea@sciops.esa.in

    2010-11-20

    Hydrogen depleted environments are considered an essential requirement for the formation of fullerenes. The recent detection of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} fullerenes in what was interpreted as the hydrogen-poor inner region of a post-final helium shell flash planetary nebula (PN) seemed to confirm this picture. Here, we present strong evidence that challenges the current paradigm regarding fullerene formation, showing that it can take place in circumstellar environments containing hydrogen. We report the simultaneous detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes toward C-rich and H-containing PNe belonging to environments with very different chemical histories such as our own Galaxy and the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that PAHs and fullerenes may be formed by the photochemical processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon. These observations suggest that modifications may be needed to our current understanding of the chemistry of large organic molecules as well as the chemical processing in space.

  14. High-density FRC formation studies on FRX-L.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Intrator, Thomas; Zhang, S.; Wurden, G. A.; Begay, D. W.; Mignardot, E. R.; Waganaar, W. J.; Siemon, R. E.; Tuszewski, M. G.; Sanchez, P. G.; Degnan, J. H.; Sommars, W.

    2002-01-01

    FRX-L (Field Reversed configuration experiment - Liner) is a magnetized-target injector for magnetized target fusion (MTF) experiments. It was designed with the goal of producing high-density n-1017 cm3 field reversed configurations (FRCs) and translating them into an aluminum liner (1-mm thick, 10-cm diameter cylindrical shell) for further compression to fusion conditions. Although operation at these high densities leads to shorter FRC lifetimes, our application requires thlat the plasma live only long enough to be translated and compressed, or on the order of 10-20 ps. Careful study of FRC formation in situ will be done in the present experiment to differentiate between effects introduced in future experiments by translation, trapping, and compression of the FRC. We present current results on the optimization of the FRC formation process on RX-L and compare the results with those from past experiments.

  15. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2007-06-30

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

  16. Soliton communication lines based on spectrally efficient modulation formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushko, O V; Redyuk, A A

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of mathematical modelling of optical-signal propagation in soliton fibre-optic communication lines (FOCLs) based on spectrally efficient signal modulation formats. We have studied the influence of spontaneous emission noise, nonlinear distortions and FOCL length on the data transmission quality. We have compared the characteristics of a received optical signal for soliton and conventional dispersion compensating FOCLs. It is shown that in the presence of strong nonlinearity long-haul soliton FOCLs provide a higher data transmission performance, as well as allow higher order modulation formats to be used as compared to conventional communication lines. In the context of a coherent data transmission, soliton FOCLs allow the use of phase modulation with many levels, thereby increasing the spectral efficiency of the communication line. (optical communication lines)

  17. THE FORMATION OF COSMIC FULLERENES FROM AROPHATIC CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Cami, Jan; Peeters, Els; Fanchini, Giovanni; Jones, Anthony P.; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo

    2012-12-10

    Fullerenes have recently been identified in space and they may play a significant role in the gas and dust budget of various astrophysical objects including planetary nebulae (PNe), reflection nebulae, and H II regions. The tenuous nature of the gas in these environments precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes even on astronomical timescales. We have studied the processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H or HAC) nanoparticles and their specific derivative structures, which we name ''arophatics'', in the circumstellar environments of young, carbon-rich PNe. We find that UV-irradiation of such particles can result in the formation of fullerenes, consistent with the known physical conditions in PNe and with available timescales.

  18. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  19. Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

    2013-12-31

    On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled “Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery” under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

  20. FILAMENTARY STAR FORMATION: OBSERVING THE EVOLUTION TOWARD FLATTENED ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Katherine; Looney, Leslie; Johnstone, Doug; Tobin, John E-mail: lwl@illinois.edu E-mail: jtobin@nrao.edu

    2012-12-20

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous from large-scale molecular clouds (a few parsecs) to small-scale circumstellar envelopes around Class 0 sources ({approx}1000 AU to {approx}0.1 pc). In particular, recent observations with the Herschel Space Observatory emphasize the importance of large-scale filaments (a few parsecs) and star formation. The small-scale flattened envelopes around Class 0 sources are reminiscent of the large-scale filaments. We propose an observationally derived scenario for filamentary star formation that describes the evolution of filaments as part of the process for formation of cores and circumstellar envelopes. If such a scenario is correct, small-scale filamentary structures (0.1 pc in length) with higher densities embedded in starless cores should exist, although to date almost all the interferometers have failed to observe such structures. We perform synthetic observations of filaments at the prestellar stage by modeling the known Class 0 flattened envelope in L1157 using both the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We show that with reasonable estimates for the column density through the flattened envelope, the CARMA D array at 3 mm wavelengths is not able to detect such filamentary structure, so previous studies would not have detected them. However, the substructures may be detected with the CARMA D+E array at 3 mm and the CARMA E array at 1 mm as a result of more appropriate resolution and sensitivity. ALMA is also capable of detecting the substructures and showing the structures in detail compared to the CARMA results with its unprecedented sensitivity. Such detection will confirm the new proposed paradigm of non-spherical star formation.

  1. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Domnguez, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although the mechanisms for the formation of PopIII stars are rather well understood on theoretical grounds, their formation history is still veiled in mystery because of their faintness. To shed light on this matter, we study jointly the gamma-ray opacity of distant objects and the reionization constraints from studies of intergalactic gas. By combining these studies, we obtain a sensitive upper bound on the PopIII star formation rate density of ?-dot {sub ?}(z)<0.01[(1+z)/(1+7.0)]{sup 3.4}(f{sub esc}/0.2){sup ?1}(C/3.0)M{sub ?}yr{sup ?1}Mpc{sup ?3} at z ? 7, where f {sub esc} and C are the escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies and the clumping factor of the intergalactic hydrogen gas. This limit is a ?10times tighter constraint compared with previous studies that take into account gamma-ray opacity constraints only. Even if we do not include the current gamma-ray constraints, the results do not change. This is because the detected gamma-ray sources are still at z ? 4.35 where the reionization has already finished.

  2. Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

    2011-05-31

    A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

  3. Methods for retarding coke formation during pyrolytic hydrocarbon processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-22

    A method is described for inhibiting the formation and deposition of pyrolytic coke on the heated metal surfaces in contact with a hydrocarbon feedstock which is undergoing pyrolytic processing to produce lower hydrocarbon fractions and said metal surfaces having a temperature of about 1,400 F or higher, consisting essentially of adding to said hydrocarbon feedstock being pyrolytically processed a coke inhibiting amount of hydroquinone.

  4. Formation of thin-film resistors on silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schnable, George L. (Montgomery County, PA); Wu, Chung P. (Hamilton Township, Mercer County, NJ)

    1988-11-01

    The formation of thin-film resistors by the ion implantation of a metallic conductive layer in the surface of a layer of phosphosilicate glass or borophosphosilicate glass which is deposited on a silicon substrate. The metallic conductive layer materials comprise one of the group consisting of tantalum, ruthenium, rhodium, platinum and chromium silicide. The resistor is formed and annealed prior to deposition of metal, e.g. aluminum, on the substrate.

  5. ORIGIN OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY-STAR FORMATION RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwit, Martin; Brisbin, Drew

    2015-02-20

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in the low-redshift range 0.07 ? z ? 0.3 considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy mass-metallicity-star formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most consequential among our findings is that, on average, extragalactic infall accounts for one half of the gas required for star formation, a ratio that is remarkably constant across galaxies with stellar masses ranging at least from M* = 2 10{sup 9} to 6 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}. This leads us to propose that star formation is initiated when extragalactic infall roughly doubles the mass of marginally stable interstellar clouds. The processes described may also account quantitatively for the metallicity of extragalactic space, though to check this the fraction of extragalactic baryons will need to be more firmly established.

  6. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

    1992-01-01

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and expert riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  7. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

    1994-01-01

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and export riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  8. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of prokaryotic partition is the Escherichia coli P1 plasmid par system, which consists of a centromere

  9. Spontaneous Formation of Biomimetic, Nanoporous Membrane Channels | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Office of Science (SC) Spontaneous Formation of Biomimetic, Nanoporous Membrane Channels Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information »

  10. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of prokaryotic partition is the Escherichia coli P1 plasmid par system, which consists of a centromere

  11. Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richard Newell, Administrator May 5, 2011 Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation EIA's Energy and Financial Markets Initiative 2 Richard Newell, May 5, 2011 * Collection of critical energy information to improve market transparency - improved petroleum storage capacity data - other improvements to data quality and coverage * Analysis of energy and financial market dynamics to improve understanding of what drives energy prices - internal analysis and sponsorship of

  12. Method for recovering oil from an underground formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesselink, F.T.; Saidi, A.M.

    1982-12-21

    Method for recovering oil from an underground formation consisting of blocks of relatively low permeability with an oilwet pore space containing oil surrounded by a fracture network of relatively high permeability by supplying to the fracture network an aqueous solution of a surfactant adapted for decreasing the surface tension between water and oil and displacing the oil from the oil-wet pore space of the blocks.

  13. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. , Martin; Grant D. , Holzrichter; Michael W.

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  14. CLSF (Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation) - About the Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About the Center EFRCs (Energy Frontier Research Centers) The Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF) is one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) initially established in 2009 by the US Department of Energy to accelerate research to meet critical energy challenges of the 21st century. EFRCs integrate the expertise of multiple leading scientific investigators to enable fundamental research of a scope and complexity that would not be possible with the small group research

  15. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Few-Layer Graphene | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most remarkable physical properties of any material in terms of hardness, stiffness, thermal conductivity, transparency and chemical inertness1. Graphite, which is the most thermodynamically stable form of carbon at room temperature and at ambient

  16. ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crump, S.; Young, J.

    2014-08-01

    Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

  17. Rapid Formation of Soft Hydrophilic Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efimenko,K.; Crowe, J.; Manias, E.; Schwark, D.; Fischer, D.; Genzer, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the rapid formation of hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces by ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) irradiation of poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) network films. Our results reveal that the PVMS network surfaces render hydrophilic upon only a short UVO exposure time (seconds to a few minutes). We also provide evidence that the brief UVO irradiation treatment does not cause dramatic changes in the surface modulus of the PVMS network. We compare the rate of formation of hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces made of PVMS to those of model poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and commercial-grade PDMS (Sylgard-184). We find that relative to PVMS, 20 times longer UVO treatment times are needed to oxidize the PDMS network surfaces in order to achieve a comparable density of surface-bound hydrophilic moieties. The longer UVO treatment times for PDMS are in turn responsible for the dramatic increase in surface modulus of UVO treated PDMS, relative to PVMS. We also study the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made of semifluorinated organosilane precursors on the PVMSUVO and PDMS-UVO network surfaces. By tuning the UVO treatment times and by utilizing mono- and tri-functional organosilanes we find that while mono-functionalized organosilanes attach directly to the substrate, SAMs of tri-functionalized organosilanes form in-plane networks on the underlying UVO-modified silicone elastomer surface, even with only short UVO exposure times.

  18. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ? 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  19. FORMATION OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS IN A DEAD ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Alexander, Richard D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-10

    Circumbinary planets have been observed at orbital radii where binary perturbations may have significant effects on the gas disk structure, on planetesimal velocity dispersion, and on the coupling between turbulence and planetesimals. Here, we note that the impact of all of these effects on planet formation is qualitatively altered if the circumbinary disk structure is layered, with a non-turbulent midplane layer (dead zone) and strongly turbulent surface layers. For close binaries, we find that the dead zone typically extends from a radius close to the inner disk edge up to a radius of around 10-20 AU from the center of mass of the binary. The peak in the surface density occurs within the dead zone, far from the inner disk edge, close to the snow line, and may act as a trap for aerodynamically coupled solids. We suggest that circumbinary planet formation may be easier near this preferential location than for disks around single stars. However, dead zones around wide binaries are less likely, and hence planet formation may be more difficult there.

  20. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M.; Rempel, M.; Schuessler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.