Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

William Nazaroff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seema, Brett C. Singer, and William W. Nazaroff. "Calibration of the Ogawa ozone passive sampler for aircraft cabins." Atmospheric Environment 65 (2013): 21-24. 2011 Apte,...

2

Alison Williams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alison Williams Alison Williams Alison Williams Energy Efficiency Standards Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-4042 (510) 495-2548 AAWilliams@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Meyers, Stephen, Alison A. Williams, and Peter Chan. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2012. Berkeley : Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2013. Download: standards_1987-2012_impacts_overview_lbnl-6217e.pdf (1012.36 KB) Williams, Alison A., Edward L. Vine, Sarah K. Price, Andrew Sturges, and Gregory J. Rosenquist. The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase

3

William Fisk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William J. Fisk William J. Fisk William Fisk Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-3058F (510) 486-5910 WJFisk@lbl.gov William Fisk is a Sr. Scientist (mechanical engineer) and is the leader of the Indoor Environment Group. He has more than 30 years of experience in research on the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in commercial buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the Academy of Indoor

4

Sylvia Williams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sylvia Williams Bus. Development Mgr. Global GTL Development, Shell International Gas, Ltd., UK This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s)...

5

William Morrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morrow Morrow William Morrow Sustainable Energy Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2024L (510) 495-2027 WRMorrow@lbl.gov William R. Morrow, III is a Senior Scientific Engineering Associate in the Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and is a member of the Sustainable Energy Systems Group and the Emerging Technology Assessment Group. William's research is focused on how to reconcile complex environmental goals with social demands for energy services and sustainable economic development. His research focuses on evaluating large-scale energy infrastructures and systems such as the electric grid, residential, commercial, and

6

WILLIAM H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WILLIAM H. ESCHENFELDT, Ph.D. WILLIAM H. ESCHENFELDT, Ph.D. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Argonne National Laboratory (1996-present) STA - Molecular Biologist Amoco BioProducts Corporation (1988 - 1995) Staff Research Scientist National Cancer Institute (1981 - 1988) Senior Staff Fellow University of Kentucky (1979 - 1981) Public Health Service Postdoctoral Fellow EDUCATIONAL SUMMARY Ph.D. Microbiology, Michigan State University (1979) M.S. Microbiology, Michigan State University (1975) B.S. Microbiology, University of Illinois (1972) PUBLICATIONS Nusca T.D., Kim Y., Maltseva N., Lee J.Y., Eschenfeldt W., Stols L., Schofield M.M., Scaglione J.B., Dixon S.D., Oves-Costales D,. Challis G.L., Hanna P.C., Pfleger B.F., Joachimiak A., Sherman D.H. (2012) Functional and structural analysis of the siderophore synthetase AsbB

7

William Delp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portrait of Woody Delp Portrait of Woody Delp William Delp Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-3030 (510) 486-5864 WWDelp@lbl.gov Woody Delp received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri Rolla in 1995. His graduate work involved modeling how much ventilation (outside air) comes into variable air volume (VAV) systems as they operate across a range of climates and seasons. Woody grew up in Rolla working in a family-owned HVAC contracting business. In his dad's business he worked in every capacity, from service calls at a young age, to designing and installing complex systems for local laboratories. HVAC is very much in his blood. Woody has been at LBNL since 1995 and has worked in various project areas

8

Carl Williams Bio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dr. Williams worked as a senior policy analyst within the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), Executive Office of the President from ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

BNL | F. William Studier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F. William Studier Molecular & Structural Biology Group Leader Research Interests Research has centered on conformations and interactions of DNA, molecular genetics and...

10

Williams, Ronald L From: Breed, William  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breed, William Breed, William Sent: Thursday, February 15,2001 4:14 PM To: Anderson, Margot Cc: Terry, Tracy Subject: RE: national energy strategy Okay by me; let us know what effort is needed and appropriate. Bill -Original Message- From: Anderson, Margot Sent Thursday, February 15, 2001 4:13 PM To: Breed, William Cc Terry, Tracy Subject: RE: national energy strategy BB - Thanks for volunteering HS for the macro section and Fred for micro. John fingered Tracy for both. Tracy is working AS WE WRITE on the macro part - we got EIA's input and she is reviewing and adding her two cents. I am going to let TT make the call. If she has time for Hilary to review and add (by the end of the day), fine, otherwise, given the short timeframe, Hilary can get in on the next round. Margot --

11

Interaction with William Carnall  

SciTech Connect

A personal account is given of interaction with William T. Carnall during the period 1977-1988, when I made regular visits to the Argonne National Laboratory to discuss the theoretical background to the spectroscopic work he was carrying out on the lanthanides and actinides.

Judd, Brian R. [Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States)]. E-mail: juddbr@pha.jhu.edu

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Williams, Ronald LM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LM LM - "- Williams, Ronald L From: Braitsch, Jay Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2001 6:21 PM To: Anderson, Margot Cc: Kripowicz, Robert; DeHoratiis, Guido; Johnson. Nancy; Melchert, Elena; Rudins, George; Carter, Douglas; Juckett, Donald Subject: NEP Chapter 8 - Supply Importance: High Margo - I'll be out until next Tuesday but the above people can respond to whatever. ch 8 march 22.doc 21008 DOE021-1461 Williams, Ronald L From: Melchert, Elena Sent: Friday, March 23, 2001 8:09 AM To: Anderson, Margot Cc: DeHoratiis, Guido Subject: RE: NEP Chapter 8 - Supply Yes we can get some graphics this morning. Elena -- Orginal Message- From: Anderson, Margot Sent: Friday, March 23, 2001 8:08 AM To: Braitsch, Jay Cc Krlpowlcz, Robert; DeHoratis, Guido; Johnson, Nancy; Melchert, Eena; Rudins, George; Carter, Douglas; Judcett, Donald

13

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

14

William Brinkman | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William Brinkman William Brinkman About Us Dr. William Brinkman - Director of the Office of Science Photo of Dr. William F. Brinkman Dr. William F. Brinkman was confirmed by the Senate on June 19, 2009 and sworn in on June 30, 2009 as the Director of the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy. He joins the Office of Science at a crucial point in the Nation's history as the country strives toward energy security - a key mission area of the Department of Energy. Dr. Brinkman said during his confirmation hearing that he looked forward to working "tirelessly to advance the revolution in energy technologies, to understand nuclear technologies and to continue basic research in the 21st century." Dr. Brinkman brings decades of experience in managing scientific research

15

William Perry | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William Perry William Perry About Us William Perry - Former Secretary of Defense, Stanford University Professor Photo of William Perry William Perry is the Michael and Barbara Berberian Professor (emeritus) at Stanford University. He is a senior fellow at FSI and serves as co-director of the Nuclear Risk Reduction initiative and the Preventive Defense Project. He is an expert in U.S. foreign policy, national security and arms control. He was the co-director of CISAC from 1988 to 1993, during which time he was also a professor (half time) at Stanford. He was a part-time lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at Santa Clara University from 1971 to 1977. Perry was the 19th Secretary of Defense for the United States, serving from February 1994 to January 1997. He previously served as Deputy Secretary of

16

William J. Clinton, 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Administration of William J. Clinton, 1998 / June 11 somehow going there would absolve the Chi- nese Government of its responsibility for the terrible killings at Tiananmen Square 9 years ago, or indicate that America is no longer concerned about such conduct. They are wrong. Protocol and honoring a nation's tradi- tional practices should not be confused with principle. China's leaders, as I have repeat- edly said, can only move beyond the events of June, 1989, when they recognize the re- ality that what the Government did was wrong. Sooner or later they must do that. And perhaps even more important, they must change course on this fundamentally impor- tant issue. In my meetings with President Jiang and other Chinese leaders and in my discussions with the Chinese people, I will press ahead

17

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 26 / Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 We intend to establish ecological reserves in the most fragile areas to keep them off- limits to fishing, drilling, and other damaging uses. I'm also directing the EPA to strength- en water quality standards all along our coasts and provide stronger protections for the most vulnerable ocean waters, to reduce pollution of beaches, coasts, and oceans. Second, I'm announcing today our com- mitment to permanently protect coral reefs of the northwest Hawaiian Islands. If you've ever been there, you know why we should. These eight islands are not, all of them, so well-known, but they stretch over 1,200 miles. They shelter more than 60 percent of America's coral reefs. They're home to plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth

18

Mr. William Steuteville  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

45 45 DEC 18 13% Mr. William Steuteville 3 HW 33 EPA Region III 841 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 Dear Mr. Steuteville: I am enclosing for your information a copy of the radiological survey report for the former Aeroprojects Facility in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Only background levels of radioactivity were found during the course of the survey. A copy of the survey has been furnished to the owners of the property, Philadelphia Ventures. A copy of the transmittal letter is enclosed. There have been allegations of burial of small quantities of uranium at this site. It appears that the amount of uranium involved is well below the 100 pound reportable quantity (RQ) set

19

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 / Apr. 22 have the vehicles they want with the effi- ciency they deserve. More than 100 years ago, the great Amer- ican poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow re- minded us that ''nature is a revelation of God.'' This Earth Day, let us remember that we are only stewards, in our time, of the Earth God gave us for all time. And let us strengthen our resolve to preserve the beauty and the natural bounty that sustains us and must sustain generations yet to come. Happy holidays, and thanks for listening. NOTE: The address was recorded at 5:12 p.m. on April 21 in the East Room at the White House for broadcast at 10:06 a.m. on April 22. The tran- script was made available by the Office of the Press Secretary on April 21 but was embargoed

20

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Nov. 6 / Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 Statement on Signing the Executive Order on Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments November 6, 2000 Today I am pleased to sign a revised Exec- utive order on consultation with Indian tribal governments. This Executive order, itself based on consultation, will renew my admin- istration's commitment to tribal sovereignty and our government-to-government relation- ship. The first Americans hold a unique place in our history. Long before others came to our shores, the first Americans had estab- lished self-governing societies. Among their societies, democracy flourished long before the founding of our Nation. Our Nation en- tered into treaties with Indian nations, which acknowledged their right to self-government

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

William J. Clinton, 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration of William J. Clinton, 1995 / Aug. 8 for an egg would you give him a scorpion? Today we must ask, if our child asked about the future, will we give him or her dirty air, poison water; would we keep them from knowing what chemicals are being released into their neighborhoods and keep their par- ents from protecting them? We all know what the answer is. It's no. It seems simple here in this wonderful neighborhood. Why don't you help us make it simple in Washington, DC? Thank you very much. NOTE: The President spoke at 1:10 p.m. at Fort Armistead Park. In his remarks, he referred to Doris McGuigan, environmental activist in the Brooklyn-Curtis Bay community of Baltimore, and Thomas V. ''Mike'' Miller, Jr., president of the Maryland Senate. Executive Order 12969-Federal

22

NREL: Energy Sciences - William Tumas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical & Nanoscale Science Theoretical Materials Science Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version William Tumas Associate Laboratory Director, Materials and Chemical Science and Technology Photo of William Tumas Phone: (303) 384-7955 Email: Bill.Tumas@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2009 Dr. William Tumas is the Associate Laboratory Director for Materials and Chemical Science and Technology, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). He is responsible for overall leadership, management, technical direction, and workforce development of the materials and chemical science and technology capabilities at NREL spanning fundamental and applied R&D for renewable energy and energy efficiency. Key program areas include solar

23

Thomas D. Williams Assistant Administrator  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thomas D. Williams Thomas D. Williams Assistant Administrator for Resource and Tecnology Management Duties Thomas D. Williams is the Assistant Administrator for Resource & Technology Management. He provides leadership and direction to oversee the management and operation of EIA's employee services, information technology policy and operations, and integrated planning, budget, procurement, evaluation and project management activity. Biography Thom is a career member of the Senior Executive Service with more than 27 years of professional experience in developing, linking, and implementing successful strategic, financial, human capital, operational, technology, and administrative policies and plans for federal research, science, engineering, and regulatory programs.

24

Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae of William D. Phillips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abbreviated Curriculum Vitae of William D. Phillips Updated: November 1997. Personal: Born: 5 November 1948; Birthplace ...

25

William Bryan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William Bryan William Bryan About Us William Bryan - Deputy Assistant Secretary of Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration William Bryan Mr. Bryan is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). The office of Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) works with the National Security Staff, other U.S. government agencies, and international partners to enhance the security and resiliency of critical energy infrastructure and facilitate the reconstruction and recovery of damaged or disrupted energy systems. As a career Senior Executive, Mr. Bryan oversees the collection, analysis, and dissemination of vital information to all involved in energy response

26

East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fork Biodiesel LLC Fork Biodiesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name East Fork Biodiesel, LLC Place Algona, Iowa Sector Renewable Energy Product Biodiesel producer and co-developer, with Renewable Energy Group (REG) of a 227m biodiesel plant in Algona, Iowa. Coordinates 47.278335°, -122.248554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.278335,"lon":-122.248554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spanish Fork Wind Farm Facility Spanish Fork Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Utah County near Spanish Fork UT Coordinates 40.072707°, -111.580027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.072707,"lon":-111.580027,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a

29

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams DES ­ Environmental Affairs Extension 53163 #12,100 Locally · 1998 Univ of Va $33,990 · 1998 Univ. of MD $0 !!!!! #12;Hazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Hazardous (Chemical) Waste Management in University of Maryland Laboratories o All laboratories and work

Appelbaum, Ian

30

William Heller | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William Heller William Heller Instrument Scientist: EQ-SANS Education B.S. in Physics and Mathematics, 1993; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Lincoln, NE M.A. in Physics, 1996; Rice University; Houston, TX; Thesis Advisor: Prof. H. W. Huang Ph.D. in Physics, 1999; Positions Held: 1999-2002: Postdoctoral Research Associate, Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Supervisor: Jill Trewhella, Ph.D. 2002-2004: Postdoctoral Research Associate, Condensed Matter Sciences Division and Center for Structural Molecular Biology, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Supervisors: Michelle V. Buchanan, Ph.D., George D. Wignall, Ph.D., and Dean A. A. Myles, Ph.D. 2004-2008: Chemist/Biophysicist Research Associate, Chemical Sciences Division and Center for Structural Molecular Biology, Oak Ridge National

31

Clark Fork, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clark Fork, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

32

Longwall mining thrives in Colorado's North Fork Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With mining units poised for record-setting capacity and rail service restored, these mines in Colorado's North Fork valley are ready to cut coal. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

William F. Hederman, Jr. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William F. Hederman, Jr. William F. Hederman, Jr. About Us William F. Hederman, Jr. - Deputy Director for Systems Integration and Senior Advisor to the Secretary William F. Hederman, Jr. William F. Hederman is the Deputy Director for Systems Integration and Senior Advisor to the Secretary. Mr. Hederman is a trained electrical engineer and public policy analyst with decades of executive experience in the private and public sectors. He began his professional career as a systems integration engineer at Bell Labs in the directorate that later developed the cell phone system. Mr. Hederman served on the RAND Corporation's research team that pioneered analysis of Federal technology demonstrations, worked as the Congressional Budget Office's first energy and science budget analyst, and led the establishment of the policy

34

Alice C. Williams | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alice C. Williams Alice C. Williams About Us Alice C. Williams - Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Alice C. Williams Alice is currently the Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). She is responsible for providing oversight of the EM Mission Units and ensuring integration across the mission areas at both DOE Headquarters and the field. Prior to her current position, Alice Williams served as the Livermore Site Manager for the National Nuclear Security Administration. In this capacity, she was responsible for the operations, oversight, and contract administration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With a Federal staff of approximately 100 positions, she performed Federal

35

Melvin G. Williams, Jr. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Melvin G. Williams, Jr. About Us Melvin G. Williams, Jr. - Former Associate Deputy Secretary Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Melvin G. Williams Jr., Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy (retired), served as the Associate Deputy Secretary of Energy until February 2013. As a Presidential Appointee at the U.S. Department of Energy, he served as the key leader responsible for the Department's management and operational excellence. He reported directly to the Secretary of Energy and the Deputy Secretary, and drove improvements in mission execution and assured that they were efficiently and effectively implemented throughout the Department. A nuclear trained submariner, he served in the U.S. Navy for thirty-two years as a commissioned officer and one year as an enlisted sailor. His extensive operational assignments included four Command opportunities,

36

The .Hoiorable William S. Cohen'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Secretary of Energy' Secretary of Energy' Washington, bC 20585 October 10, 1997 ' . , :. . The .Hoiorable William S. Cohen' Secretary of' eefense Washing+, D.C. 203Oi .' Dear Mr. Se&etm: ,_ -_ . . ' ,I. ' . a- / 4 ' . \ ' . The Congr&s recently se$ tp the President for signature the' Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provi$ions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility forthe Formerly:U&zed Sites Remedial Action . Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United Strites Army Corps of Engineers.. ;Assuming that this transfer becomes law, but without prejudging the President' s decision, the Department of Energy will work with the Corps to ensure a prompt and smooth transition, consistent with the wish& of the

37

The Honorable, William S . Cohen  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' The Skcretary of Energy _ Washington. bC 20585 ' -. October 10, 1997 ' 0 -- .' . . The Honorable, William S . Cohen ' Secretary 0f' Defense Washington, D.C. 20301 .' Jhr Mr. Secretary: ,I ' . ,.. *- . : . ' . The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water . Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would ' . immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actron Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Assuming that this transfer becomes law, but without prejudging the President' s decision, the Department of Energy will work with the Corps to ensure a prompt and smooth transition, consi&ent with the wishes of the

38

William Morrow CV May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Morrow III Page 1 R. Morrow III Page 1 William R. Morrow III, P. E., Ph.D. WRMorrow@lbl.gov 510.495.2027 LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORITORY Berkeley, CA Principle Scientific Engineering Associate 2010 - Present Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Energy Analysis Department Sustainable Energy Systems Group, International Energy Studies Group & the Emerging Technology Assessment Team Developing resolution to complex technical problems where analysis of situations or data requires an in-depth evaluation of various factors, and uses scientific/engineering concepts in accordance with organizational objectives to solve complex problems in creative and effective ways in the following areas: o Developing forward looking techno-economic projections and conceptual frameworks for evaluating

39

The Honorable, William S . Cohen  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c - c - . .' 0 -- .' . . - . . The Honorable, William S . Cohen . : Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -. , 1. .' .- - I &karMr. Secretary: . ' The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program @USRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Assuming that this transfer becomes law, but without prejudging the President' s decision, the Department of Energy will work with the Corps to ensure a prompt and smooth transition, consistent with the wishes of the ' Congress. . Should this provision become law, the Department of Energy'

40

The Fork+ burnup measurement system: Design and first measurement campaign  

SciTech Connect

Previous work with the original Fork detector showed that burnup as determined by reactor records could be accurately allocated to spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The original Fork detector, designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, used an ion chamber to measure gross gamma count and a fission chamber to measure neutrons from an activation source, {sup 244}Cm. In its review of the draft Topical Report on Burnup Credit, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission indicated it felt uncomfortable with a measurement system that depended on reactor records for calibration. The Fork+ system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute with the aim of providing this independent measurement capability. The initial Fork+ prototype was used in a measurement campaign at the Maine Yankee reactor. The campaign confirmed the applicability of the sensor approach in the Fork+ system and the efficiency of the hand-portable Fork+ prototype in making fuel assembly measurements. It also indicated potential design modifications that will be necessary before the Fork+ can be used effectively on high-burnup spent fuel.

Olson, C.E.; Bronowski, D.R.; McMurtry, W. [Sandia National Labs. (United States); Ewing, R. [Electric Power Research Inst. (United States); Jordan, R.; Rivard, D. [Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co., Westboro, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for renewable energy sources has stimulated technological advances in solar cell development. Initially, development and fabrication were extremely costly and no encouragement for use in industrial applications was made. Today, evidence exists that new technological advances and mass-production techniques have lowered the costs considerably. The U.S. Department of Energy has indicated that by the year 1990 the price per peak watt would be less than fifty U.S. cents. This paper keeps this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial material handling. Two evaluation methods were used; namely, the Payback Method, and the Modified Energy Inflation Rate Method. Neither of the methods proved to be economically favorable, but some interesting results were obtained.

Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Manhattan Project: William S. "Deke" Parsons  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alamos, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944 Places > Other Places > Bomb Casing and Drop Test Sites Places > Los Alamos: The Laboratory > S-Site Implosion Facility William S. "Deke"...

43

Williams Stone Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Turbine Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Williams Stone Wind Turbine Facility Williams Stone Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Williams Stone Developer Sustainable Energy Developments Energy Purchaser Williams Stone Location Otis MA Coordinates 42.232526°, -73.070952° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.232526,"lon":-73.070952,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Michael D Williams | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL was nearing a new era when Williams joined the Lab in 1976 as a Rutgers-trained electrical engineer. Just ahead lay construction of the TFTR, which was completed in 1982...

45

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act State Colorado Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 for small projects and up to $25,000 Provider Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program Residents of Eagle, Gunnison or Pitkin Counties may be eligible for financing through the Energy Smart Program. Loans as low as $1,000 with flexible terms are available for small projects, and larger projects may

46

Interfacial instability and DNA fork reversal by repair proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A repair protein like RecG moves the stalled replication fork in the direction from the zipped to the unzipped state of DNA. It is proposed here that a softening of the zipped-unzipped interface at the fork results in the front propagating towards the unzipped side. In this scenario, an ordinary helicase destabilizes the zipped state locally near the interface and the fork propagates towards the zipped side. The softening of the interface can be produced by the aromatic interaction, predicted from crystal structure, between RecG and the nascent broken base pairs at the Y-fork. A numerical analysis of the model also reveals the possibility of a stop and go type motion.

Somendra M. Bhattacharjee

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

47

Roaring Fork Valley - Renewable Energy Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Roaring Fork Valley for the installation of photovoltaic, solar hot water, and micro hydro systems. Solar energy systems must be installed or signed off by a COSEIA or NABCEP...

48

The Fork+ Developmental Measurement Campaign at Maine Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of burnup credit in the design of spent-fuel storage and transportation systems significantly reduces risks and decreases costs. However, approval of storage and transportation designs using burnup credit will likely require independent measurement of the spent-fuel assembly burnup. EPRI's Fork(plus) system has been designed for measuring spent-fuel burnup without recourse to reactor records. This report presents results from testing of the Fork(plus) system prototype at the Maine Yankee reactor ...

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

William Fowler and Elements in the Stars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William Fowler and Elements in the Stars Resources with Additional Information William A. Fowler Courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives 'William A. Fowler ... shared the 1983 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into the creation of chemical elements inside stars ... . During his career in nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, which spanned more that 60 years, Fowler was primarily concerned with studies of fusion reactions--how the nuclei of lighter chemical elements fuse to create the heavier ones in a process known as nucleosynthesis. In 1957, Fowler coauthored ... the seminal paper "Synthesis of the Elements in the Stars", [which] showed that all of the elements from carbon to uranium could be produced by nuclear processes in stars, starting only with the hydrogen and helium produced in the Big Bang.

50

Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc Place Tennessee Utility Id 2960 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial GSA 1 (less than 50 kW) Commercial Commercial GSA 2 (51-1000 kW) Commercial Commercial GSA 3 (1001-5000 kW) Commercial Industrial GSA 1 (less than 50 kW) Industrial Industrial GSA 2 (51-1000 kW) Industrial Industrial GSA 3 (1001-5000 kW) Industrial Residential Residential outdoor light (175 MV) Lighting

51

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Funding Source The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 State Colorado Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount 50% of the total costs of efficiency opportunities identified by the analyst, up to $500 $50 co-pay for energy assessments through the end of 2012, raising to $100 in 2013. Residents of Eagle, Pitkin and Gunnison Counties can participate in the Energy Smart Program. The Energy Smart Program helps residents identify,

52

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Appliance Program Efficient Appliance Program Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Smart Strip: $30 Programmable Thermostats: $50 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnaces (AFUE 92% or higher): $300 Boilers (AFUE 92% or higher): $500 Dishwashers: $100 Clothes Washers: $75 Refrigerators: $100 Smart Strip: $15 Programmable thermostats: $15 Provider Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who install energy

53

Williams instructional technology: summer students working on faculty projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Williams Instructional Technology (WIT) is a summer technology intern program hosted by the Office for Information Technology at Williams College. The WIT program started in 1997 as part of an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant. The goals of the program ... Keywords: faculty, instructional technology, program, projects, students, summer, training, williams college, wit

Trevor Murphy

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Mr. William Mendoza Acting Executive Director  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William Mendoza William Mendoza Acting Executive Director Department of Energy Washing!on, DC 20585 May4, 2011 White House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities Department of Education 400 Maryland A venue, SW Washington, DC 20202 Dear Mr. Mendoza: Enclosed is the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Annual Performance Report on our activities to assist Tribal College and Universities (TCUs). DOE is submitting this information in accordance with Executive Order 13270. In FY 2010, DOE provided $275,000 in total expenditures for TCUs, an increase of $169,500 from the amount provided to TCU s in FY 2009. In an effort to raise the level of support in future years, DOE will continue to set funding goals and to identify opportunities for additional

55

Williams, Ronald L From: PETTIS, LARRY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PETTIS, LARRY PETTIS, LARRY Sent Tuesday, February 13, 2001' 10:12 PM To: Kelliher, Joseph Cc: Anderson, Margot; McSlanrow, Kyle Subject: Briefing for Vice President's Task Force 11164 DOE016-0916 Williams, Ronald L From: PETTIS, LARRY Sent: Tuesday, February 13.2001-10:12 PM To: Kelliher, Joseph Cc: Anderson, Margot; McSlarrow, Kyle Subject: Briefing for Vice President's Task Force 11165 DOE016-0917 Williams, Ronald L From: Kelliher. Joseph Sent: Tuesday. February 27. 2001 2:24 PM To: Anderson, Margot Subject: RE: solutions From: Anderson, Margot Sent: Tuesday, February 27, 2001 9:38 AM To: Kelliher, Joseph Subject: RE: solutions Yes, I'll stop by. r ---- Orginal Message-- From: Kelliher, Joseph Sent: Tuesday, February 27, 2001 9:34 AM To: Anderson, Margot Subject: RE: solutions Can you stop by after 11? We could talk about this and about providing input into the other sections of the report.

56

Williams Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Facility Williams Sector Biomass Owner Enpower Corp Location Williams, California Coordinates 39.1546137°, -122.1494187° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1546137,"lon":-122.1494187,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2494566°, -112.1910031° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2494566,"lon":-112.1910031,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.0037819°, -97.3594525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.0037819,"lon":-97.3594525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.3176°, -81.5209534° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3176,"lon":-81.5209534,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.9252568°, -97.0328547° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.9252568,"lon":-97.0328547,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City Corporation (Utility Company) City Corporation (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Spanish Fork City Corporation Place Utah Utility Id 17732 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General service Industrial General service 2 Industrial Large Power Industrial Residential Residential yard light Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0892/kWh Commercial: $0.0798/kWh Industrial: $0.0602/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spanish_Fork_City_Corporation_(Utility_Company)&oldid=411594"

62

Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2005 Math-Science-Technology Institute Oak Ridge, Tennessee Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area ARC Participants Darin Baugess Ben Mordan Debi Owens Yvonne Shafer Mentors Larry Pounds Harry Quarles Final Presentations Pollard Auditorium July 22, 2005 Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area Introduction: The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of approximately 33,000 to 36,000 acres. This large forested area of land contains numerous unique habitats and communities that are disappearing from other areas in Tennessee and the Southeast US. In 2004 John Devereux Joslin, Jr. investigated one community in the north end of the Oak Ridge Reservation called the East

63

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2250114°, -112.4840675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2250114,"lon":-112.4840675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.  

SciTech Connect

In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

Siddall, Phoebe

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details...

66

DOE/EIS-0353; South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2005 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic

67

Community Studies and Research for Change: An Oral History with William Friedland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research for Change: An Oral History with William FriedlandResearch for Change: An Oral History with William FriedlandResearch for Change: An Oral History with William Friedland

Friedland, William; Rabkin, Sarah; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

John J. MacWilliams | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » John J. MacWilliams About Us John J. MacWilliams - Senior Advisor John J. MacWilliams John J. MacWilliams was appointed in June 2013 as Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy. In this role he serves as the Secretary's senior finance advisor and is a member of his national security team. Prior to DOE, he was a partner of Tremont Energy Partners, LLC, a private investment firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that was formed in 2003. Prior to Tremont, he was Vice Chairman, Investment Banking, at JP Morgan Chase and a Partner of JP Morgan Partners. Mr. MacWilliams was a founding partner in 1993 of The Beacon Group, LLC, a private investment firm located in New York, which was acquired by JP Morgan Chase in 2000. He was also

69

Oral Histories: Biochemist William D. Moss  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Biochemist William D. Moss Conducted November 30, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments September 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Early Career at Los Alamos Early Development of Bioassay Tests to Measure Plutonium Exposure Developing Occupational Exposure Limits Exposure Accident Creates Need for More Sensitive Testing Long-Term Follow-Up Studies and the UPPU Club Wright Langham Joins the Los Alamos Health and Safety Group Langham Analyzes Results of Previous Plutonium and Polonium Injection Studies Langham Enacts Stringent Research Controls December 2, 1944 Memo Proposes Human Injection Study Polonium Studies at Rochester Los Alamos Analyzes Urine and Fecal Samples for 1945 Oak Ridge Injection Study

70

The HonorableZ William S. Cohen  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.- . .- . ) p. .' *-. , * . . _ The Secretary of Energy d ' -- ,. Washington. s>C 20585 October 10, 199' 7 ' ./ .- ~ * The HonorableZ William S. Cohen : Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -' Jkar Mr. Secretary: /' . " _,.. .- - z ' The Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water . Development Appropriations Act,' 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly' Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) from the Department of Energy to the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Assuming that this transfer becomes law, but without prejudging the President' s decision, the Department of Energy will work with the Corps to ensure a prompt and smooth transition, consistent with the wishes of the

71

Notices 19. LTG William Phillips, Deputy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

429 Federal Register 429 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 219 / Monday, November 14, 2011 / Notices 19. LTG William Phillips, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology), Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology). 20. Mr. Wimpy D. Pybus, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Policy and Logisitics, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology). 21. Mr. Craig R. Schmauder, Deputy General Counsel (Installation, Environment and Civil Works), Office of the General Counsel. 22. Mr. Karl F. Schneider, Principal Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs), Office of Assistant Secretary of the Army, Manpower and Reserve Affairs.

72

Williams, Ronald L From: Kelliher, Joseph  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kelliher, Joseph Kelliher, Joseph Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2001 8:56 AM To: Anderson, Margot; Haspel. Abe Subject: Cal conservation plan 6174 DOE012-0199 Williams, Ronald L From: KjerstenS._Drager@ovp.eop.gov%intemet [Kjersten_S._Drager@ovp.eop.gov] Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2001 10:34 AM To: Kelliher, Joseph; Kolevar, Kevin; Anderson, Margot; kmurphy@osec.doc.gov%intemet: dina.ellis@do.treas.gov%intemet; sue_ellen_wooldridge@ios.doi.gov%intemet; keith.collins@usda.gov 0 /ointemet; joseph.glauber@usda.gov%intemet; galloglysj@state.gov%intemet; mcmanusmt@state.gov%intemet; michelle.poche@osLdot.gov%intemet patricia.stahlschmidt@fema.gov%intemet: brenner.rob@epa.govointemet; symons.jeremy@epa.gov%/ointemet; beale.john@epa.gov% intemet; mpeacock@omb.eop.gov%intemet; Mark_A._Weatherly@omb.eop.gov%intemet;

73

William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House March 20, 2007 Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House Testimony of William S. Maharay, Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Testimony on issues associated with the FY 2005 and 2006 Audits of the Department of Energy's Financial Statements. Over the years, the Office of Inspector General has conducted and overseen a number of reviews of the

74

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk 5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk William Fisk January 2014 Quantifying the Economic Implications of Indoor Air on Energy Efficiency, Performance, and Health William Fisk is a senior scientist, mechanical engineer, and leader of the Indoor Environment Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). During his 33 years at the lab, he has researched the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the

75

William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House William S. Maharay: Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House March 20, 2007 Before the Subcommittee on Government Management, Organization and Procurement Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House Testimony of William S. Maharay, Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Testimony on issues associated with the FY 2005 and 2006 Audits of the Department of Energy's Financial Statements. Over the years, the Office of Inspector General has conducted and overseen a number of reviews of the

76

City of East Grand Forks, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota (Utility Company) Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name East Grand Forks City of Place Minnesota Utility Id 5575 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Rate Commercial Off Peak Rates Commercial Residential Electric Heat Residential Residential General Electric Residential Small Commercial Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0943/kWh Commercial: $0.0740/kWh Industrial: $0.0789/kWh

77

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

78

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

79

Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Place North Dakota Utility Id 20413 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Air conditioning rate Grain Drying Program Commercial Heat rate Residential rate Residential Wind Energy Average Rates Residential: $0.0717/kWh Commercial: $0.0885/kWh Industrial: $0.0703/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for

80

City of Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Williams - AZ Place Arizona Utility Id 56535 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png City owned Lights(20,000 Lumens,400 W MV-Pole) Lighting City owned Lights(4,000 Lumens-Pole) Lighting City owned Lights(7,000 Lumens, 175 W MV-Pole) Lighting Customer owned Lights(20,000 Lumens 400 W MV-Pole) Commercial Customer owned Lights(4,000 Lumens-Pole) Lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft PowerPoint - Williams_IPRC_Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZONE ZONE FREEZING STUDY FOR PYROCHEMICAL PROCESS WASTE MINIMIZATION ZONE FREEZING STUDY FOR PYROCHEMICAL PROCESS WASTE MINIMIZATION Ammon N. Williams and Supathorn Phongikaroon University of Idaho Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory 2012 International Pyroprocessing Research Conference Ammon N. Williams and Supathorn Phongikaroon University of Idaho Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory 2012 International Pyroprocessing Research Conference Outline * Background, Motivation, and Goals * Experimental Method * Experimental Results * Model Development * Modeling Results * Conclusions and Recommendations * Acknowledgments 2 Concept of Advanced Pyrochemical Process Chopped Driver or Blanket Fuel Uranium Metal Metal Waste Ceramic Waste Electrorefiner and Product Refinement Recycled High Purity Electrolyte 3 Contaminated Electrolyte Ion Exchange

82

SANS for Biology William T. Heller, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SANS for Biology A Tutorial William T. Heller, Ph.D. SNS-HFIR Users Meeting October 10, 2007 #12 probed Detector: Collects the neutrons scattered by the sample SNS and HFIR have large area detectors #12;SANS Instruments The HFIR SANS instrument control program is based on Spice, originally developed

83

Job Security and Productivity: Evidence From William Leung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Job Security and Productivity: Evidence From Academics William Leung Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley May 3, 2009 Abstract: How does job security influence productivity? I efficiency, it is important to know what institutions motivate workers to work hard. Job security is a topic

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

84

Network Externalities and Standardization: A Classroom Demonstration Christopher Ruebeck, Sarah Stafford, Nicola Tynan, William Alpert, Gwendolyn Ball, and Bridget Butkevich*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stafford, Nicola Tynan, William Alpert, Gwendolyn Ball, and Bridget Butkevich* Abstract: This paper College, Easton, PA 18042, ruebeckc@lafayette.edu; Stafford: Department of Economics, College of William

Portegys, Thomas E.

85

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams & Deangelo, Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin F. Williams, Jacob DeAngelo (2008) Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_U.S._West_Region_(Williams_%26_Deangelo,_2008)&oldid=390068" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

87

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams & Deangelo, Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin F. Williams, Jacob DeAngelo (2008) Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_U.S._West_Region_(Williams_%26_Deangelo,_2008)&oldid=387276" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers

88

The Honorable Robert E. Williams 44 W. Washington Street  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SEC ; : ' SEC ; : ' ,-<- I ;;;s The Honorable Robert E. Williams 44 W. Washington Street Shelbyville, Indiana 46176 Dear Mayor Williams: Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former General Electric Co. site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. This information is provided for your information, use, and retention. DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program is responsible for identification of sites used by DOE's predecessor agencies, determining their current radiological condition and, where it has authority, performing

89

Williams Elementary and Middle School Wind Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle School Wind Project Middle School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Williams Elementary and Middle School Wind Project Facility Williams Elementary and Middle School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location AZ Coordinates 35.253555°, -112.19558° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.253555,"lon":-112.19558,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

91

W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

March 20, 1995 March 20, 1995 W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager EM-421 Quince Orchard U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585-0002 L -=kj SUBJECT: FINAL REPORT-RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE F AMERICAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY OF TEXA WORTH, TEXAS I ,d Sl I lRMER , FORT Dear Dr. Williams: The Environmental,Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the C for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted radiological survey activii American Manufacturing Company of Texas Site in Fort Worth, Texas October 3 through 5, 1994. The survey activities consisted of document revi surface activity measurements, smears for removable activity, exposure rate m soil and miscellaneous sampling. k Ridge Institute :s at the former wing the period

92

Effects of rainbow trout fry of a metals-contaminated diet of benthic invertebrates from the Clark Fork River, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper Clark Fork River in northwestern Montana has received mining wastes from the Butte and Anaconda areas since 1880. These wastes have contaminated areas of the river bed and floodplain with tailings and heavy metal sludge, resulting in elevated concentration of metals in surface water, sediments, and biota. Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed immediately after hatching for 91 d to cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in water at concentrations simulating those in Clark Fork River. From exogenous feeding (21 d posthatch) through 91 d, fry were also fed benthic invertebrates from the Clark Fork River that contained elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead. Evaluations of different combinations of diet and water exposure indicated diet-borne metals were more important than water-borne metals - at the concentrations we tested - in reducing survival and growth of rainbow trout. Whole-body metal concentrations ([mu]g/g, wet weight) at 91 d in fish fed Clark Fork invertebrates without exposure to Clark Fork water were arsenic, 1.4; cadmium, 0.16; and copper, 6.7. These were similar to concentrations found in Clark Fork River fishes. Livers from fish on the high-metals diets exhibited degenerative changes and generally lacked glycogen vacuolation. Indigenous Clark Fork River invertebrates provide a concentrated source of metals for accumulation into young fishes, and probably were the cause of decreased survival and growth of age-0 rainbow trout in our laboratory exposures. 30 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Woodward, D.F. (National Fisheries Contaminant Research Center, Jackson, WY (United States)); Brumbaugh, W.G.; DeLonay, A.J.; Little, E.E. (National Fisheries Contaminant Research Center, Columbia, MO (United States)); Smith, C.E. (Bozeman Fish Technology Center, MT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

94

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration...

95

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/01/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department's (MFWP) South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program. This program is the Proposed Action in the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program EIS (DOE/EIS- 0353, July 2005). BPA will fund the program pursuant to its authority under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in the Columbia River Basin. The project constitutes a portion of the Hungry

96

Intern experience with William F. Guyton & Associates: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a review of the author's experience as an intern with William F. Guyton & Associates. William F. Guyton & Associates is a consulting groundwater hydrology firm with offices in Austin and Houston, Texas. The intern worked at the main office in Austin for the duration of the internship. The author worked on a variety of projects during the internship. These projects encompassed general groundwater studies, computer simulation, technical analyses of aquifer parameters, and inspection of water well construction and testing. General groundwater studies involved the collection of water well construction and chemical analyses data. The author wrote several computer codes to handle basic computations, and the author used several existing finite difference codes to simulate groundwater movement. The technical analyses of pumping test data were analyzed by the author to determine aquifer parameters. The field work involved on-site inspection of water well construction and involved quality control of the pumping test after construction. The author interacted with various agencies of the state and federal government. This interaction was necessary to many of the projects. The collection of water well data and the use of the finite difference codes gave the author the opportunity to obtain knowledge of the daily operations of these agencies.

Stevens, William Scott, 1953-

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..A ..A -- South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment ig of No Significant Impact and Findi RECEIVED @ S T 1 JAN 3 1 DOEIEA-0956 September 1995 SOUTH FORK SNAKE RIVER / PALISADES WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE EA # 0956 DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an a m u n t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their ' employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- , bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer-

98

VBH-0079 - In the Matter of William Cor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBH-0079 - In the Matter of William Cor VBH-0079 - In the Matter of William Cor VBH-0079 - In the Matter of William Cor This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by William Cor under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From August 1998 to September 2001, Mr. Cor was employed as a glovebox systems engineer at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), one of three national laboratories operated by the University of California (UC) for the DOE. Mr. Cor alleges that LANL management retaliated against him for activity protected under the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. vbh0079.pdf More Documents & Publications TBU-0045 - In the Matter of William Cor TBH-0111 - In the Matter of Eugene N. Kilmer TBZ-0111 - IN THE MATTER OF EUGENE N. KILMER

99

Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

)N i-i 5 - "i )N i-i 5 - "i Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Department of the Army Washington, D. C. 203 14- 1000 -' . UC-i -, :? . -0' /, \ ._ ' .;' Dear Mr. Augustine: I am writing to you as a follow-up to discussions our staffs have had regarding two former Department of the Army facilities in the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program where the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) also conducted activities. These sites are the former Marion Engineer Depot and the former Scioto Ordnance Plant, both just outside of Marion, Ohio. The Department of Energy (DOE) has records relating to both of these facilities. Since there has been public concern regarding the possibility of residual radioactivity at

100

Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the information furnished in Aerospace's Review of the.subject site (Attachment 1) and the ORKL/RASA (Attachment 2), it Is requested that designation survey of the Palmerton Ore Storage Pennsylvania. The survey should be detailed to and subsurface data to make up for the lack of the previous AEC surveys and in keeping with ORNL/RASA group should furnish a draft survey approval prior to conducting any survey activities. If there are any questions, please call Edward DeLaney 04 FTS 253-4716. Arthur J. Whitman / '/ Division of Facility and Site ' Deconrnissioning P,rojects Office of Nuclear Energy : 2 Attachments I bee: I E. Keller, OR, w/attachs:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~ *-,-' .r_~, ~ *-,-' .r_~, VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by W. C. Adams Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT JUNE 1994 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Baker arId Wi,,iMI Wsrchouwl-Vcrification June 28, ,994 - ,I I_ ..I .- VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND W ILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by: ' J .,,,~ ' . W . C. Adams, Project Leader Date: Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program

102

Participants: William Naughton, COHMED Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conference call May 27, 1998 conference call May 27, 1998 Participants: William Naughton, COHMED Bill Sherman, NE HLRW Task Force Bob Fronczak, AAR Mike Butler, UETC Ray English, DOE-NR George Ruberg, UETC Kevin Blackwell, FRA Markus Popa, DOE-RW Sandy Covi, UP The Rail Topic Group is currently in a transitional mode, moving simultaneously toward closure of the two rail information matrices, Comparison of CVSA Recommended National Procedures and Out-Of-Service Criteria for the Enhanced Safety Inspection of Commercial Highway Vehicles Transporting Transuranics, Spent Nuclear Fuel, and High Level Waste to Rail Inspection Standards, and Rail and Highway Regulations Relative to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials and their Applicability to States, Tribes, Shippers, and Carriers, (both

103

Oral Histories: Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Health Physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D. Conducted October 14, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Graduate Studies at University of Rochester AEC-Funded Research at University of Rochester Use of Human Subjects at University of Rochester AEC Direction of University of Rochester Research Contacts With Researchers Into Radiation Effects No Knowledge of Uranium Injections at Rochester Beginning a Career at Hanford Radionuclide Inhalation Studies at Hanford Use of Animals in Radiation Studies Identifying Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides Expanded Customer Base for Inhalation Studies Limited Involvement With Human Studies

104

CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513-519 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by W. C. Adams Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment System Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Prepared for the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT DECEMBER 1993 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. .- .- .- CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND W ILLIAMS WAREHOUSES BUILDING 513419 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by: Date: W . C. Adams, Project Leader i L!J!?J Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Reviewed by: W . L. Beck, Acting Laboratory Manager

105

Glassy Aging with Modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this report we address the question whether aging in the non equilibrium glassy state is controlled by the equilibrium alpha-relaxation process which occur at temperatures above Tg. Recently Lunkenheimer et. al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 055702 (2005)] proposed a model for the glassy aging data of dielectric relaxation using a modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) form. The aging time dependence of the relaxation time is defined by these authors through a functional relation involving the corresponding frequency but the stretching exponent is same as the alpha-relaxation stretching exponent. We present here an alternative functional form directly involving the relaxation time itself. The proposed model fits the data of Lunkenheimer et. al. perfectly with a stretching exponent different from the alpha-relaxation stretching exponent.

Bhaskar Sen Gupta; Shankar P. Das

2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER COLLEGE CATALOG YEAR: 2011-2012 NIU CATALOG: 2011-2012 DATE: JULY 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER COLLEGE CATALOG YEAR: 2011-2012 NIU CATALOG: 2011-2012 DATE: JULY 2011, GE HUM F2 902 133 NON-WESTERN ART EL F2 903N #12;WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER COLLEGE CATALOG YEAR: 2011 ACCOUNTING FOR FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS EL #12;WILLIAM RAINEY HARPER COLLEGE CATALOG YEAR: 2011-2012 NIU

Kostic, Milivoje M.

107

Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster, John McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad, William Turnbull and Steven White  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McDuffie, McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad William Turnbull, Steven White U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command Langley Air Force Base, Virginia The U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) facility energy team expertly managed a comprehensive program focused on project execution, facility optimization, and energy accounting for 16 installations. Their efforts led to an energy intensity reduction of 5.9 percent in FY 2012 as compared to the prior year, and saved $6.67 million in utility costs. The team spearheaded the award of 39 energy projects that will save an estimated $5.4 million annually. In addition, the team led projects to retro-commission 2.3 million square feet at 78 major facilities, repair energy management control systems, and provide training at 12 bases to save an additional 76.6 billion Btu.

108

William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William R. Wiley Environmental William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

109

Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Calibration of JohnsonWilliams and PMS ASSP Probes in a Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have provided calibrations and intercomparisons of the LAMP's cloud liquid water content probes (three JohnsonWilliams sensor heads and one PMS ASSP). The tunnel liquid water content was deduced with a rotating cyclinder ...

J. F. Gayet

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An Indigenous Thing: The Story of William Wurster and the Gregory Farmhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

200. 4. Kenneth Reid, "The Architect and the Flouse: W i l lthere. In the words of its architect, William Wurster, or "American Institute of Architects in 1929 and the $500 first

Gregory, Daniel P

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

NEW MIGRATIONS TO ISRAEL AND THE EMERGENCE OF A COSMOPOLITAN TEL AVIV DR. WILLIAM BERTHOMIERE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEW MIGRATIONS TO ISRAEL AND THE EMERGENCE OF A COSMOPOLITAN TEL AVIV BY DR. WILLIAM BERTHOMIERE AT THE CONFERENCE COSMOPOLITANISM & ANTHROPOLOGY ASA 2006 DIAMOND JUBILEE CONFERENCE - KEELE UNIVERSITY 10-13 APRIL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

114

Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams County, North Dakota...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

collaborated with Eagle Operating, Inc. to complete the test in the Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams County, North Dakota. The "huff-and-puff" EOR method consists of three...

115

William H. Miller, 1985 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

William H. Miller, 1985 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life...

116

William Robert Ware and the beginnings of architectural education in the United States, 1861-1881  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

William Robert Ware (1832- 1915) planned and directed the first collegiate program in architectural education i n the United States. He was educated in the liberal arts and civil engineering at Harvard University and ...

Chewning, John Andrew

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

FIA-12-0049- In the Matter of William B. Ray  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On October 1, 2012, OHA denied an Appeal filed by William B. Ray under the Freedom of Information and Privacy Act. Mr. Ray was appealing from a determination issued by the DOEs Oak Ridge Office ...

118

Calibrations of Johnson-Williams Liquid Water Content Meters in a High-Speed Icing Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind tunnel tests have provided calibrations and intercomparisons of 14 Johnson-Williams (JW) cloud liquid water content (LWC) measuring devices with 23 sensor heads from 10 research organizations. The absolute tunnel LWC was deduced using a ...

J. Walter Strapp; Robert S. Schemenauer

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The moment of William Ralph Emerson's Art Club in Boston's art culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis will analyze the architect William Ralph Emerson's (1833-1917) Boston Art Club building (1881-82) and its station within Boston and New York's art culture. Even though there has been considerable research on ...

Hoeffler, Michelle Leah

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

William Flynn William Ratcliff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hard drives, credit cards, VHS ? Transformers, generators ? Electric Motors ... Comprehensive testing ? Widespread distribution 19 Page 20. 20 ...

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Burnup verification measurements at U.S. Nuclear Facilities using the Fork system  

SciTech Connect

Burnup verification measurements have been performed using the Fork system at the Oconee Nuclear Station of Duke Power Company, and at Arkansas Nuclear One (Units 1 and 2), operated by Energy Operations, Inc. Passive neutron and gamma-ray measurements on individual spent fuel assemblies were correlated with the reactor records for burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment. The correlation generates an internal calibration for the system in the form of a power law determined by a least squares fit to the neutron data. The average deviation of the reactor burnup records from the calibration determined from the measurements is a measure of the random error in the burnup records. The observed average deviations ranged from 2.2% to 3.5% for assemblies at the three reactor sites, indicating a high degree of consistency in the reactor records. Anomalous measurements were also observed, but could be explained by the presence of neutron sources in the assemblies. The effectiveness of the Fork system for verification of reactor records is due to the sensitivity of the neutron yield to burnup, the self-calibration generated by a series of measurements, the redundancy provided by three independent detection systems, and the operational simplicity and flexibility of the design.

Ewing, R.I.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm II Facility Camp William Utah National Guard Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Camp William Utah National Guard Energy Purchaser Camp William Utah National Guard Location Riverton UT Coordinates 40.439852°, -111.919141° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.439852,"lon":-111.919141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Microsoft Word - Wolf Fork CX-Environ Clearance Memo-CX 021511.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sarah Branum Sarah Branum Project Manager, KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provide funds for the Blue Mountain Land Trust (BMLT) to purchase a conservation easement on the Wolf Fork property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1996-046-01, Reference Number BPA-005911. Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 9 North, Range 39 East, Section 11 T of the Dayton Quadrangle, in

128

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Waste management plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Plant Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain. The waste management plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the LEFPC remedial action. Most of the solid wastes will be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y- 12 facilities. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, along with possible low-level or mixed wastes (> 35 pCi/g). Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary and capable of being disposed of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant, except sanitary sewage.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Behavioral constraints on harlequin duck population recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I investigated the relationship between harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) behavior and lack of recovery from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska. (more)

[No author

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Why aren't pigeon guillemots in Prince William Sound, Alaska recovering from the Exxon Valdez oil spill?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba) is now the only species of marine bird in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska that is listed as "not recovering" (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Harlequin duck demography during winter in Prince William Sound, Alaska : effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill was a major perturbation of nearshore habitats of Prince William Sound, a wintering area for harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus). (more)

[No author

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker and Williams Co (NJ 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Baker and Company, Inc. Engelhard Industries, Baker Platinum Division NJ.13-8 NJ.13-1 Location: 113 Astor Street , Newark , New Jersey NJ.13-1 NJ.13-8 Evaluation Year: 1990 NJ.13-2 NJ.13-7 Site Operations: From 1943 through the mid-1950s, the facility processed spent catalyst (contaminated platinum) to recovery the platinum for the AEC. From the Mid-1950s to the early-1960s the facility conducted research and development on metal fabrication processes including rolling, drawing uranium metal metals continued recovery operations (uranium from scrap under AEC source material license). NJ.13-3

134

Edward William Larsen, 1994 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Edward William Larsen, 1994 Edward William Larsen, 1994 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov 1990's Edward William Larsen, 1994 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Nuclear Technology: For his profound impact on the analytic and numerical methods used to model the transport of particles and radiation in complex systems, with applications in diverse areas of nuclear technology ranging from nuclear weapons design to nuclear reactor safety

135

EA-1958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley 958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington EA-1958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with proposed future development on the South Federal Campus of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site, in Benton County, Washington. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multi-program U.S. Department of Energy-Office of Science (DOE-SC) national laboratory conducting research to meet DOE

136

OSTIblog Posts by Dr. William Watson | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

William Watson William Watson Dr. William Watson's picture Physicist Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity - ChemCam NASA/JPL-Caltech Published on Sep 12, 2012 How do you run chemical tests at a geologic site millions of miles away from you to see what the rocks and soil are made of? Curiosity's new instrument ChemCam, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is designed to determine how much light is emitted at each frequency by a geologic sample when it's heated by a laser beam. Since different materials have different light-emission patterns, measuring the patterns shows what materials emitted them. Slide presentations giving a general view of Los Alamos contributions to ChemCam: "Mechanical & System Engineering Challenges Associated with the Development of the ChemCam Instrument for the NASA Mars Science Laboratory"

137

William L. Russell, 1976 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

William L. Russell, 1976 William L. Russell, 1976 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: fermi.award@science.doe.gov 1970's William L. Russell, 1976 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Citation For his outstanding contributions during a long and distinguished career to the quantitative evaluation of the genetic effects of radiation in mammals which serve as a major scientific base for national and international standards for radiation protection of human populations; for his major contributions to the principles of genetic theory; and most recently, for

138

Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Andreas Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes As part of an ongoing effort to investigate the thermal regime of California basins, the USGS has measured heat flow in idle oil and gas wells throughout the state. (Details and references on the published data presented in this paper can be found in the USGS heat flow database for California online at http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/heatflow/. Major references are Sass et al., 1971, Lachenbruch and Sass, 1980, DeRito et al., 1988, and

139

FIA-12-0051 - In the Matter of William Berger | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - In the Matter of William Berger 1 - In the Matter of William Berger FIA-12-0051 - In the Matter of William Berger On October 9, 2012, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The Appellant filed an Appeal seeking information about an internal investigation conducted at Fort Chaffee, AR. In its Determination Letter, NNSA informed the Appellant that it neither confirmed nor denied the existence of any such records described in the request (Glomar response). Citing FOIA Exemption 6, the Authorizing Official stated in the Determination Letter that an official acknowledgement of an investigation or an acknowledgment of the existence

140

Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices, Volume 4, Appendix V-C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the the final verification run data package for pilot scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are data on volatiles, semivolatiles, and TCLP volatiles.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Diphenylsilylene Andrey G. Moiseev and William J. Leigh*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.05 M) and methanol (MeOH; 0.16 M) led to the formation of diphenylmethoxysilane (4, 69%), disilane 5 the photolysis. Three products were formed: 4, 5, and 1,1,1-triethyl-2,2-diphenyl- disilane (6), which

Leigh, William J.

142

Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of change he called ``creative evolution.'' Keywords: William Morris, H.G. Wells, G.B. Shaw, Malthus, August

Hale, Piers J.

143

Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah National Guard Wind Farm I Utah National Guard Wind Farm I Jump to: navigation, search Name Camp William Utah National Guard Wind Farm I Facility Camp William Utah National Guard Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Camp William Utah National Guard Energy Purchaser Camp William Utah National Guard Location Riverton UT Coordinates 40.439852°, -111.919141° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.439852,"lon":-111.919141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

AES Southland, Inc. and Williams Energy Marketing & Trading Company, 94 FERC 61,248 (2001).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Huntington Beach plant were designated as RMR units in the year 2000. The ISO was unable to dispatch Alamitos to the replacement service provided by Alamitos 5. The estimated average variable operating cost of the non-RMR units that Williams received approximately $10.85 million in additional revenue after costs, and including interest

Laughlin, Robert B.

147

Thermodynamic Bias in the Multimodel Mean Boreal Summer Monsoon* WILLIAM R. BOOS AND JOHN V. HURLEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Bias in the Multimodel Mean Boreal Summer Monsoon* WILLIAM R. BOOS AND JOHN V. HURLEY of boreal summer monsoons. The strongest bias lies over South Asia, where the upper-tropospheric temperature the monsoon thermal maximum, suppressing moist convection and cooling the upper troposphere. In a climate

148

Texas Engineering Experiment Station 1470 William D. Fitch Pkwy (MS-3579)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Engineering Experiment Station 1470 William D. Fitch Pkwy (MS-3579) College Station, TX 77845 and Information Resources for which an exception is needed Software Applications or Operating Systems (Texas Administrative Code §213.30) Web Sites (Texas Administrative Code §206.70) Telecommunications Products (Texas

149

SIAN MURPHY, WILL WILLIAMS, CHRISTINA AALTO, AND JASON BUCK Energy Efficiency in Boulder's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIAN MURPHY, WILL WILLIAMS, CHRISTINA AALTO, AND JASON BUCK Energy Efficiency in Boulder's Rental Residential energy use ~ 25% of U.S. energy consumption (EIA, 2009). Efficiency retrofits = `low-hanging fruit students to know the energy of efficiency of properties they will be renting"- Rob Hall #12;Barriers

Colorado at Boulder, University of

150

Book Review of Hydrogeophysics, by William Herkelrath Geofluids, Volume 6 Page 201 -May 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review of Hydrogeophysics, by William Herkelrath Geofluids, Volume 6 Page 201 - May 2006 doi century in incorporating geophysical measurements into subsurface hydrologic science. The book is based that the book is 523 pages long, it is understandable that the discussion is often limited. Many of the chapters

Hubbard, Susan

151

Appendix 18 Excerpt from Return to the River, Chatper 5 (Williams et al.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix 18 Excerpt from Return to the River, Chatper 5 (Williams et al. 2000) The pages; Meehan 1991; Rhodes et al. 1994). In this chapter, we summarize the major habitat requirements of various progressively lower densities of juvenile salmonids (Li et al. 1995b). Summer temperatures in most Columbia

152

WILLIAMS ET AL. VOL. 6 ' NO. 7 ' 61856196 ' 2012 www.acsnano.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on ALD-Modified SiO2 Aerogel Frameworks Vennesa O. Williams, Nak Cheon Jeong, Chaiya Prasittichai aerogels was fabricated on transparent conducting oxides for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). These templates were coated with ZnO via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to yield an electronically interconnected

153

A Pioneer in Tropical Meteorology: William Sharpe's Barbados Weather Journal, AprilAugust 1680  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first barometers in the Americas were provided by the Royal Society of London in 1677 to correspondents in the Caribbean Island of Barbados. Colonel William Sharpe of Barbados was the first person in the Americas to make daily observations of ...

M. Chenoweth; J. M. Vaquero; R. Garca-Herrera; D. Wheeler

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

FLINT 1.5.2: Fast Library for Number Theory William B. Hart and David Harvey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLINT 1.5.2: Fast Library for Number Theory William B. Hart and David Harvey April 8, 2010 Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Building and using FLINT 1 3 Test code 2 4 Reporting bugs 2 5 Example programs 2 6 FLINT macros 3 7 The fmpz poly module 3 7.1 Simple example

Stein, William

155

William L. Fisher The Energy and Earth Resources (EER) Graduate Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Welcome William L. Fisher Director The Energy and Earth Resources (EER) Graduate Program provides. Per- haps more than any other program in the United States, EER can help you gain knowledge across designed EER to meet a growing need in both the private sector and government for professionals who can

Lightsey, Glenn

156

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

Cochran, Brian

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Waste Management Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain upon completion of remediation activities. This effort will be conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for LEFPC as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) action. The Waste Management Plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the remedial action for the LEFPC Project Most of the solid wastes will be considered to be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y-12 facilities for those types of waste. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, and the possibility of low- level or mixed waste exists (greater than 35 pCi/g), although these are not expected. Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary in nature and which will be capable of being disposed 0214 of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM S. MAHARAY DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR AUDIT SERVICES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WILLIAM S. MAHARAY WILLIAM S. MAHARAY DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR AUDIT SERVICES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON D.C. BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT MANAGEMENT, ORGANIZATION AND PROCUREMENT COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 20,2007 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on issues associated with the FY 2005 and 2006 Audits of the Department of Energy's Financial Statements. Over the years, the Office of Inspector General has conducted and overseen a number of reviews of the accounting and financial operations of the Department. Our reviews related to the audits of the year-end financial statements have covered accounting information system issues, financial statement reporting, and

160

The Influence of Several Factors Controlling the Interactions between Prince William Sound, Alaska, and the Northern Gulf of Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interactions between the circulation of Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, and that of the continental shelf region of the northern Gulf of Alaska are studied numerically. The focus is on the flow structure at Hinchinbrook Entrance (HE) and ...

Inkweon Bang; Christopher N. K. Mooers

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company Jump to: navigation, search Name KST Coatings, A Business Unit of The Sherwin-Williams Company Address 101Prospect Ave NW Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44115 Sector Buildings, Efficiency Product Manufacturing Phone number 888-321-5665 Website http://kstcoatings.com Coordinates 41.4980731°, -81.6914371° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4980731,"lon":-81.6914371,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

162

South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners William Kuster, John McDuffie, Dennis Svalstad, William Turnbull, and Steven White  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McDu e, Dennis Svalstad McDu e, Dennis Svalstad William Turnbull, Steven White U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command Langley Air Force Base, Virginia The U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) facility energy team expertly managed a comprehensive program focused on project execution, facility optimization, and energy accounting for 16 installations. Their e orts led to an energy intensity reduction of 5.9 percent in FY 2012 as compared to the prior year, and saved $6.67 million in utility costs. The team spearheaded the award of 39 energy projects that will save an estimated $5.4 million annually. In addition, the team led projects to retro-commission 2.3 million square feet at 78 major facilities, repair energy management control systems, and provide training at 12 bases to save an additional 76.6 billion Btu.

164

Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Donald Hunsberger Wind Band Transcription of Ralph Vaughan Williams' Variations for Brass Band: Historical Profile, Performance Practice, Conducting Considerations, and Corrected Edition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The Donald Hunsberger Wind Band Transcription of Ralph Vaughan Williams' Variations for Brass Band: Historical Profile, Performance Practice, Conducting Considerations, and Corrected Edition Gary (more)

Brattin, Gary Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The meeting was called to order by Chairman William Martin at 8:59 a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Meeting April 29, 2010 L'Enfant Plaza Hotel Washington, D.C. Committee Members Participating John Ahearne Susan Ion (by telephone) Brew Barron Raymond Juzaitis Ashok Bhatnagar William Martin, Chair Dana Christensen Carl Paperiello Thomas Cochran Burton Richter Michael Corradini (by telephone) John Sackett Marvin Fertel Allen Sessoms Donald Hintz Neil Todreas Committee Members Absent None Other Participants: Keith S. Bradley, NEAMS Program Manager, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Nancy Carder, Medical University of South Carolina, NEAC Support Staff Shane Johnson, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Nuclear Energy, USDOE Alexander Larzelere, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fuel Cycle Management, Office

167

Prince William Sound disabled tanker towing study. Part 1. Evaluation of existing equipment, personnel and procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study has been undertaken by the Glosten Associates, Inc., to evaluate the existing capability for emergency towing at Prince William Sound and to examine alternatives that could enhance the escort and assist capabilities for disabled tankers within the waterway from the Alyeska Oil Terminal at the Port of Valdez to the Gulf of Alaska outside Hinchinbrook Entrance. Part 1, reported herein, is an objective evaluation by an experienced salvage towing master of the existing tugs, emergency towing equipment, towing practices, and discussion of alternative tug types.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

William Fisk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the Academy of Indoor Air Sciences, and he serves on the editorial board...

169

Kath Williams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

statestwo cities on sustainability policy development. My next assignment is to Argentina and possibly India, where my work for four years has been supported by USAID-AEP. I...

170

Kath Williams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Australia (councileducation development advisor); Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center (LEED-Existing Buildings pilot project): U.S. Green Building Council (case study development...

171

William Tschudi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leader of the High Tech and Indusctrial Systems Group. Bill currently leads LBNL's data center and cleanroom energy efficiency projects. Bill is a licensed mechanical engineer...

172

William Luecke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on high-temperature deformation models and standard test methods for structural ceramics, primarily silicon nitride, for gas turbine engines. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

William Osborn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Storrs, CT 2009. BS, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 2004. Contact. Phone: (301 ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

William Watts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for David Lorenzetti, and Tracy Thatcher. This Speaker's Seminars GE Nucleus for Residential Energy Use Education, Home Energy ManagementControl, Residential Energy Integration...

175

William Morrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in California, British Columbia, and the WECC, energy efficiency and demand side management policies, and residential and commercial electricity rate designs that...

176

William Johnston  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESnet4, to accommodate massive scientific data flows of petabytesyear from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN to several ESnet sites for storage and processing and then to...

177

Charles Williams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Federal Operations Group. He is Laboratory Lead for all Federal Energy Management Program activities at LBNL, and also directs the FEMP Finance Program...

178

Maureen Williams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electronics Manufacturing Initiative (iNEMI) Sn whisker projects and from ... 1 & 2 of the Lead Free Electronics Manhattan Project (LFMP), sponsored ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

William Ames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physics Graduation Date: 5/2009 Hometown: Fairfax, Virginia Project: I worked measuring contact resistances and electron mobility in graphene ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

William Bordass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bill Bordass Bill Bordass Principal & CEO, and Technical Director Usable Buildings Trust (UBT), UK bilbordass@aol.com This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Bill Bordass studies technical and energy performance of buildings and works closely with human factors specialists. He is a member of the Probe team, which since 1995 has undertaken UK government-supported post-occupancy studies of recent buildings and published them in Building Services, the Journal of CIBSE (the British equivalent of ASHRAE). Dr. Bill Bordass is a scientist who joined the multi-disciplinary designers RMJM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 2, Appendix V-A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains information concerning validation of analytical data for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain soils located at the Y-12 Plant site. This volume is an appendix of compiled data from this validation process.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Williams College Expedition: Jay M. Pasachoff, Bryce A. Babcock, William G. Wagner, Matthew Baldwin, Katherine DuPr, Marcus Freeman, Marek Demianski, and Paul Rosenthal, in collaboration with Alphya Nestorenko and Igor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Siberian 2008 Total Solar Eclipse Jay M. Pasachoff (Caltech & Williams College), Bryce A. Babcock, Marcus Schneider (Steward Obs., U. AZ) Abstract. We successfully observed the 1 August 2008 total solar eclipse from the rooftop observatory of the State University of Novosibirsk in Aka- demgorodok, Siberia

Schneider, Glenn

185

Observational Evaluation of a Convective Quasi-Equilibrium View of Monsoons JI NIE, WILLIAM R. BOOS, AND ZHIMING KUANG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observational Evaluation of a Convective Quasi-Equilibrium View of Monsoons JI NIE, WILLIAM R. BOOS been used to explain the location, intensity, and intraseasonal evolution of monsoons. This paper examines whether observations of the earth's regional monsoons are consistent with the assumption of QE

186

Canal Wave Oscillations from the I-84 Bridge Expansion in Boise, Idaho William Rahmeyer, Ph.D., P.E.*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canal Wave Oscillations from the I-84 Bridge Expansion in Boise, Idaho By William Rahmeyer, Ph-84 Bridge crossing of the New York Canal in Boise, Idaho have increased the number of bridge columns oscillations. #12;Rahmeyer, Clegg, Barfuss 2 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND As part of the Idaho Transportation

Rahmeyer, William J.

187

Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of Research and Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science William E. Johnston, ESnet Adviser and Senior Scientist Chin Guok, Evangelos Chaniotakis, Kevin Oberman, Eli Dart, Joe Metzger and Mike O'Conner, Core Engineering, Brian Tierney, Advanced Development, Mike Helm and Dhiva Muruganantham, Federated Trust Steve Cotter, Department Head wej@es.net, this talk is available at www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science TERENA Networking Conference 2009 2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet - the ESnet Mission * The Office of Science (SC) is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for US research programs in high-energy

188

AUTI.-IoR(s,: S. A. Colgate, Jean Audouze, and William A. Fowler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTI.-IoR(s,: S. A. Colgate, Jean Audouze, and AUTI.-IoR(s,: S. A. Colgate, Jean Audouze, and William A. Fowler SUBMITTED TO: 15th International C o s m i c Ray Conference P l o v d i v , Bulgaria - August 13-26, 1977 \ . NOTICE lhis report WPE prepared as an ac=xmnt of work sponsored by the United Stater Government. Neither the United States nor the United Stater Energy Rcwvch and Cevelopment Administration, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, rubmntracton o r thdr employees, makes any wmanty. ex;res or implied, o r asurns any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, eompletcneJs or usefulnea of any information, apparatus, product 01 process disclosed, or repreants that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. _ _ e By acceptance of this article for publication. the

189

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-07_Williams_Mobilization of High Yield Sludges.pptm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage, Mobilization, And Retrieval Of Storage, Mobilization, And Retrieval Of Very High Yield Strength Sludges EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Atlanta November 16-18 2010 Martin Williams Vice President Advanced Process Systems NuVision Engineering 184B Rolling Hill Rd Mooresville NC 28117 USA Print Close 2 Storage, Mobilization, and Retrieval of Very High Yield Strength Sludges Sellafield Site in the UK Magnox Storage Pond *Constructed in 1940's *Major D&D project Print Close 3 Storage, Mobilization, and Retrieval of Very High Yield Strength Sludges Magnox Sludge *Up to 1200m3 arising from the corrosion of magnesium alloy clad Magnox reactor fuel in storage primarily magnesium and uranium corrosion products *small percentage of un-corroded Magnox metal *fission and activation products and their corrosion products

190

An example of physical system with hyperbolic attractor of Smale - Williams type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple and transparent example of a non-autonomous flow system, with hyperbolic strange attractor is suggested. The system is constructed on a basis of two coupled van der Pol oscillators, the characteristic frequencies differ twice, and the parameters controlling generation in both oscillators undergo a slow periodic counter-phase variation in time. In terms of stroboscopic Poincar\\'{e} section, the respective four-dimensional mapping has a hyperbolic strange attractor of Smale - Williams type. Qualitative reasoning and quantitative data of numerical computations are presented and discussed, e.g. Lyapunov exponents and their parameter dependencies. A special test for hyperbolicity based on statistical analysis of distributions of angles between stable and unstable subspaces of a chaotic trajectory has been performed. Perspectives of further comparative studies of hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic chaotic dynamics in physical aspect are outlined.

Sergey P. Kuznetsov

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Use of benthic invertebrate community structure and the sediment quality triad to evaluate metal-contaminated sediment in the upper Clark Fork River, Montana  

SciTech Connect

The upper Clark Fork River, above Flathead River, is contaminated with large amounts of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn ores from past mining activities. The contaminated area extends from the Butte and Anaconda area to at least 230 km downstream to Milltown Reservoir. Both the upper Clark Fork River and Milltown Reservoir have been designated as US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites because of metal-contaminated bottom sediments. The authors evaluated the impacts of past mining activities on the Clark Fork River ecosystem using benthic invertebrate community assessment, residue chemistry, and toxicity testing. Oligochaeta and Chironomidae generally accounted for over 90% of the benthic invertebrate community in the soft sediment depositional areas. Taxa of Oligochaeta and Chironomidae were predominantly pollution tolerant. Higher numbers of Chironomidae genera were present at stations with higher concentrations of metals in sediment identified as toxic by the amphipod Hyalella azteca in 28-d exposures. Frequency of mouthpart deformities in genera of Chironomidae was low and did not correspond to concentrations of metals in sediment. Total abundance of organisms/m[sup 2] did not correspond to concentrations of metals in the sediment samples. Chemical analyses, laboratory toxicity tests, and benthic community evaluations all provide evidence of metal-induced degradation to aquatic communities in both the reservoir and the river. Using a weight-of-evidence approach--the Sediment Quality Triad--provided good concurrence among measures of benthic community structure, sediment chemistry, and laboratory toxicity.

Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Fairchild, J.F. (National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Midwest Science Center)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Investigation of increased mercury levels in the fisheries of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (Lefpc), Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is supporting remediation efforts on the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee by performing this study. MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) has performed a series of literature reviews and bench-scale testing to further evaluate the mercury problem in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) at Oak Ridge. The primary problem is that total mercury (HgT) levels in LEFPC water decrease, while HgT levels in sunfish muscle tissue increase, with distance away from the National Security Complex (NSC), despite extensive source control efforts at the facility and within downstream riparian zones. Furthermore, dissolved methylmercury (d-MeHg) levels increase downstream from the NSC, especially during warm weather and/or high flow events. MSE performed four test series that focused on conversion of aqueous phase elemental mercury (Hg deg. A) to methyl mercury (MeHg) by algal-bacterial bio-films (periphyton) present in the stream-bed of LEFPC. Small (mg/L) quantities of un-sulphured molasses and peptone were added to some of the Hinds Creek samples to stimulate initial bacterial growth. Other Hinds Creek samples either were dosed with glutaraldehyde to preclude microbial growth, or were wrapped in aluminum foil to preclude Hg photochemical redox effects. The bench-scale testing for Phase II was completed August 2006. The final reporting and the planning for Phase III testing are in progress. (authors)

Byrne-Kelly, D.; Cornish, J.; Hart, A. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., 200 Technology Way, Butte, MT (United States); Southworth, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sims, L. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Final report for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils  

SciTech Connect

IT Corporation (IT) was contracted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the effectiveness of thermal desorption as a remedial technology for removing mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain soil. Previous laboratory studies by Energy Systems suggested that this technology could reduce mercury to very low levels. This pilot-scale demonstration study was initiated to verify on an engineering scale the performance of thermal desorption. This report includes the details of the demonstration study, including descriptions of experimental equipment and procedures, test conditions, sampling and analysis, quality assurance (QA), detailed test results, and an engineering assessment of a conceptual full-scale treatment facility. The specific project tasks addressed in this report were performed between October 1993 and June 1994. These tasks include soil receipt, preparation, and characterization; prepilot (bench-scale) desorption tests; front-end materials handling tests; pilot tests; back-end materials handling tests; residuals treatment; and engineering scale-up assessment.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Postremediation monitoring program baseline assessment report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) and its floodplain are contaminated with mercury (Hg) from ongoing and historical releases from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. A remedial investigation and feasibility study of LEFPC resulted in the signing of a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 1995. In response to the ROD, soil contaminated with mercury above 400 mg/kg was removed from two sites in LEFPC and the floodplain during a recently completed remedial action (RA). The Postremediation Monitoring Program (PMP) outlined in the LEFPC Monitoring Plan was envisioned to occur in two phases: (1) a baseline assessment prior to remediation and (2) postremediation monitoring. The current report summarizes the results of the baseline assessment of soil, water, biota, and groundwater usage in LEFPC and its floodplain conducted in 1995 and 1996 by personnel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). This report also includes some 1997 data from contaminated sites that did not undergo remediation during the RA (i.e., sites where mercury is greater than 200 mg/kg but less than 400 mg/kg). The baseline assessment described in this document is distinct and separate from both the remedial investigation/feasibility study the confirmatory sampling conducted by SAIC during the RA. The purpose of the current assessment was to provide preremediation baseline data for the LEFPC PMP outlined in the LEFPC Monitoring Plan, using common approaches and techniques, as specified in that plan.

Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Ashwood, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Rash, C.D.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc. (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

F. Jerry Lucia

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cloud Liquid Water Measurements on the Armored T-28: Intercomparison between JohnsonWilliams Cloud Water Meter and CSIRO (King) Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between liquid water concentration (LWC) readings obtained from a JohnsonWilliams (JW) cloud water meter and a King (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) liquid water probe, both mounted on the ...

Rand E. Feind; Andrew G. Detwiler; Paul L. Smith

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

198

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

199

Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonaradian Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of this project was to evaluate the impact of fracture porosity on performance of the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir. The approach was to use subcritical crack (SCC) index measurements and a crack-growth simulator to model potential fracture geometries in this reservoir. The SCC index on representative rock samples and proceedings with other pertinent rock measurements were measured. An approach for modeling coupled matrix and fracture flow using nonneighbor connections in a traditional finite-difference simulator was tested and found to be feasible.

Philip, Zeno; Jennings, Jr., James W.

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the Project Rulison Horizon the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program to try stimulation natural gas in tight sandstone formations using a nuclear device. On 10 September 1969, a 40- nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31 March 2011 31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected: * 7 gas samples from 7 wells * 7 produced water samples from 6 wells and 1 drip tank; one well was dry Findings:

202

rulison_model.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and and its prede- cessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated the use of nuclear detonations to enhance production from low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. Project Rulison was the second of three Plowshare Program tests designed to stimulate the production of natural gas by detonating a nuclear device in a deep, low-permeability geologic formation. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of DOE, detonated a 43-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the Williams Fork Formation of the Mesaverde Group. The natural gas reservoirs of the Williams Fork Formation occur in low-permeability sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. A variety of radionuclides, primarily fission products, were generated as a result

203

Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A retrospective study of the chemical analysis cost for the remediation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A retrospective study of the remediation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee was completed. The study was conducted by reviewing the public Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act record documents associated with the remediation of LEFPC and through discussions with the project staff involved or familiar with the project. The remediation took place in two phases. The first phase involved the excavation of about 5,560 yd{sup 3} of soil at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) locations in 1996. The second phase involved the excavation of 39,200 yd{sup 3} at another NOAA location and at the Bruner location in 1997. For the entire project (remedial investigation through cleanup), a total of 7,708 samples (1 sample for each 5.8 yd{sup 3} of soil remediated) were analyzed for mercury. The project obtained special regulatory approval to use two methods for the determination of mercury in soils that are not part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act SW-846 methods manual. The mercury analysis cost was $678,000, which represents 9.6% of the cleanup cost. During the cleanup phase of the project, an on-site laboratory was used. The estimated cost savings that the on-site laboratory provided fall into two categories: direct reduction of costs associated with chemical analysis and sample shipment totaling approximately $38,000, which represents a 5.3% savings relative to the estimated cost of using an off-site laboratory, and savings in the amount of $890,000 (12.5% of the $7.1 M cleanup cost), associated with expediting execution of the cleanup work by providing rapid (< 3 hours) sample result turnaround time. The manner in which the analytical services were procured for the LEFPC project suggest that the development of new chemical analysis technology must address deployment, performance, regulatory, robustness, reliability, and business appropriateness factors if the technology is to be used in environmental remediation.

Klatt, L.N.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from the upper Clark Fork River, Montana, to aquatic invertebrates and fish in laboratory exposures  

SciTech Connect

Sediments of the upper Clark Fork River, from the Butte and Anaconda area to Milltown Reservoir (230 km downstream), are contaminated with As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn primarily from mining activities. The toxicity of pore water from these sediments was determined using Daphnia magna, rainbow trout, and Microtox[reg sign]. However, pore-water data from these exposures were questionable because of changes in the toxicity of pore-water samples after 5 to 7 d of storage. Whole-sediment tests were conducted with Hyalella azteca, Chironomus riparius, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) 21- to 28-d exposure and Daphnia magna. Sediment samples from Milltown Reservoir and the Clark Fork River were not generally lethal to test organisms. However, both reduced growth and delayed sexual maturation of amphipods were associated with exposure to elevated concentrations of metals in sediments from the reservoir and river. Relative sensitivity (most sensitive to least sensitive) of organisms in whole-sediment toxicity tests was: Hyalella azteca > Chironomus riparius > rainbow trout > Daphnia magna. Relative sensitivity (most sensitive to least sensitive) of the three end points evaluated with Hyalella azteca was: length > sexual maturation > survival. The lack of lethal effects on organisms may be related to temporal differences in sediment, acid-volatile sulfide, or organic carbon.

Kemble, N.E.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G. (National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Midwest Science Center); Monda, D.P. (Pyramid Lake Fisheries, Sutcliffe, NV (United States)); Woodward, D.F. (National Biological Survey, Jackson, WY (United States). Midwest Science Center)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

"1. William F Wyman","Petroleum","FPL Energy Wyman LLC",822  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "1. William F Wyman","Petroleum","FPL Energy Wyman LLC",822 "2. Westbrook Energy Center","Gas","Calpine Operating Services Company Inc",506 "3. Maine Independence Station","Gas","Casco Bay Energy Co LLC",490 "4. Rumford Power Associates","Gas","Rumford Power",254 "5. Verso Paper","Gas","Verso Bucksport LLC",250 "6. Androscoggin Energy Center","Gas","Verso Paper Androscoggin LLC",137 "7. Kibby Mountain Wind","Other Renewables","TransCanada Maine Wind Development Inc",132 "8. Great Lakes Hydro America - ME","Hydroelectric","Great Lakes Hydro America LLC",130

207

SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Microsoft Word - RUL_3Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_18Wells.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Results Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 13 July 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 18 gas wells sampled are within 1.1 miles of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison is the Plowshare Program code name for the detonation of a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device on 10 September 1969. The detonation point was 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. The purpose of the test

209

Microsoft Word - rul_rpt.09.20.2010  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The first section following this introduction describes data collected from new gas exploration wells drilled on Battlement Mesa regarding stratigraphy in the Williams Fork...

210

Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARADIAN AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Petrophysical heterogeneity in the South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCF) reservoir and other shallow-water platform carbonates in the Permian Basin and elsewhere is composed of a large-scale stratigraphically controlled component and a small-scale poorly correlated component. The large-scale variability exists as a flow-unit scale petrophysical layering that is laterally persistent at interwell scales and produces highly stratified reservoir behavior. Capturing the rate-enhancing effect of the small-scale variability requires carefully controlled averaging procedures at four levels of scaleup. Porosity can be easily scaled using arithmetic averaging procedures. Permeability, however, requires carefully controlled power-averaging procedures. Effective permeability is increased at every scaleup level.

James W. Jennings, Jr.; F. Jerry Lucia

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Remedial investigation work plan for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, located within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. The entire ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of CERCLA sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites under investigation require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) of potential remedial actions. The need to complete RIs in a timely manner resulted in the establishment of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Characterization Area (CA) and the Bear Creek CA. The CA approach considers the entire watershed and examines all appropriate media within it. The UEFPC CA, which includes the main Y-12 Plant area, is an operationally and hydrogeologically complex area that contains numerous contaminants and containment sources, as well as ongoing industrial and defense-related activities. The UEFPC CA also is the suspected point of origin for off-site groundwater and surface-water contamination. The UEFPC CA RI also will address a carbon-tetrachloride/chloroform-dominated groundwater plume that extends east of the DOE property line into Union Valley, which appears to be connected with springs in the valley. In addition, surface water in UEFPC to the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek CA boundary will be addressed. Through investigation of the entire watershed as one ``site,`` data gaps and contaminated areas will be identified and prioritized more efficiently than through separate investigations of many discrete units.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Hardware Wrapper for the SHA-3 Hash Brian Baldwin , Andrew Byrne, Liang Lu, Mark Hamilton , Neil Hanley , Maire O'Neill and William P.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Hardware Wrapper for the SHA-3 Hash Algorithms Brian Baldwin , Andrew Byrne, Liang Lu, Mark Hamilton , Neil Hanley , Maire O'Neill and William P. Marnane Claude Shannon Institute for Discrete hash algorithm (SHA-3) family. Federal Register, 72(212):66212­66220, November 2007. [5] Brian Baldwin

216

An Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez, Charles Sodini, and Joel L. Dawson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in a 0.18 m CMOS process, consists of a switched-capacitor DC-DCAn Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Abstract We present the first known energy management IC to allow low

Dawson, Joel

217

A Volcano Rekindled: The Renewed Eruption of Mount St. Helens, 20042006 Edited by David R. Sherrod, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, William E. Scott, and Peter H. Stauffer U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750, 2008 Chapter 12 1 U.S. Geological Survey, 1300 SE Cardinal Court, Vancouver, WA 98683 2 U.S. Geological Survey, PO Box by other researchers to correlate with repetitive, nearly periodic shallow earthquakes. Introduction Aerial

218

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: William Perry, Chair; Ralph Cicerone; John Deutch; Nicholas Donofrio; Michael  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Minutes of the Summary Minutes of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: William Perry, Chair; Ralph Cicerone; John Deutch; Nicholas Donofrio; Michael McQuade; Arthur Rosenfeld; Steven Westly; Dan Yergin Date and Time: 8:30 AM- 3:30 PM, January 31, 2012 Location: Department of Energy Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20585 Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board SEAB Staff: Alyssa Morrissey, Deputy Designated Federal Officer DOE Staff: Secretary Steven Chu; Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman; Renee Stone, Senior Advisor; Richard Kauffman, Senior Advisor; Ramamoorthy Ramesh, SunShot Director; Minh Le, Solar Energy Technologies Program Chief Engineer; Rachel

219

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of biochemist William D. Moss, conducted November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview with William D. Moss by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Mr. Moss was selected for this interview because of his work at Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning analytical methods in the chemical determination of plutonium in biological materials. After a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Moss relates his understanding of how occupational exposure limits were determined for the Manhattan Project, how data from those workers who were exposed to plutonium was collected and analyzed, how the experiments were planned and data was gathered from plutonium or polonium injections in man, how problems with analytical procedures compounded health physics aspects of the project, and problems remaining in the interpretation of these data.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vortex formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating deep optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of vortex nucleation and lattice formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating square optical lattice by numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Different dynamical regimes of vortex nucleation are found, depending on the depth and period of the optical lattice. We make an extensive comparison with the experiments by R. A. Williams et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 050404 (2010)], especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotation frequency for the first vortex nucleation and the vortex number as a function of rotation frequency.

Kato, Akira; Nakano, Yuki; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Matsui, Tetsuo [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Subtask 1.8 - Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation  

SciTech Connect

Given the importance of hydraulic fracturing and proppant performance for development of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations within the Williston Basin, a study was conducted to evaluate the key factors that may result in conductivity loss within the reservoirs. Various proppants and reservoir rock cores were exposed to several different fracturing and formation fluids at reservoir conditions. The hardness of the rock cores and the strength of the proppants were evaluated prior to and following fluid exposure. In addition, the conductivity of various proppants, as well as formation embedment and spalling, was evaluated at reservoir temperatures and pressures using actual reservoir rock cores. The results of this work suggest that certain fluids may affect both rock and proppant strength, and therefore, fluid exposure needs to be considered in the field. In addition, conductivity decreases within the Bakken Formation appear to be a function of a variety of factors, including proppant and rock strength, as well as formation embedment and spalling. The results of this study highlight the need for advanced conductivity testing, coupled with quantification of formation embedment and spalling. Given the importance of proppant performance on conductivity loss and, ultimately, oil recovery, better understanding the effects of these various factors on proppant and rock strength in the field is vital for more efficient production within unconventional oil and gas reservoirs.

Bethany Kurz; Darren Schmidt; Steven Smith Christopher Beddoe; Corey Lindeman; Blaise Mibeck

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effects of the Cabinet Gorge Kokanee Hatchery on Wintering Bald Eagles in the Lower Clark Fork River and Lake Pend, Oreille, Idaho: 1986 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The abundance and distribution of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on the lower Clark Fork River, Lake Pend Oreille, and the upper Pend Oreille River, Idaho, were documented during the winters of 1985--86 and 1986--87. Peak counts of bald eagles in weekly aerial censuses were higher in 1985--86 (274) and 1986--87 (429) than previously recorded in mid-winter surveys. Differences in eagle distribution within and between years were apparently responses to changes in prey availability. Eight bald eagles were captured and equipped with radio transmitters in the winter and spring of 1986. Residencies within the study area averaged 13.9 days in 1985--86 and 58.3 days for the four eagles that returned in 1986-87. The eagles exhibited considerable daily movement throughout the study area. After departing the area, one eagle was later sighted approximately 1185 km to the southwest in northern California. Eagle behavioral activity was recorded at time budget sessions at areas of heavy use. Perching in live trees was the most common behavior observed. 34 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs.

Crenshaw, John G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An aerial radiological survey of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Forked River, New Jersey. Date of survey: September 18--25, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant in Forked River, New Jersey, during the period September 18 through September 24, 1992. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) over a 26-square-mile (67-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power plant and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 4 and 10 microroentgens per hour and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system. A previous survey of the power plant was conducted in August 1969 during its initial startup phase. Exposure rates and radioactive isotopes revealed in both surveys were consistent and within normal terrestrial background levels.

Hopkins, H.A.; McCall, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope  

SciTech Connect

New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: 1993 groundwater quality data interpretations and proposed program modifications  

SciTech Connect

This Groundwater Quality Report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). The groundwater quality data are presented in Part 1 of the GWQR submitted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in February 1994 (HSW Environmental Consultants, Inc. 1994a). Groundwater quality data evaluated in this report were obtained at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste management facilities and underground storage tanks (USTS) located within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements and in accordance with DOE Orders and Energy Systems corporate policy. The annual GWQR for the East Fork Regime is completed in two parts. Part 1 consists primarily of data appendices and serves as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each CY under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. Part 2 (this report) contains an evaluation of the data with respect to regime-wide groundwater quality, presents the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describes changes in monitoring priorities, and presents planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis program for the following calendar year.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

BNL | William Horak  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the University of Illinois. He is an internationally recognized expert on energy issues and has served on numerous boards, committees, and panels, both in the U.S....

228

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuels in light, medium, and heavy-duty vehicles; the acquisition of vehicles with higher fuel economy, including hybrid vehicles; the sub- stitution of cars for light trucks; an...

229

Dr. William F. Mitchell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and PS Julienne, Effective-range Description of a Bose Gas Under Strong ... Tight-binding Wave Functions for Quantum Dots, Journal of Research of ...

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

William J. Keese Commissioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, October 2003, P100-03-014, pp. 141-142. 10 The Energy Commission also made a similar proposal in the CPUC's utilities and retail electricity suppliers. In the proposed process, the Energy Commission's information. This proposed planning, procurement, and monitoring process should result in improving electricity efficiency

231

William Forston, Author  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1996) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management, clean-up of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE Orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance extends only to those activities performed by SNL or under its direction. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized herein. This report is prepared for the DOE as required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988). PREFACE This report presents summary information on t...

Kirk-Mayer Inc Tonopah; Todd Culp; William Forston; Dianne Duncan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

William F. Guthrie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... BA degree in mathematics from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland ... Department of Energy Secretarial Honor Award, 2011; Department of ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

Abstract for William Newton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newton Newton Texas A&M University - Commerce The physics and observational consequences of the neutron star crust-core boundary layer A neutron star, of order 10km in radius, is believed to have a mostly solid outer layer, the crust, about 1km thick, and a fluid core comprising the remaining depth to the center. The theoretical study of the properties of matter at the boundary layer between crust and core is crucial to understanding certain observational phenomena such as pulsar glitches, quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray tails of SGR light curves, and potential gravitational waves from neutron star oscillation modes and deviations from axial symmetry from material accreted onto the surface. I will introduce the various ingredients to such studies: nuclei and exotic

234

William Hurley Managing Consultant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Arizona University System Optional Retirement Plan (ORP). We are sending you this letter to remind youTIAA-CREFandFidelityfortheORPtoreduceyourplancosts.VALICis no longer an active ORP vendor. · Increasedtheamountyoucantransferfromyour additional benefits to the ORP including

Wong, Pak Kin

235

Michael Williams University Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Payroll Specialist Processing/Garnish Rhonda Reynolds 51160 Accounting Specialist Benefit Refunds Voncille

McQuade, D. Tyler

236

Michael Williams University Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas 60018 Accounting Specialist Processing/Garnish Rhonda Reynolds 51160 Accounting Specialist Benefit

Weston, Ken

237

William J. Behrens | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Society, Washington, DC. October, 1995. Ashjian, C.J., Smith, S.L., Flagg, C.N., Mariano, A.J., Behrens, W.J., and Lane, P. The influence of a Gulf Stream meander on the...

238

William F. Guthrie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... GC Turk, JL Mann, WR Kelly, WF Guthrie (2001) An Alternative Method for the Certification of S Mass Fraction in Coal Standard Reference ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

239

William Bryan, OE-30  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Mr. Bryan is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE...

240

William VanSchalkwyk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... VanSchalkwyk has extensive environmental management experience, is a certified safety professional and certified hazardous materials manager. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dr. William M. Healy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

William J. Boettinger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... He co-chaired the 1994 Physical Metallurgy Gordon Research Conference with JH Perepezko. ... 1974 - 2012: Metallurgy Division, NIST. ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

William M. (Mickey) Haynes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MML). Mickey has been the Editor-in-Chief of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics since 2010 (91st edition). He ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

William M. Smith  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smith COO Infotility, Inc. wmsmith@epri.com This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise...

245

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tuning Forks for Vibrant Teaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average student cannot distinguish between galvanized steel and stainless steel, between aluminum and tin, or between gold and polished brass. With the...

247

91AJULY/AUGUST 2011--VOL. 66, NO. 4JOURNAL OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION Mark Rickenbach, Lisa A. Schulte, David B. Kittredge, William G. Labich, and Doug J. Shinneman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and a policy analyst for Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham, Massachusetts. William G. Labich on this manuscript were the result of a working meeting at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts of Massachusetts. Petersham, MA: Harvard Forest paper. http:// www.wildlandsandwoodlands.org. Gass, R.J., M

Moore, Lisa Schulte

248

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: William Perry, Chair; Nicholas Donofrio, Co-Chair; Michael McQuade;  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: William Perry, Chair; Nicholas Donofrio, Co-Chair; Michael McQuade; Arthur Rosenfeld; Steven Westly Date and Time: 9:00 AM- 3:30 PM, April 17, 2012 Location: Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont, IL 60439 Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board SEAB Staff: Alyssa Morrissey, Deputy Designated Federal Officer DOE Staff: Secretary Steven Chu; Renee Stone, Senior Advisor Argonne Staff: Eric Isaacs, Director of Argonne National Laboratory; Peter Littlewood, Associate Laboratory Director; Don Hillebrand, Energy Systems Interim Director; Ian Foster, Computation Institute Director; Mark Peters,

249

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Description Description These high-performance homes in northern Florida are two that have achieved Home Energy Rating System (HERS) ratings of less than zero since Building America (BA) builders started building them in 2010. The homes (TW1 and TW2) were built in the Gainesville area by Tommy Williams Homes (TW), with technical assistance from Florida H.E.R.O. and energy-efficient home design input provided by Energy Smart Home Plans. The homes are being metered by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as part of BA efforts to collect data that characterize the performance of the homes and verify that the solar photovoltaic (PV) system used in their design produces more energy than these all-electric homes require, as the HERS rating of <0 implies.

250

Testimony by J. William Currie, Ph.D Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs Washington D.C.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of the testimony by J. William Currie, Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, Washington, DC on February 18, 1992. He states ``It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to talk with this distinguished committee about energy conservation technologies and policies, especially as they relate to federal energy use and the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies. Clearly, using energy more efficiently offers the potential for tremendous cost savings and environmental benefits in the United States and throughout the rest of the world. The challenge, especially with regard to the federal sector, is to lay the foundation for ensuring that the citizens of our nation realize the maximum savings and environmental benefit over the long run. This is the primary focus of my comments today.``

Currie, J.W.

1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Testimony by J. William Currie, Ph. D Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs Washington D. C  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of the testimony by J. William Currie, Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, Washington, DC on February 18, 1992. He states It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to talk with this distinguished committee about energy conservation technologies and policies, especially as they relate to federal energy use and the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies. Clearly, using energy more efficiently offers the potential for tremendous cost savings and environmental benefits in the United States and throughout the rest of the world. The challenge, especially with regard to the federal sector, is to lay the foundation for ensuring that the citizens of our nation realize the maximum savings and environmental benefit over the long run. This is the primary focus of my comments today.''

Currie, J.W.

1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Health physicist William J. Bair, Ph.D., October 14, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview of William J. Blair by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Blair was selected for this interview because of of his participation in the University of Rochester Atomic Energy Project and for his radiological inhalation research at Hanford Site. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Blair discusses his remembrances on a wide rage of topics. Discussions include his graduate studies at Rochester University, use of human subjects at Rochester, his inhalation studies, his limited involvement with human studies, differing biological effects of plutonium 238 and 239, emissions from proposed nuclear-propelled aircraft, cancer research, cleanup at Nevada Test Site and Marshall Islands, impact of Langham studies to understand Plutonium exposure, and AEC controversies and colleagues.

Harrell, D.; Shindledecker, C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FC26-08NT43291 FC26-08NT43291 University of North Dakota EERC FE SCNGO FY12/ 14.5 months William Fincham Grand Forks, North Dakota Demo. of Gas-Powered Drilling Operations for Econo. Challenged Wellhead Gas & Eval. of Comp. Platforms Demonstrate the utilization of wellhead gas in the Bakken formation of North Dakota for powering drilling operations. Subtask 1.9. William Fincham Digitally signed by William Fincham DN: cn=William Fincham, o=NETL / DOE, ou=SCNGO, email=william.fincham@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2011.12.14 09:51:57 -05'00' 12 14 2011 Fred E. Pozzuto Digitally signed by Fred E. Pozzuto DN: cn=Fred E. Pozzuto, o=USDOE, ou=NETL-Office of Project Facilitation and Compliance, email=fred.pozzuto@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I am approving this document Date: 2011.12.29 14:10:06 -05'00'

255

Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level ...

Michael T. Montgomery; Brian F. Farrell

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 200 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

257

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

258

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

259

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

260

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A high resolution geophysical investigation of spatial sedimentary processes in a paraglacial turbid outwash fjord: Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simpson Bay is a turbid, outwash fjord located in northeastern Prince William Sound, Alaska. A high ratio of watershead:basin surface area combined with high precipitation and an easily erodable catchment create high sediment inputs. Fresh water from heavy precipitation and meltwater from high alpine glaciers enter Simpson Bay through bay head rivers and small shoreline creeks that drain the catchment. Side scan sonar, seismic profiling, and high resolution bathymetry were used to investigate the record of modern sedimentary processes. Four bottom types and two seismic faces were described to delineate the distribution of sediment types and sedimentary processes in Simpson Bay. Sonar images showed areas of high backscatter (coarse grain sediment, bedrock outcrops and shorelines) in shallow areas and areas of low backscatter (estuarine mud) in deeper areas. Seismic profiles showed that high backscatter areas reflected emergent glacial surfaces while low backscatter areas indicated modern estuarine mud deposition. The data show terminal morainal bank systems and grounding line deposits at the mouth of the bay and rocky promontories, relict medial moraines, that extend as terrestrial features through the subtidal and into deeper waters. Tidal currents and mass wasting are the major influences on sediment distribution. Hydrographic data showed high spatial variability in surface and bottom currents throughout the bay. Bottom currents are tide dominated, and are generally weak (5-20 cm s-1) in the open water portions of the bay while faster currents are found associated with shorelines, outcrops, and restrictive sills. Tidal currents alone are not enough to cause the lack of estuarine mud deposition in shallow areas. Bathymetric data showed steep slopes throughout the bay suggesting sediment gravity flows. Central Alaska is a seismically active area, and earthquakes are most likely the triggering mechanism of the gravity flows.

Noll, Christian John, IV

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

William Lloyd Bircher Dissertation Committee for William Lloyd Bircher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................. 113 Figure 6.4 Varying OS P-state Transition Rates........................................................... 32 3.4.2 Active Power Management: P-states .......................................................... 33 3.4.3 Idle Power Management: C-states

John, Lizy Kurian

266

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Photo Identification, Summer Activity Pattern, Estimated Field Metabolic Rate and Territory Quality of Adult Male Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris) in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes a portion of a long-term study of the behavioral ecology of sea otters. Sub-studies of this project include the development of an individual recognition program for sea otters, the construction of male sea otter activity and energy budgets, and the assessment of male sea otter territory quality. The Sea Otter Nose Matching Program, or "SONMaP", was developed to identify individual sea otters in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska, using a blotch-pattern recognition algorithm based on the shape and location of nose scars. The performance of the SONMaP program was tested using images of otters collected during the 2002-03 field seasons, and previously matched by visually comparing every image in a catalog of 1,638 animals. In 48.9% of the visually matched images, the program accurately selected the correct image in the first 10% of the catalog. Individual follows and instantaneous sampling were used during the summers of 2004-06, to observe male sea otter behavior. Six behaviors (foraging, grooming, interacting with other otters, patrolling, resting, and surface swimming) were observed during four time periods (dawn, day, dusk, night) to create 24-hr activity budgets. Male sea otters spent 27% of their time resting, 26% swimming, 19% grooming, 14% foraging, 9% patrolling and 5% interacting with other otters. Field Metabolic Rate (FMR) was estimated by combining the energetic costs for foraging, grooming, resting, and swimming behaviors of captive otters from Yeates et al. (2007) with these activity budgets. "Swimming" accounted for the greatest percentage (43%) of energy expended each day followed by grooming (23%), resting (15%), feeding (13%) and other (5%). With a peak summer sea otter density of 5.6 otters km-2, the low percentage of time spent foraging indicates that Simpson Bay is below equilibrium density. Territory quality was assessed for male sea otters using four attributes: territory size, shoreline enclosure, accessibility, and number of females observed feeding in each territory. Each attribute was coded with a score of 0-2, and total quality scores ranged from 0.14-1.96 (0.9 + 0.61 SD). High quality territories had large areas, moderate shoreline enclosure, high accessibility, and many foraging females.

Finerty, Shannon E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Tommy Williams | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now...

269

William Perry | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

includes serving as a laboratory director for General Telephone and Electronics (1954-1964); founder and president of ESL Inc. (1964-1977); executive vice-president of...

270

Grid Architecture William E. Johnston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·numerical grid generators ·etc. Apache Tomcat&WebSphere &Cold Fusion=JVM + servlet instantiation + routing

271

Increased gyrification in Williams syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetics82: 49­51. Ono M, Kubic S, Abernathy C. (1990)Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci. New York: Thieme Medical

272

NREL: Energy Analysis - William Wallace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selected publications Wallace, W.; Wang, Z. (2006). "Solar Energy in China: Development Trends for Solar Water Heaters and Photovoltaics in the Urban Environment," Bulletin of...

273

Abstract for William Raphael Hix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to match the most fundamental observable property, an explosion with roughly 1044 J of kinetic energy. Weaknesses in the current generation of models include inadequate tracking of...

274

Travis Williams | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

superconductors and heavy-fermion systems. Travis has extensive experience with single crystal growth of such materials as URu2Si2 and has employed a wide range of...

275

Curriculum Vitae William Bruce Hart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maintain the FLINT number theory library and MPIR, a library for multiple precision arithmetic. I am also Talk: FLINT : Fast Library for Number Theory ­ Sage Days 15, University of Washington 2009 Invited Talk On short division; FLINT: a status report

Stein, William

276

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Self-formation in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external formation of integrated circuits based on lithographic processes is not the only possible method for manufacturing electron devices, either integrated circuits or photovoltaic cells. Planar technology, based on external formation, requires ... Keywords: Artificial Systems, Development, Microelectronics, Reproduction, Self-Formation

Stepas Januonis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Optimal reorganization of agent formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we address the problem of determining how a structured formation of autonomous undistinguishable agents can be reorganized into another, eventually non-rigid, formation based on changes in the environment, perhaps unforeseeable. The methodology ... Keywords: combinatorial optimization, dynamic programming, formation reorganization

Dalila B. M. M. Fontes; Fernando A. C. C. Fontes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NIST 'Quantum Tuning Forks' Demonstrate Directly Coupling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for quantum simulations, which may help explain the mechanisms of complex quantum systems such as high-temperature superconductors. ...

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Market Structure Across Retail Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study how market structure within a product category varies across retail formats. Building on the literature on internal market structure, we estimate a joint store and brand choice model where the loading matrix of brand attributes are allowed to ... Keywords: brand maps, heterogeniety, market structure, retail formats

Karsten Hansen; Vishal Singh

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

283

Microsoft Word - 3Q2012_Samp_Results.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Third Quarter 2012 Third Quarter 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: September 20, 2012 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down, then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

284

Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: June 12, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterwards, the site was shut down, then remediated and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

285

Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2012_GasPW_Samp_Results_19June2012.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Second Quarter 2012 Second Quarter 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 19 June 2012 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low permeability formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterwards, the site was shut down, then remediated and the emplacement well (R-E) and reentry well (R-Ex) plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

286

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

287

Microsoft Word - 4Q2012_Gas PW_Samp_Results.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Results for Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells near Project Rulison Fourth Quarter 2012 and First Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: January 10, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program test to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep and low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged.

288

Mechanisms of Banner Cloud Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Banner clouds are clouds in the lee of steep mountains or sharp ridges. Their formation has previously been hypothesized as due to three different mechanisms: (i) vertical uplift in a lee vortex (which has a horizontal axis), (ii) adiabatic ...

Matthias Voigt; Volkmar Wirth

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hail Formation via Microphysical Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that alternation of low-density riming and wet growth processes play a role in hailstone formation. Such alternation of growth processes, which has been called microphysical recycling, is envisioned to operate in the following ...

John C. Pflaum

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

From the Office Document Format Battlefield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two most common XML-based formats for office application suites are now international standards. Unfortunately, the Open Document Format and Office Open XML are similar but imperfectly compatible. Keywords: ODF, OOXML, XML, document format, office application

Jirka Kosek

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams

293

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

rulison.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rulison Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north flank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, about 12 miles southwest of the town of Rifle and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the fine-grained, low-permeability sandstone of the Williams Fork Formation. This was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Austral Oil Company of Houston, Texas, and the nuclear engineering firm CER Geonuclear Corporation of Las Vegas, Nevada, proposed the project. Those two firms and AEC jointly

295

rulison.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north flank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, about 12 miles southwest of the town of Rifle and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the fine-grained, low-permeability sandstone of the Williams Fork Formation. This was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Austral Oil Company of Houston, Texas, and the nuclear engineering firm CER

296

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

298

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

299

Minimizing the formation of coke and methane on Co nanoparticles in steam reforming of biomass-derived oxygenates  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental understanding and control of chemical transformations are essential to the development of technically feasible and economically viable catalytic processes for efficient conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach, we report high hydrogen selectivity and catalyst durability of acetone steam reforming (ASR) on inert carbon supported Co nanoparticles. The observed catalytic performance is further elucidated on the basis of comprehensive first-principles calculations. Instead of being considered as an undesired intermediate prone for catalyst deactivation during bioethanol steam reforming (ESR), acetone is suggested as a key and desired intermediate in proposed two-stage ESR process that leads to high hydrogen selectivity and low methane formation on Co-based catalysts. The significance of the present work also sheds a light on controlling the chemical transformations of key intermediates in biomass conversion such as ketones. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) project of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Computing time was granted by the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL, and sponsored by the U.S. DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

Sun, Junming; Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice-Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The effects of flow rate, mineral dissolution rate and geometrical properties of the fracture were investigated, and the optimal conditions for wormhole formation determined.

Szymczak, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

305

The Formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution global model forecast of the formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979 is analyzed by means of several diagnostic computations on the model's output history. The formation is addressed from an analysis of limited-area energetics ...

T. N. Krishnamurthi; H. S. Bedi; Darlene Oosterhof; Vivek Hardiker

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Western North Pacific Monsoon Depression Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively few studies have been carried out as to the conditions leading to the formation of monsoon depressions in the western North Pacific. Two monsoon depression formations during July 2007 were analyzed using ECMWF analyses and satellite ...

Jodi C. Beattie; Russell L. Elsberry

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Negative ion formation processes: A general review  

SciTech Connect

The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.

Alton, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Unifying biological image formats with HDF5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biosciences need an image format capable of high performance and long-term maintenance. Is HDF5 the answer?

Matthew T. Dougherty; Michael J. Folk; Erez Zadok; Herbert J. Bernstein; Frances C. Bernstein; Kevin W. Eliceiri; Werner Benger; Christoph Best

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A metrics framework for evaluating group formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many approaches to learning and teaching rely upon students working in groups. So far, many Computer-Supported Group Formation systems have been designed to facilitate the formation of optimal groups in learning. However, evaluating the quality of automated ... Keywords: efficiency, group formation, optimization

Asma Ounnas; David E. Millard; Hugh C. Davis

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

315

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NETL: News Release -Website Provides Data for Key Oil Play in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Mineral Resources. Additional well completion data is planned for future release. Unconventional oil sources such as the Bakken and Three Forks Formations represent a...

317

Annual Logging Symposium, June 19-23, 2010 Formation Evaluation in the Bakken Complex Using Laboratory Core Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

complex include the Middle Bakken dolomitic sand/siltstone and the Three Forks dolomite. The Upper basin (Energy Information Administration, 2006). The tight Mississippian age Lodgepole Limestone fine sand). Some of the samples were found to contain fractures. Fig. 8 Ternary diagram of sandstone

318

Shift Gray Codes Aaron Michael Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'" ""_ ,-:...... . ~ ....,,COOllS 00. w.h pubbc .ccessI """ "'.-De(klength Tower He'llhl Design Lovo l

Williams, Aaron

319

William M. Hoge Abrams, Gen. Creighton: 155,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 236, 240-241 Atchafalaya floodway: 58, 59 Atomic bombs: 160 Attu Island: 162 Australian troops: 174 B: 162 E Education of officers: 31-32, 43-47 Efficiency reports: 231-232 Eisenhower, General of the Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

320

Photovoltaic Installations at Williams College Ruth Aronoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thumb that 10 Watts of power fit into every square foot of roof space (or 0.1 square meters). This means of the total array, panels cost between $7.50 and $10 per Watt of power installed; smaller systems cost slightly more to install per Watt, while larger systems cost less since they are bought in bulk

Aalberts, Daniel P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Recipient: 2002 William Hume-Rothery Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This collaboration led to more correspondence, which is recounted in N. Saunders and A.P. Miodownik CALPHAD Pergamon/ Elsevier (1998) pp. 9-15. We were...

322

The Williams Parents Fund Committee thanks these  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Joanne Farrell Ms. Suzanne Farver Mr. & Mrs. Mahamed A. Fayad Mr. & Mrs. Mark S. Ferber Mr. & Mrs. David

Aalberts, Daniel P.

323

Williams, Ronald L From: Scalingi, Paula  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scalingi, Paula Scalingi, Paula Sent: Monday, March 12. 2001 10:47 AM To: Anderson, Margot Subject Policy Options for Infrastructure Goals Margot, Cheers, Paula -Original Message From: Anderson, Margot Sent: Friday, March 09, 2001 11:58 AM To: Scalingi, Paula Subject: RE: NEP goals Paula. Sent out earlier. No big deal on the deadline - would like to have your policy ideas by Monday (we have a WH deadline by Wednesday). 111 edit the goals using the input I got from you this a.m. Dont feel you have to dot every i - a solid paragraph for each program or policy idea will be enough for this first round. I'll compile what I get and send around in advance of a Monday afternoon meeting. I have a feeling this could go on for a week or two until WH decides what they want to go forward with.

324

William Charlis MBADINGA LES POURPARLERS DE PAIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suppléments, 1903- 1978. RIB R.G. Collingwood et R.P. Wright, The Roman Inscriptions of Britain, Oxford, puis

325

Williams, Ronald L From: Kelliher. Joseph  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

prod- Very-low-sulfur diesel products have been available ucts comes from the crude oil processed by the refinery commercially in some European countries and in Cali-...

326

Updated 2-13 William G. Melton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Command. His next assignment was as the Deputy AC/S, G-2, III Marine Expeditionary Force in Okinawa, Japan

327

The Complex Chemistry of William H. Green  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population (billions) Global Energy Demand (1971-2030) 1750-2050 #12;Electricity: Coal, Nuclear? · 20th Century View: ­ Complex reacting mixtures are too hard to model... ­ ...so do many pilot plant us to handle complexity. ­ Quantum chemistry allows us to predict kinetic parameters. ­ To cost

Barton, Paul I.

328

Recipient: 2009 William Hume-Rothery Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biography: John H. Perepezko is a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his...

329

IsoRay Medical William A. Cavanagh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiences that inserting radioactive materials into tumors revealed that radiation caused cancers to shrink-131 Implant - Constructed and tested several phantom models with direct dose measurement - Issued "proof of concept" report to potential development partner Cianna Medical - Outpatient model #12;Iso

330

Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of incandescent light bulbs that progressively brighten in response to a bicycler's physical effort. By...

331

Table of Contents FOREWORD: WILLIAM H. DANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

332

Publications by Dylan Williams (Topic Based)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Verification; Planar Transmission Line Characterization; Multiconductor Transmission Lines; Electronic Packaging Characterization; ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Recipient: 2001 William Hume-Rothery Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He has held visiting positions at Oakridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Institute Laue-Langevan, University of Toronto, and Technical...

334

William David (Dave) Pointer receives Landis Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

335

WILLIAM D. PHILLIPS ELECTED TO NATIONAL ACADEMY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Fellow since 1996, is internationally known for advancing basic knowledge and ... Bureau of Standards) in 1978 to work in the Electricity Division ...

336

William M. Hoge Acronyms and Abbreviations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANOL . . . . . . . Canada Oil CCA . . . . . . . . Combat Command A CCB . . . . . . . . . Combat Command

US Army Corps of Engineers

337

Dr. William V. (Vance) Payne, II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... His refrigerant work included examining natural refrigerants such as propane and iso-butane (hydrocarbons) as well as carbon dioxide (CO2). ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

338

William F. (Rick) Brandes 8075 Leehaven Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hazardous priority chemicals from commerce through voluntary reduction efforts. In addition, #12;the branch million pounds of lead from the environment. Mr. Brandes additionally championed the integration of environmental endpoints into the existing system of Lean Manufacturing principles. This action was recognized

339

Michael Williams | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

340

William Tang | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NIST: Physical Measurement Laboratory - William R. Ott  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... space experiments, from the first Skylab measurements of solar radiation to ... the Physics Laboratory's development of measurement methods and ...

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

WILLIAM HUME-ROTHERY AWARD LECTURE: Thermodynamics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hume-Rothery Symposium Thermodynamics and Diffusion ... (1997) the common assumption of a linear progression from basic research (science),...

343

William S. Cortright Annie and Robert Mitchell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cahall, Jr. Dorothy and Leicester Lancaster Ralph J. McMillan Dorothy and Thomas Robinson Harry L. Rust George M. Rust Geraldine and Irving Schaffer Grace and James H. Schnabel Bernice and Francis Shannon. Murray Rust, Jr. Julia and J. Edward Tyler, III 1935 Leonor and Cornelius Ackerson Rachel and Curtis

Napier, Terrence

344

William G. Billotte, Program Manager, Counterterrorism And ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Counterterrorism And Response Technologies (CART) program ... Biological Radiation Nuclear and Explosive (CBRNE) technology needs ...

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

346

Minimizing formation damage during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well. The method comprises: filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; perforating the casing; and introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

ICE 62755 Standard N42 Data Format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEC 62755 Standard N42 Data Format. Summary: The purpose ... The structure of the data is described by an XML schema. The schema ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

result formats | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

result formats Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google...

350

Simplified Electrode Formation using Stabilized Lithium Metal ...  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers led by Gao Liu has developed a doping process for lithium ion battery electrode formation that can boost a cells ...

351

Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses ... copper have been treated in hydrogen atmospheres to form nanocrystals imbedded in a glassy matrix.

352

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

Simultaneous Planet and Sun Formation Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simultaneous Planet and Sun Formation Evidence Name: Christie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: SC Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What specific evidence indicates...

354

TMS Proceedings Manuscript Instructions: One-Column Format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ENERGY INITIATIVES KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE CENTER MATERIALS ... Formatting Guide (PDF) This file contains basic formatting instructions for...

355

Deep Space Formation Flying Spacecraft Path Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient algorithms for collision-free energy sub-optimal path planning for formations of spacecraft flying in deep space are presented. The idea is to introduce a set of way-points through which the spacecraft are required to pass, combined with ... Keywords: formation flying spacecraft, path planning for multiple mobile robot systems, trajectory generation

Cornel Sultan; Sanjeev Seereram; Raman K. Mehra

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Concept formation using incremental Gaussian mixture models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new algorithm for incremental concept formation based on a Bayesian framework. The algorithm, called IGMM (for Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model), uses a probabilistic approach for modeling the environment, and so, it can rely ... Keywords: Bayesian methods, EM algorithm, clustering, concept formation, finite mixtures, incremental learning, unsupervised learning

Paulo Martins Engel; Milton Roberto Heinen

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2010 Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation SPE 139032 S.Zargari, S Bakken Formation is comprised of 3 Members: · Upper Shale Member­ Source & Seal · Middle "Siltstone" Member­ Reservoir & Migration Conduit · Lower Shale Member- Source & Seal #12;July 2010 Reservoir

Mohaghegh, Shahab

359

I/O Formats at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I/O Formats I/O Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like a directory tree, with subdirectories, and leaf nodes that contain the actual data. This means that data can be found in a file by referring to its name, rather than its location in the file. NetCDF is a file format and support library developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

360

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

362

Density Functional Theory Study of Surface Carbonate Formation on BaO(001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Periodic density functional theory calculations have been used to study the formation and stability of surface carbonate on BaO(001) upon CO2 exposures. CO2 adsorbs at Lewis basic Os site forming anionic surface carbonate ( ) species until one monolayer coverage (1ML). Certain amount of electrons has been transferred from the surface to CO2 after CO2 adsorption. The adsorption energy of CO2 decreases with the increasing coverage as a combinative result of the less electrons accepted by each adsorbed CO2 and the lateral repulsive interactions. At ?CO2 0.75 ML, dramatic surface reconstruction had been found for the parallel pattern of surface carbonates that initially arranged on BaO(001). Due to strong lateral repulsion between the surface carbonates, the surface reconstruction actually pulls the surface Ba atom out of the surface plane, suggesting a possible onset of phase transition from surface carbonate overlayer to crystalline bulk-like barium carbonate. Surface free energy calculations have been performed to study the stability of surface carbonate at different temperature and pressure conditions. Our calculations indicate that surface carbonates decompose at 850 K at low coverage. For the fully covered carbonate overlayer, surface carbonate will become unstable at about 600 K. This is in good agreement with previous experimental observations. Finally, the effect of surface hydroxyl on the stability of surface carbonate is investigated. At low hydroxyl coverage, the neighboring hydroxyl stabilizes surface carbonate. On the fully hydroxylated BaO surface, the chelating bicarbonate instead of surface carbonate is formed upon CO2 adsorption. This work, performed in the Institute for Interfacial Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was partially supported by a PNNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. Computing time was granted by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) under project No. m752, and also by the scientific user project (st30469) using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL is a U.S. DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL, and supported by the DOEs Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

Mei, Donghai

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

From design experiments to formative interventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion of design experiments has largely ignored the Vygotskian tradition of formative interventions based on the principle of double stimulation. This tradition offers a radical approach to learning reasearch which focuses on the agency of the ...

Yrj Engestrm

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

366

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermodynamic Aspects of Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic aspects of tropical cyclone (TC) formation near the center of the wave pouch, a region of approximately closed Lagrangian circulation within the wave critical layer, are examined through diagnoses of a high-resolution numerical ...

Zhuo Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Eddy Formation in 2-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, contour dynamical model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which the ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation Formation during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an...

371

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Does Format of Pricing Contract Matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working Paper No. XL05-002 Does Format of Pricing Contractquantity discount contract does not include a fixed fee andtariff. Also, division equivalence does not hold because the

Ho, Teck H; Zhang, Juanjuan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Predicting Nepheline Formation with Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... model has been developed to predict nepheline (NaAlSiO4) formation in compositions of interest for waste glasses projected to be formed at the Hanford Site.

374

Fuzzy coalition formation among rational cooperative agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of coalitions in multi-agent systems (MAS) enables the development of efficient organizations. In the article, a model of fuzzy cooperative game with coalitions is described. It extends the model of the fuzzy coalition game with associated ...

Leonid B. Sheremetov; Jos C. Romero Corts

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Formation of New England Coastal Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal fronts are a frequent late fall and early winter feature of eastern New England weather. Data from a mesoscale observing network is used to describe the process of coastal frontogenesis and to determine the causes of formation. Three ...

John W. Nielsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

John F. WilliamsJohn F. Williams Adjunct Assistant ProfessorAdjunct Assistant Professor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of renewable energy · Install 20,000 solar energy systems · Implement best management practices CrisisFuel Crisis #12;· As of May 2004, 28 states and Puerto Rico have voluntarily completed state action * Preliminary Data Solar Energy Historical Statistics Renewable FuelsRenewable Fuels Source: Energy Information

Columbia University

379

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formations, such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs,sedimentary formations, including oil and gas reservoirs andassociated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). At the North-

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced Plasmas by Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry Title Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Focus Area 1 - Biomass Formation and Modification : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Modification BESC biomass formation and modification research involves working directly with two potential bioenergy crops (switchgrass and Populus) to develop...

382

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Title Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Publication Type Report...

383

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Category:Formatting Templates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Formatting Templates Jump to: navigation, search Formatting Templates are Templates used primarily to achieve a certian layout or style on a wiki page. They can be generic, like Template:Clear or specific, like Template:Definition. For help on creating templates, see Help:Templates. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. Q [×] Query Results Templates‎ 4 pages Pages in category "Formatting Templates" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 465 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area

385

Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Isocurvature Fluctuations Induce Early Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early reionisation of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarisation results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star formation if extreme assumptions are made about the efficiency and nature of early reionisation. We develop an alternative hypothesis that invokes an additional component of a non-scale-free isocurvature power spectrum together with the scale-free adiabatic power spectrum for inflation-motivated primordial density fluctuations. Such a component is constrained by the Lyman alpha forest observations, can account for the small-scale power required by spectroscopic gravitational lensing, and yields a source of early star formation that can reionise the universe at z~20 yet becomes an inefficient source of ionizing photons by z~10, thereby allowing the conventional adiabatic fluctuation component to reproduce the late thermal history of the intergalactic medium.

Naoshi Sugiyama; Saleem Zaroubi; Joseph Silk

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Microsoft Word - CX_Clark_Fork_River_Delta.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$XJXVW   $XJXVW   REPLY TO ATTN OF: .(& SUBJECT: (QYLURQPHQWDO &OHDUDQFH 0HPRUDQGXP /HH :DWWV 3URMHFW 0DQDJHU ± .(:0 Proposed Action: 3URYLVLRQ RI IXQGV WR WKH ,GDKR 'HSDUWPHQW RI )LVK DQG *DPH IRU 3XUFKDVH RI &ODUN )RUN 5LYHU 'HOWD :KLWH ,VODQG 3URSHUW\ Fish and Wildlife Project No.:  &RQWUDFW %3$ Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 7UDQVIHU OHDVH GLVSRVLWLRQ RU DFTXLVLWLRQ RI LQWHUHVWV LQ XQFRQWDLPLQDWHG ODQG IRU KDELWDW SUHVHUYDWLRQ RU ZLOGOLIH PDQDJHPHQW DQG RQO\ DVVRFLDWHG EXLOGLQJV WKDW VXSSRUW WKHVH SXUSRVHV

390

Five Forks, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina: Energy Resources South Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.7418214°, -80.4531214° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.7418214,"lon":-80.4531214,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

391

Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio: Energy Resources Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8875703°, -83.6143632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8875703,"lon":-83.6143632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

Roaring Fork Valley - Renewable Energy Rebate Program (Colorado...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of tune-up and repair costs Small Hydro: 0.50 per Watt Installation Requirements PV and solar water heating systems must be installed by CoSEIA or NABCEP certified installers...

393

Forked River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River, New Jersey: Energy Resources River, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.8398413°, -74.1901399° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398413,"lon":-74.1901399,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

American Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah: Energy Resources Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3768954°, -111.7957645° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3768954,"lon":-111.7957645,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Microsoft Word - CoastMiddleForksWillamette_Wildish__CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Wildish Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-017-00, Contract # BPA-004959 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 18 South, Range 2 and 3 West of the Springfield Quad, in Lane County, Oregon (Near Springfield, Oregon) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of the 1270-acre

396

Spanish Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

955°, -111.654923° 955°, -111.654923° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.114955,"lon":-111.654923,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Three Forks, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana: Energy Resources Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.892428°, -111.5521925° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.892428,"lon":-111.5521925,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this...

399

Fork lift look-a-like picking up crude  

SciTech Connect

A unique mechanical concept uses a forklift design for producing crude oil. The design features 2 sheaves which travel side by side on a hydraulic ram between the 2 legs of a truncated derrick. Work loads are borne by the hydraulic cylinder, which rests on a horizontal beam. The beam, in turn, rests on the ground or platform. No loads are imposed on the derrick, which serves only to guide the traveling sheaves. The pump's rod hanger and its down-hole load are suspended from the free ends of a looped cable, the legs of which run over the 2 sheaves to anchors inboard of the well bore. Stroke length and speed are adjustable, and hydraulic pressure instruments are calibrated for specific monitoring functions.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pressure measurements in low permeability formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance requirements and identifies candidate hardware implementations for pressure instrumentation that is needed to provide well test data in low permeability formations. Low permeability values are typically defined to be less than 1 microdarcy and are usually encountered in hard rock formations, such as granite, that are of interest in hot dry rock geothermal, deep exploration drilling, and fluid waste disposal. Groundwater flow in these tight formations has been shown to be dominated by flow-through fractures rather than through the formation's intrinsic permeability. In these cases, we cannot use Darcy's law or the usual dimensionless coefficients to estimate the expected scale factors and dynamic responses necessary to properly select and setup the wellbore pressure instrument. This paper shows that the expected instrument responses can be estimated using some recent work by Wang, Narasimhan, and Witherspoon. This paper further describes the minimum electronic capability that the downhole pressure instrument must have in order to provide the required measurement resolution, dynamic range, and transient response. Three specific hardware implementations are presented based on the following transducers: a quartz resonator, a capacitance gauge, and a resistance strain gauge.

Veneruso, A.F.; McConnell, T.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Polyglots: crossing origins by crossing formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a heterogeneous system like the web, information is exchanged between components in versatile formats. A new breed of attacks is on the rise that exploit the mismatch between the expected and provided content. This paper focuses on the root cause ... Keywords: cross-domain, injection, polyglot, web security

Jonas Magazinius, Billy K. Rios, Andrei Sabelfeld

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

High temperature simulation of petroleum formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum formation has been simulated in the laboratory with emphasis on the effects of temperature, mineral catalysis, and starting material structure on the yield and composition of the liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon products. In an attempt to prove the hypothesis that petroleum formation can be simulated using high temperatures, Green River Shale from Colorado, USA, was subjected to pyrolysis for 16 hours at temperatures ranging from 300 to 500/sup 0/C. The sequence of products formed over this temperature range was used as the basis for defining five different zones of maturation reaction: 1) a heterobond cracking zone; 2) a labile carbon bond cracking zone; 3) a free radical synthesis zone; 4) a wet gas formation zone; and 5) an aromatization zone. The role of some typical inorganic components of sedimentary rocks in the origin and maturation of petroleum has been investigated using this high temperature model. The importance of the structure of organic matter in petroelum formation has also been investigated using this high temperature model. Lignin and cellulose are poor sources of liquid hydrocarbons, but cellulose in the presence of carbonate gives a high yield of gaseous hydrocarbons. Protein pyrolysis gives a high oil yield with an alkane distribution similar to petroleum. The lipids produced the highest oil yield of the substances tested but the n-alkanes show an odd carbon length predominance unlike the distribution found in petroleum.

Evans, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation, in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which we examine an ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

404

Photoionization and the formation of dwarf galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued that a UV photoionizing background radiation field suppresses the formation of dwarf galaxies, and may even inhibit the formation of larger galaxies. In order to test this, we present gas-dynamical simulations of the formation of small objects in a CDM universe with and without a photoionizing background. The objects are selected from a collisionless simulation at a redshift of 2.4, and rerun at higher resolution including the effects of gas dynamics and using a hierarchical grid of particles. Five objects, each with a circular speed of 46 km/sec are simulated. The presence of the photoionizing background has only a small effect on the amount of gas that collapses in these objects, reducing the amount of cold collapsed gas by at most 30%. Analysis of the smaller objects found in the higher resolution simulation indicates that the photoionizing background only significantly affects the formation of objects with a virialized halo mass less than 10^9 soalr masses and circular speeds less than ...

Quinn, T; Efstathiou, G P; Quinn, Thomas; Katz, Neal; Efstathiou, George

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Photoionization and the Formation of Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued that a UV photoionizing background radiation field suppresses the formation of dwarf galaxies, and may even inhibit the formation of larger galaxies. In order to test this, we present gas-dynamical simulations of the formation of small objects in a CDM universe with and without a photoionizing background. The objects are selected from a collisionless simulation at a redshift of 2.4, and rerun at higher resolution including the effects of gas dynamics and using a hierarchical grid of particles. Five objects, each with a circular speed of 46 km/sec are simulated. The presence of the photoionizing background has only a small effect on the amount of gas that collapses in these objects, reducing the amount of cold collapsed gas by at most 30%. Analysis of the smaller objects found in the higher resolution simulation indicates that the photoionizing background only significantly affects the formation of objects with a virialized halo mass less than 10^9 soalr masses and circular speeds less than 23 km/sec. However, the ionization balance is greatly changed by the presence of the background radiation field. Typical lines of sight through the objects have 4 orders of magnitude less neutral hydrogen column density when the photoionizing background is included.

Thomas Quinn; Neal Katz; George Efstathiou

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

Engineering Documents into XML File Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XML has become the preferred language for representing information in documents. The goal of this research work is to allow a user to convert any document on Windows into a standard and open document format in XML (the Extensible Markup Language). One ...

Chia-Chu Chiang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing clouds. The hierarchical structure in the gas made by turbulence ensures that the triggering time scales with size, giving the Schmidt law over a wide range of scales and the size-duration correlation for young star fields. The efficiency of star formation is determined by the fraction of the gas above a critical density of around 10^5 m(H2)/cc. Star formation is saturated to its largest possible value given the fractal nature of the interstellar medium.

Bruce G. Elmegreen

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

Specifying formative constructs in information systems research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While researchers go to great lengths to justify and prove theoretical links between constructs, the relationship between measurement items and constructs is often ignored. By default, the relationship between construct and item is assumed to be reflective, ... Keywords: composite constructs, formative constructs, latent constructs, measurement models, methodology, reflective constructs, statistical conclusion validity, type i and type II errors

Stacie Petter; Detmar Straub; Arun Rai

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Electricity 5 E Lesson Plan Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity 5 E Lesson Plan Format Standards Grade 4- Force, Energy, and Motion- 4.3a & 4.3b. What their experimentation, students should gain a thorough understanding of electricity's characteristics and mode of travel, familiarity with the structure and function of a basic electrical circuit as well as the concept

Marsh, David

410

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Marked correlations in galaxy formation models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-point correlation function has been the standard statistic for quantifying how galaxies are clustered. The statistic uses the positions of galaxies, but not their properties. Clustering as a function of galaxy property, be it type, luminosity, color, etc., is usually studied by analysing a subset of the full population, the galaxies in the subset chosen because they have a similar range of properties. We explore an alternative technique---marked correlations---in which one weights galaxies by some property or `mark' when measuring clustering statistics. Marked correlations are particularly well-suited to quantifying how the properties of galaxies correlate with their environment. Therefore, measurements of marked statistics, with luminosity, stellar mass, color, star-formation rate, etc. as the mark, permit sensitive tests of galaxy formation models. We make measurements of such marked statistics in semi-analytic galaxy formation models to illustrate their utility. These measurements show that close pairs of galaxies are expected to be red, to have larger stellar masses, and to have smaller star formation rates. We also show that the simplest unbiased estimator of the particular marked statistic we use extensively is very simple to measure---it does not require construction of a random catalog---and provide an estimate of its variance. Large wide-field surveys of the sky are revolutionizing our view of galaxies and how they evolve. Our results indicate that application of marked statistics to this high quantity of high-quality data will provide a wealth of information about galaxy formation.

Ravi K. Sheth; Andrew J. Connolly; Ramin Skibba

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

Carbon Monoxide Formation in Fires by High-Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... experiments. Page 7. FORMATION BY ANAEROBIC WOOD PYROLYSIS 1461 . ... 1990. Milne, T,, in Biomass Gasification. ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mean reaction rate closures for nanoparticle formation in turbulent reacting flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposed to sunlight. A few applica- tions exploit the photocatalysis. For example, anti-fogging glass, self-cleaning and anti-microbial coatings (Fujishima et al., 1999). Applications in solar water purification are being developed (Morgan, 2008; Williams... size. The milling is typically performed using either fluid-energy (Slepetys, 1970) or media mills (Niedenzu et al., 1996) and adds significant cost to the pigment. The more control that can be used to minimise agglomeration and reduce the need...

Akroyd, Jethro

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Factors of paleosol formation in a Late Cretaceous eolian sand sheet paleoenvironment, Marlia Formation, Southeastern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation, Southeastern Brazil Patrick Francisco Führ Dal' Bó a, , Giorgio Basilici a , Rômulo Simões), Brazil b IG ­ Universidade Federal do Pará, 66075-110, Belém (PA), Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i Late Cretaceous The Marília Formation, which crops out in southeastern Brazil, is interpreted as a Late

Ahmad, Sajjad

417

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, R.S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

Hawke, R.S.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Formation of Globular Clusters in Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution simulation of globular cluster formation in a galaxy merger. For the first time in such a simulation, individual star clusters are directly identified and followed on their orbits. We quantitatively compare star formation in the merger to that in the unperturbed galaxies. The merging galaxies show a strong starburst, in sharp contrast to their isolated progenitors. Most star clusters form in the tidal tails. With a mass range of $5\\times10^{5}$--$5\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$, they are identified as globular clusters. The merger remnant is an elliptical galaxy. Clusters with different mass or age have different radial distributions in the galaxy. The cluster mass spectrum appears to be roughly log-normal. Our results show that the high specific frequency and bimodal distribution of metallicity observed in elliptical galaxies are natural products of gas-rich mergers, supporting a merger origin for the ellipticals and their globular cluster systems.

Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Formation of Globular Clusters in Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution simulation of globular cluster formation in a galaxy merger. For the first time in such a simulation, individual star clusters are directly identified and followed on their orbits. We quantitatively compare star formation in the merger to that in the unperturbed galaxies. The merging galaxies show a strong starburst, in sharp contrast to their isolated progenitors. Most star clusters form in the tidal features. With a mass range of $5\\times10^{5}$--$5\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$, they are identified as globular clusters. The merger remnant is an elliptical galaxy. Clusters with different mass or age have different radial distributions in the galaxy. Our results show that the high specific frequency and bimodal distribution of metallicity observed in elliptical galaxies are natural products of gas-rich mergers, supporting a merger origin for the ellipticals and their globular cluster systems.

Yuexing Li; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

422

QCD String formation and the Casimir Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three distinct scales are identified in the excitation spectrum of the gluon field around a static quark-antiquark pair as the color source separation R is varied. The spectrum, with string-like excitations on the largest length scales of 2-3 fm, provides clues in its rich fine structure for developing an effective bosonic string description. New results are reported from the three-dimensional Z(2) and SU(2) gauge models, providing further insight into the mechanism of bosonic string formation. The precocious onset of string-like behavior in the Casimir energy of the static quark-antiquark ground state is observed below R=1 fm where most of the string eigenmodes do not exist and the few stable excitations above the ground state are displaced. We find no firm theoretical foundation for the widely held view of discovering string formation from high precision ground state properties below the 1 fm scale.

K. Jimmy Juge; J. Kuti; C. Morningstar

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect

Under sub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) drastically reducing cell performance. Although a number of strategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of freezing within PEMFC components. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to elucidate the effects of hydrophobicity (Teflon loading) and water saturation on the rate of ice formation within three commercial GDLs. We find that as the Teflon loading increases, the crystallization temperature decreases due to a change in internal ice/substrate contact angle, as well as the attainable level of water saturation. Classical nucleation theory predicts the correct trend in freezing temperature with Teflon loading.

Dursch, Thomas; Radke, Clayton J.; Weber, Adam Z.

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Uflow Computational Model and Intermediate Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report motivates and defines a general-purpose, architecture independent, parallel computational model, which captures the intuitions which underlie the design of the United Functions and Objects programming language. The model has two aspects, which turn out to be a traditional dataflow model and an actor-like model, with a very simple interface between the two. Certain aspects of the model, particularly strictness, maximum parallelism, and lack of suspension are stressed. The implications of introducing stateful objects are carefully spelled out. The model has several purposes, although we largely describe it as it would be used for visualising the execution of programs. The model is embodied in a textual intermediate format, and in a set of UFO data structures. This report also serves as a definition of the intermediate format, and gives a brief overview of the data structures. 1 Introduction This report serves two purposes. Firstly, in sections 1 to 9, the Uflow computational...

John Sargeant; Chris Kirkham; Steve Anderson

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geothermal resources Frio Formation, South Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the Frio sand distribution and formation temperatures and pressures was undertaken in order to define prospective areas in which a more detailed reservoir analysis is necessary prior to the selection of a site for a geothermal well. As a result two potential geothermal fairways were identified--one in the south part of the area in Hidalgo, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, and the other in the north part in north-central Nueces County.

Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

Tornabene, T.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Non Poisson intermittent events in price formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of price in a financial market is modelled as a chain of Ising spin with three fundamental figures of trading. We investigate the time behaviour of the model, and we compare the results with the real EURO/USD change rate. By using the test of local Poisson hypothesis, we show that this minimal model leads to clustering and "declustering" in the volatility signal, typical of the real market data.

Greco, A; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Carbone, Vincenzo; Greco, Antonella; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated weak collision'' formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Photoionising feedback in star cluster formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first ever hydrodynamic calculations of star cluster formation that incorporate the effect of feedback from ionising radiation. In our simulations, the ionising source forms in the cluster core at the intersection of several dense filaments of inflowing gas. We show that these filaments collimate ionised outflows and suggest such an environmental origin for at least some observed outflows in regions of massive star formation. Our simulations show both positive feedback (i.e. promotion of star formation in neutral gas compressed by expanding HII regions) and negative feedback (i.e. suppression of the accretion flow in to the central regions). We show that the volume filling factor of ionised gas is very different in our simulations than would result from the case where the central source interacted with an azimuthally smoothed gas density distribution. As expected, gas density is the key parameter in determining whether clusters are unbound by photoionising radiation. Nevertheless, we find - on account of the acceleration of a small fraction of the gas to high velocities in the outflows - that the deposition in the gas of an energy that exceeds the binding energy of the cluster is not a sufficient criterion for unbinding the bulk of the cluster mass.

J. E. Dale; I. A. Bonnell; C. J. Clarke; M. R. Bate

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

431

Toy Models for Galaxy Formation versus Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe simple useful toy models for key processes of galaxy formation in its most active phase, at z > 1, and test the approximate expressions against the typical behaviour in a suite of high-resolution hydro-cosmological simulations of massive galaxies at z = 4-1. We address in particular the evolution of (a) the total mass inflow rate from the cosmic web into galactic haloes based on the EPS approximation, (b) the penetration of baryonic streams into the inner galaxy, (c) the disc size, (d) the implied steady-state gas content and star-formation rate (SFR) in the galaxy subject to mass conservation and a universal star-formation law, (e) the inflow rate within the disc to a central bulge and black hole as derived using energy conservation and self-regulated Q ~ 1 violent disc instability (VDI), and (f) the implied steady state in the disc and bulge. The toy models provide useful approximations for the behaviour of the simulated galaxies. We find that (a) the inflow rate is proportional to mass and to (...

Dekel, A; Tweed, D; Cacciato, M; Ceverino, D; Primack, J R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

A SIMPLE LAW OF STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We show that supersonic MHD turbulence yields a star formation rate (SFR) as low as observed in molecular clouds, for characteristic values of the free-fall time divided by the dynamical time, t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, the Alfvenic Mach number, M{sub a}, and the sonic Mach number, M{sub s}. Using a very large set of deep adaptive-mesh-refinement simulations, we quantify the dependence of the SFR per free-fall time, {epsilon}{sub ff}, on the above parameters. Our main results are (1) that {epsilon}{sub ff} decreases exponentially with increasing t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, but is insensitive to changes in M{sub s}, for constant values of t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn} and M{sub a}. (2) Decreasing values of M{sub a} (stronger magnetic fields) reduce {epsilon}{sub ff}, but only to a point, beyond which {epsilon}{sub ff} increases with a further decrease of M{sub a}. (3) For values of M{sub a} characteristic of star-forming regions, {epsilon}{sub ff} varies with M{sub a} by less than a factor of two. We propose a simple star formation law, based on the empirical fit to the minimum {epsilon}{sub ff}, and depending only on t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}: {epsilon}{sub ff} Almost-Equal-To {epsilon}{sub wind}exp (- 1.6 t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}). Because it only depends on the mean gas density and rms velocity, this law is straightforward to implement in simulations and analytical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

Padoan, Paolo [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Haugbolle, Troels [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, University of Copenhagen, Oestervoldgade 5-7., DK-1350, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nordlund, Ake, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: haugboel@nbi.dk, E-mail: aake@nbi.dk [Centre for Star and Planet Formation and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Open Standards, Open Formats, and Open Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper proposes some comments and reflections on the notion of openness and on how it relates to three important topics: open standards, open formats, and open source. Often, these terms are considered equivalent and/or mutually implicated: open source is the only way to enforce and exploit open standards. This position is misleading, as it increases the confusion about this complex and extremely critical topic. The paper clarifies the basic terms and concepts. This is instrumental to suggest a number of actions and practices aiming at promoting and defending openness in modern ICT products and services.

Davide Cerri; Alfonso Fuggetta; Davide Cerri; Alfonso Fuggetta; Cefriel Politecnico Di Milano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Consumption externalities, habit formation and equilibrium efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the welfare properties of the competitive equilibrium in a capital accumulation model where individual preferences are subject to both habit formation and consumption spillovers. Using an additive specification for preferences, according to which the argument in the utility function is a linear combination of present and past values of own consumption and consumption spillovers, we analyze the circumstances under which these spillovers are a source of inefficiency. It is shown that consumption externalities have to interact with habits in order to generate an inefficient dynamic equilibrium. Finally, we characterize optimal tax policies aimed at restoring efficient decentralized paths.

Jaime Alonso-carrera; Jordi Caball; Xavier Raurich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation  

SciTech Connect

The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

437

Massive Black Holes: formation and evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive black holes are nowadays believed to reside in most local galaxies. Observations have revealed us vast information on the population of local and distant black holes, but the detailed physical properties of these dark massive objects are still to be proven. Accretion of gas and black hole mergers play a fundamental role in determining the two parameters defining a black hole: mass and spin. We briefly review here the basic properties of the population of supermassive black holes, focusing on the still mysterious formation of the first massive black holes, and their evolution from early times to now.

Martin J. Rees; Marta Volonteri

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

STRUCTURE FORMATION IN THE SYMMETRON MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Scalar fields, strongly coupled to matter, can be present in nature and still be invisible to local experiments if they are subject to a screening mechanism. The symmetron is one such mechanism that relies on restoration of a spontaneously broken symmetry in regions of high density to shield the scalar fifth force. We have investigated structure formation in the symmetron model by using N-body simulations and find observable signatures in both the linear and nonlinear matter power spectrum and on the halo mass function. The mechanism for suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions is also found to work very well.

Davis, Anne-Christine; Li Baojiu [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Observational Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Formation Associated with Monsoon Gyres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale monsoon gyres and the involved tropical cyclone formation over the western North Pacific have been documented in previous studies. The aim of this study is to understand how monsoon gyres affect tropical cyclone formation. An ...

Liguang Wu; Huijun Zong; Jia Liang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Dynamic and thermal control of an electromagnetic formation flight testbed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation flight of multiple spacecraft is an emerging method for completing complex space missions in an efficient manner. A limitation found in maintaining such formations is the need for precise control at all times. ...

Neave, Matthew D. (Matthew David)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Enhanced Lattice Defect Formation Associated with Hydrogen and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced Lattice Defect Formation Associated with Hydrogen and Hydrogen Embrittlement under Elastic Stress of High-Strength Steel.

443

Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hydrogen Storage in Materials: Theory and Experiment. Presentation Title, Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory and...

444

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy-Driven Pattern Formation Robert V. Kohn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Driven Pattern Formation Robert V. Kohn Grad Student and Postdoc Seminar April 22, 2011 Robert V. Kohn Energy-Driven Pattern Formation #12;Overview What is energy-driven pattern formation? Hard by singular perturbation Statics: minimum energy scaling laws Dynamics: patterns induced by steepest

446

Dynamics and flight control of the UAV formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe the flight of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) formation by using a 6 degrees of freedom (6 DOF) models. The problem of flight formation will be approached in a simple manner, by using a 3 DOF models, as well ... Keywords: UAV, control, dynamic, flight, formation

Teodor-Viorel Chelaru; Valentin Pana; Adrian Chelaru

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Stability and control of the UAV formations flight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the flight stability of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) formation by using 3 degrees of freedom (3 DOF) models. The problem of flight formation will be approached in a simple manner, by using 3 DOF nonlinear ... Keywords: automation, control, flight, formation, simulation, stability

Teodor-Viorel Chelaru; Valentin Pan?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Parameterized formatting of an XML document by XSL rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibilities of formatting offered by database management systems (DBMS) are insufficient and do not allow emphasizing the various data results. It is the same for the usual browsing of an XML document without any particular rules of formatting. ... Keywords: DOM tree, XHTML document, XML document, XSL rules, XSLT, parameters of formatting

Madani Kenab; Tayeb Ould Braham; Pierre Bazex

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Indian Statistical Institute: Using Multiple Metadata Formats in DSpace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of The University of Manitoba to provide etdms metadata format. However, the user community has often expressed the requirement for other metadata formats like VRA core, IMS etc. Support for many metadata formats will greatly enhance the use of DSpace and the type...

Prasad, A R D

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

450

Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier  

SciTech Connect

A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

451

XML Representation of Constraint Networks: Format XCSP 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new extended format to represent constraint networks using XML. This format allows us to represent constraints defined either in extension or in intension. It also allows us to reference global constraints. Any instance of the problems CSP (Constraint Satisfaction Problem), QCSP (Quantified CSP) and WCSP (Weighted CSP) can be represented using this format.

Roussel, Olivier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Method for completing wells in unconsolidated formations  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing fluids from a subterranean formation in a formation region of substantially unconsolidated sandlike particles comprising the steps of: penetrating the region to form an uncased wellbore cavity extending within the region; extending within the region; inserting filter means into the cavity, the filter means forming an interior space for gathering fluids from the region for production from the wellbore and the filter means including means for permitting the flow of solids fines into the space with the fluids from the region; causing fluids to flow into the cavity and through the filter means into the space to be produced from the region at a rate which will cause sand particles in the region to flow into and occupy the cavity to form an in situ packing around the filter means; producing fluids from the region through the cavity and into the space and having a limited quantity of solids fines entrained therein smaller than the solid particles retained in the cavity; and controlling the rate of production of fluids to form a cylindrical dilatant zone extending radially outward in the region from the cavity and which is mechanically stable.

Perkins, T.K.

1989-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Enthalpy of Formation of Nitrosylpentaammineruthenium(II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enthalpy of Formation of Nitrosylpentaammineruthenium(II) from NO+(aq) Enthalpy of Formation of Nitrosylpentaammineruthenium(II) from NO+(aq) and Aquopentaammineruthenium(II) James F. Wishart, Henry Taube, Kenneth J. Breslauer and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 25, 1479-1481 (1986) Abstract: An estimate of the enthalpy change associated with the substitution of H2O on (NH3)5RuOH22+ with NO+(aq) has been made by thermochemical measurements on a cycle of reactions, which includes the reaction of (NH3)5RuOH22+ with NO2-(aq) and which involves the assumption that the heat of dissolution of NOBF4(s) to produce NO+(aq) + BF4-(aq) is close to the heat of dissolution of CsBF4(s). The chemistry is complicated because the reaction of (NH3)5RuOH22+ with NO2-(aq) ultimately produces trans-[(NH3)4Ru(OH)NO]2+(aq) rather than [(NH3)5RuNO]3+(aq). Reasonably

454

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

On water ice formation in interstellar clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

Renaud Papoular

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

456

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Alfoterra-38 (0.05 wt%), Alfoterra-35 (0.05 wt%), SS-6656 (0.05 wt%), and DTAB (1 wt%) altered the wettability of the initially oil-wet calcite plate to an intermediate/water-wet state. Low IFT ({approx}10{sup -3} dynes/cm) is obtained with surfactants 5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability and mobilization studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing cl...

Elmegreen, B G

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nuclear Reaction Rates and Carbon Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied how the third dredge-up and the carbon star formation in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch stars depends on certain key nuclear reaction rates. We find from a set of complete stellar evolution calculations of a 2Msun model with Z=0.01 including mass loss, that varying either the N14(p,g)O15 or the 3-alpha reaction rate within their uncertainties as given in the NACRE compilation results in dredge-up and yields that differ by a factor of 2. Model tracks with a higher rate for the 3-alpha rate and a lower rate for the N14(p,g)O15 reaction both show more efficient third dredge-up. New experimental results for the N14(p,g)O15 reaction rates are surveyed, yielding a rate which is about 40% lower than the tabulated NACRE rate, and smaller than NACRE's lower limit. We discuss the possible implications of the revised nuclear reaction stellar evolution calculations that aim to reproduce the observed carbon star formation at low mass, which requires efficient third dredge-up.

Falk Herwig; Sam M. Austin

2004-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Subterranean formation permeability contrast correction methods  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of correcting the permeability contrast in a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore to improve the sweep efficiency of waterflooding operations carried out therein, the formation containing at least one high permeability zone lying adjacent to at least one low permeability zone, which zones are in fluid communication with one another at the boundary therebetween. It comprises isolating the high permeability zone from the low permeability zone; injecting a crosslinkable aqueous polymer solution into the high permeability zone in an amount sufficient to substantially fill some the zone therewith, the crosslinkable aqueous polymer solution being capable of plugging the high permeability zone when crosslinked; isolating the low permeability zone from the high permeability zone; injecting into the low permeability zone an aqueous liquid containing a crosslinking agent which upon contact with the aqueous polymer solution causes the solution to form a crosslinked gel; and displacing the aqueous liquid containing the crosslinking agent through the low permeability zone so that the crosslinking agent contact the aqueous polymer solution and forms a crosslinked gel at least at the boundary between the zones whereby fluid communication between the zones is reduced and subsequently injected flood water is substantially confined to the low permeability zone.

Beardmore, D.H.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

463

Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Minimizing formation damage under adverse conditions during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well comprising: (a) filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; (b) placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; (c) setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; (d) perforating the casing; (e) introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids where the agent is a gel; (f) causing the blocking agent to solidify while forming a solidified plug within the well and a solid mass within the adjacent washed out portion of the formation; (g) removing the first tubing from the well; (h) placing within the well a second tubing having a slotted portion therein sufficient to allow gravel packing of the well and the formation; (i) removing the solidified plug from the wellbore along with solidified gel from the washed-out portion of the formation; and (j) placing a gravel pack within the well and the washed-out portion of the formation via the second tubing which consolidates the formation.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Shu, P.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

467

Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation Print page Print page Email page Email page Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation October 2013 The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is responsible for permanently storing the Department of Energy's (DOE) scientific and technical information (STI) collection. The STI must be collected in a digital format that can be preserved and accessible for years to come. In the late 1990's, OSTI selected the Portable Document Format (PDF) as the preferred format for receiving STI. OSTI continues to use this format for the submission and storage of STI documents. Preservation, content, and accessibility are enhanced by following these best practices for generating

468

Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Author Shakeel Ahmed Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Citation Shakeel Ahmed. Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) [Internet]. 2013. [cited 2013/10/09]. Available from: http://petphy.blogspot.com/2011/12/formation-micro-imager-logs-fmi.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Micro-Imager_Logs_(FMI)&oldid=687994" Categories: References Geothermal References Uncited References What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

469

The flip-side of galaxy formation: A combined model of Galaxy Formation and Cluster Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Only ~10% of baryons in the universe are in the form of stars, yet most models of luminous structure formation have concentrated on the properties of the luminous stellar matter. In this paper we focus on the "flip side" of galaxy formation and investigate the properties of the material that is not presently locked up in galaxies. This "by-product" of galaxy formation can be observed as an X-ray emitting plasma (the intracluster medium, hereafter ICM) in groups and clusters, and we present a version of the Durham semi-analytic galaxy formation model GALFORM that allows us to investigate the properties of the ICM. As we would expect on the basis of gravitational scaling arguments, the previous model (presented in Bower et al. 2006) fails to reproduce even the most basic observed properties of the ICM; however, we present a simple modification to the model to allow for heat input into the ICM from the AGN "radio mode" feedback. This heating acts to expel gas from the X-ray luminous central regions of the host halo. With this modification, the model reproduces the observed gas mass fractions and luminosity-temperature relation of groups and clusters. Introducing the heating process into the model requires changes to a number of model parameters in order to retain a good match to the observed galaxy properties. With the revised parameters, the best fitting luminosity function is comparable to that presented in Bower et al. (2006). The new model makes a fundamental step forward, providing a unified model of galaxy and cluster ICM formation. However, the detailed comparison with the data is not completely satisfactory, and we highlight key areas for improvement.

Richard G. Bower; Ian G. McCarthy; Andrew J. Benson

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

Venture Formation | BNL Technology Commercialization and Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrepreneurs and Investors Entrepreneurs and Investors Venture Formation Resources Entrepreneurship Resource Center - Entrepreneurship.org was created by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation as a free, online international resource with a vast array of content designed to assist entrepreneurs, business mentors, policy makers, academics and investors through each phase of the entrepreneurial process. U.S. Small Business Administration - The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is a federally funded organization developed to aid, counsel, assist and protect the interests of small business concerns and new ventures in the United States. Wall Street Journal Entrepreneur Resource - An online how to guide for small businesses and start ups with tips from The Wall Street Journal's reporters and columnists.

471

The Fluid Mechanics of Gravitational Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard model for gravitational structure formation in astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology is questioned. Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical clustering cosmology neglects particle collisions, viscosity, turbulence and diffusion and makes predictions in conflict with observations. From Jeans 1902 and CDMHC, the non-baryonic dark matter NBDM forms small clumps during the plasma epoch after the big bang that ``cluster'' into larger clumps. CDM halo clusters collect the baryonic matter (H and He) by gravity so that after 300 Myr of ``dark ages'', huge, explosive (Population III) first stars appear, and then galaxies and galaxy clusters. Contrary to CDMHC cosmology, ``hydro-gravitational-dynamics'' HGD cosmology suggests the diffusive NBDM material cannot clump and the clumps cannot cluster. From HGD, the big bang results from an exothermic turbulent instability at Planck scales (10^{-35} m). Turbulent stresses cause an inflation of space and fossil density turbulence remnants that trigger gravitational i...

Gibson, C H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Orbital entanglement in bond-formation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the (differential) correlation energy is central to the quantum chemical description of bond-formation and bond-dissociation processes. In order to estimate the quality of single- and multi-reference approaches for this purpose, various diagnostic tools have been developed. In this work, we elaborate on our previous observation [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 3129 (2012)] that one- and two-orbital-based entanglement measures provide quantitative means for the assessment and classification of electron correlation effects among molecular orbitals. The dissociation behavior of some prototypical diatomic molecules features all types of correlation effects relevant for chemical bonding. We demonstrate that our entanglement analysis is convenient to dissect these electron correlation effects and to provide a conceptual understanding of bond-forming and bond-breaking processes from the point of view of quantum information theory.

Boguslawski, Katharina; Barcza, Gergely; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Star-Formation Knots in IRAS Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

J. B. Hutchings

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

474

Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: i) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; ii) the nature of the clumps produced by thermal instability, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment; iii) the density-magnetic field correla...

Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Mental Representations Formed From Educational Website Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing popularity of web-based distance education places high demand on distance educators to format web pages to facilitate learning. However, limited guidelines exist regarding appropriate writing styles for web-based distance education. This study investigated the effect of four different writing styles on readers mental representation of hypertext. Participants studied hypertext written in one of four web-writing styles (e.g., concise, scannable, objective, and combined) and were then administered a cued association task intended to measure their mental representations of the hypertext. It is hypothesized that the scannable and combined styles will bias readers to scan rather than elaborately read, which may result in less dense mental representations (as identified through Pathfinder analysis) relative to the objective and concise writing styles. Further, the use of more descriptors in the objective writing style will lead to better integration of ideas and more dense mental representations than the concise writing style.

Elizabeth T. Cady; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Tuan Q. Tran; Bernardo de la Garza; Peter D. Elgin

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Formation of Pluto's Low Mass Satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the New Horizons mission, we consider how Pluto's small satellites -- currently P5, Nix, P4, and Hydra -- grow in debris from the giant impact that forms the Pluto-Charon binary or in solid material captured from the protoplanetary debris disk. If the satellites have masses close to their minimum masses, our analysis suggests that capture of material into a circumplanetary or circumbinary debris disk is a viable mechanism for satellite formation. If the satellites are more massive, they probably form in debris from the giant impact. After the impact, Pluto and Charon accrete some of the debris and eject the rest from the binary orbit. During the ejection, high velocity collisions among debris particles produce a collisional cascade, leading to the ejection of some debris from the system and enabling the remaining debris particles to find stable orbits around the binary. Our numerical simulations of viscous diffusion, coagulation, and migration show that collisional evolution within a ring or disk...

Kenyon, Scott J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at z~0, collisional excitation following photo-heating may well dominate the total emission at higher redshifts. The central regions of these systems are dense enough to shield themselves from the metagalactic ionizing background; unfortunately, in this regime our simulations are no longer reliable. We therefore consider several scenarios for the emission from the central cores, including one in which self-shielded gas does not emit at all. We show that the combination of star formation and cooling IGM gas can explain most of the observed "Lyman-alpha blobs" at z~3, with the important exception of the largest sources. On the other hand, except under the most optimistic assumptions, cooling IGM gas cannot explain the observations on its own.

Steven Furlanetto; Joop Schaye; Volker Springel; Lars Hernquist

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

478

Hierarchical Structure Formation and Modes of Star Formation in Hickson Compact Group 31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The handful of low-mass, late-type galaxies that comprise Hickson Compact Group 31 is in the midst of complex, ongoing gravitational interactions, evocative of the process of hierarchical structure formation at higher redshifts. With sensitive, multicolor Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we characterize the large population of <10 Myr old star clusters that suffuse the system. From the colors and luminosities of the young star clusters, we find that the galaxies in HCG 31 follow the same universal scaling relations as actively star-forming galaxies in the local Universe despite the unusual compact group environment. Furthermore, the specific frequency of the globular cluster system is consistent with the low end of galaxies of comparable masses locally. This, combined with the large mass of neutral hydrogen and tight constraints on the amount of intragroup light, indicate that the group is undergoing its first epoch of interaction-induced star formation. In both the main galaxies and the tidal-dwarf candida...

Gallagher, S C; Elmegreen, D M; Chandar, R; English, J; Charlton, J C; Gronwall, C; Young, J; Tzanavaris, P; Johnson, K E; de Oliveira, C Mendes; Whitmore, B; Hornschemeier, A E; Maybhate, A; Zabludoff, Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF M32  

SciTech Connect

We use deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel observations of a field within M32 (F1) and an M31 background field (F2) to determine the star formation history (SFH) of M32 from its resolved stellar population. We find that 2-5 Gyr old stars contribute {approx}40% {+-} 17% of M32's mass, while {approx}55% {+-} 21% of M32's mass comes from stars older than 5 Gyr. The mass-weighted mean age and metallicity of M32 at F1 are (Age) = 6.8 {+-} 1.5 Gyr and ([M/H]) = -0.01 {+-} 0.08 dex. The SFH additionally indicates the presence of young (<2 Gyr old), metal-poor ([M/H] {approx} -0.7) stars, suggesting that blue straggler stars contribute {approx}2% of the mass at F1; the remaining {approx}3% of the mass is in young metal-rich stars. Line-strength indices computed from the SFH imply a light-weighted mean age and metallicity of 4.9 Gyr and [M/H] = -0.12 dex, and single stellar population-equivalent parameters of 2.9 {+-} 0.2 Gyr and [M/H] = 0.02 {+-} 0.01 dex at F1 ({approx}2.7 r{sub e} ). This contradicts spectroscopic studies that show a steep age gradient from M32's center to 1 r{sub e} . The inferred SFH of the M31 background field F2 reveals that the majority of its stars are old, with {approx}95% of its mass already acquired 5-14 Gyr ago. It is composed of two dominant populations; {approx}30% {+-} 7.5% of its mass is in a 5-8 Gyr old population, and {approx}65% {+-} 9% of the mass is in an 8-14 Gyr old population. The mass-weighted mean age and metallicity of F2 are (Age) = 9.2 {+-} 1.2 Gyr and ([M/H]) = -0.10 {+-} 0.10 dex, respectively. Our results suggest that the inner disk and spheroid populations of M31 are indistinguishable from those of the outer disk and spheroid. Assuming the mean age of M31's disk at F2 ({approx}1 disk scale length) to be {approx}5-9 Gyr, our results agree with an inside-out disk formation scenario for M31's disk.

Monachesi, Antonela; Trager, Scott C. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lauer, Tod R.; Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Hidalgo, Sebastian L. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Freedman, Wendy; Dressler, Alan [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Grillmair, Carl, E-mail: antonela@umich.edu [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

480

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Abstract Stabilized formation temperatures were estimated at different depths in 40 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico, using the Horner and the spherical radial flow (SRF) methods. The results showed that the Horner method underestimates formation temperatures, while the SRF method gives temperatures that are closer to the true formation temperatures. This was supported by numerical simulation of a combined circulation and shut-in period in several wells, and results for well H-26 are presented. Numerical reproduction of logged temperature is more feasible if an initial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "williams fork formation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul [Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08024 Barcelona (Spain); Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Heavens, Alan [Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Clarkson, Chris [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Surface coating for prevention of crust formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Molecular cloud regulated star formation in galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a numerical implementation of star formation in disk galaxies, in which the conversion of cooling gas to stars in the multiphase interstellar medium is governed by the rate at which molecular clouds are formed and destroyed. In the model, clouds form from thermally unstable ambient gas and get destroyed by feedback from massive stars and thermal conduction. Feedback in the ambient phase cycles gas into a hot galactic fountain or wind. We model the ambient gas hydrodynamically using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). However, we cannot resolve the Jeans mass in the cold and dense molecular gas and, therefore, represent the cloud phase with ballistic particles that coagulate when colliding. We show that this naturally produces a multiphase medium with cold clouds, a warm disk, hot supernova bubbles and a hot, tenuous halo. Our implementation of this model is based on the Gadget N-Body code. We illustrate the model by evolving an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy and study the properties of a disk formed in a rotating spherical collapse. Many observed properties of disk galaxies are reproduced well, including the molecular cloud mass spectrum, the molecular fraction as a function of radius, the Schmidt law, the stellar density profile and the appearance of a galactic fountain.

C. M. Booth; T. Theuns; T. Okamoto

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at ...

Furlanetto, S; Springel, V; Hernquist, L; Furlanetto, Steven; Schaye, Joop; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

488

Positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions with Debye potentials  

SciTech Connect

Positronium (Ps) formation cross sections (n = 1, 2) in positron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasma environment are calculated using the screening approximation model for various Debye screening lengths from the Ps formation thresholds to 50 eV. The effect of the screened Coulomb potential on Ps formation process is investigated by using the Debye-Hueckel potential. The present results are compared with available theoretical calculations.