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Sample records for wildlife toxicity reference

  1. Environmental Guidance Program reference book: Toxic substances control act. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. Toxic Substances Control Act. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  3. Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oikari, A.O.J.

    1987-07-01

    Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

  4. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  5. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  6. Wildlife Diseases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    with rodents and rodent- infested areas, by controlling rodent populations, and by proper sanitation. For additional information contact the nearest office of Texas Cooperative Extension?Wildlife Services.. TCE?Wildlife Services P.O. Box 100410 ? San Antonio...

  7. Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ; methods used to assess hazards contaminants pose to fish and wildlife; sublethal and indirect effects" Session 2: Laboratory Toxicity Tests/ "Anatomy of an Oil Spill" Session 3: Factors Governing Test Results

  8. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  9. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  10. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  11. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  12. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of...

  13. Wildlife Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23

    in large numbers may damage property and cause human health problems. ? Protecting crops, timber, rangeland and other natural resources from the damage caused by gophers, prairie dogs, feral hogs, raccoons, rabbits, coyotes, grackles, beavers and other... wildlife. When building dams, beavers may cause flooding of timber and pastureland and the loss of trees and field crops. Feral hogs damage field crops, pastures and riparian habitat by their feeding, trampling and rooting activities. ? Protecting livestock...

  14. Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

    2008-08-11

    Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

  15. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Fish & Wildlife Program, which implements and provides policy and planning support for actions to meet BPAs fish and wildlife mitigation responsibilities under...

  16. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubicthe FOIA? TheWildlife Studies Studying Our

  17. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  18. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

  19. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  20. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  1. Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

  2. Toxic remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alamed County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  3. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Toxic Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Toxic Contamination *Preliminary draft, please refer in the program implementation section a requirement to implement actions to reduce toxic contaminants and types of known contaminants in the Columbia Basin be mapped, and a means of identifying contaminants

  4. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  5. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road Closings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  6. Wildlife management assistance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with 1773 people participating. Biological data was collected on 76 deer, eight wild turkeys, 33 feral hogs, 58 ducks of two species, 75 gray squirrels, 4 raccoons, 9 bobwhites, and 484 fish of 9 species. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRS Site Use Committee entailed evaluating 81 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. The antlerless deer quota program continued in the district with 129 landowners in Aiken, Barnwell, and Orangeburg Counties being approved for antlerless harvest which required field investigations, acreage verification at tax offices, and personal correspondence. Bait sites for turkey trapping were maintained on the SRS for two months. Wildlife census work was conducted on wild turkey, bobwhite, mourning dove, furbearers, fox squirrels, and bald eagles on the SRS and in Aiken and Barnwell Counties. Three wetlands in Aiken County were evaluated for suitability with regard to wood duck boxes. Two wetland environmental review notices for the SRS were evaluated. Additional work on Wildlife Management Area land included reposting 50 miles of boundary in Aiken and Lexington County and removing signs form several tracts lost from the program. Future recommendations for the turkey and regulations brochures were submitted and WMA maps covering Aiken and Lexington Counties were updated.

  7. Acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, B.; Haws, R.; Little, D.; Reese, D.; Peterson, C.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    This study develops data on the acute aquatic toxicity of selected biodiesel fuels which may become subject to environmental effects test regulations under the US Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The test substances are Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Methyl Soyate (MS), a biodiesel mixture of 20% REE and 80% Diesel, a biodiesel mixture of 50% REE and diesel, and a reference substance of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel. The test procedure follows the Daphnid Acute Toxicity Test outlined in 40 CFR {section} 797.1300 of the TSCA regulations. Daphnia Magna are exposed to the test substance in a flow-through system consisting of a mixing chamber, a proportional diluter, and duplicate test chambers. Novel system modifications are described that accommodate the testing of oil-based test substances with Daphnia. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an EC50, an effective concentration producing immobility in 50% of the test specimen.

  8. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials Reference

  9. Reference Shelf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference MaterialsReference Shelf

  10. Poroelastic references

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Christina Morency

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  11. Poroelastic references

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Christina Morency

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  12. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  13. WILDLIFE MITIGATION RULE AND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to wildlife by 13 Columbia Basin hydropower dams for which habitat loss statements have been submitted to be general consensus that 35 percent was well . within the losses that could be attributed to hydropower of the habitat losses allocated to hydropower. During the 10- year period, the Council will focus on wildlife

  14. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford SiteRecoveryWatertheReference

  15. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials

  16. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):205­213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to corn at reducing wildlife damage to row crops rely on information concerning the spatial nature of wildlife damage at local and landscape scales. In this study we explored spatial patterns of wildlife damage within

  17. Toxicity of ammonia to larvae of the freshwater shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llobrera, Jose Alvarez

    1979-01-01

    TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO LARVAE OF THE FRESHWATER SHRIMP, MACR OBRACHIUM R OSENBERGI I A Thesis by JOSE ALVAREZ LLOBRERA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences TOXICITY OF AMMONIA TO LARVAE OF THE FRESHWATER SHRIMP, MACR OBRACHIUM ROSENBERGI I A Thesis JOSE ALVAREZ LLOBRERA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  18. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) · Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes ­ discussion groups, · Choice experiments, · Fellowships / Placements, · Newsletters

  19. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  20. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  1. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impacts of hydropower dams on fish and wildlife. It also helps direct more than $250 million each year habitats in tributaries that have been damaged by development. A broad range of entities propose projects issues, as well as an independent panel of economists to provide guidance on questions of cost

  2. Professional References Ready Reference E-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Professional References Ready Reference E-11 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office ATRC 109E Stillwater, OK 74078 requested to do so. Create a separate sheet entitled "References." Print it on the same high quality papers

  3. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  4. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  5. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  6. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  7. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

  9. CHEMISTRY AND TOXICITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) primary treated domestic sewage from greater Vancouver (Annacis Island Wastewater Treatment Plant); (2#12;CHEMISTRY AND TOXICITY OF THREE WASTEWATERS DOE FRAP 1993-08 Prepared for Environment Canada wastewater characterization study in April and May 1992. Three representative effluent types were sampled: (1

  10. Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook Wildland fire safeTy Course Module Revised from the "Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course ­ Forest Harvesting and Silviculture." Jeff Mc contributions to this current course workbook. #12;Danger Tree Assessor's Course July 2010 ii Library

  11. Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook Forest Harvesting and Silviculture: Ministry of Forests and Range Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook: Forest Harvesting and Silviculture Module May 2008 iii DANGEROUS TREE ASSESSMENT IN BRITISH

  12. Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University

  13. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelper JumpWild HorseWildlife

  14. Emergency Information Desk Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    Emergency Information Desk Reference ECU Police Department ECU Environmental Health & Safety Revised Feb 2012 #12;Emergency Information Desk Reference 2 INTRODUCTION Emergencies, accidents, and injuries can occur at any time and without warning. ECU has designed this emergency information desk

  15. Combining classifiers of pesticides toxicity through a neuro-fuzzy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    of polymers, critical micelle concentrations of surfactants, rubber vulcanization rates) properties. Suitable (including biomedical, toxicological, ecotoxicological) and technological (glass transition temperatures, most of the QSAR models are regressions, referring to the dose giving the toxic effect in 50

  16. Acute aquatic toxicity and biodegradation potential of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haws, R.A.; Zhang, X.; Marshall, E.A.; Reese, D.L.; Peterson, C.L.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    Recent studies on the biodegradation potential and aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels are reviewed. Biodegradation data were obtained using the shaker flask method observing the appearance of CO{sub 2} and by observing the disappearance of test substance with gas chromatography. Additional BOD{sub 5} and COD data were obtained. The results indicate the ready biodegradability of biodiesel fuels as well as the enhanced co-metabolic biodegradation of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel mixtures. The study examined reference diesel, neat soy oil, neat rape oil, and the methyl and ethyl esters of these vegetable oils as well as various fuel blends. Acute toxicity tests on biodiesel fuels and blends were performed using Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) in a static non-renewal system and in a proportional dilution flow replacement system. The study is intended to develop data on the acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels and blends under US EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. The test procedure is designed from the guidelines outlined in Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms and the Fish Acute Aquatic Toxicity Test guideline used to develop aquatic toxicity data for substances subject to environmental effects test regulations under TSCA. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an LC50, a lethal concentration effecting mortality in 50% of the test population.

  17. Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation Center by E. Kathleen Wildlife Rehabilitation Center for allowing me access to the wildlife admittance records and providing

  18. Reviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to wildlife management? Who opposes wildlife management and why? Change in the human dimensions of wildlifeReviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation Mariella Marzano Norman Dandy Centre for Human & Ecological Sciences Forest Research #12;Human Dimensions of Species Management http

  19. WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH WOODLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH WOODLANDS by Robert A. Hodorff A thesis submitted Sciences, South Dakota State University. 1985 #12;WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Date #12;WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH

  20. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers andMEDA Station3/%2A| National48/%2A en

  1. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  2. High frequency reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  3. High frequency reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  4. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  5. Optical voltage reference

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, Richard (Ammon, ID); Kotter, Dale (Bingham County, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function.

  6. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

  7. LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 REFERENCES 10-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This section includes a comprehensive list of references including those cited in Volume I of the Lower of forest stream heating: A simple model. Weyerhaeuser Technical Report. 044-5002/89/1. Technology Center Energy and Natural Resources, Fish and Wildlife Division, Red Derr, Alberta. Allen, K.R. 1969

  8. Sandia Energy - Reference Model Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Reference Model Project (RMP) Reference Model Documents Reference Model DocumentsTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-...

  9. Application Protocol Reference Architecture Application Protocol Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sinderen, Marten

    Application Protocol Reference Architecture 165 Chapter 7 Application Protocol Reference Architecture This chapter proposes an alternative reference architecture for application protocols. The proposed reference architecture consists of the set of possible architectures for application protocols

  10. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS Satellite Accumulation Area 9 Waste Accumulation Facility 10 HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAINER MANAGEMENT Labeling

  11. Reference Hashed Frank Schilder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides the reader with an introduction to hashing lists and how they can be used for linguistic dam data structure for the representation of discourse referents. A so-called hashing list is employed instead a novel data structure for the representation of discourse referents. A/rushing list t

  12. Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calm, James M.

    2000-09-30

    This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

  13. Operational/Secondary Losses and Wildlife Monitoring Issues Wildlife Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to costs and manpower, likely cannot be applied at the scale needed to fully mitigate operational impacts with dual benefits and strive to mesh both fish and wildlife resources in the development of these ecosystem for the development of ecosystem approaches to mitigation that benefit both fish and wildlife resources, while keeping

  14. 46 The Wildlife Professional, Winter 2012 The Wildlife Society A New Forest Fire Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSante, David F.

    46 The Wildlife Professional, Winter 2012 © The Wildlife Society A New Forest Fire Paradigm paradigm--which holds that severe forest fires are always harmful--to a new one that embraces among forest types and regions, and fire severity differs with vegetation type, geographical location

  15. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  16. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Morency, Christina

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  17. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  18. Precision displacement reference system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Dubois, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Strother, Jerry D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  19. The Use of Remotely Sensed Bioelectric Action Potentials to Evaluate Episodic Toxicity Events and Ambient Toxicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, W. Tom; Acevedo, Miguel F.; Allen, H. J.; Schwalm, F. U.

    1996-01-01

    The exposure of an organism to a toxicant is defined by the magnitude, duration, and frequency with which the organism(s) interact with the toxicant(s). Predicting the exposure of organisms to toxicants during episodic ...

  20. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  1. The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP) Originally Written By: Edward L. Neilson, Jr. and Delwin E. Benson, Ph.D. Adapted From the 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program National..........................................................................................................................3 A Real Life Project

  2. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  3. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  4. Riparian Buffers for Wildlife Benefits of Riparian Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    , develop- ment, and recreation. Losing these buffers has negatively affected wildlife habitat and water the information you will need to create an effective riparian buffer for wildlife while pro- tecting water quality for wildlife; but they also improve water quality for humans. In general, the wider and more diversely planted

  5. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE The Power Act requires that the Council's power plan and Bonneville's resource acquisition program and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  6. Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States Presented by: Neelam C. Poudyal... Number of studies scrutinized demand for wildlife hunting (Ziemer et al. 1980; Miller and Hay,1981). Essential to understand what influences hunting demand. Projecting how the future of wildlife hunting

  7. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    for Wind Farm Sitings #12;Ohio Map of Survey Effort #12;Wind Energy & Nebraska's Wildlife Map #12Wind Energy Development & Wildlife ­ Striving for Co-existence Caroline Jezierski Nebraska Wind Energy & Wildlife Project Coordinator ISU ­ October 26, 2012 #12;#12;Installed Wind Power Capacity http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/wind

  8. California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

  9. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald R. (Belmont, MA)

    1988-01-01

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  10. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  11. Multifunctional reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.; Vissers, D.R.

    1981-12-30

    A multifunctional, low mass reference electrode of a nickel tube, thermocouple means inside the nickel tube electrically insulated therefrom for measuring the temperature thereof, a housing surrounding the nickel tube, an electrolyte having a fixed sulfide ion activity between the housing and the outer surface of the nickel tube forming the nickel/nickel sulfide/sulfide half-cell are described. An ion diffusion barrier is associated with the housing in contact with the electrolyte. Also disclosed is a cell using the reference electrode to measure characteristics of a working electrode.

  12. Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

    2000-05-01

    Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

  13. Grant Reference Lead / Sole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Overall Score Grant Reference Lead / Sole Grant Grant Holder Research Organisation Project of Birmingham Controls on Soil Carbon Export revealed by Novel Tracers on multiple timescales (SCENT) Standard Grant DEC12 8 8 NE/K011871/1 N Melanie Leng NERC British Geological Survey A 500,000-year environmental

  14. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

  15. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 39(3), 2003, pp. 712717 Wildlife Disease Association 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gompper, Matthew E.

    37996, USA; 3 New York State Museum, CEC 3140, Albany, New York 12230, USA; 4 Wildlife Conservation is important for understanding coyote pop- ulation limitation and understanding po- tential risks that coyote

  16. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01

    1080 (Ruckelshaus 1972). Primary poisoning results from an animal's exposure to unassimilated Compound 1080 (Kun 1980). Examples of primary hazards would include: Compound 1080 spilled on soil or vegetation, an animal's ingestion of vomitus from a... coyote that has ingested Compound 1080, or an animal's scavenging a livestock carcass with Compound 1080 spilled on it. Secondary poisoning results from exposure to assimilated Compound 1080 (Kun 1980), which would occur when an animal comes...

  17. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, Brian

    2007-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

  19. WFS 350 -WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGEMENT SPRING 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Lisa

    . Omaha, Nebraska, USA. Available on-line at: www.ianr.unl.edu/wildlife/solutions/handbook the lecture material, field trips, and assigned readings. General Reports: You must locate one current (no.). The written report will be graded as follows: 1. Report format, article selection, etc. 20 pts. 2. Writing

  20. WILDLIFE HABITAT RELATIONS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in California's Hardwood Rangelands1 Barrett A. Garrison2 Frank W. Davis3 The nine papers in the following. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Garrison and Davis Brief Overview of the Session on Wildlife Habitat and described a coordinated regional planning effort to conserve remaining habitats. Garrison and Standiford

  1. ESD Toxicology Laboratory Representative References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    .K. Konetsky. 2004. Source of toxicity in storm water: Zinc from commonly used paint. Environ. Toxicol. Chem organisms. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 113: 74-85. Stewart, A. J. 1984. Interactions between dissolved humic materials and organic toxicants. In: Synthetic Fossil Fuel Technologies: Results of Health and Environmental

  2. OSH technical reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    In an evaluation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Occupational Safety and Health programs for government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities, the Department of Labor`s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommended a technical information exchange program. The intent was to share written safety and health programs, plans, training manuals, and materials within the entire DOE community. The OSH Technical Reference (OTR) helps support the secretary`s response to the OSHA finding by providing a one-stop resource and referral for technical information that relates to safe operations and practice. It also serves as a technical information exchange tool to reference DOE-wide materials pertinent to specific safety topics and, with some modification, as a training aid. The OTR bridges the gap between general safety documents and very specific requirements documents. It is tailored to the DOE community and incorporates DOE field experience.

  3. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645 8244 Reference

  4. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645 8244 Reference6

  5. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645 8244 Reference64

  6. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645 82444 Reference

  7. Appendix A: Reference case

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645 82444 Reference6

  8. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint References | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    References Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint References footprintreferences.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: References...

  9. Toxicity of contaminants in lagoons and pannes of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, R.; Speelman, J. [Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Stewart, P.M. [National Biological Service, Porter, IN (United States). Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    1995-12-31

    Contaminants in water and sediments of lagoons and pannes were 2--90 times greater at sites adjacent to slag and coal piles than those at reference sites. One site (Lagoon-US5) had sediments with very high concentrations of toxic organics (e.g. naphthalene, phenanthrene, dibenzofuran). Although analyses indicated a gradient of contaminant concentration with distance from their sources, toxicity assays were somewhat equivocal. With the exception of less reproduction in Ceriodaphnia at one lagoon site (US3 = 0.55 of reference), survival of fathead minnows and reproduction in Ceriodaphnia in lagoon and panne waters varied independently of the contaminant concentration. In fact, there was better Ceriodaphnia reproduction in water from two contaminated sites (Lagoon-US5, Panne-WP1) than in water from reference sites. Fathead minnow survival, Ceriodaphnia survival, Ceriodaphnia reproduction, amphipod survival, and amphipod growth varied among sites in toxicity assays with sediments, 100% mortality of fatheads at Lagoon-US5, 100% mortality of Ceriodaphnia at Lagoon-US3, and less survival of fathead minnows at Lagoon-US3 indicate possible toxicity from contaminants in sediments at these sites. Of all organisms and end-points tested, Ceriodaphnia survival seemed to be most closely associated with concentrations of contaminants in lagoon water and sediments. Amphipod survival also varied with contaminants in sediments, however, survival in sediments of contaminated sites ranged only from 0.90--0.93 of reference sites. Although the results are not consistent among organisms, toxicity assays indicate that sediments from the lagoon site with the highest contaminants (Lagoon-US5) and possibly those from another contaminated lagoon site (Lagoon-US3) could be toxic to aquatic organisms. Water and sediments from contaminated panne sites do not appear to be toxic to aquatic test organisms.

  10. Coal data: A reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  11. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  12. Role of domestic dogs in diseases of significance to humans and wildlife health in central Chile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The higher proximity among humans, domestic animals and wildlife favours disease spill-over both from wildlife to domestic animals and vice versa, which is a potential risk for the extinction of wildlife populations and ...

  13. Tank characterization reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research.

  14. Nuclear Science References Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pritychenko; E. B?ták; B. Singh; J. Totans

    2014-07-08

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr and the International Atomic Energy Agency http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr.

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson...

  16. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  17. The Wildlife Society (TWS) GIS Annual Remote Sensing Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Chris

    1996-01-01

    Secretary/Treasurer, TWS GIS & Remote Sensing Working Group.The Wildlife Society (TWS) GIS Annual Remote Sensing Meetinghosted a special meeting of GIS and remote sensing interests

  18. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  19. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  20. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  1. EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOEEIS-0246SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch...

  2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  3. SEASONAL VARIATIONS in TOXICITY of BUTTER CLAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    'iations in the toxicity of the clams from the different areas and the variation in tcxicity between the siphon

  4. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  5. Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

  6. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  7. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  8. Toxic Gas List This is a list of known toxic gases. Mixtures with these gases may also be considered toxic. Refer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbonyl fluoride carbonyl sulfide chlorine chlorine dioxide chlorine pentafluoride chlorine trifluoride chloride hydrogen cyanide hydrogen fluoride hydrogen selenide hydrogen sulfide methyl bromide methyl

  9. 2011Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report AnnuAl RePoRt to the noRthWest Gove | Northwest Power & Conservation Council Document 2012-11 | September 2012 #12;FIsh & WIlDlIFe Costs ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthWESt GOvERNORS costs 08

  10. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring that have significant capital and/or operating costs that would be borne, at least in part, by the power that the Council would develop the fish and wildlife program immediately after passage of the Act.5 In contrast

  11. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    PotentialWind Energy Resource Potential New U.S. Generating CapacityNew U.S. Generating Capacity Wind energy1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions

  12. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  13. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop's blog HomeWildlife and Wind Energy

  14. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoTherm GmbH JumpFishWildlife

  15. World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: navigation, searchWorld FuelWildlife Fund Jump

  16. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Chase, Charles L. (Dublin, CA)

    2006-03-14

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  17. FAQS Reference Guide – Construction Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the March 2004 edition of DOE-STD-1180-2004, Construction Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  18. FAQS Reference Guide – Industrial Hygiene

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the November 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  19. FAQS Reference Guide – Emergency Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the January 2004 edition of DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  20. FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  1. FAQS Reference Guide – Environmental Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the June 2011 edition of DOE-STD-1156-2011, Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  2. Ris Energy Report 5 References References for Chapter 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 5 References References for Chapter 3 1. UNEP. (2006). Background paper for the ministerial-level consultations on energy and environment for development. Ninth special session energy outlook 2005. Paris: IEA. 3. IEA. (2003). World energy investment outlook. Paris: IEA. 4. World

  3. Ris Energy Report 6 References Reference list for Chapter 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø Energy Report 6 References Reference list for Chapter 3 1. European Commission. (2007). Communication from the Commis- sion to the European Council and the European Parliament ­ An energy policy of the Brussels European Council 8/9 March 2007. Brussels. (7224/1/07 Rev. 1). 3. Danish Energy authority. (2007

  4. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-04-01

    Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  5. Analysis of radio tracking data obtained by triangulation with special reference to ecology of collared peccary herds in South Texas, U.S.A. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ettestad, Paul Jonas

    1984-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF RADIO TRACKING DATA OBTAINED BY TRIANGUIATION WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ECOLOGY OF COLLARED PECCARY HERDS IN SOUTH TEXAS, U. S. A. A Thesis by PAUL JONAS ETTESTAD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife 6 Fisheries Sciences ANALYSIS OF RADIO TRACKING DATA OBTAINED BY TRIANGULATION WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ECOLOGY OP COLLARED PECCARY HERDS...

  6. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  7. iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK 98501-1091 Prepared by Pat E. Fowler, District Wildlife Biologist January 2001 Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Date #12;iiJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife TABLE OF CONTENTS

  8. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  9. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  10. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 35(2), 1999, pp. 194203 Wildlife Disease Association 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    TO THE FUNGUS METARHIZIUM FLAVOVIRIDE, A BIOCONTROL AGENT FOR LOCUSTS IN AFRICA Judit E. Smits1 , Dan L. Johnson agents with reduced toxicity to non-target organisms. Grasshoppers and locusts are often the most serious

  11. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J.; Helble, J.J.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Ames, M.R.; Finkelman, R.; Mamani-Paco, M.; Sterling, R.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Panagiotou, T.; Seames, W.

    1999-05-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environ-mental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 January 1999 to 31 March 1999. During this period, a full Program Review Meeting was held at the University of Arizona. At this meeting, the progress of each group was reviewed, plans for the following 9 month period were discussed, and action items (principally associated with the transfer of samples and reports among the various investigators) were identified.

  13. Sandia Energy - Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Home Transportation Energy Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility...

  14. California high speed rail proposal: “High speed rail and wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Chapter Wildlife and High Speed Rail C ALIFORNIA H IGH SDan Leavitt, California High Speed Rail Authority) AbstractThe California High Speed Rail (HSR) Proposal is in the

  15. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainably’s...

  16. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  17. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  18. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  19. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  20. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  1. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing roost sites, each within rock crevices in outcrops near the base of the Surry Mountain Lake dam

  2. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference P. Gilman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-64102 May 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S....

  3. Emergency Preparedness Desk Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Emergency Preparedness Desk Reference Manual Important Phone Numbers Medical Emergencies / Hazardous Material Fire Emergencies Vehicle Accidents Evacuation Weather Emergencies Building/System Problem or Failure Threat of Violence Terrorism Interpersonal Emergencies Next Page >>> #12;Important Phone Numbers

  4. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  5. Nutrient Interactions and Toxicity The Amino Bisphosphonate Ibandronate Prevents Vitamin D Toxicity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    Nutrient Interactions and Toxicity The Amino Bisphosphonate Ibandronate Prevents Vitamin D Toxicity and Inhibits Vitamin D-Induced Calcification of Arteries, Cartilage, Lungs and Kidneys in Rats1 Paul A. Price,2 treated with a toxic dose of vitamin D. These studies were prompted by the recent discovery

  6. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  7. Safeguards and Security Program References

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    The manual establishes definitions for terms related to the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program and includes lists of references and acronyms/abbreviations applicable to S&S Program directives. Cancels the Safeguards and Security Glossary of Terms, dated 12-18-95. Current Safeguards and Security Program References can also be found at Safeguards and Security Policy Information Resource (http://pir.pnl.gov/)

  8. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  9. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2000-11-01

    Toxic plants can cause serious losses to livestock, but with the information in this leaflet producers will know how to manage grazing to minimize the danger of toxic plants. It is important to recognize problems early and know how to deal with them....

  10. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01

    -ITHION. The residual toxicity of para- rliioti to the tumid spider mite was not affected by ~i1nul;ttetl rain when the spray was applied at a dosage c.cluiv;~lcnt to 0.3 pound of toxicant per acre. Kill5 or the cotton aphid on spray residues of 1),11;1thion were...

  11. Segmenting participants on nonconsumptive wildlife-related recreation: a comparison of casual wildlife watchers and serious birders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, James Stuart

    1998-01-01

    birders. For this study, casual wildlife watchers were represented by holders of Texas Conservation Passports and serious birders were represented by member of the American Birding Association. These two subgroups were surveyed using a mail...

  12. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  13. REFERENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-08-23

    Mechanism of Fluid Displacement in Sands. Trans. Am. Inst. Min. Metall. Eng.,. 146: 107-116. Chaudhari, N.M., 1971. An Improved Numerical Technique for ...

  14. REFERENCES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 552a. . b. P.L. 104-106, Division E, Clinger Cohen Act (CCA) (formerly Information Technology Management Reform Act of 1996. c. P.L....

  15. Evaluation of the effects of coal fly ash amendments on the toxicity of a contaminated marine sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, R.M.; Perron, M.M.; Friedman, C.L.; Suuberg, E.M.; Pennell, K.G.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Ryba, S.A.

    2009-01-15

    Approaches for cleaning up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In this study, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7-d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of postoxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash before use, and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. No evidence was seen of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel, or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28-d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high-carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, no evidence was seen of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content or of accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon content could represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments.

  16. Blood parasites of waterfowl in South Texas with special reference to Leucocytozoon simondi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loven, Judy Sue

    1978-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1978 Maj or Subject& Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences BLOOD PARASITES OF WATERFOWL IN SOUTH TEXAS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO LEUCOCYTOZOON SIMONDI A Thesis by JUDY SUE LOVEN Approved as to content and. style by: Chairman... of Committee Head. of Department rg/ Member Member May 1978 ~47'940 ABSTRACT Blood Parasites of Waterfowl in South Texas ?1th Rp I& R f t ~lt ~II. (Ihy 1978) Judy Sue Loven, B. S. , Texas AkN University Chairman of' Advisory Committee3 Dr. Brian W...

  17. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  18. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM); Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM); Levin, Bruce L. (Tijeras, NM); Leonard, Jonathan (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  19. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03

    Toxic plants can pose a major threat to livestock during a drought. This publication explains the importance of knowing which plants are toxic, keeping the range healthy, and preventing toxic plant problems....

  20. Review: Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics and Precaution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Review: Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics andFrank. Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics ands new book Poisoned for Pennies: The Economics of Toxics and

  1. Fast Reference-Based MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weizman, Lior; Ben-Basaht, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    In many clinical MRI scenarios, existing imaging information can be used to significantly shorten acquisition time or to improve Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In some cases, a previously acquired image can serve as a reference image, that may exhibit similarity to the image being acquired. Examples include similarity between adjacent slices in high resolution MRI, similarity between various contrasts in the same scan and similarity between different scans of the same patient. In this paper we present a general framework for utilizing reference images for fast MRI. We take into account that the reference image may exhibit low similarity with the acquired image and develop an iterative weighted approach for reconstruction, which tunes the weights according to the degree of similarity. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the method in three different clinical MRI scenarios: SNR improvement in high resolution brain MRI, utilizing similarity between T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)...

  2. Fact Sheet on Toxic Blue-green Algae Carole A. Lembi Department of Botany and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fact Sheet on Toxic Blue-green Algae Carole A. Lembi Department of Botany and Plant Pathology Purdue University What are blue-green algae? Blue-greens are very primitive organisms that are not really as "cyanobacteria" to acknowledge that they are bacteria. "Cyan" means "blue", which refers to the fact

  3. Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Renewable,...

  4. Title: Information theory Reference: 13791

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overill, Richard E.

    environment or communicates with others. One of the fundamental tenets of information theory a spate of publications appeared applying information theory to many aspects of music analysisTitle: Information theory Reference: 13791 Sort key: informationtheory Version: 3.0 Revision

  5. / R Reference May 25, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loon, E. Emiel van

    of time searching for a simple way to do what I wanted, but at the end of the semester, I was pleasantly that the entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission notice identical to this one, Matlab / R Reference 2 Contents 1 Help 3 2 Entering/building/indexing matrices 3 2.1 Cell arrays

  6. Reference Workbook: Pollution Prevention Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Reference Workbook: Pollution Prevention Plans DOE FRAP 1994-35 Prepared for: I Environment Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement Office 224 West Esplanade North Vancouver, B Pollution Abatement Office. Environment Canada is not responsible for the content of this report but has

  7. References: Elmasri/Navathe:Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brass, Stefan

    7. SQL I 7­1 Part 7: SQL I References: . Elmasri/Navathe:Fundamentals of Database Systems, 3rd Edition, 1999. Chap. 8, ``SQL --- The Relational Database Standard'' (Sect. 8.2, 8.3.3, part of 8. . Date/Darwen: A Guide to the SQL Standard, Fourth Edition, Addison­Wesley , 1997. . Date: A Guide

  8. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    1 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE GSU EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 404-413-0783 GSU POLICE: 404-413-3333 ATLANTA FIRE RESUCE: 911 #12;2 Emergency Response - Order of Priority In any emergency situation, Georgia infrastructure and facilities 3. Resume our research and educational programs Emergency Action Levels: A. Level 1

  9. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  10. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  11. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  12. Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 2 Wildlife Biologist, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF), Sacramento; Senior Wildlife Biologist, Jones and Stokes Associates, Inc. Sacramento, California; Operations Research and GIS Specialist, CDF, Sacramento; and GIS Manager, Teale Data Center, Sacramento. Nancy D. Tosta2

  13. Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran J.

    2009-05-15

    Urbanization decreases the amount of natural habitat available to wildlife but some species are able to adapt to and even thrive in human-dominated landscapes. When humans and wildlife live in close proximity the number ...

  14. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  15. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a...

  16. Differences in growth and toxicity of Karenia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, Tatum Elizabeth

    2006-08-16

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the Gulf of Mexico are primarily caused by dense aggregations of the dinoflagellate species, Karenia brevis. Karenia brevis produces a highly toxic neurotoxin, brevetoxin which has been shown ...

  17. Toxicity of Bitterweed (Actinea odorata) for Sheep. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boughton, I. B (Ivan Bertrand); Hardy, W. T. (William Tyree)

    1937-01-01

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, RFCAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 552 AUGUST, 1937 DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE TOXICITY OF BI'FTERWEED" FOR SHEEP (*Actinea odorata) AGRICULTURAL... AND MECHANICMIJ COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President Previous feeding tests and field observations* have established the toxicity of bitterweed (Actinea odorata) for sheep. The experi- ments reported herein prove that the minimum lethal dose of the fresh...

  18. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  19. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  20. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  1. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  2. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  3. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  4. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  5. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  6. Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM and Toxics Regulation in the South Coast Air Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Nancy J.

    1993-01-01

    Emissions Trading and Air Toxics Emissions: RECLAIM anda mar- ket-based emissions trading program called theimpacts cre- ated by emissions trading programs that affect

  7. JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995 blank page #12;SECTION 5 JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION September 13, 1995 5-16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM temperature MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-17 September 13, 1995 program. If there are conflicting

  8. SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools #12;SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT A-1 Interactive and Washington during the Wildlife-Habitat Types in Oregon and Washington project. IBIS data is currently being

  9. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  10. Microgrid cyber security reference architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veitch, Cynthia K.; Henry, Jordan M.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Hart, Derek H.

    2013-07-01

    This document describes a microgrid cyber security reference architecture. First, we present a high-level concept of operations for a microgrid, including operational modes, necessary power actors, and the communication protocols typically employed. We then describe our motivation for designing a secure microgrid; in particular, we provide general network and industrial control system (ICS)-speci c vulnerabilities, a threat model, information assurance compliance concerns, and design criteria for a microgrid control system network. Our design approach addresses these concerns by segmenting the microgrid control system network into enclaves, grouping enclaves into functional domains, and describing actor communication using data exchange attributes. We describe cyber actors that can help mitigate potential vulnerabilities, in addition to performance bene ts and vulnerability mitigation that may be realized using this reference architecture. To illustrate our design approach, we present a notional a microgrid control system network implementation, including types of communica- tion occurring on that network, example data exchange attributes for actors in the network, an example of how the network can be segmented to create enclaves and functional domains, and how cyber actors can be used to enforce network segmentation and provide the neces- sary level of security. Finally, we describe areas of focus for the further development of the reference architecture.

  11. Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet

  12. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Liange

    2014-01-01

    Shale Disposal Reference Case August 2014 Borehole activity: Oil and gas drilling targets for hydrocarbon resource

  13. Reference Inflow Characterization for River Resource Reference Model (RM2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) is leading an effort to develop reference models for marine and hydrokinetic technologies and wave and current energy resources. This effort will allow the refinement of technology design tools, accurate estimates of a baseline levelized cost of energy (LCoE), and the identification of the main cost drivers that need to be addressed to achieve a competitive LCoE. As part of this effort, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was charged with examining and reporting reference river inflow characteristics for reference model 2 (RM2). Published turbulent flow data from large rivers, a water supply canal and laboratory flumes, are reviewed to determine the range of velocities, turbulence intensities and turbulent stresses acting on hydrokinetic technologies, and also to evaluate the validity of classical models that describe the depth variation of the time-mean velocity and turbulent normal Reynolds stresses. The classical models are found to generally perform well in describing river inflow characteristics. A potential challenge in river inflow characterization, however, is the high variability of depth and flow over the design life of a hydrokinetic device. This variation can have significant effects on the inflow mean velocity and turbulence intensity experienced by stationary and bottom mounted hydrokinetic energy conversion devices, which requires further investigation, but are expected to have minimal effects on surface mounted devices like the vertical axis turbine device designed for RM2. A simple methodology for obtaining an approximate inflow characterization for surface deployed devices is developed using the relation umax=(7/6)V where V is the bulk velocity and umax is assumed to be the near-surface velocity. The application of this expression is recommended for deriving the local inflow velocity acting on the energy extraction planes of the RM2 vertical axis rotors, where V=Q/A can be calculated given a USGS gage flow time-series and stage vs. cross-section area rating relationship.

  14. New Hampshire Coverts Project Volunteers Working for Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    New Hampshire Coverts Project Volunteers Working for Wildlife 2014 Annual Report Written by: Haley) 862-5327 October 31, 2014 The New Hampshire Coverts Project is sponsored by UNH Cooperative Extension and New Hampshire Fish & Game. The program also receives support from the New Hampshire Division

  15. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Silver-haired bats do not remain in New Hampshire during the winter (see Izor 1979 for discussion to their summer habitat in New Hampshire (or, more gener- ally, to northern states; Cryan and Veilleux in press

  16. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Special Concern Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1 was listed as Threatened in New Hampshire between 1980 and 1986, was on the American Birds Blue List through

  17. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  18. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G4 State Rank: S2 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Breeding habitat for the rusty blackbird in New Hampshire

  19. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209 Associated Species: spruce grouse: Carol R. Foss Affiliation: New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat on mineral soils. In northern New Hampshire, these range from well or moderately well drained upland forests

  20. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10 Associated Species: Timber rattlesnake. Foss, Audubon Society of New Hampshire Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Appalachian oak pine forest systems are found mostly below 900 ft elevation in southern New Hampshire south

  1. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  2. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing found in similar shallow-water habitats in southernNewHampshire(JenkinsandBabbitt2003). The spotted, and a Species of Special concern in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Because their habitat overlaps

  3. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Jillian R. Kelly, New Hampshire Fish and Game Element 1). In the winter, spruce grouse feed entirely on short conifer needles (Nature- Serve 2005). New Hampshire natural

  4. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing, and Wisconsin (NatureServe 2004). New Hampshire and Maine represent the northernmost extent of the known to New Jersey are vulnerable to development. In New Hampshire, ringed boghaunter populations are limited

  5. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Eastern red bats inhabit New Hampshire during the summer. Individuals migrate to southern states in the fall and return to New Hampshire and other northern states in the spring (Cryan and Veilleux in press

  6. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing included peer-re- viewed literature, Breeding Bird Survey Database, New Hampshire's Breeding Bird Atlas, and expert consultation. 1.8 Extent and Quality of Data The annual breeding bird survey, New Hampshire

  7. O&M strategic plan Fish and Wildlife Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on O&M strategic plan Fish and Wildlife Committee February 10, 2015 #12;Background Over, but will continue to help BPA meet its mitigation requirements. 2 #12;O&M Strategic planning Initial steps #C) Next steps in developing a Strategic Plan for Public Review Proposed Categories Screens

  8. Wildlife damage management professionals deal with very few

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , environmental degradation, or disease transmission, feral hogs play a substantial role. Earlier this year damage caused by feral hogs, a growing threat is transmission of diseases, primarily pseudorabies, Washington, DC 20250-3402, USA William H. Clay #12;138 Human­Wildlife C

  9. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind by recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  10. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind by recovery and subbasin planning Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  11. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Gorge Framework Potential costs and economic considerations for recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. E Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Serv

  12. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin by recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  13. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  14. 8 Connecticut Wildlife March/April 2012 "How suddenly they

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelly, David Kiernan

    8 Connecticut Wildlife March/April 2012 "How suddenly they awake! Yesterday, as it were, asleep ­ Connecticut Science Center ; photos by Jonathan Richardson Filling occurs once leaves have fallen from in southern Connecticut to breed in March. Two images from the same vernal pond in central Connecticut

  15. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instruments for the Conservation and Preservation of Wildlife Habitat in the Lower Fraser River Estuary), Brian Fairley (B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food), Kelly Fink (Canadian Forest Service, Fisheries and Food), and Bill Wareham (Ducks' Unlimited). The Forest Economics and Policy Analysis Research

  16. Reference electrode for electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kessie, R.W.

    1988-07-28

    A reference electrode device is provided for a high temperature electrolytic cell used to electrolytically recover uranium from spent reactor fuel dissolved in an anode pool, the device having a glass tube to enclose the electrode and electrolyte and serve as a conductive membrane with the cell electrolyte, and an outer metal tube about the glass tube to serve as a shield and basket for any glass sections broken by handling of the tube to prevent their contact with the anode pool, the metal tube having perforations to provide access between the bulk of the cell electrolyte and glass membrane. 4 figs.

  17. Electrolytic cell with reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kessie, Robert W. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A reference electrode device is provided for a high temperature electrolytic cell used to electrolytically recover uranium from spent reactor fuel dissolved in an anode pool, the device having a glass tube to enclose the electrode and electrolyte and serve as a conductive membrane with the cell electrolyte, and an outer metal tube about the glass tube to serve as a shield and basket for any glass sections broken by handling of the tube to prevent their contact with the anode pool, the metal tube having perforations to provide access between the bulk of the cell electrolyte and glass membrane.

  18. PVWatts Version 1 Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobos, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    The NREL PVWatts(TM) calculator is a web application developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that estimates the electricity production of a grid-connected photovoltaic system based on a few simple inputs. PVWatts combines a number of sub-models to predict overall system performance, and makes several hidden assumptions about performance parameters. This technical reference details the individual sub-models, documents assumptions and hidden parameters, and explains the sequence of calculations that yield the final system performance estimation.

  19. DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

  20. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):129131, Fall 2007 This issue of Human-Wildlife Conflicts focuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the management of feral hogs (Sus scrofa). As this exotic species has become more numerous apparent and alarming. How best to manage feral hogs has become one of the most vexing questions for wildlife agencies today, owing to society's mixed attitudes towards feral hogs (Rollins et al. 2007

  1. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):251260, Fall 2014 Wildlife strikes with U.S. military rotary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during deployments in the Middle East (e.g., Iraq), whereas, strikes to U.S. Air Force aircraft occurred, Iraq, military, rotary-wing aircraft, wildlife strikes During the last 2 decades, a great deal of armed conflict, and political upheaval has occurredintheMiddleEast(e.g.,Iraq)andsouth- central Asia (e

  2. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  3. SNAP operating system reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabuda, J.D.; Polito, J.; Walker, J.L.; Grant, F.H. III

    1982-03-01

    The SNAP Operating System (SOS) is a FORTRAN 77 program which provides assistance to the safeguards analyst who uses the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) and the Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP) techniques. Features offered by SOS are a data base system for storing a library of SNAP applications, computer graphics representation of SNAP models, a computer graphics editor to develop and modify SNAP models, a SAFE-to-SNAP interface, automatic generation of SNAP input data, and a computer graphic post-processor for SNAP. The SOS Reference Manual provides detailed application information concerning SOS as well as a detailed discussion of all SOS components and their associated command input formats. SOS was developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the US Naval Surface Weapons Center by Pritsker and Associates, Inc., under contract to Sandia National Laboratories.

  4. Investigating packaging effects on bandgap references

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palakodety, Ravi (Ravi Kiran)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates packaging effects on precision bandgap voltage references used in LTC switching regulators. Packaging stress causes a mean offset and room temperature distribution widening of the bandgap reference ...

  5. National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture Consultation Draft Contributing to the Australian Government National Plan for Environmental Information initiative #12;National Environmental Information Infrastructure Reference Architecture: Consultation Draft Environmental Information

  6. Sandia Energy - Reference Model Project (RMP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project (RMP) Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Reference Model Project (RMP) Reference Model Project (RMP)Tara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T21:01:36+00:00...

  7. Charting Future Directions for Reference Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratton, John M.; Devlin, Frances A.

    2011-10-18

    reference desks. Reference questions were coded using a taxonomy based on subject headings used to organize databases into broad categories, in addition to corresponding to professional schools within the University. Using our earlier study as a point...

  8. Intel C++ Compiler User and Reference Guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Branislav K.

    Intel® C++ Compiler User and Reference Guides Document number: 304968-022US #12;Disclaimer) 2001, Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. #12;#12;v Table of Contents Intel(R) C++ Compiler User and Reference Guides..............................................1 Intel® C++ Compiler User and Reference

  9. Reference Phase of Fresnel Zone Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Webb

    2003-02-28

    The standard zone plate assumes that the shortest ray connecting a radiation source and a detection point has a phase of 0 deg thereby defining a reference phase. Here we examine the experimental consequences of varying this reference phase from 0 deg to 360 deg. It is concluded that reference phase is an intrinsic and useful property of zone plates.

  10. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  11. Bibliography of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Reference Series 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criqui, Nan P.; Kuhns, Kittie K.

    2002-01-01

    Scripps Institution of Oceanography Reference Series 2001.SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY REFERENCE SERIES 01-01

  12. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004)Michigan:Montana Building with Wildlife

  13. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois: Energy Resources JumpMarion,Market-Based Wildlife

  14. Wildlife Monitoring and Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar: Demonstration of NREL's BioEnergyWildlife Monitoring and

  15. Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

  16. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  17. Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

  18. REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning in the British isles: history The relationship between toxic marine microalgae species and climate change has become a high profile and well examine the current state of toxic microalgae species around the UK, in two ways: first we describe

  19. The toxicity of certain new chlorinated hydrocarbons to cotton pests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkl, Marvin Eugene

    1953-01-01

    THE TOXICITY OF CERTAIN NEW CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS TO COTTON PESTS A Dissertation 5y MARVIN EUGENE MERKL Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of CouBlttee Head of Departnent May 19*3 THE TOXICITY OF CERTAIN NEW CHLORINATED... .....................................................78 CONCLUSIONS............................................... ..81 BIBLIOGRAPHI .............................................. ..82 Pag? FIGURES 1* Dosage-?ortality curve for the toxicity of endrin to aphids...

  20. Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Tommie L.

    1994-01-01

    Sharing Texas Resources: Interpretation Handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tommie L. Herrick Nay 1994 Record of Study SHARZNG TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK POR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT A... Department Natural Resources Development SHARING TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK FOR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTNENT A Professional Paper by Tommie L. Herrick Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Edward H. Heath (Chairman...

  1. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  2. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  3. COLLISIONS BETWEEN LARGE WILDLIFE AND MOTOR VEHICLE IN MAINE: 1998 - 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van-Riper, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Source: As part of Maine Department of TransportationWILDLIFE AND MOTOR VEHICLE IN MAINE: 1998 - 2001 Robert Van-Environmental Office, Maine Department of Transportation,

  4. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  5. A GIS-based identification of potentially significant wildlife habitats associated with roads in Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Viani, Kevin; Hammond, Forrest; Slesar, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Capen. 1997. A report on the biophysical regions in Vermont.report prepared for the Vermont Ecomapping Roundtable.scientist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and

  6. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A: Workshop Agenda July 2013 Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication Dates: July...

  7. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles : Sources and toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzea, Cristina; Robbie, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This review is written with the goal of informing public health concerns related to nanoscience, while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to nanoparticles and dust from natural sources and human activities, the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation profoundly increasing anthropogenic nanoparticulate pollution. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size, smaller than cells and cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. Among diseases associated with nanoparticles are asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson`s and Alzheimer`s diseases), Crohn`s disease, colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are related to occurrence of arteriosclerosis, and blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately cardiac d...

  8. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  9. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  10. Internship Checklist Ready Reference C-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internship Checklist Ready Reference C-3 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office

  11. Cover Letter Formula Ready Reference F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cover Letter Formula Ready Reference F-3 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office

  12. Letter of Refusal Ready Reference F-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letter of Refusal Ready Reference F-8 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career

  13. Sample Withdrawal Letter Ready Reference F-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Withdrawal Letter Ready Reference F-11 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  14. Sample Application Letter Ready Reference F-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Application Letter Ready Reference F-5 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  15. Sample Networking Letter Ready Reference F-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Networking Letter Ready Reference F-6 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  16. Sample Acceptance Letter Ready Reference F-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Acceptance Letter Ready Reference F-10 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  17. Job Search Steps Ready Reference D-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Job Search Steps Ready Reference D-1 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office

  18. Preparing A Vita Ready Reference E-13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preparing A Vita Ready Reference E-13 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office

  19. FAQS Reference Guide – Facility Maintenance Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the April 2014 edition of DOE Standard DOE-STD-1181-2014, Facility Maintenance Management Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  20. FAQS Reference Guide – NNSA Package Certification Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2009 edition of DOE-STD-1026-2009, NNSA Package Certification Engineer Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  1. FAQS Reference Guide – General Technical Base

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the December 2007 edition of DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  2. EERE Program Management Quick Reference Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Program Management Reference Guide. It provides an overall description of the EERE program management structure, defines...

  3. Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations" held on October 13, 2015.

  4. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

  5. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-07-26

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

  6. Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models) Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE Models) Development of Reference Models and Design Tools (LCOE...

  7. Federal Employee Training Desk Reference | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    College of Learning and Workforce Development Federal Employee Training Desk Reference Federal Employee Training Desk Reference The DOE Federal Employee Training Desk Reference...

  8. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  9. Archived Reference Building Type: Primary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  10. Archived Reference Building Type: Primary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  11. OUTLOOK -MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    th OUTLOOK - MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE Quick Reference Guide is designed to step you through the initial set up of your Outlook email account on your Mac. Note: If you're opening Microsoft Outlook 2011 for the first time, you will see the Welcome to Microsoft Outlook for Mac window

  12. OUTLOOK -MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    th OUTLOOK - MOBILE DEVICE ACCESS QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE This Quick Reference Guide is designed to step you through the setup of your Outlook email account on your mobile device. When to use this Guide is Outlook. NOTE: After you have set up your account you must remove your old GWSync account ITS

  13. Archived Reference Building Type: Secondary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. Archived Reference Building Type: Secondary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. Archived Reference Building Type: Outpatient health care

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  18. Archived Reference Building Type: Outpatient health care

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  19. Intel Fortran Compiler User and Reference Guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Branislav K.

    Intel® Fortran Compiler User and Reference Guides Document number: 304970-005US #12;Disclaimer) 2001, Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. #12;#12;v Table of Contents Intel(R) Fortran Compiler User and Reference Guides.........................................1 Intel® Fortran Compiler User

  20. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-03

    First they had a vision: welcome people into a building embracing environmental stewardship on land that is steeped in history. The designers of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took this vision and designed a new energy-efficient and environmentally friendly visitor center for the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge located in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

  1. Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania Fortunata U and Sustainability, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, U.K.; 3 Tanzania National Parks, PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania; 4 Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania; 5 Center for Collaborative

  2. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  3. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):240247, Fall 2008 Mammalian hazards at small airports in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fence maintenance is vital for effective wildlife- strike management at small airports. Key words,000 hours of aircraft downtime each year and cost the civil aviation industry >$556 million annually (Cleary the inception of aviation 100 years ago (Sodhi 2002). Unfortunately, the probability of wildlife strikes

  4. INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

  5. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs are reaching out to these varied interests to form a coalition to secure the necessary funding appreciation of the natural world and how they might act to insure that wildlife remains a part of it

  6. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  7. New Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    preservation and other activities associated with traditional game management. Fortunately, much of the knowledge and techniques developed for game #12;management can be transferred to considerations of wildlifeNew Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1 Tamsie

  8. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  9. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:Information Wildlife Refuge System Administration

  10. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: EnergyNatural Resources Code JumpWildlife

  11. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations

  12. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25

    AgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University System a71 College Station, Texas Tableof... in diagnosis is to determine *Extension range specialist and Extension livestock- specialist, The Texas A&M University System. whether the cause is plant poisoning or in- fectious disease. To do so it is necessary to carefully observe symptoms exhibited by af...

  13. Reference samples for water-related programs in the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.A.

    1985-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory at Cincinnati provides quality assurance (QA) support for US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water-related programs. Two important segments of this support are the Quality Control Sample Program, which furnishes samples of known concentrations for use as independent checks on intralaboratory QA activities, and the EPA's Repository for Toxic and Hazardous Materials, which provides calibration standards and spiking solutions for trace organic analyses of interest to the Agency. Each series contains one or more analytes, with true or reference values. The samples and standards are prepared as stable concentrated solutions in all-glass ampuls for dilution to volume, and analyses by EPA, its contractors and grantees, and other federal, state, and local agencies. 1 reference, 6 tables.

  14. The toxicity of different emulsions of toxaphene to cotton insects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selby, James Winford

    1952-01-01

    . Summary of the cotton boll weevil toxicity tests ~ . LS 5. Analysis of cotton bolL weevil control data ob- tained in the laboratory and field teste ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20 4 ~ Summary of the cotton boll weevil toxicity test in the Laboratorye ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21 6 Summary of the saltish caterpillar toxicity tests ~ ~ ~ eo ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e( ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ee ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 22 6 ~ Vedian lethal dosage {KID) of the test materials as obtained fran the Laboratory...

  15. Volume_VIII_App_P_Summary_Ch 3_ References_Ch 4

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 3-359 25 Special Status Wildlife, Fish Aquatic Invertebrate, and Amphibian Species ... 3-379 26 Surface Water...

  16. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant....

  17. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis....

  18. Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Renewable, Non-Toxic and Cost Competitive Solvents and Plasticizers Len Rand, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman, xF Technologies

  19. Plant–herbivore interactions mediated by plant toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-03-25

    Dec 17, 2007 ... O. Box 249118, Coral Gables, FL 33124, United States. .... Per capital death rate of herbivore unrelated to plant toxicity. 2. Analysis of the ...

  20. Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles...

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Kentucky Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  2. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Ohio Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  3. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2010-01-01

    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 13(7):532-toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. Recommendations andof toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. USEtox therefore

  4. LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES DIVISION Current References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES DIVISION Current References (92 -1) ,..... .. , ... ........,., ECOSYSTEMS OF THE FLORIDA KEYS · A Bibliography U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service National Oceanographic Data Center

  5. Salary Negotiation Ready ReferenceH-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salary Negotiation Ready ReferenceH-3 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career" salary on the top end of your range. Although this range may appear high because it is created from

  6. Writing Career Objectives Ready Reference E-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Writing Career Objectives Ready Reference E-5 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology in pharmaceutical research" #12;Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career your practical skills. Examples: -"A position in a large, high tech organization requiring network

  7. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Liange

    2014-01-01

    S. and K.S. Johnson, (1984). Shale and other argillaceousand R. T. Cygan, (2010). Shale Disposal of U.S. High-LevelDC. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case August

  8. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  9. New Construction Commercial Reference Buildings — Archive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  10. Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This job aid is a quick reference to assist emergency responders in identifying preliminary safety precautions that should be taken during the initial response phase after arrival at the scene of...

  11. FAQS Reference Guide – Civil/ Structural Engineering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the March 2004 edition of DOE-STD-1182-2004, Civil/Structural Engineering Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  12. FAQS Reference Guide – Safety Software Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the (March 2011) edition of DOE-STD-1172-2011, Safety Software Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  13. Pronominal System and Reference in Pulaar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ba, Ibrahima

    2015-12-20

    This paper examines pronominal reference and the long-distance anaphor in Pulaar, a West African language spoken from Senegal to Niger and Cameroon. I am focusing on Toore, a dialect of Pulaar spoken in southern Senegal. ...

  14. Clause chaining, switch reference and coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonato, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis I ponder over a constellation of phenomena that revolve around switch reference and coordination, drawing mainly on their instantiation in Kisedje (Je, Brazil). I start by investigating Klsedje's case system. ...

  15. Precision Micropower, Low Dropout Voltage References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    series references are specified over the extended industrial temperature range (-40°C to +85°C) with typical performance specifications over -40°C to +125°C for applications, such as automotive. All

  16. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  17. Javarifier : inference of reference immutability in Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinonez, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    Javari is an extension of Java that supports reference immutability constraints. Programmers write Javari type qualifiers, such as the readonly type qualifier, in their programs, and the Javari typechecker detects mutation ...

  18. Generating and interpreting referring expressions in context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dustin Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Referring expressions with vague and ambiguous modifiers, such as "a quick visit" and "the big meeting," are difficult for computers to interpret because their meanings are defined in part by context. For the hearer to ...

  19. Integrating Referring and Informing in NP Planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Michael; Knott, Alistair; Hitzeman, Janet; Cheng, Hua

    Two of the functions of an NP are to refer (identify a particular entity) and to inform (provide new information about an entity). While many NPs may serve only one of these functions, some NPs conflate the functions, ...

  20. Population Reference Bureau Kenneth W. Wachter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wachter, Kenneth W.

    -Recapture Estimates 2. Logistic Regression for Stratum Rates 3. Synthetic Estimation for Small Areas KWW ­ p. 14/2 #12,000 households · American Community Survey: Reverse Record Check KWW ­ p. 20/2 #12;References Bell, Robert and M

  1. An expectation model of referring expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kræmer, John, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This thesis introduces EMRE, an expectation-based model of referring expressions. EMRE is proposed as a model of non-syntactic dependencies - in particular, discourse-level semantic dependencies that bridge sentence gaps. ...

  2. Quantum communication, reference frames and gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. van Enk

    2006-04-26

    We consider quantum communication in the case that the communicating parties not only do not share a reference frame but use imperfect quantum communication channels, in that each channel applies some fixed but unknown unitary rotation to each qubit. We discuss similarities and differences between reference frames within that quantum communication model and gauge fields in gauge theory. We generalize the concept of refbits and analyze various quantum communication protocols within the communication model.

  3. "Analysis of SOFCs using reference electrodes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finklea, Harry; Chen,Xiaoke; Gerdes,Kirk; Pakalapati, Suryanarayana; Celik, Ismail

    2013-07-01

    Reference electrodes are frequently applied to isolate the performance of one electrode in a solid oxide fuel cell. However, reference electrode simulations raise doubt to veracity of data collected using reference electrodes. The simulations predict that the reported performance for the one electrode will frequently contain performance of both electrodes. Nonetheless, recent reports persistently treat data so collected as ideally isolated. This work confirms the predictions of the reference electrode simulations on two SOFC designs, and to provides a method of validating the data measured in the 3-electrode configuration. Validation is based on the assumption that a change in gas composition to one electrode does not affect the impedance of the other electrode at open circuit voltage. This assumption is supported by a full physics simulation of the SOFC. Three configurations of reference electrode and cell design are experimentally examined using various gas flows and two temperatures. Impedance data are subjected to deconvolution analysis and equivalent circuit fitting and approximate polarization resistances of the cathode and anode are determined. The results demonstrate that the utility of reference electrodes is limited and often wholly inappropriate. Reported impedances and single electrode polarization values must be scrutinized on this basis.

  4. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  5. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  6. Evaluation of Sediment Toxicity Using a Suite of Assessment Tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Matthew A

    2010-01-15

    of sediment toxicity. The goal of this research was to provide information which could help increase the accuracy with which predictions of toxicity could be made at hazardous sites. A calibration study was conducted using model PAHs, PCBs, a binary PAH...

  7. Temporal and spatial distribution of fishes in the upper Galveston Bay System with particular reference to the cooling water system of Cedar Bayou Generating Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Scott Allen

    1976-01-01

    1I:MPORAL AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISHES IN THE UPPER GALVESTON BAY SYSTEM WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE COOLING WATER SYSTEM OF CEDAR BAYOU GENERATING STATION A Thesis by SCOTT ALLEN HOLT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A... This research was made possible by a grant from Hou-ton Lighting 6 Power Company to the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Scier. es and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (Project 1869-2781) . I would like to express my appreciation to Dr. Kirk...

  8. References - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference MaterialsReference Shelf

  9. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  10. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  11. INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -site measures and programs -- respond to the impacts on fish and wildlife caused by the region's hydroelectric and management of hydroelectric facilities located on the Columbia River and its tributaries, while assuring

  12. SampleSize 1.1 Sample Size Calculations for Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208-3621 Project of design variables. This project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, US Department of Energy

  13. Assessing Attitudes Toward Wildlife Ownership in United StatesMexico Borderlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Park & Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA ANGELA G. MERTIG Department or access to it on game ranches) made some wildlife species a potentially valuable asset for landowners

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  15. Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

  16. The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Etienne Samuel

    2006-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

  17. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01

    The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the wave conditions in the channel in order to evaluate the respective energies...

  18. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):296297, Fall 2009 Richard A. Dolbeer: scientist, innovator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and produced advances in how airport habitats should be managedtoreduceusebywildlife,inthedesign of turbine-powered engines and airframes to withstand bird strikes, and in how wildlife strike data are reported

  19. NIST Standard Reference Database 23 NIST Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements and models we have taken from the literature, and without which this database would be much#12;NIST Standard Reference Database 23 NIST Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (NIST) uses its best efforts to deliver a high quality copy of the Database and to verify that the data

  20. Terms of Reference Information Security Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Terms of Reference Information Security Group Version 3.1 8 March 2011 © University of Leeds 2011 Security Group Information Security Management 3.1 (8/3/11) Page 2 of 4 Document Control Owner: Kevin Darley, IT Security Co-ordinator, Information Systems Services, University of Leeds Source Location: V

  1. Risk Management Steering Committee Terms of Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Risk Management Steering Committee Terms of Reference October 2009 1.0 Purpose The purposes Facilities Management Risk and Insurance Analyst Associate Vice-President Human Resources Administrative of the Steering Committee are: a) to follow a continuous process to understand and communicate risk from

  2. The Behavioral Interview Ready Reference G-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Behavioral Interview Ready Reference G-7 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology in technical and high tech industries within the last 10 years. Behavioral interviews are designed to focus

  3. Questioning Yourself Ready Reference B-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Questioning Yourself Ready Reference B-2 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office set my own hours? Do I thrive in a high-stress atmosphere, or would I prefer something a bit more

  4. INVESTIGATION Construction of Reference Chromosome-Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    INVESTIGATION Construction of Reference Chromosome-Scale Pseudomolecules for Potato: Integrating was genotyped with several types of molecular genetic markers to construct a new ~936 cM linkage map comprising and orientation within the pseudo- molecules are closely collinear with independently constructed high density

  5. Quick-Reference Guide to Optimization with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Branislav K.

    Quick-Reference Guide to Optimization with Intel® Compilers version 11 For IA-32 processors, Intel, you may want to check correctness of your application by building it without optimization using /Od (-O0). In this compiler version, all optimization levels assume support for the SSE2 instruction set

  6. Previous Up Next Article From References: 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    (e.g. laminar) fluid flow. Two decades of interdisciplinary studies in this line of investigationPrevious Up Next Article Citations From References: 0 From Reviews: 0 MR2265644 (Review) 37N10 (37D in applications: micro to macro, fluids to solids. Cambridge Monographs on Applied and Computational Mathematics

  7. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : reference guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. It is targeted specifically to run on large-scale parallel computing platforms but also runs well on a variety of architectures including single processor workstations. It also aims to support a variety of devices and models specific to Sandia needs. This document is intended to complement the Xyce Users Guide. It contains comprehensive, detailed information about a number of topics pertinent to the usage of Xyce. Included in this document is a netlist reference for the input-file commands and elements supported within Xyce; a command line reference, which describes the available command line arguments for Xyce; and quick-references for users of other circuit codes, such as Orcad's PSpice and Sandia's ChileSPICE.

  8. Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Sections 337 the properties and potential safety and health hazards of the materials which they use or to which they are exposed. Employees who use or may be exposed to potentially hazardous substances or harmful physical

  9. Positional reference system for ultraprecision machining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, J.B.; Burleson, R.R.; Pardue, R.M.

    1980-09-12

    A stable positional reference system for use in improving the cutting tool-to-part contour position in numerical controlled-multiaxis metal turning machines is provided. The reference system employs a plurality of interferometers referenced to orthogonally disposed metering bars which are substantially isolated from machine strain induced position errors for monitoring the part and tool positions relative to the metering bars. A microprocessor-based control system is employed in conjunction with the plurality of positions interferometers and part contour description data input to calculate error components for each axis of movement and output them to corresponding axis driven with appropriate scaling and error compensation. Real-time position control, operating in combination with the reference system, makes possible the positioning of the cutting points of a tool along a part locus with a substantially greater degree of accuracy than has been attained previously in the art by referencing and then monitoring only the tool motion relative to a reference position located on the machine base.

  10. UNIVERSITY PLANNING (SCUP) Terms of Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    UNIVERSITY PLANNING (SCUP) Terms of Reference: The Committee is the chief forum within Senate for critical appraisal and coordination of long-term strategic, capital and budget plans for the University planning context, it has specific responsibilities as follows: Long-Range Planning To review and recommend

  11. Campus Planning Committee Terms of Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 Campus Planning Committee Terms of Reference Type: Advisory to President Charge: 1. Recognizing the academic priorities of the institution, the Committee shall advise the President on: a) the long-range plan for the physical development of the Campus; b) amendments to the approved campus plan; c) the University's proposed

  12. Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference Problem D. P. Stotler, PPPL S. I. Krasheninnikov, UCSD 1 Summary Type of problem: kinetic or fluid neutral transport Physics or algorithm stressed: thermal force term (spatial resolution) in momentum transport equation and treatment of collisions (charge ex- change

  13. Shape Recipes: Scene Representations that Refer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, William T.

    Shape Recipes: Scene Representations that Refer to the Image William T. Freeman and Antonio to estimate and store. We propose a low-dimensional rep- resentation, called a scene recipe, that relies on the image itself to de- scribe the complex scene configurations. Shape recipes are an example

  14. Office of Classroom Management A quick reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Office of Classroom Management A quick reference for how to navigate your classroom's technology of the camera. #12;Office of Classroom Management 1. Press any button other than the "system off" button 2. When and resources www.classroom.umn.edu Classroom Support Hotline: 612-625-1086 ·Controlsforthe

  15. Macrosegregation Macrosegregation refers to variations in composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    in casting processes: (i) Flow that feeds the solidification shrinkage and the contractions of the liquidMacrosegregation Macrosegregation refers to variations in composition that occur in alloy castings variations have a detrimental impact on the subsequent processing behavior and properties of cast materials

  16. LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES DIVISION Current References

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Satellne. Data. and InformationService National Oceanographic Data Center #12;· GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGELIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES DIVISION Current References (90 -1) Global Climate Change FEBRUARY of data centers on which an information system must be built. This bibliography offers a selection

  17. R Reference Manual: A gentle overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priestley, Jennifer Lewis

    , yet similar to SAS, R is a commands-driven programming environment to execute statistical analysisR Reference Manual: A gentle overview #12;2 Developed and maintained by the Center for Statistics statistical computing packages ­ Excel, SPSS, Minitab, R and SAS. 1 Readers of this manual are assumed to have

  18. Toxic material measurement, monitoring, and control in the metal joining and finishing industries. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the measurement, monitoring, and control of toxic exposure to hazardous substances by workers in the metal joining and finishing industries. Topics include measurement methods and monitoring studies of workplace solvents and electroplating baths used in degreasing and painting metal surfaces. Coverage includes accepted exposure control procedures that meet health guidelines and regulations. Welding safety and health guidelines from several sources are detailed, including air contamination and welding fumes standards. References to recovery and recycling of waste metals are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 122 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

  20. Bibliography of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Reference Series 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criqui, Nan P.

    1995-01-01

    OF THE SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY REFERENCE SERIESScripps Institution of Oceanography. July 1994. 179p. 94-17Scripps Institution of Oceanography Reference Series 1994.

  1. Bibliography of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Reference Series 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Paige A.

    1998-01-01

    SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY REFERENCE SERIES 97-01Scripps Institution of Oceanography Reference Series 1997.held at Scripps Institution of Oceanography 19 August 1997.

  2. Biomass Scenario Model Documentation: Data and References Lin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Documentation: Data and References Lin, Y.; Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.; Stright, D. 09 BIOMASS FUELS BIOMASS SCENARIO MODEL; BSM; BIOMASS; BIOFUEL; MODEL; DATA; REFERENCES;...

  3. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  4. Surface Temperature Humidity Reference System Handbook - November 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2005-11-30

    The Surface Temperature and Humidity Reference (SURTHREF) system is intended to provide accurate reference values of ambient temperature and relative humidity for comparison with radiosonde prelaunch values.

  5. A Method for Calculating Reference Evapotranspiration on Daily Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, William

    Measures of reference evapotranspiration are essential for applications of agricultural management and water resources engineering. Using numerous esoteric variables, one can calculate daily reference evapotranspiration ...

  6. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    akfairbanksnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    atxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mdbaltimorenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    usaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    samthelenanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    acobouldernew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    awaseattlenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nvlasvegasnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate...

  15. Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    In-Process Technology has placed a prototype of its patented, electrically heated, packed-bed air toxics oxidizer at a northern California chemical plant. This thermal oxidizer is capable of handling a wide range of chlorinated and non...

  16. Sensitivity or artifact? -- IQ Toxicity Test -- effluent values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, K.R.; Novotny, A.N.; Batista, N.

    1995-12-31

    Several complex effluents were DAPHNIA MAGNA IQ TOXICITY TESTED -- (1.25 hours) and conventionally tested with Daphnia magna (48 hours). In many samples the IQ Technology yielded low EC50 values while the 48 hour exposures yielded no acute toxicity. Possible explanations have been suggested for this occurrence such as: genotoxicity, mutagenicity, substrate interference, and enzyme satiation. To identify the causative agent(s) of this response a Toxicity Identification Evaluation was performed on one of the samples. To define the nature of the response, THE SOS-CHROMOTEST KIT and THE MUTA-CHROMOPLATE KIT were utilized to characterize genotoxicity and mutagenicity respectively. The sample did not test positive for genotoxicity but tested positive for mutagenicity only after activation with S9 enzymes, suggesting the presence of promutagens. Additional work needs to be performed to correlate IQ TOXICITY TEST sensitivity with positive MUTA-CHROMOPLATE response.

  17. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

  18. Adsorbed Polymer and NOM Limits Adhesion and Toxicity of Nano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Adsorbed Polymer and NOM Limits Adhesion and Toxicity of Nano Scale Zerovalent Iron to E. coli Z H. Here we assess the effect that adsorbed synthetic polymers and natural organic matter

  19. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drais, Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

  20. Strategies for restoring ecological connectivity and establishing wildlife passage for the upgrade of Route 78 in Swanton, Vermont: an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Ferguson, Mark; Gingras, Glenn; Bakos, Greg

    2003-01-01

    on Black bears in Vermont. Stratton Mountain Black BearStudy. Final Report. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources,biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

  1. Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Erica Dawn

    2009-05-15

    RAGS Risk Assessment Guidance For Superfund RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act SD Sum of Squared Deviation TCDD 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin TEF Toxic Equivalency Factor TEF B Bioassay Based Toxic Equivalency... Amendments (HSWA) of 1984 further strengthened the EPA?s ability to regulate waste disposal. The HSWA was responsible for the eventual removal of land disposal of hazardous wastes. Cancers, renal disease, circulatory disorders, reproductive disorders...

  2. The recognition of toxic contaminants in sea water by bioassay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duke, Thomas Wade

    1960-01-01

    THE RECOGNITION OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN SEA WATER BY BIOASSAY A Thesis By THOMAS WADE DUKE Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1960 Major Subject: Biological Oceanography THE RECOGNITION OF TOXIC CONTAMINANTS IN SEA li'ATER BY BIOASSAY A Thesis THOMAS O'ADE DUKE Approved as to style and content by: ( airman o emmy ee wi, ( ea of Depar me...

  3. Isolation and identification of a toxic metabolite of Phomopsis sp. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samples, Daniel Robert

    1982-01-01

    ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC MEl'ABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&B University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... MAY 1982 Major Subject~ Veterinary Toxicology ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC METABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Membe (Mem ) (Head of Departme t...

  4. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  5. Reference Design? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield CampusReedsville,Reference Design? Home

  6. UNBC Continuing Studies -WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9 TEL: 250-960-5980 FAX: 250-960-5984 TOLL FREE: 1-866-843-8061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Continuing Studies - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 form. Name Telephone Number Email Address COURSE INFORMATION - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE ASSESSOR

  7. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  8. Reference materials for water and wastewater analyses in USEPA (U. S. Environmental Protection Agency)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory at Cincinnati provides quality assurance support for EPA's water-related programs in response to the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act, the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act. Two important segments of this support are: (1) the Quality Control (QC) Sample Program which provides samples of known concentrations for use as independent Hazardous Materials which provides calibration standards for trace organic analyses of interest to the Agency. The samples and standards are prepared as stable concentrated solutions in all-glass ampuls. Each series contains one or more related analyses, each with a true or reference value. These are provided for dilution to volume and analyses as needed by EPA, EPA contractor/grantees, and other federal, state and local agencies.

  9. Department of Energy Construction Safety Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    DOE has adopted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926 ``Safety and Health Regulations for Construction,`` and related parts of 29 CFR 1910, ``Occupational Safety and Health Standards.`` This nonmandatory reference guide is based on these OSHA regulations and, where appropriate, incorporates additional standards, codes, directives, and work practices that are recognized and accepted by DOE and the construction industry. It covers excavation, scaffolding, electricity, fire, signs/barricades, cranes/hoists/conveyors, hand and power tools, concrete/masonry, stairways/ladders, welding/cutting, motor vehicles/mechanical equipment, demolition, materials, blasting, steel erection, etc.

  10. 1993 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Blackburn, C.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kaae, P.S.; Armacost, L.L.; Garrett, S.M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report, which updates WHC-EP-0567, 1992 Solid Waste Reference Forecast Summary, (WHC 1992) forecasts the volumes of solid wastes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site during the 30-year period from FY 1993 through FY 2022. The data used in this document were collected from Westinghouse Hanford Company forecasts as well as from surveys of waste generators at other US Department of Energy sites who are now shipping or plan to ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site for disposal. These wastes include low-level and low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and nonradioactive hazardous waste.

  11. A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries PrintA New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

  12. Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008 Technical Reference on

  13. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008 Technical Reference onType

  14. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008 Technical Reference onType1

  15. Administrator References and Logins | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAboutHelp & Reference Users Home Contacts

  16. Property:Reference material | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url Jump to:Programmable WavemakingPurchasersReference

  17. Commercial Reference Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColoradoBiomass EnergyCity,Commercial Reference

  18. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  19. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):199204, Fall 2007 A landscape-level survey of feral hog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):199­204, Fall 2007 A landscape-level survey of feral hog impacts of feral hog (Sus scrofa) on the natural resources of the Big Thicket National Preserve (BTNP), a unit years. Key words: Big Thicket National Preserve, exotic species, feral hog, human­wildlife conflicts

  20. GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat Fish and Wildlife Service-- all in an effort to ensure that wind power, which provides a cost

  1. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The sole population of about 500 birds is currently restricted to remote, higher, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880, Hilo, HI 96721, USA will.pitt@aphis.usda.gov LAURA C. DRISCOLL, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880

  2. Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, USA Tel.: (Office) +1 864.656.6190, (Home) +1 864.653.3872 Email: pjodice-June 2004), U.S. Geological Survey, South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson

  3. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  5. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marica Baldoncini; Ivan Callegari; Giovanni Fiorentini; Fabio Mantovani; Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha

    2015-02-16

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of 10 years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  6. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Colon, Carlos Jové; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-08

    Radioactive waste disposal in a deep subsurface repository hosted in clay/shale/argillite is a subject of widespread interest given the desirable isolation properties, geochemically reduced conditions, and widespread geologic occurrence of this rock type (Hansen 2010; Bianchi et al. 2013). Bianchi et al. (2013) provides a description of diffusion in a clay-hosted repository based on single-phase flow and full saturation using parametric data from documented studies in Europe (e.g., ANDRA 2005). The predominance of diffusive transport and sorption phenomena in this clay media are key attributes to impede radionuclide mobility making clay rock formations target sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The reports by Hansen et al. (2010) and those from numerous studies in clay-hosted underground research laboratories (URLs) in Belgium, France and Switzerland outline the extensive scientific knowledge obtained to assess long-term clay/shale/argillite repository isolation performance of nuclear waste. In the past several years under the UFDC, various kinds of models have been developed for argillite repository to demonstrate the model capability, understand the spatial and temporal alteration of the repository, and evaluate different scenarios. These models include the coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models (e.g. Liu et al. 2013; Rutqvist et al. 2014a, Zheng et al. 2014a) that focus on THMC processes in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) bentonite and argillite host hock, the large scale hydrogeologic model (Bianchi et al. 2014) that investigates the hydraulic connection between an emplacement drift and surrounding hydrogeological units, and Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) models (Greenberg et al. 2013) that evaluate thermal evolution in the host rock approximated as a thermal conduction process to facilitate the analysis of design options. However, the assumptions and the properties (parameters) used in these models are different, which not only make inter-model comparisons difficult, but also compromise the applicability of the lessons learned from one model to another model. The establishment of a reference case would therefore be helpful to set up a baseline for model development. A generic salt repository reference case was developed in Freeze et al. (2013) and the generic argillite repository reference case is presented in this report. The definition of a reference case requires the characterization of the waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, EBS backfill, host rock, and biosphere. This report mainly documents the processes in EBS bentonite and host rock that are potentially important for performance assessment and properties that are needed to describe these processes, with brief description other components such as waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, aquifer, and biosphere. A thorough description of the generic argillite repository reference case will be given in Jové Colon et al. (2014).

  7. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  8. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 Draft 2013 Columbia River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH Av

  9. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  10. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  11. Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1999-10-01

    &M University System; Wildlife Biologist, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. L-5332 9-99 Loc. Food Co ver W ater S E Species T P Forage M ast Fruit Protection Nesting Roosting P Agarito, desert holly, Mahonia trifoliolata 44 b i o i o B F o B F o B F Allthorn... Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily for livestock, managing brush meant...

  12. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  13. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell response.

  14. WECC Variable Generation Planning Reference Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Du, Pengwei; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Vyakaranam, Bharat

    2013-05-14

    This planning reference book is a document reflecting a Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) effort to put together multiple sources of information and provide a clear, systemic, comprehensive outline of the problems, both existing and anticipated; their impacts on the system; currently used and proposed solutions by the industry and research community; planning practices; new technologies, equipment, and standards; and expected future trends. This living (periodically updated) document could help WECC and other practicing engineers, especially the younger generation of engineers joining the workforce, to get familiar with a large variety of information related to the integration of variable resources into the WECC system, bypassing in part the need for time-consuming information gathering and learning processes from more experienced engineers or from the literature.

  15. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  16. Semantic Features for Classifying Referring Search Terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Chandler J.; Henry, Michael J.; McGrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.; Marshall, Eric J.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-05-11

    When an internet user clicks on a result in a search engine, a request is submitted to the destination web server that includes a referrer field containing the search terms given by the user. Using this information, website owners can analyze the search terms leading to their websites to better understand their visitors needs. This work explores some of the features that can be used for classification-based analysis of such referring search terms. We present initial results for the example task of classifying HTTP requests countries of origin. A system that can accurately predict the country of origin from query text may be a valuable complement to IP lookup methods which are susceptible to the obfuscation of dereferrers or proxies. We suggest that the addition of semantic features improves classifier performance in this example application. We begin by looking at related work and presenting our approach. After describing initial experiments and results, we discuss paths forward for this work.

  17. Webinar October 13: Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    titled "Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations" on Tuesday, October 13, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). The goal of the H2FIRST Reference Station Design...

  18. United States Department of the Interior - RM-53 - Reference...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Department of the Interior - RM-53 - Reference Manual - Special Park...

  19. ORNL/TM-2012/501 Small Hydropower Cost Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    ORNL/TM-2012/501 Small Hydropower Cost Reference Model October 2012 Prepared by Qin Fen (Katherine Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2012/501 Small Hydropower Cost Reference Model Final Project

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hicago-oharenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate...

  1. H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2 H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2 This H2FIRST project report, published in April 2015, presents...

  2. Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to several on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

  3. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  4. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix E, Bibliography of References Provided by Participants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergyNaturaldefinesMayWorkshop: Summary Report 1EISBarriers-25,C:E:

  5. Sidestream cigarette smoke toxicity increases with aging and exposure duration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Suzaynn; Glantz, Stanton A

    2006-01-01

    Not required. References Schick S, Glantz G. Phillip Morrisand Exposure Duration Suzaynn Schick. and Stanton A. GlantzCA 94143-1390 Suzaynn Schick Postdoctoral Fellow Center for

  6. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations *Preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:08 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section VI Mainstem (page 34) I. Summary With regard to the Fish and Wildlife Program's Mainstem Plan, a number of federal and other fish in and below the reservoirs, adjustments they believe are consistent with the flexibility

  7. RECENT REFERENCES: JULY 1, 2006 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WINCHELL, D.F.

    2006-09-30

    This document lists experimental references added to Nuclear Science References (NSR) during the period July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. The first section lists keynumbers and keywords sorted by mass and nuclide. The second section lists all references, ordered by keynumber.

  8. RECENT REFERENCES: JANUARY 1, 2005 TO DECEMBER 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WINCHELL, D.F.

    2005-12-31

    This document lists experimental references added to Nuclear Science References (NSR) during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. The first section lists keynumbers and keywords sorted by mass and nuclide. The second section lists all references, ordered by keynumber.

  9. RECENT REFERENCES: APRIL 1, 2006 TO JUNE 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WINCHELL, D.F.

    2006-06-30

    This document lists experimental references added to Nuclear Science References (NSR) during the period April 1, 2006 to June 30, 2006. The first section lists keynumbers and keywords sorted by mass and nuclide. The second section lists all references, ordered by keynumber.

  10. RECENT REFERENCES: OCTOBER 1, 2005 TO DECEMBER 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WINCHELL, D.F.

    2005-12-31

    This document lists experimental references added to Nuclear Science References (NSR) during the period October 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. The first section lists keynumbers and keywords sorted by mass and nuclide. The second section lists all references, ordered by keynumber.

  11. On the Intrinsic Locality Properties of Web Reference Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    On the Intrinsic Locality Properties of Web Reference Streams Rodrigo Fonseca Virg´ilio Almeida in the study of Web reference streams: sequences of requests for Web objects. In particular, many studies have into the nature of reference stream transformations in the Web. I. INTRODUCTION Considerable effort has gone

  12. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Findings) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council oversees the development, amendment by the development and operation of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, known

  13. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Findings) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council oversees the development, amendment by the development and operation of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, known

  14. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):257265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 4(2):257­265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition to North Dakota's program. Therefore, we analyzed fragmentation patterns and lead deposition in carcasses fragments and lead deposits throughout the entire abdominal cavity of carcasses. We also used 2 types

  15. 136 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    136 Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems BRUCE D. LEOPOLD that is growing in importance throughout the southeastern United States: feral hogs. Being in Mississippi, I am in crops to corn for biofuels will greatly enhance our feral hog populations. In Mississippi alone

  16. Wildlife management assistance report. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with 1773 people participating. Biological data was collected on 76 deer, eight wild turkeys, 33 feral hogs, 58 ducks of two species, 75 gray squirrels, 4 raccoons, 9 bobwhites, and 484 fish of 9 species. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRS Site Use Committee entailed evaluating 81 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. The antlerless deer quota program continued in the district with 129 landowners in Aiken, Barnwell, and Orangeburg Counties being approved for antlerless harvest which required field investigations, acreage verification at tax offices, and personal correspondence. Bait sites for turkey trapping were maintained on the SRS for two months. Wildlife census work was conducted on wild turkey, bobwhite, mourning dove, furbearers, fox squirrels, and bald eagles on the SRS and in Aiken and Barnwell Counties. Three wetlands in Aiken County were evaluated for suitability with regard to wood duck boxes. Two wetland environmental review notices for the SRS were evaluated. Additional work on Wildlife Management Area land included reposting 50 miles of boundary in Aiken and Lexington County and removing signs form several tracts lost from the program. Future recommendations for the turkey and regulations brochures were submitted and WMA maps covering Aiken and Lexington Counties were updated.

  17. Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -hydro agency responsibilities. #12;2 Strategic Category: Hydro RM&E The following are the primary management1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

  18. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

  19. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

  20. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  1. Notes From the Chair 2 Revised Fish and Wildlife Program 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adds to its cost, is a major question for the Council as it develops its Sixth Power Plan. On the fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams. The power plan's goal is to ensure the region of an adequate, efficient, econom- ical, and reliable power system. In 2009, the Council will develop and complete its Sixth

  2. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project would be located. Within the tidal marsh there were also tidal creeks and guts. The following list

  3. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):235244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animalvehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):235­244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animal­vehicle collisions, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People's Re- public of China, 100083 Abstract: Animal­vehicle collisions (AVCs) cause animal death, human injury, and vehicle damage. Uncovering the general patterns

  4. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):194199, Fall 2008 How people should respond when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a black bear, mountain lion, or wolf, most respondents said to fight back. Opinion was divided over, carnivores, grizzly bear, human­wildlife conflicts, mountain lion, predator attacks, wolf Attacks by large). Black bears (Ursus americana), grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), mountain lions (Puma concolor), and gray

  5. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  6. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  7. SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

  8. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  9. UNITED STATES DEPARTMEl\\1T OF THE I NTERI OR FI SH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMEl\\1T OF THE I NTERI OR FI SH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Washington} D. C. } 20240. A simple penetrometer for the measurement of texture ch::mges in canned salmon. Gulf States shrimp cinnin on spoil age characteri stics. Equi pment Kote #8 - New hydraulically driven block speeds hauling crab -pot

  10. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  11. COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Wildlife Major: Natural Resources Conservation Option: Natural Resources Science Education For Students Graduating Elective 3 13 15 SENIOR YEAR FOR CSES 4334 3444 Prin. of Agroforestry (fall) OR World Crops & Crop Systems

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(1):130144, Spring 2010 Evaluation of damage by vertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    survey, distress call, grapes, human­wildlife conflicts, Meleagris gallopavo, vineyards, wild turkey range have resulted in conflict with human interests. Complaints include turkeys causing a nuisance in the Napa Valley and Sierra Foothills American Viticultural Areas of California. We conducted damage surveys

  13. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):182194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):182­194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of two the factors affecting the vital rates in these isolated populations. Livestock grazing by domestic cattle higher for both populations in 2005 than 2006. We attributed these annual differences in vital rates

  14. Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary, copper boron azole, copper citrate, and copper dimeth- yldithiocarbamate. An unpreserved wood sample

  15. Survey of toxicity and carcinogenity of mineral deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furst, A.; Harding-Barlow, I.

    1981-11-03

    The toxicities and biogeochemical cycles of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel are reviewed in some detail, and other trace elements briefly mentioned. These heavy metals are used as a framework within which the problem of low-level radioactive waste disposal can be compared. (ACR)

  16. Transition Metal Nutrition: A Balance Between Deficiency and Toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Patrice

    333 Transition Metal Nutrition: A Balance Between Deficiency and Toxicity CHAPTER 10 CHAPTER CONTENTS I. Introduction 334 II. Components of the metal homeostasis network 335 A. Metal transporters 335 B. Metal chelation 349 C. Differences with other photosynthetic organisms 352 III. Metal tolerance

  17. Tolerance of nitrobacter to toxicity of some Nigerian crude oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okpokwasili, G.C.; Odokuma, L.O. (Univ. of Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1994-03-01

    Crude oil spillage in aquatic systems affects thousands of aquatic species including bacteria. Some of the crude oil components are rapidly evaporated or biologically degraded. Other components continue to remain for several months and perhaps several years. Some of these components may be toxic to microorganisms, while some may stimulate microbial activity especially at low concentrations. The use of bacteria as bioassay organisms is now gaining wide acceptance. It offers a number of advantages such as ease of handling, economy of space, short life cycles and low cost. Their uses in bioassays are based on cell lysis, mutagenic properties and the inhibition of physiological processes such as respiration. Recently, a number of workers have proposed the use of Nitrobacter as a test organism. The organism has a number of advantages in toxicity testing: obligate autotrophy, its sensitivity to various toxicants and its predominance in wastewater environments are some of them . Of recent, the inhibition of bacterial enzyme biosynthesis have been suggested in bacterial assays. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of six Nigerian crude oils on the cell reproduction rate (LC, lethal concentration), cellular respiration (EC, effective concentration) and biosynthesis of enzyme responsible for nitrite oxidation (IC, inhibition concentration) in Nitrobacter. In addition, the goal was to identify which of these was the most sensitive to crude oil and which may thus be used for detecting the toxicity of these chemicals. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. EVALUATION OF THE PEEP INDEX AND RECOMMENDED TOXICITY TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Vancouver storm sewer. A flow-weighte~ composite sample from each site was tested for acute toxicity the mathematicalformula used to derive the index. A battery of bioassays is recommended for use in the FraserRiver Basin tliatthe SOS-Chromotest The test battery is identical to that used for the PEEP index, is replaced

  19. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets with CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with Mo and Zr removed. Waste streams that contain Mo must be produced in reducing environments to avoid Cs-Mo oxide phase formation. Waste streams without Mo have the ability to be melt processed in air. A path forward for further optimizing the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere, and controlled heat treatment schedules are anticipated to improve the targeted elemental partitioning.

  20. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  1. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  2. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  3. WECC Variable Generation Planning Reference Book: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Du, Pengwei; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Vyakaranam, Bharat

    2013-05-13

    The document titled “WECC Variable Generation Planning Reference Book”. This book is divided into two volumes; one is the main document (volume 1)and the other is appendices (volume 2). The main document is a collection of the best practices and the information regarding the application and impact of variables generation on power system planning. This volume (appendices) has additional information on the following topics: Probabilistic load flow problems. 2. Additional useful indices. 3. high-impact low-frequency (HILF) events. 4. Examples of wide-area nomograms. 5. Transmission line ratings, types of dynamic rating methods. 6. Relative costs per MW-km of different electric power transmission technologies. 7. Ultra-high voltage (UHV) transmission. 8.High voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC). 9. HVDC. 10. Rewiring of existing transmission lines. 11. High-temperature low sag (HTLS) conductors. 12. The direct method and energy functions for transient stability analysis in power systems. 13.Blackouts caused by voltage instability. 14. Algorithm for parameter continuation predictor-corrector methods. 15. Approximation techniques available for security regions. 16. Impacts of wind power on power system small signals stability. 17. FIDVR. 18. FACTS. 19. European planning standard and practices. 20. International experience in wind and solar energy sources. 21. Western Renewable Energy Zones (WREZ). 22. various energy storage technologies. 23. demand response. 24. BA consolidation and cooperation options. 25. generator power management requirements and 26. European planning guidelines.

  4. SAPHIRE 8 Volume 2 - Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Smith; S. T. Wood; W. J. Galyean; J. A. Schroeder; M. B. Sattison

    2011-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs). Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 8.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, Workspace algorithms, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  5. 7. Flows in a rotating reference frame 7.1. Rotating reference frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    in a rotating reference frame. We use rotating axes, fixed w.r.t. the rotating system but note that time-derivatives of vectors must be modified: 1 #12;Suppose frame R rotates at constant angular velocity = (0, 0, ) w.r.t. an inertial frame I. Consider vector A(t) ­ suppose for simplicity that it lies in the xy-plane of R and I

  6. A mechanism for diversity in warning signals: Conspicuousness versus toxicity in poison frogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Molly E.

    A mechanism for diversity in warning signals: Conspicuousness versus toxicity in poison frogs natural variation among poison frog species measured with spectral reflectance and toxicity assays, we components using natural variation among poison frog species. Poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) display some

  7. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

  8. Captain Planet Takes on Hazard Transfer: Combining the Forces of Market, Legal and Ethical Decisionmaking to Reduce Toxic Exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giampetro-Meyer, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    infra Part II; see generally Toxic EXPORTS, supra note 5.82. Toxic EXPORTS, supra note 5. See infra Part II. 83.of California). 31. Toxic EXPORTS, supra note 5, at 9. Clapp

  9. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  10. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  11. One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

  12. COORDINATED IMPLEMENTATION, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION SECTION 3 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 3-2 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-2 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 3 COORDINATED IMPLEMENTATION, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION September 13, 1995 3-2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM address progress, problems and issues regarding program

  13. Is the 10-Year Wildlife Cycle Induced by a Lunar Cycle? Author(s): Herbert L. Archibald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    work(s): Source: Wildlife Society Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 3 (Autumn, 1977), pp. 126-129 Published by.22 represents the vernal equinox (21 March) in 1950. At this time, the moon's declination attained a maximum

  14. United states Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secret ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United states Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secret ary Fish and Wildlife Service in the water by means of floats on the top line and held downward by weights on the bottom line to act

  15. VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION WILDLIFE CROSSING TEAM; BUILDING AN INTER-AGENCY PLANNING TOOL TO ADDRESS ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIVITY IN VERMONT

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    Slesar, Chris; Morse, Susan C.; Austin, John M.

    2003-01-01

    He serves as chair of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibianis coordinator of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.biologist with the Vermont Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. John

  16. Preliminary Reference Case Results for Oil and Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDFWildlifeWildlifeE85Preliminary

  17. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  18. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueruqe, NM); Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  19. The subchronic toxicity of Roridin A in sheep 

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    Thormahlen, Keller Andrew

    1988-01-01

    synclranms (5, 6) . However, in 1967 a toxic outbreak occurred in Russia on rye straw infected with ecium verrucaria, which is frequently seen to occur in the same colonies as Nyrothecium roridum (9) . Unfortunately, these isolates have yet to reproduce... aminotransferase (AST) . 'Ihe disease is characterized by a fatty cirrhosis of the liver starting first as a fatty infiltration organizing itself within the ~yma su~ing the portal vein, the hepatic ~, and the bile duct. This fatty degeneration ~ a fibrogenic...

  20. Ten Steps for Career Success Ready Reference A-4

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    Ten Steps for Career Success Ready Reference A-4 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career