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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents i TEXAS WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGMENT.............................................................................................................................. 2 #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page 1 TEXAS WILDLIFE-651-2880 karen.s.dulaney@usda.gov #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page

Wilkins, Neal

2

Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name Fish and Wildlife Service Place Washington, DC Year founded 1940 Phone number (303) 275-2370 Website http://www.fws.gov/ Coordinates 38.8951118°, -77.0363658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8951118,"lon":-77.0363658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Fish and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia on AddThis.com...

6

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia October 7, 2013 - 10:09am Addthis Photo of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective. The passive solar design features include an east-west orientation that provides good solar exposure. In winter, large southern windows capture solar gain and brick floors behind windows store heat. Windows are made of

7

Final Department of Energy US Fish & Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

between between THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding Implementation of Executive Order 13186, "Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds" Prepared by: United States Department of Energy and United States Fish and Wildlife Service September 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING between THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding Implementation of Executive Order 13186, "Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds" This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into by and between the United States Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) and the United States Department of the Interior,

8

San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

USGS | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS USGS Dataset Summary Description The USGS published spatial data to supplement the report published in 2007 entitled, Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province, Alabama and Mississippi. The GIS shapefiles and related metadata are included here. Source USGS Date Released April 11th, 2007 (7 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords gas GIS oil USGS Data application/zip icon au650101cg.zip (zip, 8.7 KiB) application/zip icon au650101g.zip (zip, 9 KiB) application/zip icon au650102cg.zip (zip, 145.6 KiB) application/zip icon au650102g.zip (zip, 7.2 KiB) application/zip icon au650281cg.zip (zip, 138.8 KiB) application/zip icon au650281g.zip (zip, 15.1 KiB) application/zip icon pr6500g.zip (zip, 86.9 KiB)

10

DOE Response to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Comments on Clipper...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase.paragraph4. The DEA statesthat the proposed lattice-type meteorological tower will be 240 feet tall and will be supported by three setsof guy wires. The Service...

11

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- tory birds and other wildlife. The design team's vision became a reality when the new visitor's center opened its doors in 2010. The 5,879-square foot building provides a starting point for visi- tors to to learn about the wildlife on the refuge. The facility also houses hands-on exhibits, office and classroom space, and a nature-themed store. "The design of this visitor center exemplifies the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's commitment to lowering our carbon footprint," said Libby Herland, Project Leader, Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge Complex. "We want this center to help promote the importance of environmental stewardship and connect the public with the beauty

12

Wildlife Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some wildlife diseases can be transmitted to humans. This leaflet explains the causes and symptoms of rabies, giardiasis, bubonic plague, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, tularemia, leptospirosis and histoplasmosis.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Post-Closure Land Jurisdiction Transfer to the US Fish and Wildlife Service at Rocky Flats: Surviving the Safari Through Old Records and Other Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site (Rocky Flats), located near Denver, Colorado, was listed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Subsequent cleanup and closure activities were completed in October 2005 and the final remedy was selected in September 2006. The remedy is 'no further action' for the generally un-impacted Peripheral Operable Unit (OU), formerly known as the Buffer Zone, and institutional and physical controls with continued monitoring for the Central OU, formerly the industrialized area. The Peripheral OU has been deleted from the NPL and jurisdiction over the majority of land in that OU (3,953 acres) was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) on July 12, 2007, to establish the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. The remaining approximately 929 acres in the Peripheral OU were retained by DOE's Office of Legacy Management where outstanding mineral leases and mining operations exist. As mineral rights are purchased or mining operations and mineral leases are completed and fully reclaimed, jurisdiction of portions of the 929 acres will also be transferred to USFWS for inclusion into the refuge. During the almost 2 years since cleanup and closure work was completed at Rocky Flats, DOE and USFWS have worked the specific legal parameters, timing, and constraints of the 3,953-acre transfer. Many lessons have been learned, based on these early experiences. (authors)

Schiesswohl, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, CO (United States); Hanson, M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Westminster, CO (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

USGS Energy Geochemistry Database | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Geochemistry Database Energy Geochemistry Database Dataset Summary Description The Energy Geochemistry Data Base (EGDB) contains chemical analysis data for crude oil, natural gas, coal, water, and rock samples analyzed by the USGS Energy Resources Team's Geochemistry Laboratory, or by contracted-service laboratories. Data was also obtained from the literature and unpublished public domain sources. The sample types included are primarily rock, coal, oil, and gas. Analytical data within the EGDB includes Rock-Eval pyrolysis, organic mass spectrometry, vitrinite reflectance, gas chromatography, stable carbon isotopes, inductively coupled plasma, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, mercury analysis and a number of other related geochemistry analyses that, in some instances, predate the EGDB. The database is in a Microsoft Access format (.mdb).

15

Keeping Idaho's Wildlife Heritage Equal Opportunity Employer 208-334-3700 Fax: 208-334-2114 Idaho Relay (TDD) Service: 1-800-377-3529 http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keeping Idaho's Wildlife Heritage Equal Opportunity Employer · 208-334-3700 · Fax: 208-334-2114 · Idaho Relay (TDD) Service: 1-800-377-3529 · http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME 600 South Walnut/P.O. Box 25 C.L. "Butch" Otter / Governor Boise, Idaho 83707 Cal Groen / Director

16

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

...31 APPENDIX A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

17

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Geological Survey Sector: Land Focus Area: Land Use Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps User Interface: Website Website: landcover.usgs.gov/landcoverdata.php Cost: Free USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Screenshot References: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI)[1] "Welcome to the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Land Cover Institute (LCI). The USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from local to global scales, and in both domestic and international settings. The USGS through the Land Cover Institute

18

USGS National Oil and Gas Assessment: GIS Data The USGS Central...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas production area were created by the USGS as a method for illustrating the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of production in a play. Each cell...

19

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wildlife Interactions and Wildlife Interactions Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions November 23, 2011 - 2:08pm Addthis This webinar is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America 2011 webinar series. This webinar will provide an overview of wind turbine and wildlife issues, including a summary of research plans by the American Wind and Wildlife Institute. Other topics will include an update of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wind regulations and bat/wind turbine interactions. The webinar is free; no registration is required. More Addthis Related Articles Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends DOE Announces Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and Performance Reviews, and More

20

Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Category:USGS Map Files | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS Map Files USGS Map Files Jump to: navigation, search This category contains map files produced by the United States Geological Survey. Media in category "USGS Map Files" The following 7 files are in this category, out of 7 total. Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin us... 148 KB Fut oilp 03.pdf Fut oilp 03.pdf 10.02 MB Undiscovered.nat.gas.sacrametno.basin.2006.map.jpg Undiscovered.nat.gas.s... 81 KB Uscells1msmall.oil.gas.pdf Uscells1msmall.oil.gas... 3.33 MB USGS-Geothermal-System-Locations.png USGS-Geothermal-System... 754 KB USGS-Western-USA-Geothermal-Favorability.png USGS-Western-USA-Geoth... 1.56 MB Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf 4.02 MB Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:USGS_Map_Files&oldid=325392

22

Wildlife at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife at Brookhaven Wildlife Protection The Laboratory has precautions in place to protect on-site habitats and natural resources. Activities to eliminate or minimize negative...

23

Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Category: NEPA Resources What links here...

24

ORR Wildlife Management Update (2/5/2010)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Wildlife Services: * Recorded goose distress calls. * Laser light. * Radio-controlled boat. 35 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Goose Chaser - The...

25

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

26

USGS Energy Geochemistry Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Geochemistry Data Base (EGDB) contains chemical analysis data for crude oil, natural gas, coal, water, and rock samples analyzed by the USGS Energy Resources...

27

USGS Global Visualization Viewer for Aerial and Satellite Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

million archive images of the Earth's surface are available for immediate selection and free download via the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Global...

28

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

29

Wildlife's Winter Diet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife's Winter Diet Wildlife's Winter Diet Nature Bulletin No. 659 December 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE'S WINTER DIET Anyone who regularly feeds wild birds, and counts up the amount of food that they eat in the course of a winter, often wonders how they could get along without his help. In one day of freezing weather two or three dozen small birds commonly clean up a half pound of food -- suet, sunflower seed, cracked corn or small grain. This does not take into account raids by squirrels and rabbits. Winter in this region is a time of food crisis for all warm-blooded wildlife. Most of our summer song birds, especially the insect eaters, avoid cold by migrating to warm climates until spring. Likewise, most waterfowl and shorebirds go south during the months when our waters are locked in ice.

30

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USGS Study: Water Quality A Potential Concern in Private Wells More than 20 percent of private domestic wells sampled nationwide contain at least one contaminant at levels of potential health concern's population, use private wells, which are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. USGS

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

31

Financial Guide for USGS Employees #33 December 1, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under the USGS Organic Act relating to oil/gas/mining interests on Public or Federally-held lands under Department of the Interior (DOI) regulation concerning the oil/gas/mining interests of USGS and gas mining leases on Federal lands. The definition of "mining activities" includes the exploration

Fleskes, Joe

32

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2001 September 13, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Joe HeHerrera - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eagle Lakes Ranch Acquisition and Restoration Project No: 2000-025-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition Location: Franklin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Columbia National Wildlife Refuge Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres

34

Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Services ESnet provides interoperable, effective, reliable, and high performance network communications infrastructure, and certain collaboration services, in support of the Office of Science (SC)'s large-scale, collaborative science programs. ESnet provides users with high bandwidth access to DOE sites and DOE's primary science collaborators including Research and

35

Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concern of decline in hunting license sales (Anderson et al 1985; Sun et al. 2005) 20% decline in number 15500 16000 16500 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2005 Year Licenses('000) Fig: Certified hunting license sales in USA (US Fish & Wildlife Services) #12;2 Benefits from Hunting Revenue License sales Species management

Gray, Matthew

36

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

650 October 7, 1961 650 October 7, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO Few people realize that there is enough native wildlife worth mentioning in roaring, jam-packed Chicago, nor that very much of it is left in its fringe of adjoining suburbs. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Just as rural people become accustomed to urban life, some wild birds and mammals have adjusted to city life and are holding their own. A few kinds seem to be more numerous in parts of metropolitan Chicago than they were in those same areas a hundred years ago. The white-tailed deer, long extinct in this part of Illinois, is on the increase in the Chicago region. In recent winters two of them, perhaps chased by dogs, were rescued from the ice on the lake front -- one at Jackson Park and the other in the Calumet region.

37

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Human Capital Office offers benefit, new employee orientation and some learning & development related services to all DOE employees. Additionally the Office supplies employee and labor...

39

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

386-A September 12, 1970 386-A September 12, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO In August of 1803, when a detachment of soldiers came here from Detroit to build Fort Dearborn, they found only four crude cabins, situated on the north bank of the Chicago River. Three were occupied by French fur traders -- LeMaie, Ouilmette and Pettle -- and one was vacant. In 1833, when Chicago was incorporated as a village, there were only 200 people here. Wolves were still a problem, especially in winter. On October 6, 1834, a black bear -- the last wild one seen in Chicago was killed near the intersection of LaSalle and Adams Streets. Game was so plentiful that the region was a hunter's paradise .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real-life situations. The real-life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

42

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real life situations. The real life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

43

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parks and Wildlife Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Name Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address 4200 Smith School Rd Place...

44

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

47

Wildlife -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New Wildlife Some of the links on this page lead to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT HUNTING ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION OTHER WILDLIFE INFORMATION WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT Top of Page ORR Wildlife Management Update (Presentation - February 5, 2010) Goose Control. (Video - December 2009) Giffen, Neil R., James W. Evans, and Patricia D. Parr. 2007. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. ORNL/TM-2006/155. August. Giffen, Neil R. 2007. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL/TM-2006/154. March. Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR (Presentation - November 2006) Wildlife Management Activities on the ORR (Presentation - September 2006)

48

USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Agency/Company /Organization: United States Geological Survey Sector: Land Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: eros.usgs.gov/#/Find_Data/Products_and_Data_Available/Elevation_Produc Cost: Free USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Screenshot References: USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center[1] Logo: USGS-Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center "Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is a remotely sensed data management, systems development, and research field center for the

49

Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Spring Break March 1-9, 2014 Understand Ecology and Conservation. Explain Concepts and Terms. Compare and Contrast Wildlife Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation & Life Sciences Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Courses are taught by UF faculty WIS4905

Watson, Craig A.

51

Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and wildlife agencies are facing the challenge of balancing the known and potential impacts to wildlife from lead in spent ammunition and sport fishing tackle with the public perception of the lead issue. Reports about the effect of lead on wildlife, the environment, and/or human health whether real or perceived create social, political and legal pressure to act. Fish and

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely

53

Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 223 / Friday, November 20, 2009 / Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-

54

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE-EA-1 023 Bonneville POWER ADMINISTRATION April 1995 DISCLAIMER This report w a s prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of t h e United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or a s s u m e s any legal liability or responsibility for t h e accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents t h a t its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial, product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise d o e s not necessarily constitute or imply its

56

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wildlife Risks of Wind and Solar Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the potential wildlife impacts resulting from wind and solar power development. The report defines the potential wildlife impacts, the business reasoning for assessing these impacts, details regarding site selection to minimize impacts, strategies to assess impacts, and management strategies to mitigate or minimize impacts. The report will assist utility generation planners and electric power company environmental staff in identifying and evaluating the wildlife impacts of wind and s...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Fish and Wildlife Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(150) Contributor 4 September,...

59

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at maintaining public safety (e.g., reduction in deervehicle collisions, reduction in Canada goosehuman interactions), while also maximizing wildlife health and diversity. *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

62

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this...

63

2012 WILDLIFE CAPTURE, IMMOBILIZATION, AND HANDLING COURSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blow pipes Darts Dart guns 5. The Drugging Event: putting it all together (i.e. drugs and equipment. Drugging, reversal (i.v. and i.m.), and antibiotics: syringes, pole syringes, blow-pipes, darts, dart.M. Arnemo. 2007. Handbook of Wildlife Immobilization: International Edition. Wildlife Pharmaceutical, Inc

Weiblen, George D

64

SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT F-62 Rocky Mountain Mule Deer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. USDA . Monthly Contract Report. 1986-2005. Farm Services Agency. U.S. Dept. Agriculture. Washington D 1978; Goggans 1986; Howie and Ritchie 1987; Reynolds and Linkhart 1992; Powers et al. 1996). In centralSOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT F-62 Rocky Mountain Mule Deer

65

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

Calkins, Brian

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

File:Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province of Alabama and Mississippi Size of this preview: 742 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,860 × 1,504 pixels, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province of Alabama and Mississippi Sources USGS Related Technologies Oil, Gas Creation Date 2007 Extent Black Warrior Basin Province Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alabama, Mississippi Location of the Black Warrior Basin Province in northwestern Alabama and northeastern Mississippi, published in the USGS report entitled, Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin

68

File:Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf Usgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Coal, Oil, and Gas Activity in the Powder River Basin Size of this preview: 462 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,273 × 1,653 pixels, file size: 4.02 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Coal, Oil, and Gas Activity in the Powder River Basin Sources USGS Related Technologies Coal, Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-09 Extent Regional States Montana, Wyoming This map/diagram depicts the locations of: coal mines, coalbed methane wells, coal drill holes and oil and natural gas wells within the Powder River Basin boundary (Wyoming and Montana). This is Figure 1 in the USGS report entitled, After a Century-Revised Paleogene Coal Stratigraphy, Correlation, and Deposition, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,

69

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Report--2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Biodiversity Conservation areas Reserve selection Stochastic programming

McGuire, A. David

71

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida) Florida) Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and

72

Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Department of Wildlife Name Nevada Department of Wildlife Address 1100 Valley Rd. Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89512 Website http://www.ndow.org/ Coordinates 39.5394967°, -119.807584° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5394967,"lon":-119.807584,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Fund Wildlife Fund Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Wildlife Fund Name World Wildlife Fund Address 1250 Twenty-Fourth Street, N.W. Place Washington, DC Zip 20090-7180 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website http://www.worldwildlife.org Coordinates 38.92°, -76.99° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.92,"lon":-76.99,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80203 Phone number (303) 866-3437 Website http://wildlife.state.co.us/Pa Coordinates 39.7370973°, -104.9851154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7370973,"lon":-104.9851154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

Yde, Chris A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

69www.wildlife.org The Wildlife Society lake Grisham crawled from under the Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

69www.wildlife.org© The Wildlife Society B lake Grisham crawled from under the Texas Tech field to get water to the dilapidated structure. Towns are few and far between on the Texas Southern High Resources Management at Texas Tech University. Credit: Clint Boal After rising early at the texas tech field

77

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Thompson Falls Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents a preliminary mitigation and enhancement plan for the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. It discusses options available to provide wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501). The options focus on mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat losses attributable to the construction of the hydroelectric project. These losses were previously estimated from the best available information concerning the degree of negative and positive impacts to target wildlife species (Wood and Olsen 1984). Criteria by which the mitigation alternatives were evaluated were the same as those used to assess the impacts identified in the Phase I document (Wood and Olsen 1984). They were also evaluated according to feasibility and cost effectiveness. This document specifically focuses on mitigation for target species which were identified during Phase I (Wood and Olsen 1984). It was assumed mitigation and enhancement for the many other target wildlife species impacted by the hydroelectric developments will occur as secondary benefits. The recommended mitigation plan includes two recommended mitigation projects: (1) development of wildlife protection and enhancement plans for MPC lands and (2) strategies to protect several large islands upstream of the Thompson Falls reservoir. If implemented, these projects would provide satisfactory mitigation for wildlife losses associated with the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. The intent of the mitigation plan is to recommend wildlife management objectives and guidelines. The specific techniques, plans, methods and agreements would be developed is part of the implementation phase.

Bissell, Gael; Wood, Marilyn

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

USGS National Oil and Gas Assessment: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Oil and Gas Assessment: GIS Data National Oil and Gas Assessment: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description The USGS Central Region Energy Team assessed the oil and gas resources of the United States. Cell maps for each oil and gas production area were created by the USGS as a method for illustrating the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of production in a play. Each cell represents a one-mile (or a one-quarter mile) square of the land surface, and the cells are coded to represent whether the wells included with the cell are predominantly oil-producing, gas-producing, or dry. The data used are current as of December, 1990. Source USGS Date Released March 26th, 1996 (18 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords gas oil Data application/zip icon 1/4 mile cells (well information); plus metadata (zip, 41.8 MiB)

79

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Pesticides and their effects on wildlife  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

Driver, C.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge December 21, 2012 - 11:27am Addthis The Rocky Flats Plant was first established in 1951 as a nuclear...

82

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wildlife and Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Sage grouse sitting in grassland. Photo from LuRay Parker, NREL 17429 Birds and bats are occasionally killed in collisions with wind turbines. Like any form of development, wind projects can also negatively impact wildlife by altering habitat. However, although the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of Fossil Fuels and Nuclear Power report quantifies those impacts. The study estimates that wind farms are responsible for roughly 0.27 avian fatalities

84

Natural Hazards A National Threat USGS Science Helps Build Safer Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lost to natural hazards each year generally has declined, the economic cost of major disaster response events in the United States and Puerto Rico The USGS Role in Reducing Disaster Losses In the United States each year, natural hazards cause hundreds of deaths and cost billions of dollars in disaster aid

85

Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 1E Roberts, Energy in US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: High Voltage DC Charging of fa Nissan Leaf. E Roberts, Energy in US 53 NPC Future Transportation FuelsFigure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 2008 1E Roberts, Energy in US Source: www.eia.gov #12;Figure 2: US Liquid Demand by Sector and Fuel 2E Roberts, Energy in US Source: EIA: Annual Energy Outlook

Sutton, Michael

86

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota) Minnesota) Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas

88

Wildlife Refuges (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refuges (Iowa) Refuges (Iowa) Wildlife Refuges (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This document contains a list of wildlife refuges and sanctuaries in the state

89

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvement in storage charac- teri tic i obtained thereby. nle s keep- ing quality of dehydrated fi h can Fe search. vol. 9, DO. 4, pp. 319-327, July- st. Coen, Camillo. 1931. Preserving fish. French Patent and Industrial Re- search, British Ministry of Food, unpublished report, pp. 1-16, June. Scott, Geo. G

92

THE NORTHERN FUR SEAL FISH A>jm WILDLIFE SERVICE-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are conserved for the future, and that renewable resources make their full contribution to the progress, pros taken to the Canton market to trade for tea, silks, and other products of China. The huge populations

93

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Coalc1ale Rearing Unit ) Crystal River Ree.ring Unit Denver He.tchery Dolores Rearing Unit Durango~1 River Hatchery Moccasin Cl"eek Hatchery Moja:ve River Hatchery MoorehQ~se Springs Hatchery M~ington Hatchery Voluntown Rearing Station Windsor Locks Hatchery FLORIDA Blackwater River Hatchery Wewahitchka

94

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 BYLAWS OF DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (Ratified February 2010) Preamble The shared goals of the faculty and administration of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation are to attain excellence

Watson, Craig A.

95

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of Descriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various. sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental impacts evaluated in BPA`s Wildlife Mitigation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0246) published March, 20, 1997, and filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the week of March 24, 1997 (EPA Notice of Availability Published April 4, 1997, 62 FR 65, 16154). BPA will distribute this Record of Decision to all known interested and affected persons, groups, tribes, and agencies.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Oil Development & the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refuge (ANWR) is a wildlife refuge in Alaska Created 1956 during Eisenhower administration 1980 doubled. 9 #12;The coastal plain as depicted by oil lobbyists Source: ANWR.org 10 #12;The coastal plain can be a dreary place 11 #12;Even a harsh place 12 #12;But it also is very beautiful 13 #12;President Bush on ANWR

Kalinowski, Steven T

100

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision; 06April1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various sourcesincluding Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agenciespropose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

USGS Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rate of Earthquakes in the Midcontinent Page 29. wd = waste disposal egs = enhanced geothermal frak = fracking Maximum Seismic Moment vs. ...

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

USGS Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fiscal Year Growth of ANSS Stations Since Inception Annual Funding ($M) ... deep injection of wastewater from oil and gas production ...

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: 2: Appendices DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Appendix A Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles for Bonneville Power Administration Rates and Contracts Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Appendix A: Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles Appendix A/ 1 Appendix A FISH AND WILDLIFE FUNDING PRINCIPLES FOR BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION RATES AND CONTRACTS September 16, 1998 Preamble The purpose of these principles is to conclude the fish and wildlife funding process in which Bonneville has been engaged with various interests in the Region, and provide a set of guidelines for structuring Bonneville's subscription and power rate processes. The principles are intended to "keep the options open" for future fish and wildlife decisions that are anticipated to be made in late 1999 on reconfiguration of the hydrosystem and in

107

Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin has had far-reaching effects on many species of wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the Federal portion of this system, as allocated to the purpose of power production. BPA needs to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat in the Snake River Subbasin.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribe

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material:...

111

Pantex wildlife program featured on Amarillo's NewsChannel 10...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and study the wildlife living on the Pantex site. Pantex is currently studying how wind energy can impact the surrounding ecosystems and has studied rattlesnakes and horned...

112

National Wildlife Chemical Effects Database | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Wildlife Chemical Effects Database Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities ...

113

EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

114

Integrated training course for engineers and wildlife biologists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technical expertise and training on wildlife and highwaycomprehensive (yet concise) training course on the basics ofinterdisciplinary two-day training session that walks

Jacobson, Sandra L.; Brennan, Terry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) contains citations to more than 1,000 journal articles, government publications, conference proceedings, and other reports.

Sinclair, K.; Sandberg, T.; Cohn, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Validating alternative methods of modeling wildlife corridors using relocation data from migrating elk and dispersing wolverines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Habitat loss and fragmentation increasingly impede wildlife movements that are essential for the long-term persistence of populations. Wildlife corridors facilitating movement have become a (more)

Rainey, Meredith McClure

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Validating alternative methods of modeling wildlife corridors using relocation data from migrating elk and dispersing wolverines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Habitat loss and fragmentation increasingly impede wildlife movements that are essential for the long-term persistence of populations. Wildlife corridors facilitating movement have become a key (more)

Rainey, Meredith McClure.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks 490 North Meridian Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and Wildlife Office, Boise, Idaho, Pacific Region, Portland, Oregon. USWS.. 1999. Status review Department of the Interior IDAHO FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICE 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Room 368 Boise, Idaho 83709 Inspector General Report disclosing irregularities in development of its 2005 bull trout final critical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2001 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate for construction losses associated with Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, Deadwood, Minidoka and Palisades hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

123

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Name Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Address 1594 W North Temple, Suite 2110, Box 146301 Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6301 Phone number 801-538-4745 Website http://wildlife.utah.gov/dwr/a References Webpage[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is an organization based in Salt Lake City, Utah. References ↑ "Webpage" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utah_Division_of_Wildlife_Resources&oldid=536488" Categories: Government Agencies Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

124

Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge May 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Contacts

125

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Atlas of coal/minerals and important resource problem areas for fish and wildlife in the conterminous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atlas highlights areas in the conterminous US of potential concern involving coal and minerals development activities and fish and wildlife resources, in particular the Important Resource Problem Areas (IRPs) designated in 1980 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as areas of emphasis in policymaking. The atlas serves as an initial screening tool for national and regional planners and administrators to help define areas that may require additional analysis prior to development in order to minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish and wildlife resources and to protect and enhance these resources where practicable. The publication contains maps of selected mineral resources (coal, copper, geothermal resources, gold, iron, molybdenum, nickel, oil shale/tar sands, peat, phosphate, silver, uranium), IRPs, and Federal Endangered and Threatened Animal Species. An overlay of the IRP map is provided: by placing this on a mineral map, counties containing both mineral and wildlife resources will be highlighted. Background information on IRPs, the mineral commodities, and environmental impacts of mineral mining is provided, as well as appendices which tabulate the data displayed in the maps. The document can also be used with a series of 1:7,500,000-scale reproductions of the maps.

Honig, R.A.; Olson, R.J.; Mason, W.T. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NSLS Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services NSLS Services Computing Services Lab Space Libraries Postal Services Procurement Repair & Equipment Services Shipping Procedures Storage User Accounts Workshop Procedures...

128

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for the Wildlife Management Areas; and (2) Evaluation of the simplified YN HEP methodologies as a means of measuring mitigation progress.

Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish, Wildlife & Parks Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0701 Phone number 406-444-2535 Website http://fwp.mt.gov/doingBusines Coordinates 46.586864°, -112.01525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.586864,"lon":-112.01525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Agency/Company /Organization Government of India Sector Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.envfor.nic.in/legis Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife[1] Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers Eco-marks Scheme Eco-sensitive Zone Environmental Clearance - General Environmental Labs Environmental Standards Hazardous Substances Management Loss Of Ecology Noise Pollution Ozone Layer Depletion Water Pollution 2-T Oil Public Liability Insurance

133

EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

134

EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

135

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

California high speed rail proposal: High speed rail and wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife and High Speed Rail C ALIFORNIA H IGH S PEED R AILLeavitt, California High Speed Rail Authority) Abstract TheCalifornia High Speed Rail (HSR) Proposal is in the initial

Wilkerson, Cynthia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE, FISHERIES, AND PARKS Sam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

321-1132. Sincerely, Kathy W. Lunceford Fish and Wildlife Biologist Cc: FWS, Atlanta, GA Attn: Jerry Ziewitz P.O. BOX 3658, TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI 38803-3658 WWW.WILDLIFETECHNICAL...

138

Schedule for 2013 Oak Ridge Wildlife Management Area (ORWMA)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schedule for 2013 Oak Ridge Wildlife Management Area (ORWMA) Spring Turkey Hunts Scouting day - April 6th Hunt Weekend - April 13th-14th Hunt Weekend - April 20th -21st These...

139

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring and financially viable Bonneville Power Administration is essential to carrying out those purposes. The Council

140

Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook - Appendix: Literature Review Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II United States Office of Research EPA/600/R-93/187 Environmental Protection and Development December 1993 Agency (8603) Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II EPA/600/R-93/187 December 1993 WILDLIFE EXPOSURE FACTORS HANDBOOK APPENDIX: LITERATURE REVIEW DATABASE Volume II of II Office of Health and Environmental Assessment Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 Additional major funding for this Handbook was provided by the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and by the Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4-04 4-04 Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

143

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

WIND POWER Impacts on Wildlife and Government Responsibilities for Regulating Development and Protecting Wildlife Why GAO Did This Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has recently experienced dramatic growth in the United States, with further growth expected. However, several wind power-generating facilities have killed migratory birds and bats, prompting concern from wildlife biologists and others about the species affected, and the cumulative effects on species populations. GAO assessed (1) what available studies and experts have reported about the impacts of wind power facilities on wildlife in the United

Protecting Wildlife

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit GRR/Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Regulations & Policies WAC 232-12-064 Triggers None specified In Washington, it is unlawful to take wildlife from the wild without permission from the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The WDFW issues Live Wildlife Taking Permits under WAC 232-12-064. 12-WA-a - Live Wildlife Taking Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

148

NSLS Services | Postal Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postal Services Postal Services U.S. Postal Service BNL has a full-service U.S. Postal Service Office (Upton branch) located in Staff Services, Building 179, x2539. BNL Mail Service Mail is delivered and picked up twice a day from each building on site. Users should leave internal lab mail (brown envelopes, no stamps needed) and U.S. Mail (regular envelopes, stamps required) in the outgoing mail boxes at NSLS mail stop 725A, located in the lobby by the elevator. Receiving Mail During regular working hours, packages and other special deliveries are brought to the Stockroom while regular mail is taken to the mailstops around the building. Each beam port is assigned a mail slot at NSLS mail stop 725A near the elevator in the lobby. The beamline number should be on all mail addressed to users. Mail to users should be addressed as follows

149

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

153

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the above mentioned EISs and RODs. Pursuant to its obligations under the Endangered Species Act, BPA has made a determination of whether its proposed project will have any effects on any listed species under the jurisdiction of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). A species list was obtained from USFWS on June 12, 2003, identifying bald eagles, Canada lynx, and bull trout as potentially occurring in the project area. A site assessment was conducted on July 15, 2003 to determine if these species were present and the potential effects of project activities. A ''No Effect'' determination was made for all ESA-listed species. There were no listed species under the jurisdiction of NOAA Fisheries present in the project area. As management activities proceed in the future, BPA will annually re-assess potential effects of planned activities on listed species. The Burns-Paiute Tribe conducted a literature search for historic and archaeological sites on the property on January 11, 1999. No known sites were identified. Further site-specific surveys will be conducted for individual ground disturbing activities. The results of these surveys will be sent to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and BPA. BPA will annually summarize and submit a report to the State Historic Preservation Office. On December 29, 1999, Fred Walasavage of BPA completed a Phase I Site Assessment and concluded that the site did not reveal any environmental factors that would pose a significant liability for remedial action or cleanup under the Comprehensive Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act. A public meeting was held when the property was initially acquired where the property acquisition and proposed activities were discussed. Subsequent public involvement was conducted on July 23, 2002 for commenting on the proposed Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan.

N /A

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Collaboratives for Wildlife-Wind Turbine Interaction Research: Fostering Multistakeholder Involvement (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This poster highlights the various wildlife-wind collaboratives (specific to wildlife-wind turbine interaction research) that currently exist. Examples of collaboratives are included along with contact information, objectives, benefits, and ways to advance the knowledge base.

Sinclair, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Instrumenting Wildlife Water Developments to Collect Hydrometeorological Data in Remote Western U.S. Catchments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the arid western United States, wildlife water developments, or guzzlers, are important water sources for wildlife, and consist of impermeable roof structures designed to intercept precipitation and small tanks for storing water. Guzzlers are ...

Nicholas Grant; Laurel Saito; Mark Weltz; Mark Walker; Christopher Daly; Kelley Stewart; Christo Morris

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2))  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2)) Mark Newbill - TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Joint project with US Forest Service for vegetation control for the McNary- Santiam #2 230 kV transmission line that enhances wildlife habitat under powerlines. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region within Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in cooperation with US Forest Service. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way by hand cutting or machine mowing. The overall goal is to remove small fir trees, brushy

157

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: 1: Environmental Analyses DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Action: Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan States and Provinces Involved: Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and British Columbia Abstract: Despite the efforts of BPA and other regional entities in the Pacific Northwest, some populations of fish and wildlife continue to decline. Reasons for the lack of success include the following: different groups have different values and priorities; there is no clear and agreed-upon scientific answer; and there are conflicting

158

EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan 2: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan SUMMARY In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially combines elements of the Weak Stock and Sustainable Use alternatives and that falls within the established range of potential Policy Direction alternatives. This FEIS evaluates the environmental consequences of BPA's implementation and funding of sample actions that could emerge from any of the Policy Directions. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 2012 EIS-0312: Notice of Availability of the Bonneville Power Administration

159

Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the central effort to protect and restore habitat and avoid adverse impacts to native fish and wildlife

160

Integrating Wildlife Crossing into Transportation Plans and Projects in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for wildlife in future transportation projects. Traditionaleffects of existing and future transportation projects. Ourand overpasses into future transportation project, everyday

Cramer, Patricia C.; Bissonette, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of volumes that together comprise a Recovery and Subbasin Plan for Washington lower Columbia River salmon Subbasin Plans Subbasin vision, assessments, and management plan for each of 12 Washington lower Columbia of Engineers Lee VanTussenbrook, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board

162

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97303 Phone number 800-720-ODFW Website http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ Coordinates 44.974582°, -123.020498° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.974582,"lon":-123.020498,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of combustion turbine power plants (Table 1) should allow these plants to be developed "from scratch," providing, 1994 C-5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Table 1 Representative Combustion Turbine Power Plant Development as well as the effects of contingencies in large thermal plant operation and intertie availability were

164

Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

Transportation Services | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transportation Services The BNL Transportation Office, located at 20 Brookhaven Avenue, Building 400A, is available to assist BNL employees, guests and visitors with transportation needs in support of Laboratory programs. The hours of operation are 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. To contact the Transportation Office call (631) 344-2535. Stony Brook Parking Passes The Transportation Office has a limited number of parking passes for the three (3) parking garages at Stony Brook University. The passes are available to and are intended for use by BNL employees/scientific staff on official business only. Passes may be used at the Administration, University Hospital and Health Services Center garages on the Stony Brook campus when visiting SBU on official business.

166

Africa Data Dissemination Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa Data Dissemination Service Africa Data Dissemination Service Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Africa Data Dissemination Service Agency/Company /Organization: United States Geological Survey, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools Website: igskmncnwb015.cr.usgs.gov/adds/ UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

167

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Volume 3: Sample Implementation Actions, Research Monitoring and Evaluation, and Policy and Planning Volume 3/ 1 VOLUME 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING One of the major challenges within the Region has been understanding the interrelationships among the numerous proposed fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery actions. One reason for this difficulty is that these actions are derived from many different regional proposals, each of which has been designed to meet a specific goal. In addition, the lack of an effective tool to illustrate these interrelationships has hampered understanding.

170

NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (11) Apply Africa filter Asia (12) Apply Asia filter Australia and Oceania (10) Apply Australia and Oceania filter Europe (219) Apply Europe filter Global (7) Apply Global filter North America (217) Apply North America filter Technology Land-Based Wind (280) Apply Land-Based Wind filter Marine Energy (58) Apply Marine Energy filter Offshore Wind (161) Apply Offshore Wind filter Power Lines (66) Apply Power Lines filter Towers (23) Apply Towers filter Animal Birds (334) Apply Birds filter Fish (71) Apply Fish filter Invertebrates (44) Apply Invertebrates filter Mammals (185) Apply Mammals filter Reptiles (10) Apply Reptiles filter Publication Year 2013 (92) Apply 2013 filter

171

Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

Yde, Chis

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recruitment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IAEA Recruitment Services Personal History Form (PHF) and Job Opportunities IAEA Employment Benefits Relevant Publications and Brochures Interview Process This service is provided...

173

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

174

Copy Service, Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copy Service Copy Service Copying in color or black-and-white from hard copy or electronic files. Paper size up to 13" x 19" in a variety of stocks and colors. Larger Documents (up to 36" wide and 100" long) can be reproduced in Black & White from prints or files and can be saved in a variety of electronic format Variable Data Printing - personalized document production Tab Printing Forms CD/DVD Duplication CD/DVD direct printing Binding Collate documents, insert tab dividers, punch holes for binding Stapling documents up to 1 inch thick Spiral, adhesive and perfect binding. Hard covers also available upon request Folding & Mailing Print and apply mailing addresses and labels Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing Laminate printed items up to 35" wide.

175

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

176

GRR/Section 3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land 03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process of leasing Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) land in Texas. The Texas General Land Office manages

177

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

178

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 10, 2003 October 10, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36) Joe DeHerrera- KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project-Implemetation of Wildlife Mitigation Plan Project No: 200000900 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.0 Species Manangement

179

Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Tiger and the Sun: Solar Power Plants and Wildlife Sanctuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss separate and integrated approaches to building scalable solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries. Both solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries need a lot of land. We quantify some of the requirements using various estimates of the rate of solar power production as well as the rate of adding wildlife to a sanctuary over the time range 2010-2050. We use population dynamics equations to study the evolution of solar energy and tiger populations up to and beyond 2050.

McGuigan, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

Merker, Christopher

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A GIS-based identification of potentially significant wildlife habitats associated with roads in Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capen. 1997. A report on the biophysical regions in Vermont.report prepared for the Vermont Ecomapping Roundtable.scientist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and

Austin, John M.; Viani, Kevin; Hammond, Forrest; Slesar, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs  

SciTech Connect

The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

Spitler, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Oil production in the Arctic Natl. Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment responds to U.S. House and Senate committee requests for an examination of technical issues concerning potential development of the Arctic Natl. Wildlife Refuge (ANWAR) in northeastern Alaska. The illustrated report presents the results of an assessment of oilfield technology used to develop the Alaskan North Slope, as an analog for technology at ANWR. The report considers prospects for future North Slope oil production, especially the likelihood that oil flowing through the Trans Alaskan Pipeline System will decline dramatically during the next decade.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mailing Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mailing Services Mailing Services Use the form below to add your name to the Depleted UF6 Mailing List. First Name: Last Name: Organization: Address: City: State: Postal Code:...

190

SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a maximum of about 2,000 ft (610 m) in much of northern Washington and 3,500 ft (1,067 m) in central OregonSOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools #12;SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT A-1 Interactive

191

DRAFT SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington and 3,500 ft (1,067 m) in central Oregon. Soils and geology are very diverse. Topography rangesDRAFT SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools #12;DRAFT SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT A-1

192

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

Bedrossian, Karen L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Calibration Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of these applications, the Optoelectronics Division provides measurement services at laser power levels from nanowatts to kilowatts and pulse ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 11, 2002 June 11, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Purchase of Fisher River Conservation Easement (Fiscal Years 2002-2004) Project No: 2002-044-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: near Libby, Lincoln County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development

195

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35) Joe Deherrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Project- Denny Jones Ranch Project No: 200002700 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.2 Control of Predators and

196

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246-SA-24) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife MitigationProgram EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-24) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Herbert Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Benton County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 221 acres of the Herbert parcel in Benton County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. The Herbert parcel is located within the Willamette

197

Biometric Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biometric Web Services. The biometric web services project combines biometrics and web services to. ... What are Web services? ...

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

Calkins, Brian

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Appendix F: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Section 7 Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bat, Myotis Sodalis." Journal of Mammalogy 58(1): 2. Cope, J.B.; Richter, A.R.; and Mills, R.S. 1974. "A Summer Concentration of the Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalis in Wayne...

200

US Fish and Wildlife Service biomonitoring operations manual, Appendices A--K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains Appendices and Summary Sheets for the following areas: A-Legislative Background and Key to Relevant Legislation, B- Biomonitoring Operations Workbook, C-Air Monitoring, D-Introduction to the Flora and Fauna for Biomonitoring, E-Decontamination Guidance Reference Field Methods, F-Documentation Guidance, Sample Handling, and Quality Assurance/Quality Control Standard Operating Procedures, G-Field Instrument Measurements Reference Field Methods, H-Ground Water Sampling Reference Field Methods, I-Sediment Sampling Reference Field Methods, J-Soil Sampling Reference Field Methods, K-Surface Water Reference Field Methods. Appendix B explains how to set up strategy to enter information on the ``disk workbook``. Appendix B is enhanced by DE97006389, an on-line workbook for users to be able to make revisions to their own biomonitoring data.

Gianotto, D.F.; Rope, R.C.; Mondecar, M.; Breckenridge, R.P.; Wiersma, G.B.; Staley, C.S.; Moser, R.S.; Sherwood, R.; Brown, K.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The public concern for continued delivery of these ecosystem services is increasing; with private landowners of the plateau region affecting the delivery of these services. A geographic information systems spatial analysis was conducted for Bandera and Kerr counties, with two components being: (1) biophysical and (2) landowner interest. Together these resulted in an overarching map depicting the optimal locations to allocate government assistance to landowners for managing their property to support three ecosystem services: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration.In April 2003, a mail survey of selected landowners was conducted to determine their opinions regarding ecosystem services and cost-share programs (Olenick et al. 2005). In July 2004, a supplemental survey of respondents to the first survey was conducted to follow-up on a few questions answered incorrectly and to focus on landowner opinions regarding cost-share assistance programs and land management activities. Overall, it appeared that five year performance contracts were the most chosen contract type for respondents of all property sizes, earning mid/high annual incomes, and for all length of ownership time periods. Based on our findings, the publicly-funded assistance programs that should be allocated to the optimal ecosystem service locations are five and ten year performance contracts based on property size, length of ownership, and income level categories. The spatial and statistical analysis results were successful, in that optimal locations and types of cost share programs were identified for each ecosystem service in order to prioritize the allocation of limited public resources. The patches of ecosystem target areas within the final target area map can be used as land management demonstration sites to reveal to surrounding landowners the benefits of participating in publicly funded cost-share assistance programs. However, the study has been limited by the generality of the GIS statewide wildlife data.

Davis, Amber Marie

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

203

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation (INEPC) primary mission is to oversee and manage the Department's international commercial nuclear fuel management initiatives, and to support Departmental/USG initiatives supporting advocacy for U.S. nuclear exports, including the Team USA initiative. INEPC also supports advancing international civil nuclear policy through the development of innovative approaches to used fuel storage and permanent disposition, including commercially-based comprehensive fuel services and financing vehicles. Program Focuses To achieve these goals, INEPC has taken a leadership role in the following: Leading U.S. government engagement to advance CFS as an option for

204

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award The Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award is designed to recognize special contributions made by the Department's LES/FSN's in achieving the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) and United States Government's (USG) foreign policy goals and objectives. The LES/FSN of the Year Award is the Department's most prestigious award for non- Federal locally employed staff serving the Department overseas, and recognizes their outstanding achievements for the period of 1 October through 30 September each year. This

205

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

Calkins, Brian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Project Management Plan for the "Dilling Addition".  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) for management of the Pend Oreille Wetland Wildlife Mitigation project II (Dilling Addition) for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on Kalispel Ceded Lands. Albeni Falls Dam is located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington-Idaho border, about 25 miles upstream of the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The dam controls the water level on Lake Pend Oreille. The lake was formerly the center of subsistence use by the Kalispel Tribe. Flooding of wetlands, and water fluctuations both on the lake and downstream on the river, has had adverse impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. An extensive process was followed to formulate and prioritize wildlife resource goals. The Kalispel Natural Resource Department provided guidance in terms of opportunities onsite. To prioritize specific goals, the Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Caucus were consulted. From this process, the top priority goal for the Kalispel Tribe is: Protect and develop riparian forest and shrub, and freshwater wetlands, to mitigate losses resulting from reservoir inundation and river level fluctuations due to Albeni Falls Dam. Indicator species used to determine the initial construction/inundation loses and mitigation project gains include Bald Eagle (breeding and wintering), Black-capped Chickadee, Canada Goose, Mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer, and Yellow Warbler.

Entz, Ray D.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NEHRP - John Filson (USGS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 905 National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS ... of the Director of Central Intelligence, 1994 ... assistant University of California Berkeley, 1960 ...

210

Translation Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... As a courtesy, the National Center for Standards ... companies may be located by entering the term ... translation services" in any Internet search engine. ...

211

Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creek Winter Range: Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment I F 8 - Spokane Tribe of Indians Bonneville POWER ADMINISTRATION B r n u r r o N aF THIS D O C ~ I H ~ E E 1% utifi_;'iUzi: w DOVEA-0939 November1 994 Bureay of Indian Affairs DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

212

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Curriculum development of a wildlife habitat gardening Golden Ray Series [sm] for the Junior Master Gardener [sm] Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of the Backyard Buddies Golden Ray Series curriculum for the Junior Master Gardener Program is a labor-intensive and ongoing project requiring consideration of numerous factors relating not only to the habitat gardening subject matter of the curriculum but to educational, economic, political, and other concerns as well. This paper summarizes the steps in the development of this curriculum. A first necessary step in developing the Backyard Buddies curriculum was understanding the Junior Master Gardener Program for which it was intended. JMG began as a 4-H gardening program in Texas and has since spread to 25 states and 2 countries. The program stresses "hands-on" learning in an effort to make the program fun for participants. JMG curricula are also oriented toward "whole-child" education, where both emotional and intellectual fulfillment are goals. JMG groups can consist of anyone, needing only an adult leader and a minimum of 5 youth participants. The only other requirement for a JMG group is that they register their group through the Texas Agricultural Extension Service and that they buy the necessary curriculum materials. However while anyone can form a JMG group and while the curriculum is applicable to groups of any kind, the curriculum is geared toward the needs of schools in an effort to gain a wider participation in the program. For this reason, JMG curriculum is typically designed to fulfil the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) requirements for schools. Likewise, JMG curricula are also often designed to be compatible with the materials typically found on standardized tests like the TAAS test. A Golden Ray Series, such as Backyard Buddies, is an outgrowth of JMG'S basic curriculum. Each Golden Ray Series focuses upon a specific concern related to gardening. A previous GRS, for instance, dealt with Health and Nutrition in the Garden while Backyard Buddies focuses specifically upon habitat gardening. In developing the Backyard Buddies curriculum, JMG guidelines had to be followed while also developing a curriculum that would teach youth how to create and maintain a habitat garden. Because the final goal of this curriculum was to give learners an understanding of how to attract wildlife to a garden and to instill an appreciation of wildlife in learners, a Backwards Design approach to curriculum development was used. Finally, basic research had to be conducted in order to insure that all activities were factually-accurate as well as age-appropriate. Beginning with lessons on what habitats are, Backyard Buddies first section guarantees that learners have the necessary vocabulary and the necessary scientific understanding of wildlife needs to begin a habitat garden. This basic education continues with the next section on elements, such as food, water, and shelter, that are essential to the survival of wildlife in a garden setting. Following these sections come sections on birds, mammals, insects, and reptiles/amphibians. These sections deal with specific needs and concerns relating to habitat gardening and these particular animal groups. Next comes a problem-solving section in which learners deal with potential problems related to wildlife habitat gardening. Finally, the concluding section consists of life skill and career exploration lessons related to habitat gardening. The Backyard Buddies curriculum is currently awaiting review. Following review and any necessary revisions, the curriculum will be pilot tested and, again, will undergo any necessary revisions. Then, artwork, graphics, and layout will be designed prior to the curriculum's publication and implementation.

Meche, Michelle S

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

USGS and Engineering and Environmental Division joint compliance monitoring report for Sacramento, CA Municipal Utility District's SMUDGEO No. 1 Geothermal project. Appendix D to final decision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The laws, ordinances, standards, and conditions for designing, constructing, and operating the power plant and related facilities are referenced. In addition, actions, verifications, submittals, and approvals required by the USGS, BLM, and CEC are specified to assure that the facilities are designed, constructed, and operated in compliance with air and water quality, public health and safety, environmental and such other laws, ordinances, and standards specified. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Service Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines for Obtaining Guidelines for Obtaining Best-Practice Contracts for Commercial Buildings Operation and Maintenance Service Contracts Prepared with funding from the U.S. EPA December 1997 PECI Acknowledgements Special thanks to the following people for their ongoing contributions and careful review of the document: Byron Courts, Director of Engineering Services, and Dave Rabon, Chief Engineer, Melvin Mark Pete Degan, Director of Customer Marketing, Landis/Staefa David Fanning, HVAC Coordinator, EXPRESS Bil Pletz, Facility Manager, Intel Mike Sanislow, Service Channel Development Leader, Honeywell Home and Building Karl Stum, Director of Technical Services, PECI Tom Walton, President, United Service Alliance For additional copies of this guidebook, contact: Portland Energy Conservation Inc. (PECI)

216

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2004 14, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Proposed Weaver Slough Conservation Easement Project No: 2002-042 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS [page A/2]): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Flathead River System, Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Flathead Land Trust Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that

217

Energy Policy 35 (2007) 47204729 Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and provides original analysis. We apEnergy Policy 35 (2007) 4720­4729 Should we drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge $123 billion to extract and bring to market. The difference, $251 billion, would generate social

Kotchen, Matthew J.

218

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wildlife Use of Open and Decommissioned Roads on the Clearwater National Forest, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

success of elk hunters in Idaho. Wildlife Society Bulletinbears in west-central Idaho. In: Martinka, C.J. , McArthur,and elk behavior in northern Idaho. In North American elk:

Switalski, T. Adam; Broberg, Len; Holden, Anna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

Benson, Etienne Samuel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

How does the public process impact the selection of a nuisance wildlife management plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1950s the human relationship with wildlife in the United States shifted dramatically; from primarily consumptive to primarily recreational. Over the same time period a trend of humans moving into suburban communities ...

Siegel, Julianne (Julianne Susan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Novell Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CIS Department CIS Department Novell Services If you don't see the answer to your question here, contact the help desk at 486-HELP or submit a Help Request. Novell Netware is the labs main method of providing file and print services for the PC and Macintosh platforms. Novell end user services are free and include a backed up home directory and access to all distributed printers at LBL. Request a Novell account Request a new Novell printer Request a Novell file restore (choose PC for platform and Backups/Restores for problem) Novell iPrint Accessing Novell File Services Download the LBL Netware client Novell Server Information Novell Departmental Administrative Contacts Novell FAQ: How do I login to the Novell network? 9x | NT4/2000/XP Do I have the Netware client installed? 9x | NT4/2000/XP

227

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reservoir quality studies, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir quality studies are part of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska. Petrographic analyses have been carried out of samples collected from surface exposures in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska, to evaluate surface materials as to their potential reservoir rock qualities in the subsurface. This entails characterization of relevant petrologic-petrophysical properties, integration with regional geological-geophysical relationships, and synthesis in terms of likely diagenetic, structural, and stratigraphic conditions in the subsurface. There is a paucity of relevant data in this region. Inferences must be predicated largely on general principles and known relationships elsewhere. A spectrum of lithologies were studied, representing a substantial portion of the regional stratigraphic column. In a number of cases, particularly among the pre-Brookian samples, the rocks appear to have low reservoir potential, based on their present high degree of diagenetic maturity. There is always the possibility - deemed somewhat unlikely here - of subsurface equivalents with more favorable characteristics, due to different original compositions, textures, and/or geologic histories. Brookian sandstones and conglomerates feature samples with fair-good reservoir characteristics, with prospects of being equally good or better in the subsurface. The samples studied suggest the likelihood of horizons with viable reservoir qualities in the subsurface within the ANWR region.

Mowatt, T.C.; Banet, A. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Railroad crossing structures for spotted turtles: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Greenbush rail line wildlife crossing demonstration project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authority, Proposed Greenbush Rail Line: Wildlife ResourcesProposed Greenbush Rail Line: Conservation Management Plan.and federal agencies. Rail corridors pose unique design

Pelletier, Steven K.; Carlson, Lars; Nein, Daniel; Roy, Robert D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Strategies for restoring ecological connectivity and establishing wildlife passage for the upgrade of Route 78 in Swanton, Vermont: an overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Black bears in Vermont. Stratton Mountain Black BearStudy. Final Report. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources,biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

Austin, John M.; Ferguson, Mark; Gingras, Glenn; Bakos, Greg

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

Drais, Gregory

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts for Users Contacts for Users User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

233

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Contact Home Contact User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

234

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Detroit Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project, North Santiam River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Detroit/Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project (Detroit Project) on the North Santiam River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1939, 1956, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each time period were determined. Ten wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Detroit Project extensively altered or affected 6324 acres of land and river in the North Santiam River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 1,608 acres of conifer forest and 620 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Detroit Project included the loss of winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, pileated woodpecker, spotted owl, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Detroit Project. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

Noyes, J.H.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

236

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

237

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

238

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Print User Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

239

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Print Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

240

User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Print Services Print The User Services Group is available to aid ALS users before they arrive, while they are here, and after they leave. User Office Experiment Coordination Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users Tel: 510-486-7727 ALS User Office The User Office is located on the mezzanine of Building 6 (the ALS), Room 2212. Contact Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Tel: 510-486-7745 Fax: 510-486-4773 Address: Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab, MS 6-2100, Berkeley, CA 94720 Hours User Office: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and 1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. New user registration: Monday-Friday 8.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Optical dynamic circuit services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IP service, leased-line service and POTS service have been the three long-standing communication service offerings of providers. Recently, both commercial and research-andeducation network providers have started offering optical dynamic circuit services. ...

Malathi Veeraraghavan; Mark Karol; George Clapp

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have flow. baseload #12;GLOSSARY December 14, 1994 G-2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM In a demand sense, a load

246

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Smith and Parsons Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of three parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 870 acres.

247

Conforth Ranch (Wanaket) Wildlife Mitigation Project : Draft Management Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects, including McNary dam. The proposed wildlife mitigation project involves wildlife conservation on 1140 hectares (ha)(2817 acres) of land (including water rights) in Umatilla County, Oregon. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA)(DOE/EA- 1016) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

250

SERVICES Purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Management Memo calls on all state agencies operating state motor vehicles to make every effort to Flex Your Power at the Pump, and lower fuel costs for the State of California through vigorous compliance with the preventative maintenance standards identified in this management memo and in the Automobile Record, Standard (STD.) 271. Background Public Resources Code 25722 mandates the state reduce petroleum consumption of its vehicle fleet to the maximum extent practicable including improved preventative maintenance. State Administrative Manual Section (SAM) 4101 establishes the need to comply with minimum preventative maintenance standards listed in the Automobile Maintenance Record, STD. 271. This includes prescribed services and mechanical inspections that promote state vehicle efficiency and achieve optimum fuel mileage. SAM Section 3687.1 prohibits the purchase of premium grade gasoline for state vehicles. And, directs state drivers to make fuel purchases at lower priced self-service pumps whenever possible.

Manual Sections

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

What's in a Service?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proper understanding of the general nature, potential and obligations of electronic services may be achieved by examining existing commercial services in detail. The everyday services that surround us, and the ways in which we engage with them, are ... Keywords: electronic services, service description, service properties, service substitution

Justin O'Sullivan; David Edmond; Arthur Ter Hofstede

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

Narolski, Steven W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 5/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2002 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Canby Ferry Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 16 acres of the Canby Ferry parcel in Clackamas County, Oregon for the protection

256

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Services Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Services Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleServices&oldid...

258

Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ASSIGNMENTS ASSIGNMENTS Pamela Arias-Ortega - Administrative and judicial litigation; and personnel law and workforce discipline mailto:parias-ortega@doeal.gov Celina Baca - Research and special projects for litigation and general law group mailto:cbaca@doeal.gov Dick Blakely - Designated Agency Ethics Advisor - Administrative litigation and mediation services; and ethics mailto:rblakely@doeal.gov Jonathan Buckner - Administrative review hearings; and administrative hearings before EEOC and MSPB mailto:jbuckner@doeal.gov Sean Counce - Administrative review hearings; and administrative hearings before EEOC and MSPB mailto:scounce@doeal.gov Diana Cruz - Copyright program; intellectual property databases; support for IP issues; and time and attendance mailto:dcruz@doeal.gov

259

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award The Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award is designed to recognize special contributions made by the Department's LES/FSN's in achieving the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) and United States Government's (USG) foreign policy goals and objectives. The LES/FSN of the Year Award is the Department's most prestigious award for non-Federal locally employed staff serving the Department overseas, and recognizes their outstanding achievements for the period of 1 October through 30 September each year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of

260

DRAFT SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT F-39 Sage Thrasher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 - 4.0 ac) in south central Idaho (Reynolds and Rich 1978). #12;DRAFT SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN Oregon. The reported territory size in central Washington is much lower, 0.1 ha (0.2 ac) (Rotenberry etDRAFT SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT F-39 Sage Thrasher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below Libby Dam. The reservoir operation in spring largely works toward project refill while otherwise operations in the mid-Columbia River to support fall Chinook spawning and rearing in the Hanford Reach to fish. Action item F&W-2 (see the Action Plan) calls for the Council to work with fish and wildlife

263

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Review: Receptor-oriented approaches in wildlife and human exposure modelling: A comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five human and five wildlife receptor-oriented exposure models were compared with the aim to identify similarities, differences and areas where both fields can learn from each other. Similarities were revealed in exposure endpoints, chemical stressors ... Keywords: Chemical stressors, Contaminant exposure, Environmental risk assessment, Model comparison, Multiple stressors

Mark Loos; Aafke M. Schipper; Uwe Schlink; Kathrin Strebel; Ad M. J. Ragas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NIST Measurement Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standard Reference Materials Laboratory accreditation services (NVLAP) ? DIY You can do it; we can help. ? Services for legal metrology labs ...

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Biometric Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biometric Web Services. ... This page last updated Thursday, November 14, 2013. Join the Biometric Web Services Mailing List. ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

267

On-Site Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Boulder Laboratories Employees Association ... a variety of health services including emergency ... emergency ambulance service; administration of ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions Protecting Civil Rights Integrating...

269

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 3/7/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2002 March 7, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch Dam Phase II Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Camas and Elmore Counties, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 1,370 acres of

271

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (07/3/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Windy Bay Property Acquisition Project No: 1990-044-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Kootenai County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 150 acres of land located at the mouth of Lake Creek on Lake Coeur d'Alene on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation in Kootenai County, Idaho. Title to the land will be held by the Coeur d'Alene

272

DOE/EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (8/9/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2001 9, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-16) Brad Miller, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Johnson Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: Benewah Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase three parcels totaling 411 acres of private property on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for

273

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 12/12/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2001 December 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) David Sill, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Bader Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: St. Joe Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

274

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 7/24/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Lower Naches River Land Acquisition, Yakima River Side Channels Project Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources Location: Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project

275

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) 5/20/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 20, 2003 May 20, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) Joe DeHerrera, KECU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Zumwalt Prairie Preserve Conservation Easement Project No: 2001-043-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques-1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The

276

Kalispel Tribe of Indians Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Albeni Falls Dam: Flying Goose Ranch Phase I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for wildlife habitat mitigation for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on and near the Kalispel Indian Reservation.

Merker, Christopher

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION WILDLIFE CROSSING TEAM; BUILDING AN INTER-AGENCY PLANNING TOOL TO ADDRESS ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIVITY IN VERMONT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

He serves as chair of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibianis coordinator of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.biologist with the Vermont Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. John

Slesar, Chris; Morse, Susan C.; Austin, John M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..A ..A -- South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment ig of No Significant Impact and Findi RECEIVED @ S T 1 JAN 3 1 DOEIEA-0956 September 1995 SOUTH FORK SNAKE RIVER / PALISADES WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE EA # 0956 DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an a m u n t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their ' employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- , bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer-

279

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Sampson, Lantzy, Allotment #0065-C, and Allotment 154 Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land

280

File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:50, 26 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:50, 26 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (46 KB) Apalazzo (Talk | contribs)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energys Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each sites sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Career Services Pricing Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Job/Resume Posting and Prices Career Services Pricing Information Career Services Career Services chemistry jobs classifieds employment fats global help wanted job Jobs member membership network oils science jobs ...

284

A flexible service selection for executing virtual services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the adoption of a service-oriented paradigm on the Web, many software services are likely to fulfil similar functional needs for end-users. We propose to aggregate functionally equivalent software services within one single virtual service, that ... Keywords: marketplace, service aggregation, service discovery, service selection, service selector, virtual service

Nassim Laga; Emmanuel Bertin; Noel Crespi; Ivan Bedini; Benjamin Molina; Zhenzhen Zhao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Literature Review of the Impact of Wind Turbine Generator Induced Sound on Wildlife  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review describes findings of a scientific literat ure search evaluating effects of exposure to wind turbine-generated sound on wildlife. It also provides a searchable digital database of over 350 literature sources related to this topic.BackgroundThe proliferation of wind energy generation facilities has created immense pressure to understand the impact on the local ecosystem of all aspects of these new systems, including sound generated by wind ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Stewart L. Udall, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Clarence F. Pautzke, Commissioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bukvich, performs at a 1987 football game. (GEM nle photo) All-male yell leadersper- formed the Idaho the ceremony, w hile you searched for friends in different colleges to see w hat color their tassels were

287

United States Depar'bnent of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................. . ........ ....... . 13t feet Main engine ·····..·..·..······. ··· · . ·.· ~er charged diesel, delivering 600 hp. a t 400 nto the wind or before the wind. HISCELLANEOUS EQUIPl1ENT ABOARD THE VESSEL: 1 - Radio-tel ephone, 65

288

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OSCAR L. CHAPMAN, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, ALBERT M. DAY, Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

____________________________________________ 1 Annotated bibliography__________________________________ 3 Abbreviations usec

289

The Status of Wildlife in Protected Areas Compared to Non-Protected Areas of Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compile over 270 wildlife counts of Kenyas wildlife populations conducted over the last 30 years to compare trends in national parks and reserves with adjacent ecosystems and country-wide trends. The study shows the importance of discriminating human-induced changes from natural population oscillations related to rainfall and ecological factors. National park and reserve populations have declined sharply over the last 30 years, at a rate similar to non-protected areas and country-wide trends. The protected area losses reflect in part their poor coverage of seasonal ungulate migrations. The losses vary among parks. The largest parks, Tsavo East, Tsavo West and Meru, account for a disproportionate share of the losses due to habitat change and the difficulty of protecting large remote parks. The losses in Kenyas parks add to growing evidence for wildlife declines inside as well as outside African parks. The losses point to the need to quantify the performance of conservation policies and promote integrated landscape practices that combine parks with private and community-based measures.

David Western; Samantha Russell; Innes Cuthill

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning, Dworshak Reservoir : Final Report FY 1987.  

SciTech Connect

The impact to wildlife and habitat losses due to the construction and operation of Dworshak Dam on bald eagles and osprey were investigated for the 54 miles of the North Fork Clearwater River that was inundated by Dworshak Reservoir. Down stream impacts, and habitat losses due to Dworshak Dam were investigated for all target wildlife species that utilize the riparian area along the 42.5 miles of North Fork and lower Clearwater Rivers from the dam site to the confluence with the Snake River. The investigation was restricted to existing information. Changing the riverine habitat along the North Fork Clearwater River to one with unique reservoir characteristics has changed the ability of the North Fork Drainage to support past and present wildlife species that inhabited the area. The historical breeding grounds of bald eagles were reduced by increased human activities facilitated by the open access to Dworshak Reservoir and the permanent loss of historical salmon runs up the North Fork Clearwater River. The permanent loss of historical anadromous fish runs have had a negative impact on wintering eagles. The introduction of kokanee, however, has provided a replacement prey base, but only if the fishery is stable and reliable. 47 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Kronemann, Loren A.; Lawrence, Keith P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hardwood energy crops and wildlife diversity: Investigating potential benefits for breeding birds and small mammals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hardwood energy crops have the potential to provide a profit to growers as well as environmental benefits (for water quality, soil stabilization, chemical runoff, and wildlife habitat). Environmental considerations are important for both sustainable development of bioenergy technologies on agricultural lands, and for public support. The Environmental Task of the US DOE`s Biofuels feedstock Development Program (BFDP) is working with industry, universities and others to determine how to plant, manage and harvest these crops to maximize environmental advantages and minimize impacts while economically meeting production needs. One research objective is to define and improve wildlife habitat value of these energy crops by exploring how breeding birds and small mammals use them. The authors have found increased diversity of birds in tree plantings compared to row crops. However, fewer bird and small mammal species use the tree plantings than use natural forest. Bird species composition on hardwood crops studied to date is a mixture of openland and forest bird species. Restricted research site availability to date has limited research to small acreage sites of several years of age, or to a few larger acreage but young (1--2 year) plantings. Through industry collaboration, research began this season on bird use of diverse hardwood plantings (different ages, acreages, tree species) in the southeast. Together with results of previous studies, this research will help define practical energy crop guidelines to integrate native wildlife benefits with productive energy crops.

Schiller, A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States); Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NIST Internet Time Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All services available. ntp-nist.ldsbc.edu, 198.60.73.8, LDSBC, Salt Lake City, Utah, All services available. nist1-lv.ustiming ...

296

Rates and Repayment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates Loveland Area Project Firm Power Rates Transmission and Ancillary Services Rates 2012 Rate Adjustment-Transmission and Ancillary Services 2010 Rate Adjustment-Firm Power 2009...

297

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

298

Topic: Service Life Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Service Life Prediction. Event. 24th NIST Computer Modeling Workshop. ... Service Life Prediction of Polymeric Materials: Vision for the Future. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

ORNL Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page ORNL Home | ESH&Q Home | Health Services Internal A division in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Directorate The Health Services Division at Oak Ridge...

300

Record of Decision for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) (10/31/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT ADMINISTRATOR'S RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt the Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) Policy Direction in its Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Environmental Impact Statement (FWIP EIS, DOE/EIS-0312, April 2003) as a comprehensive and consistent policy to guide the implementation and funding of the agency's fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery efforts. PA 2002 focuses on enhancing fish and wildlife habitat, modifying hydro operations and structures, and reforming hatcheries to both increase populations of listed fish stocks and provide long-term harvest opportunities. PA 2002 reflects regional fish and wildlife policy guidance and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

From Jimmy Carter to George W. Bush: Presidential Policies and Involvement in the Debate over the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1977-2009.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), located in the Northeastern corner of Alaska, has for the last three decades been the focus of one of (more)

Eriksen, Gisle Holsb

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Debatten om The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). : En diskursanalyse av ANWR-debatten i Representantenes hus i perioden 1995-2012.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I over 50 r har debatten om omrdet The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) pgtt i amerikansk politikk. Debattens kjerne handler om man skal pne (more)

Kristiansen, Hanne Holm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Service Life Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of Service Life of Reinforced Concrete Structure Exposed to Chlorides. Please supply the following parameters ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Making Web services tradable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In service-oriented architectures, applications are developed by incorporating services which are often provided by different organizations. Since a service might be offered under different configurations by various different organizations, sophisticated ... Keywords: Automated negotiations, Preferences for functional/non-functional properties, Web service policies

Sudhir Agarwal; Steffen Lamparter; Rudi Studer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

USGS Annual Water Data Reports  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data are published annually for use by engineers, scientists, managers, educators, and the general public. These archival products supplement direct access to current and historical water data provided by the National Water Information System (NWIS). Beginning with Water Year 2006, annual water data reports are available as individual electronic Site Data Sheets for the entire Nation for retrieval, download, and localized printing on demand. National distribution includes tabular and map interfaces for search, query, display and download of data. Data provided include extreme and mean discharge rates.

None

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Service Water Piping Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the years 1988 and 1989, EPRI organized the Service Water Working Group (SWWG) to identify and help resolve the many issues surrounding service water (SW) systems in nuclear power plants. One issue identified by the SWWG was corrosion in service water piping systems. Interest in this issue resulted in the development of several technical reports: Guidelines for the Repair/Replacement Welding of Nuclear Service Water Systems, TR-100386; Guide for the Examination of Service Water System Piping, TR-10206...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

310

Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (Water Entity); National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Launched in 2002, the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (CBWTP) is anticipated to be a five-year effort to test new strategies for enhancing tributary flows. The premise of the CBWTP is that water can most readily be made available for instream flows not by attempting to regulate senior water users but, instead, by acquiring water rights from willing sellers and transferring those rights to instream flows within the prior appropriation framework ('first in time, first in right'). The primary goals for this water initiative included: (1) To implement Action 151 of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion on the Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. (2) To implement Provision A.8 of the Council's 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program related to securing water for instream flows. (3) To integrate components of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Program and Watershed Assessment process with the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion. (4) To ensure actions taken under the program would be effective, fiscally efficient, and biologically beneficial to fish and wildlife in the region. In the spring of 2002, BPA and a group of water experts selected ten local entities in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana with a demonstrated potential to innovate and implement tributary flow improvements. We also selected the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to serve as the regional entity for this initiative. BPA then set up the funding agreement and scope of work to establish what is now known as the Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program. In FY 2003, BPA provided over $1.5 million in funding to the CBWTP and approved 33 water transactions. In FY 2004, BPA will provide up to $4 million to the project to enhance habitat. Thanks to the dedicated efforts of partners throughout the Basin, the CBWTP is off to a strong start in improving tributary flows in key areas across the region.

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

N /A

2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Review of BPA Funded Sturgeon, Resident Fish and Wildlife Projects for 1990/1991.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 19--21, 1991, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. This document list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leader's presentation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

Howerton, Jack

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-30)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Horkley Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 120 acres of sagebrush steppe and agricultural lands in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies on the west slope of the Menan Butte Area of Critical

317

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-31)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) 1) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Allen Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 81 acres of forested wetlands and scrub shrub wetlands along the south bank of the South Fork of the Snake River in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies within

318

Processing Distinguished Service Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Award honoring outstanding, meritorious service to the oilseed processing industry. Processing Distinguished Service Award Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents divisi

319

DOE Grids Service Transition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Grids Service Transition DOE Grids Service Transition Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net DOE Grids Service Transition Background ESnet has decided to transition support and management for the certificate services provided by the DOE Grids public key infrastructure (PKI) to the Open Sciences Grid (OSG). OSG and ESnet provide service to many of the same user communities, and have long been collaborators in the areas of identity

320

Web services @ MIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are several useful web services developed at MIT by students, faculty and researchers. However, they are scattered all over MIT. Most people at MIT are unaware of the availability of these web services and hence they ...

Tyagi, Sapna DevendraSingh, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Towards Service Description Logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semantic service description and matchmaking are needed in embedded and disappearing computing, cooperative multiagent systems, and the semantic web. Standard program semantics formalizations are not suited to modeling service semantics, because they ... Keywords: description logics, semantic web

Piero A. Bonatti

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Grammatical framework web service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a web service for natural language parsing, prediction, generation, and translation using grammars in Portable Grammar Format (PGF), the target format of the Grammatical Framework (GF) grammar compiler. The web service implementation is open ...

Bjrn Bringert; Krasimir Angelov; Aarne Ranta

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ORNL DAAC User Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Ready to Answer Your Questions The ORNL DAAC's User Services Office is the first point of contact for answering your questions concerning data and information held by...

324

NSIT Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Special Publication 250-59 NIST Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS), Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS), ...

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

MSID Products, Tools, & Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SID Products, Tools, & Services. XML Testbed - collection of XML-Related Tools; Express Engine - STEP (ISO 10303) development ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

Legend Technical Services, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legend Technical Services, Inc. NVLAP Lab Code: 102081-0. Address and Contact Information: 88 Empire Drive St. Paul ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Accountability as a service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that accountability be a first-class network service, independent of addressing and routing. We design a scheme for allowing accountability services, rather than connectivity-providing ISPs, to vouch for traffic, allowing victims to report abuse, filter abusive traffic, and isolate malicious senders. We discuss how accountability services may evolve, how they may facilitate new applications, and the implications of shifting the burden of network policing to a dedicated service. 1

Adam Bender; Neil Spring; Dave Levin; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Outstanding Service Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Outstanding Service Award is awarded in even-numbered years to recognize a career of outstanding service to ACM SIGGRAPH by a volunteer. It recognizes an individual who has given extraordinary service to ACM SIGGRAPH, both in the trenches and in ...

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Broadband and universal service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 254(b)(3) of the 1996 Telecommunications Act established the objective that residents of rural areas should have access to advanced telecommunications and information services comparable to services in urban areas. Pursuant to the passage of ... Keywords: Broadband policy, Empirical analysis, Rural, Telecommunications policy, Universal service

David Gabel

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Whole-Organism Concentration Ratios for Plutonium in Wildlife from Past US Nuclear Research Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo-media}) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR{sub wo-media} values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR{sub wo-media} values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt.

johansen, M.; Kamboj; Kuhne, W.

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Services | Central Fabrication Services | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services & Capabilities Services & Capabilities The Central Fabrication Services Division's capabilities range from an Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) capability, to a state of the art cleaning facility, to a large fabricating facility which includes CNC Machining, Automatic Tube Welding, CNC Punch Press capability, and 3-D printing. CNC Auto Feed Saw High Bay Area 3-D Printer Main Shop, Building 479 Maintenance Sheet Metal Area Water Jet Machine X-ray Generating Tube CR X-ray Processor with High Resolution Monitor Low Bay Area in Machine Shop Wire EDM Machine Wire EDM Machine Oil Recycling Facility, Building 495 UHV Cleaning Facility, Building 498 Material Storage and Stock Central Fabrication Services is proud of it's highly proficient technical staff all of which are available, at no cost to the customer, for

335

NSLS Services | Repair & Equipment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair & Equipment Services Repair & Equipment Services Cleaning Facility (BNL Central Shops) Solvent cleaning of vacuum parts and leak checking service is also available. Work is billed to each user via a BNL ILR. Contact the NSLS Building Manager to arrange for any of these services. Electronics Repair Limited repairs for electronic equipment are available from an outside contractor through the Control Room. Contact Control Room Supervisor Randy Church (x2550 or x2736, pager 5310). Shipping memos are filled out on the web, and pick ups are on Fridays. Come to the Control Room for assistance. The user should call the contractor on the day before scheduled pickups to alert the contractor of the pickup. Items to be repaired should be left in the Control Room with the completed shipping memo. Costs are charged to the

336

Internal Audit Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Contacts Organizational Chart IAS Search Staff Only Lab Search Phone Book A-Z Index Privacy and Security Notice "Internal Auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes." The Institute of Internal Auditors Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing About IAS | Audit Committee | Audit Planning | Ethics & Investigations | External Audit Coordination Advisory Services | Other Relevant Audit Links | Contacts | Organizational

337

China Information Service Offered  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Information Service Offered China Information Service Offered The Energy Analysis Program is proposing to launch a multiclient service, tentatively called the China Energy Information Service, that would draw upon EAP's extensive research on China's energy sector and its strong working relationships with Chinese policymakers and researchers. The service would provide private U.S. firms with the information they need to market their energy-related products, technologies, and services in China. For an annual fee of less than $15,000, participants would be entitled to: Annual updates of EAP's China Databook covering China's energy supply, use, investment, and other related statistics. Bimonthly topical reports on subjects to be chosen in consultation with advisory committees composed of the service's subscribers.

338

Wildlife Society Bulletin 2005, 33(1):317325 Peer edited Although widely used, aerial surveys of large  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

317 Wildlife Society Bulletin 2005, 33(1):317­325 Peer edited Although widely used, aerial surveys biases remained unsatisfactory, more recent approaches aim at correcting the bias. Bias in aerial surveys missed. Availability bias (Graham and Bell 1989, Marsh and From the Field: Testing 2 aerial survey

Laval, Université

339

Landowners' perceptions on coordinated wildlife and groundwater management in the Edwards Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since Texas contains less than 5% public land, private landowners are critical to the success of environmental management initiatives in the state. This has implications for resources that traverse property boundaries, such as wildlife and groundwater. Texas landowners are increasingly capitalizing on the income potential of fee-based hunting, and many have banded together to form Wildlife Management Associations (WMAs). Not only can such landowner associations enhance the coordination of resource management decisions, they also have the potential to increase social capital, which is reflected by interpersonal trust, reciprocity and civic participation. To improve the management of common-pool resources it is important to understand the relationship between social capital and coordinated resource management because long-term community stability and resource sustainability appear to be highly correlated. A 600-landowner mail survey (with 48.1% response) was conducted in the Edwards Plateau region of Texas to compare the land management characteristics and social capital of landowners who are members of WMAs with non-member landowners. The goal of this research was to determine how WMA membership, property size, and location affect levels of social capital and interest in cooperative resource management. It was hypothesized that members, large landowners, and northern landowners would be more interested in cooperative management and exhibit higher social capital. While WMA members and large-property owners were more involved in wildlife management than non-members and small-property owners, this interest in resource management did not carry over to groundwater. These groups were not more involved in groundwater management activities, and all survey groups were disinterested in joining private cooperatives for groundwater marketing. Social capital differences were more evident between large- and small-property owners than between WMA members and non-members. Members scored higher only on community involvement, while large owners scored higher on community involvement as well as trust. These results suggest that WMA membership per se does not significantly increase social capital among Edwards Plateau landowners, but do not necessarily refute the importance of social capital within WMAs. Differences in trust between members were positively correlated with increased communication and meeting frequency, suggesting ways WMAs can improve intra-association social capital.

Limesand, Craig Milton

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Product Service Codes @ Headquarters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Product Service Codes @ Headquarters Product Service Codes @ Headquarters A listing of Product Service Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services Produce Service Codes @...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

National Service Activation Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Activation Checklist Service Activation Checklist You have just received information that you are being activated for national service. Covered or Not Covered If you have received notice to report for active duty - Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, Public Health Service, or Coast Guard and you are a Federal employee, you have employment and reemployment rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994 (USERRA). Basics - Telling People What is Happening 1. Have you told your spouse, family, best friend, or someone else who is important to you? Point of Contact for Department of Energy Use: Name: Telephone Number: E-mail: 2. Go to Employee Self-Service and make sure your personal information is up to date.

342

Distributed service composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we explore the use of action systems for distributed service composition. Distributed systems can be composed out of a basic computation and a set of services. Even though this way of designing a system out of components helps in managing the derivation task, formal description techniques are needed due to the complexity of distributed systems. We propose a method where services, or features as they are often called, are speci ed in isolation by the service provider. The services when available are used by clients in a distributed manner. Reasoning about the services and their interactions with each other and with the basic computation of the clients is carried out within the re nement calculus. To exemplify the proposed methodology we study feature composition and feature interaction in telecommunications software.

Joost N. Kok; Kaisa Sere

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Wildlife Impact Assessment : Bonneville, McNary, The Dalles, and John Day Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Army Corps of Engineers Bonneville project in Oregon and Washington. The project directly impacted 20,749 acres of wildlife habitat. Seven evaluation species were selected with losses and gains expressed in Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to 1 acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated a gain of 2671 HU's of lesser scaup wintering habitat. Losses of 4300 HU's of great blue heron habitat, 2443 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2767 HU's of spotted sandpiper habitat, 163 HU's of yellow warbler habitat, 1022 HU's black-capped chickadee habitat, and 1622 HU's of mink habitat occurred as a result of the project. This amounts to a total combined loss of 12,317 HU's. 18 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Rasmussen, Larry; Wright, Patrick

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Review of BPA Funded Sturgeon, Resident Fish and Wildlife Projects, 1989/1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 6-7, 1990, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. The following pages list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leaders presentation. These summaries are in some cases preliminary; they are subject to change and should not be quoted without consulting the project leader.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Dispersal of radioactivity by wildlife from contaminated sites in a forested landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province of eastern Tennessee (USA). This area is characterized by deciduous forests dominated by hardwood and mixed mesophytic tree species. Wildlife populations have access to some radioactively contaminated sites at ORNL, and contaminated animals or animal nests within the Laboratory's boundaries have been found to contain on the order of 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}6} Ci/g of {sup 90}Sr or {sup 137}Cs, and trace amounts of other radionuclides (including transuranic elements). Theoretical calculations indicate that nanocurie levels of {sup 90}Sr in bone can arise from relatively small amounts (1%) of contaminated browse vegetation in a deer's diet. Measures that have been undertaken at ORNL to curtail the dispersal of radioactivity by animals are briefly reviewed.

Garten, C.T. Jr.

1992-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dispersal of radioactivity by wildlife from contaminated sites in a forested landscape  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province of eastern Tennessee (USA). This area is characterized by deciduous forests dominated by hardwood and mixed mesophytic tree species. Wildlife populations have access to some radioactively contaminated sites at ORNL, and contaminated animals or animal nests within the Laboratory`s boundaries have been found to contain on the order of 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}6} Ci/g of {sup 90}Sr or {sup 137}Cs, and trace amounts of other radionuclides (including transuranic elements). Theoretical calculations indicate that nanocurie levels of {sup 90}Sr in bone can arise from relatively small amounts (1%) of contaminated browse vegetation in a deer`s diet. Measures that have been undertaken at ORNL to curtail the dispersal of radioactivity by animals are briefly reviewed.

Garten, C.T. Jr.

1992-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

347

Influence of pre-Mississippian paleogeology on Carboniferous Lisburne Group, Arctic National Wildlife refuge, northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of northern Alaska formed an extensive carbonate platform, which was later deformed as part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. In the northeast, the Lisburne Group is parautochthonous and analogous to that at Prudhoe Bay. The Lisburne's paleogeography and facies relationships pertain to assessment of the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The Franklinian paleogeology, unconformably underlying the Ellesmerian sequence, has influenced sedimentation patterns in the Lisburne Group. The transgressive Endicott Group (Kekiktuk Conglomerate and Kayak, Shale) and Lisburne Group thin northward over Franklinian basement highs. In the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Katakturuk Dolomite formed a paleotopographic high over which the Endicott Group inched out and the Lisburne Group thinned. Shallow-marine oolitic grainstone developed in the cyclic Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone.

Watts, K.F.; Carlson, R.; Imm, T.; Gruzlovic, P.; Hanks, C.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services Concentrating Solar Power Services CSP Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services) Place Cologne, Germany Zip D-51143 Sector Solar Product A spin-out of the DLR Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, providing consulting, due diligence and component testing for Solar Thermal Electricity Generation (STEG). References Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services) is a company located in Cologne, Germany . References ↑ "Concentrating Solar Power Services (CSP Services)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Concentrating_Solar_Power_Services_CSP_Services&oldid=343830

349

@ SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. kangley Terrell D. Smith Ralph C. Hall USDA F~rgstService Resea~chNote PSW-256 1971 acquired for the Redw

Standiford, Richard B.

350

Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Services The Office of Policy and International Affairs supports the Secretary of Energy and other departmental elements with a range of expertise on domestic and international energy matters. Among other areas, PI experts maintain extensive knowledge of the following issues: International Affairs regional and country-specific energy policies and practices, technology developments, and market conditions encompassing Africa, Asia, Europe, Eurasia, Russia, the Middle East, and the Western Hemisphere bilateral and multilateral energy treaties and obligations international cooperation in science and technology regional and country-specific barriers to energy markets and services trade and investment trends in the global energy economy international energy partnerships, commitments, and agreements

351

Services, and Meetings and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organizes outstanding events and important information of the year into program departments, administrative services, and the AOCS Foundation. The four major program departments are

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

TMS 2010 Exhibitor Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

View exhibitor benefits and information, and reserve booth space. ... Lead Retrieval services for annual meeting and exhibition are available through Experient.

353

Products, Services: Not Procurable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products, Services: Not Procurable As a premier national research and development laboratory, LANL seeks to do business with qualified companies that offer value and high...

354

Rates and Repayment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and Repayment Services Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2014 Rates BCP Annual Rate Process Central Arizona Project Transmission Rate Process DSW Multiple System Transmission...

355

Service/Product Provider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GA 30068 Toledo, OH 43659 Business: Energy Process Mngnt Solutions Business: Insulation, Composites, Roofing Mtrls Pat Golden, Dir. Industrial Field Services Fred...

356

Software Services: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About MISSION The APS Software Services Group provides flexible, customer-oriented software services to the accelerator and beamlines in support of world-class photon science at the APS. These services are rendered through the application of our core competencies: embedded software, software engineering, distributed control systems, information systems, high performance computing, and graphical user interfaces. Our mission is to maintain cutting edge skills and technology in these competencies, apply them to meet or exceed the requirements of the accelerator and beamline projects at hand, and provide responsive, efficient support of established systems. Projects shall be conducted in a transparent, well-documented manner to enable the prioritization of our services

357

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

Ashley, Paul

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Energy Services: A Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is designed to assist EPRI members in identifying new services to attract customers and retain or expand market share. It describes the services most commonly offered in the market and the successful features of those services. Indications also are given of the percentage of companies promoting particular services and the rate of growth or decline in the services. In addition, innovative services or variations on services are described. Where possible, analysis is provided to indicate why ser...

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Automatic service deployment using virtualisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manual deployment of the application usually requires expertise both about the underlying system and the application. Automatic service deployment can improve deployment significantly by using on-demand deployment and selfhealing services. To support these features this paper describes an extension the Globus Workspace Service [10]. This extension includes creating virtual appliances for Grid services, service deployment from a repository, and influencing the service schedules by altering execution planning services, candidate set generators or information systems. 1 2 1.

Gabor Kecskemeti; Peter Kacsuk; Gabor Terstyanszky; Tamas Kiss; Thierry Delaitre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness, Health & Counseling Services Dr. Marcelle Holmes Assistant Vice Chancellor CARE Career Student Health Center #12;The mission of the Wellness, Health & Counseling Services cluster is to support · Dedicated to promoting principles of wellness, prevention and healthy life-style choices for students

Stanford, Kyle

363

UTILITY SERVICE CONNECTION APPLICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and DISTRICT HEATING Part 3 (a). Water Distribution. Water service to meet requirements of UBC Technical.5.6). #12;Page 2 of 2 Revised 16 Nov 2011 Part 3 (c). Gas and District Heating · Service to meet (%) District Heating Telephone Contractor or UBC Dept Fax Contractor Primary Contact Email Telephone Design

Vellend, Mark

364

University Services Facilities Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loughlin is the practice area leader for Network Automation and Analytics with the IBM Global Business Services, Energy by leveraging all of the benefits of automation and digitization. Mark Welch and Kieran McLoughlin, IBM Global Business Services www.UtilitiesProject.com/10744 CHAPTER are being made by utilities in automation, remote

Weiblen, George D

365

Corporate Information & Computing Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporate Information & Computing Services High Performance Computing Report March 2008 Author The University of Sheffield's High Performance Computing (HPC) facility is provided by CiCS. It consists of both Graduate Students and Staff. #12;Corporate Information & Computing Services High Performance Computing

Martin, Stephen John

366

Contracting for Collaborative Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the contracting issues that arise in collaborative services, such as consulting, financial planning, and information technology outsourcing. In particular, we investigate how the choice of contract type---among fixed-fee, time-and-materials, ... Keywords: consulting, contracting, joint production, principal/agent models, services

Guillaume Roels; Uday S. Karmarkar; Scott Carr

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

An Interdisciplinary Perspective on IT Services Management and Service Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing importance of information technology (IT) services in the global economy prompts researchers in the field of information systems (IS) to give special attention to the foundations of managerial and technical knowledge in this emerging arena ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Economics, Is, It Services, Literature Survey, Marketing, Operations, Research Directions, Service Science, Services Management, Services-Oriented Systems, System Science

Indranil Bardhan; Haluk Demirkan; P. Kannan; Robert Kauffman; Ryan Sougstad

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

MasteringWeb Services Security MasteringWeb Services Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preview of MasteringWeb Services Security Preview of MasteringWeb Services Security Konstantin introduction Highlights of the book Web Services security problem XML Security WS-Security Security mechanisms for ASP.NET Web Services Planning and building secure Web Service systems ­ Architectural and policy

369

An Energy Services Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parent company of a large electric utility has launched a new unregulated subsidiary that provides a portfolio of value-added, beyond-the-meter energy services. These services are designed to meet the specific needs of customers and to better position the company to meet the challenges of a more competitive operating environment. The energy services initiative integrates a variety of hardware-based solutions to meet a customer's energy management, high voltage distribution, information, and power quality needs. The subsidiary will continually search the horizon for emerging technologies to enhance its ability to deliver comprehensive and customized energy solutions. The approach to marketing these services supplements the electric utility's core competencies with services and expertise provided by trade allies and performance partners.

Beasley, R. C.; Tipton, J. K.; Ehmer, R. C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Essays on Service Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As economies are increasingly driven by services, the introduction of new services to satisfy customers and improve firm value is becoming a critical issue for managers. In my dissertation, I take a step in improving the understanding of service innovations. In the first essay, I look at the determinants of the number of service innovations introduced by a firm and their interrelationship with customer satisfaction and firm value. Furthermore, I look how these interrelationships vary between Internet-Enabled Service Innovations (IESIs) and Non-Internet-Enabled Service Innovations (NIESIs). I develop a system of equations that link service innovation, customer satisfaction and firm value. I model the determinants of service innovations, using a zero-inflated Poisson model. I estimate the model on a panel data set that I assembled across multiple industries from multiple data sources such as the American Customer Satisfaction Index, Compustat, SDC Platinum, and LexisNexis. My results reveal that IESIs are more strongly influenced by financial resources of the firm and by market growth than are NIESIs. Surprisingly, neither IESIs nor NIESIs have a significant direct effect on customer satisfaction. However, IESIs have a positive and significant effect on firm value. Given the differences between consumer markets and business markets, it is important to understand better the determinants and outcomes of business-to-business service innovations (B2B-SIs). In my second essay, I empirically address this issue. I develop a modeling system that relates service innovation to firm value. I estimate my model on unique panel data of service innovations. Results indicate that B2B-SIs have positive effects on firm value. Furthermore, I find that the number of B2B-SIs introduced by a firm is primarily determined by firm-level factors rather than marketlevel factors Overall, I find that regardless of firm type or market type, the number of service innovations introduced by a firm has a substantial impact on firm value. In particular, IESIs and B2B-SIs increase firm value. In addition, the two essays also show that liquid financial resources are important determinants of service innovations. This is especially true for IESIs and B2B-SIs.

Dotzel, Thomas

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Information Management, Analytics & Optimization Services IMS System Maintenance Service Offering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Management, Analytics & Optimization Services IMS System Maintenance Service Offering The IMS System Maintenance Review offering is a special service offering from the IMS laboratory Technical Specialist group. Complex IMS systems require periodic maintenance, coupled with a specific testing process

372

Dynamic service placement in shared service hosting infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale shared service hosting environments, such as content delivery networks and cloud computing, have gained much popularity in recent years. A key challenge faced by service owners in these environments is to determine the locations where service ...

Qi Zhang; Jin Xiao; Eren Grses; Martin Karsten; Raouf Boutaba

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Berkeley Lab Directory Services: Offsite Directory Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offsite Directories Offsite Directories Directories for Organizations Related to the Lab Berkeley Lab Directory Services DOE Labs and Sites DOE National Telephone Directory EPA ESnet Contacts Federal Telephone Directories Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Directory National Science Foundation (NSF) SLAC Directories, Including High Energy Physics (HEP Names) UC Berkeley Directory (all current faculty, staff, and students) University of California Campuses and Offices General Online Directories AT&T directory services All-In-One HotBot Internet Address Finder WhoWhere? People Search Yellowbook Yahoo People Search International Country Codes for Email Addresses Official USPS Abbreviations (States, Street Suffixes, Secondary Unit

374

Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Services Services Waste Management EM is dedicated to safely disposing of waste and seeks cost effective and environmentally responsible project execution methods. Read more Site & Facility Restoration EM provides integration, planning and analysis for all soil and groundwater remediation, deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) and facility engineering. This work includes sustainability projects to ensure that these activities are completed efficiently and effectively, reducing significant risks and life-cycle schedules and costs in the D&D program. Read more Program Management EM provides program management support with the goal of continuously improving performance. Read more Communication & Engagement EM provides clear, timely, and consistent communication on the mission and

375

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ecosystem and Wildlife Implications of Brush: Management System Designed to Improve Water Runoff and Percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the settlement of Texas and establishment of ranchers to produce cattle, there was an effort to maximize beef production. This caused serious overgrazing. In addition, there was a reduced incidence of fires across the landscape to clear out brush. These factors led to deterioration of the grazing lands and provided an opportunity for invasive intrusion by brush and other species onto the land and riparian zones. There has been a large-scale conversion from grasslands and savannahs to wildlands over the last 150 years (Scholes and Archer, 1997). The overall impacts are significantly impaired uplands and reduced percolation and surface flow of water from rainfall which caused changes and loss in basic aquatic and terrestrial habitat. The State of Texas adopted a program to study and implement brush management systems across the state to improve the water availability in streams, rivers, reservoirs and aquifers, as well as to improve the rangelands. The feasibility studies have shown great promise for improving ranchland and improving the water situation. However, there is less known about the aquatic and wildlife species response implications of brush management. Certainly, there are opportunities for improving the viability of an ecosystem through brush management strategies and continuing management practices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in hydrology and biological diversity associated with brush management in two watersheds where significant data was already available. This study focused on assessing the aquatic and terrestrial species implications related to specified brush management strategies over time. This involved an integrated analysis including modeling of the landscape, assessing biological diversity and developing economic implications for the two watersheds (Twin Buttes and Edwards regions). Thus, this study is comprised of three parts: modeling of brush management strategies temporally, assessing biological diversity (aquatic and terrestrial) and estimating economic implications. This represents a complex analysis involving variable units and multiple disciplines. Previous feasibility studies of brush removal have been targeted at maximizing water runoff. This analysis is an extension that is designed to examine the implications of brush management under a more restrictive set of brush removal criteria that were chosen based upon wildlife considerations. To achieve the integration of hydrologic modeling, range ecology, and economic implications, there were three team meetings bringing together all components to review status and set priorities for the remainder of the work. In addition, scientists in the three basic groups of specialization interacted daily along with representatives of the Corps of Engineers to assure that each decision was reflected in other parts of the analyses. The major addition of this analysis to brush management feasibility studies being conducted as part of the Texas brush management plan is the consideration of wildlife and aquatic biota and assessing changes in biological diversity likely to result from alternative brush management scenarios.

Arrington, D. Albrey; Conner, Richard; Dugas, William; Hejl, Sallie; Magness, Dawn; Muttiah, Ranjan; Olenick, Keith; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Zinn, Michele; Wilkins, Neal; Amonett, Carl; Bednarz, Steve; Dybala, Tim; Griffith, Rebecca; Jarboe, Hank

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Health Services: Clinical Services...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clinical Services: Occupational Health Mission Statement In support of the pursuit of world class science at the Berkeley Laboratory, Health Services promotes the highest level of...

379

Ecological and Wildlife Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of vegetation on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs) is an essential part of managing electrical transmission and distribution systems. A variety of manual, mechanical, and chemical methods, singly or in combination, are used for this purpose. The method or methods selected must be safe for humans and the environment and cost-effective in accomplishing the goals of ROW management. This report reviews environmental and wildlife safety through an assessment of risk to the environment, incl...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

Staff Services | Brookhaven National Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our mission is to provide services that support and assist the world-class Our mission is to provide services that support and assist the world-class scientific research performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our services are available to all Brookhaven Departments, Divisions, guests, users, and visiting researchers. The Staff Services office is located in Building 400, 20 Brookhaven Avenue. Get maps and directions. Food Services food services Food services are an integral part of life at BNL. We offer an on-site cafeteria, full service restaurant, a cafe serving Starbuck's coffee and vending machines. Housing Services housing services BNL attracts more than 4,500 visiting scientists from all over the world each year. To support our guests, 333 on-site housing units are available for rent. Mail Services mail services The BNL Mail Room handles all official U.S. mail, through our on-site U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Data Integration Using Web Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the opportunities for data integration in the context of the emerging Web Services systems development paradigm. The paper introduces the programming standards associated with Web Services and provides an example of how Web Services ...

Mark Hansen; Stuart E. Madnick; Michael Siegel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Versioning of Web service interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the problem of "design for change" in the context of Web Service based information systems. It describes the current status of architecting Web Services, an implementation of the Service Oriented ...

Agarwal, Anamika, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ancillary services market in California  

SciTech Connect

This report includes sections on the following topics: (1) California restructured electricity system overview; (2) Reliability criteria; (3) Design of the California ISO ancillary services market; (4) Operation of ancillary services markets; (5) Ancillary services markets redesign; and (6) Conclusions.

Gomez, T.; Marnay, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Liew, L.; Khavkin, M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Services SERVICES OF THE OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL The Office of the General Counsel is responsible for providing legal advice, counsel, and support to the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, and all Departmental elements, except the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This Office assures that the Department operates in compliance with all pertinent laws and regulations. The Immediate Office of the General Counsel directs, manages, and supervises all activities assigned to the General Counsel, including the following offices: Litigation & Enforcement (GC-30) The Deputy General Counsel for Litigation and Enforcement directs, manages, supervises and coordinates the activities and functions assigned to the following Assistant General Counsels responsible for:

385

ORISE: Health physics services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health physics services Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as other federal and state agencies. From radiological facility audits and reviews to dose modeling and technical evaluations, ORISE is nationally-recognized for its health physics support to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Our health physics services include: Environmental survey Applied health physics projects We work with government agencies and organizations to identify, measure and assess the presence of radiological materials during the D&D process. ORISE

386

CROSS-SERVICING AGREEMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CROSS-SERVICING AGREEMENT CROSS-SERVICING AGREEMENT PLWOSE: This agreement establishes the terms under which GSA Flcct Management will p m e m and pay for the specified goods and/or services from another government agcncy: (Check Block(s) Which ~ p p l y ) , [ X 1 Category I - Scheduled Repairs- Per Job Labor Schedule ( f a t rate charge) [ X ] Category I I - Unschcduled Repairs- Rate Per Hour Name and Address of Supplying Activity: BWXT Pantcx, LLC. P. 0. BOX 30020 Amarillo. Texas 79 120-0020 - Effective Date: [ X ] Category I l l - Servicing & Dispensing of Petroleum Products ~.d-'@- Terminate Date (Effective until canccled by either agcncy) 30-DAY WRIITEN NOTICE [ 1 PAC o r [ X ] Non-IPAC (Attachm'mt A) BILLING INSTRUCTIONS: .- . Monthly billings submitted by Standard Form 1080 or another approveh form will be supported by appropriate

387

Safety and Technical Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Technical Services Safety and Technical Services Minimize The Safety and Technical Services (STS) organization is a component of the Office of Science's (SC's) Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center. The mission of STS is to provide excellent environmental, safety, health, quality, and engineering support to SC laboratories and other U.S. Department of Energy program offices. STS maintains a full range of technically qualified Subject Matter Experts, all of whom are associated with the Technical Qualifications Program. Examples of the services that we provide include: Integrated Safety Management Quality Assurance Planning and Metrics Document Review Tracking and trending analysis and reporting Assessments, Reviews, Surveillances and Inspections Safety Basis Support SharePoint/Dashboard Development for Safety Programs

388

Customer Service Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Service Plan Department of Energy Customer Service Plan - 2011 1 A Message from the Secretary Over the past two and a half years, the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy have worked to make the federal government more open for the American public and its own employees. Through these efforts, we have significantly expanded the amount and breadth of information available online about our programs and services. We have also transformed the way we communicate with the public by relaunching Energy.gov, making it an interactive, streamlined information platform. In April, President Obama directed federal agencies to take this ongoing effort one step further and establish Customer Service Plans, improving the public's interactions with the

389

NERSC Consulting services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consulting Services Consulting Services Consulting Services Consulting Consultants and Account Support staff are available to assist users from 8 AM to 5 PM Pacific time, Monday through Friday (except Berkeley Lab holidays). Questions and problems submitted through the On-Line Help Desk are immediately sent to the consulting staff and this is the preferred method of communication. NERSC staff can be reached at 1-800-66-NERSC (USA) or 510-486-8600 (local and international); or email consult@nersc.gov to speak with a consultant and accounts@nersc.gov to speak with Account Support staff. Users may sometimes contact specific User Services staff members directly by phone or email, but in that case there is no guarantee of a timely response. Staff members are often involved with other time-critical assignments and may not

390

TTA supported service availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Time-Triggered Architecture (TTA) is a distributed architecture for high-dependability real-time applications. In this paper the mechanisms that guarantee a high availability of TTA services are presented. The paper starts with a deliberation on ...

H. Kopetz

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Services Via Mobility Portals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the importance of mobility portal services and the technologies that will be essential in delivering content over next generation network technologies.A discussion of some examples of the different mobile portals currently available ...

D. Ralph; C. G. Shephard

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Degree Services Registrar's Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Degree Services Registrar's Office Name (please print Fund. of Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier (1) _____ CM/ENT 3978 Hydrogen Measurements Laboratory (1/SS 4520 Sustainable Futures II (3)* _____ ENT 3956 Industrial Health and Safety (2)* _____ ENT 3975 Intro

393

The Semiconductor Applet Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 11, 2007 ... Educational Java Applet Service (JAS). Launch Site Edited: 7/2/2008 at 10:57 AM by Cathy Rohrer. Comment on Posting Quote Top Bottom...

394

Experiments in service learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service learning, an educational method that involves the application of academic work to projects that benefit under-served communities, was explored in two complementary forms. First, the development of an alternative ...

Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Exhibitor Services Kit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 9, 2009 ... company's look and image, attracts business and shows off your most important assets. ...... On-site supervisors with dedicated floor managers ...... Wireless Service (Enterprise) includes one (1) 256Kbps shared Ethernet...

396

Performance Based Service Acquisition Toolkit | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Performance Based Service Acquisition Toolkit Performance Based Service Acquisition Toolkit Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at...

397

Safety and Health Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Safety & Health Services Division (SHSD) provides subject matter expertise and services in industrial hygiene, safety engineering, and safety & health programs for the Lab....

398

Time-critical information services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency medical services have never been more ready for the implementation of time-critical interorganizational information services for the public good.

Thomas A. Horan; Benjamin L. Schooley

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Staff Services | Brookhaven National Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

services that support and assist the world-class scientific research performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our services are available to all Brookhaven Departments,...

400

On-line Service Scheduling?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not allowed unless, in some service policies, the jumping job belongs to a class ... service policies via the worst case analysis, and focus on the relationship

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Services Initiatives | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Initiatives Services Initiatives The Transportation Team Uses Alternative Fueled Vehicles in HQ Fleet 73% of HQ Fleet is alternative fueled (FY2011). HQ utilizes biodiesel...

402

Location-based communication services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our demo shows end-user-oriented location-based services based on application-layer, human understandable location descriptions. Keywords: internet telephony, location-based services

Xiaotao Wu; Ron Shacham; Matthew J. Mintz-Habib; Kundan Singh; Henning Schulzrinne

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Employee Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Document Imaging Exchange Visitors Program Facility Operations Food Services Graphics Mail and Distribution Parking and Garage Photography Printing Recycling Safety and...

404

NNSA Service Center Chart | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA Service Center Chart NNSA Service Center Chart Office of Chief Counsel at the NNSA Service Center in Albuquerque, NM NNSA Service Center Chart More Documents & Publications...

405

Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration Customer Services Handbook, 2010, Office of Administration Customer Services Handbook Customer Services Handbook, 2010,...

406

Alternative Energy Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Services Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alternative Energy Services Name Alternative Energy Services Place Florida Product renewable energy products and services Phone number...

407

Transportation and Program Management Services | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Program Management Services Transportation and Program Management Services Overview of Secured Transportation Services (STS) Transportation and Program Management Services More...

408

Dispersal of radioactivity by wildlife from contaminated sites in a forested landscape  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located within the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of eastern Tennessee (USA). Wildlife populations have access to some radioactively contaminated sites at ORNL. Contaminated animals or animal nests within the Laboratory's boundaries have been found to contain {sup 90}Sr or {sup 137}Cs on the order of 10{sup -2}-10{sup 4} Bqg{sup -1} and trace amounts of other radionuclides (including transuranic elements). Animals that are capable of flight and animals with behavior patterns or developmental life stages involving contact with sediments in radioactive ponds, like benthic invertebrates, present the greatest potential for dispersal of radioactivity. The emigration of frogs and turtles from waste ponds also presents a potential for dispersal of radioactivity but over distances < 5 km. Mud-dauber wasps (Hymenoptera) and swallows (Hirundinidae) may transport radioactive mud for nest building, but also over relatively short distances (0.2-1 km). Movement by small mammals is limited by several factors, including physical barriers and smaller home ranges. Larger animals, like white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), are potential vectors of radioactivity due to their greater body size, longer life expectancy, and larger home range. Larger animals contain greater amounts of total radioactivity than smaller animals, but tissue concentrations of {sup 137}Cs generally decline with body size.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The augmented fish health monitoring project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with the mandate to collect fish health data on anadromous fish stocks of the BPA Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The project began in 1986 and the data reported here was collected in the fourth year. This segment of the project was carried out by the Washington Department of Wildlife and summarizes fish health findings at anadromous game fish hatcheries in Washington State operated by the BPA. Information gathered to data has provided impetus to alter facility design and management practices for improved fish health through prevention. Treatment efficacy can be better assessed due to the monthly monitoring of fish stocks and insight is being gained into disease prevention and control. The ultimate goal, of course, is to improve fish health for better survival in the wild. Tagged returns at index hatcheries within this project area will provide some indication of the impact of improving fish health on providing greater adult returns as well as an improved product for the fishery. 3 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs.

Kerwin, John L.; Roberts, Steve; Oman, Leni; Bolding, Bruce

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The augmented fish health monitoring project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration with the mandate to collect fish health data on anadromous fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The project began in 1986 and the data reported here was collected in the third year. This segment of the project was carried out by the Washington Department of Wildlife and summarizes fish health findings at anadromous game hatcheries in Washington State operated by the BPA. Information gathered to date has provided impetus to alter facility design and management practices for improved fish health through prevention. Treatment efficacy can be better assessed due to the monthly monitoring of fish stocks and insight is being gained into disease prevention and control. The ultimate goal, of course, is to improve fish health for better survival in the wild. Tagged returns at index hatcheries within this project area will indicate the impact of improving fish health on providing greater adult returns as well as an improved product for the fishery. 2 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs.

Gearheard, Jim

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Petrologic-petrophysical-engineering relationships, selected wells near the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska, selected stratigraphic horizons were studied in a number of wells adjacent to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeast Alaska. Petrographic analyses were integrated with petrophysical and engineering data, in order to provide a substantive knowledge base from which to infer reservoir potentials elsewhere in the region, using geological and geophysical methods. Of particular interest in the latter regard is the ANWR area. Horizons of concern with regard to reservoir characteristics include Franklinian through Brookian strata. Of particular interest are clastic Ellesmerian 'Break-up/Rift Sequence' sediments such as the Lower Cretaceous Thomson sand, and deeper-water marine clastics, as exemplified by the Brookian Colville Group 'turbidites.' Also of concern are pre-Ellesmerian 'basement' rocks, some of which are hosts to hydrocarbon accumulations in the Point Thomson field. Petrologic-mineralogic characteristics have been keyed to various wireline log responses and related to available engineering data, as feasible, for the wells considered. Synthesis of this information in terms of the regional geological framework, tied in with geophysical data, will facilitate more refined, effective resource assessment and management.

Mowatt, T.C.; Gibson, C.; Seidlitz, A.; Bascle, R.; Dygas, J. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Influence of pre-Mississippian paleogeology on Carboniferous Lisburne Group, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of northern Alaska formed an extensive carbonate platform, which was later deformed as part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. In the northeast, the Lisburne Group is parautochthonous and analogous to that at Prudhoe Bay. The Lisburne's paleogeography and facies relationships pertain to assessment of the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The Franklinian paleogeology, unconformably underlying the Ellesmerial sequence, has influenced sedimentation patterns in the Lisburne Group. The transgressive Endicott Group (Kekiktuk conglomerate and Kayak Shale) and Lisburne Group thin northward over Franklinian basement highs. In the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Katakturuk Dolomite formed a paleotopographic high over which the Endicott Group pinched out and the Lisburne Group thinned. Shallow-marine oolitic grainstone developed in the cyclic Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. To the south in the Shublik Mountains, a repeated sequence of Katakturuk Dolomite and the Nanook Limestone were lower, so the Endicott Group lapped over the area and was later overlain by comparable Lisburne Group rocks. In the Fourth Range, the Lisburne Group is thicker and limestones also occur in the upper Endicott Group. Oolitic grainstone in the Wahoo Limestone is rare, and broad ooid shoals apparently pinched out into deeper water carbonates on a southward sloping carbonate ramp.

Watts, K.F.; Carlson, R.; Imm, T.; Gruzlovic, P.; Hanks, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Depth and temporal variations in water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In-situ measurements of the specific conductance and temperature of ground water in the Snake River Plain aquifer were collected in observation well USGS-59 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These parameters were monitored at various depths in the aquifer from October 1994 to August 1995. The specific conductance of ground water in well USGS-59, as measured in the borehole, ranged from about 450 to 900 {micro}S/cm at standard temperature (25 C). The pumping cycle of the production wells at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant causes changes in borehole circulation patterns, and as a result the specific conductance of ground water at some depths in the well varies by up to 50% over a period of about 14 hours. However, these variations were not observed at all depths, or during each pumping cycle. The temperature of ground water in the well was typically between 12.8 and 13.8 C. The results of this study indicate that temporal variations in specific conductance of the ground water at this location are caused by an external stress on the aquifer--pumping of a production well approximately 4,000 feet away. These variations are believed to result from vertical stratification of water quality in the aquifer and a subsequent change in intrawell flow related to pumping. When sampling techniques that do not induce a stress on the aquifer (i.e., thief sampling) are used, knowledge of external stresses on the system at the time of sampling may aid in the interpretation of geochemical data.

Frederick, D.B. [Idaho INEL Oversight Program, Boise, ID (United States); Johnson, G.S. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

Magee, Joseph W.

416

Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Service Standards Office of Headquarters Procurement Services - Employee Customer Service Standards CUSTOMER FOCUS The Office of Headquarters Procurement Services (MA-64) serves a variety of customers in the performance of its acquisition and financial assistance mission. Primary among its many customers is each of the Department of Energy Headquarters program offices. MA-64 continually seeks to improve service to its customers, by prioritizing its workload through a better understanding of customer needs; providing effective assistance in the development of quality procurement request packages; improving the timeliness of procurement transactions through the establishment of mutually agreeable transaction milestone

417

Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

EIA received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairmanof the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Reportwith plausible scenarios for ANWR supply development consistent with the most recentU.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to therequest of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currentlyrestricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

Floyd Wiesepape

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Argonne TDC: Asset Environmental Services  

Small business teams with Argonne for urban revitalization effort. Asset Environmental Services Chicago, IL

419

FTP Upload Service  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC FTP NERSC FTP Upload Service NERSC FTP Upload Service L The NERSC FTP Upload service is designed for external collaborators to be able to send data to NERSC staff and users. It allows you to create a temporary FTP account to upload files that will be delivered to a NERSC user. You must specify a valid NERSC user as the receiver for your uploads. Once you successfully fill out this form you will receive a username and password that can be used to access an FTP server. You can use any FTP client to upload files. The target NERSC user will receive an email letting him/her know that they have an upload waiting for them. Uploads will automatically expire after a week. After the email has been sent, the NERSC user can retrieve the file with "take -u ftpup ".

420

Services For Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posed group photo and laptop computers Posed group photo and laptop computers Services For Staff Where employees can find important information on health and safety, communications services, proposals and subcontracts, and program development. The links on this page for EETD staff only. Find help on safety and emergency procedures, budgets, proposals, subcontracts, and communications services such as web development. Budget Office and Proposals/Subcontracts Group Contact EETD's Budget Office for budget management support. For help writing research proposals or initiating subcontracts, contact EETD's Proposals/Subcontracts Group. Program Development The Program Development Office can help you develop sources of funding and partnerships for research. Communications Office The Communications Office is a creative group within EETD supporting the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Services OE plays a major role in addressing immediate challenges to America's energy security, while sustaining applied research into new technologies and implementing policies to meet the challenges we will face in the future. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Technology Development Electricity Policy Coordination & Implementation DOE Grid Tech Team Energy Assurance Cybersecurity Provides advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in implementing the Energy Policy Act of 2005, executing the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure. OE supports a portfolio of technology development and deployment programs that will modernize our Nation's electric delivery system. OE is laying the framework for a modern electricity system by contributing to the development and implementation of electricity policy at the Federal and State level. Recognizing the need for strategic grid modernization efforts, both internally and externally, DOE established the Grid Tech Team (GTT) to:

422

Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Services Services Document Library The Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis produces a variety of reports, analyses and papers on a number of energy topics. Check back for archived versions of new documents and reference materials as they are released. Report: U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather July 10, 2013 This report-part of the Administration's efforts to support national climate change adaptation planning through the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force and Strategic Sustainability Planning process established under Executive Order 13514 and to advance the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of promoting energy security-examines current and potential future impacts of these climate trends on the U.S. energy sector.

423

Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Services Services The responsibilities of stakeholder relations are achieved through public outreach to and input from those individuals, groups, host communities, and other entities in the public and private sectors that are interested in or affected by any of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE or Department's) activities and decisions. Stakeholder Relations Information from Office of Legacy Management (LM) record holdings are shared with LM stakeholders following several formal request processes. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Public Document Request DOE is the fourth-largest federal land manager, conducting its mission at 50 major sites on 2.4 million acres across the country. LM will act as a

424

Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services Services Office of Inspector General Hotline: The Office of Inspector General (OIG) maintains a Hotline to facilitate the reporting of allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, or mismanagement in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs or operations. If you wish to report such allegations, you may call, send a letter, or email the OIG Hotline as identified at the right. Allegations may be reported by DOE employees, DOE contractors, or the general public. Issues that should be reported: Abuse of funds Contract, Procurement, and Grant Fraud Environment, Health, and Safety Violations Computer Crimes Product Substitution and Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Bribery, Kickbacks, and Gratuities False Statements and False Claims Conflicts of Interest and Ethics Violations

425

Services | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Services Services The Office of Indian Energy coordinates and manages the government-to-government and intertribal collaboration involved in carrying out all DOE tribal energy-related activities and initiatives prescribed through the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Learn more about the Office of Indian Energy program initiatives. Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Established by Energy Secretary Steven Chu, the Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group guides the strategic planning and implementation of DOE's tribal energy programs and policies. DOE Tribal Summit Held in May 2011, the Department's Tribal Summit with American Indian and Alaska Native leaders was attended by over 350 participants ranging from tribal leaders to congressional staff to private sector representatives.

426

SERVICES Rental Car Agreement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Management Memorandum announces the new contracts between the State of California and the commercial rental car vendors. This year the Department of General Services (DGS) competitively bid the commercial car rental contract resulting in a contract with a primary car rental vendor and a secondary car rental vendor. The primary car rental vendor is Enterprise Rent A Car for all government travel. In the event that the primary vendor is unable to provide service the secondary vendor must be used. Vanguard Car Rental USA is the secondary vendor. Vanguard Car Rental USA is the parent company of Alamo and National Car Rental. Departments are required to ensure that the secondary vendor is only used when the primary vendor cannot provide service. Contract Information The new rental car contracts require vendors to provide counter bypass. Counter bypass allows government employees traveling on official State

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Federal Energy Management Program: Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services to Services to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Services on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Services on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Services on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Services on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Services on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Services on AddThis.com... Project Assistance Training Outreach Services The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers specialized services through: Technical and Project Assistance: Find resources for technical assistance and information about FEMP calls for projects. Training: Look up FEMP-produced live and on-demand courses, workshops, and webinars. Outreach: Get information about awards and campaigns that motivate energy-

428

FEMP Utility Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Services Utility Services Karen Thomas & Deb Beattie  SPONSORED BY THE FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM  Overview  UESC Project Support  Agency / Utility Partnerships  Renewable Project Support  Design Assistance  Agency Energy Implementation Plans * * * * * * UESC Project Support Education UESC Workshops Agency Briefings Utility Briefings On-site team training Communications Web site Enabling documents * Case studies UESC Project Support Direct Project Assistance Project facilitation Advise & Consult In depth Contract development Technical Proposal review Performance Verification Agency / Utility Partnerships Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Strategic Partnering Meeting Renewable Projects  Resource Screening: - PV - Solar Hot Water

429

Ancillary Services Measurement Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the deregulated electric utility industry, it is anticipated that many ancillary services (A/S) will be sold by "generators" to operating authorities (OAs) or independent system operators (ISOs). Such trade-in A/S will require contractual agreements, and these agreements will need to specify quality and quantity of service to be supplied. This, again, means it will be necessary to certify or measure the quality of an A/S to be supplied, as well as the quantity actually supplied. Towards that end, this...

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Taking value-networks to the cloud services: security services, semantics and service level agreements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud services have become an emerging solution for organizations striving to address today's need for agility, but little research has addressed transitioning multiple, collaborating organizations to what can be referred to as a "value-network cloud." ... Keywords: Cloud service broker, Collaboration, Resource virtualization, Security services, Service level agreement, Trust, Value chain, Value networks, Web 2.0, Web 3.0

Haluk Demirkan; Michael Goul

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

25/08/2010 14:33In pictures: The week in wildlife | Environment | guardian.co.uk Page 2 of 3http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/aug/20/week-in-wildlife#/?picture=365949451&index=1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/aug/20/week-in-wildlife#/?picture=365949451&index=1 A white-fronted bee-eater, a species with very in wildlife Ads by Google FSC Certified Printing Get a free envrionmental health check for your business? Download Paper www.CarbonNeutral.com The pick of this week's best flora and fauna shots from around

432

Combining environmental chemistry, somatic biomarkers, and population genetics: an innovative approach in wildlife ecotoxicology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Caspian region and specifically the Apsheron peninsula of Azerbaijan is known to be polluted with a variety of environmental contaminants, making risk assessment difficult. The wetlands of Sumgayit contain particularly complex mixtures of contaminants. Flow cytometry and the micronucleus assay were used to assess chromosomal damage in aquatic turtles and frogs inhabiting contaminated wetlands in Azerbaijan. By evaluating biomarkers that are indicative of somatic effects, elevated chromosomal damage was documented at several sites in Azerbaijan relative to reference sites. Sediment samples were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorines (OCs), and mercury to evaluate contaminant associations with genetic damage. Sediment samples revealed heterogeneous patterns of PAH and mercury concentrations throughout Sumgayit. Significant positive correlations were documented between both PAH and mercury sediment concentrations and chromosomal damage. Population genetic methods were employed to study the effects of long-term chronic contaminant exposure in marsh frogs from Sumgayit. The Sumgayit region has reduced levels of genetic diversity, likely due to environmental degradation. One of the most contaminated sites in Sumgayit, WTP, appears to be a source of new mutations as a result of an increased mutation rate. Finally, the Sumgayit region seems to act as an ecological sink, with levels of gene flow into the region exceeding gene flow out of the region. This study provides not only exposure and biomarker data, but also an integrated method for assessing the cumulative population impacts of contaminant exposure by studying both population genetic and evolutionary effects. The results presented here will be used in conjunction with those of ongoing research involving both wildlife and humans to develop comprehensive ecological and human risk assessments.

Matson, Cole Wesley

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Petroleum geology of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska has the potential for major petroleum accumulations. This area has many anticlinal structures, good oil-prone source rocks, and oil seeps and other surface indications of oil. The thickness and extent of reservoirs, however, are problematic, which places a wide range on estimated petroleum resources. In this remote area, resources must be very large to be economic. Sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Precambrian through Cenozoic and aggregate more than 20,000 ft in thickness. Post-Devonian strata generally are considered prospective for petroleum. In addition, underlying Precambrian to Devonian carbonate rocks, which are locally present in the Brooks Range to the south and in a few boreholes west of ANWR, are potential reservoirs in areas where they could be charged by overlying source rocks. The Mississippian through lowermost Cretaceous section consists of shelf carbonate rocks and shallow-marine and nonmarine sandstone and shale that were deposited along a slowly subsiding, south-facing continental margin bordering a northern (present-day orientation) land area. Known as the Ellesmerian sequence, these rocks are about 3,500 ft thick along the mountain front. The major reservoir rocks that are oil productive at Prudhoe Bay 75 mi to the west occur in this sequence. Early Cretaceous erosion related to Canada basin rifting, however, has removed much of this sequence in parts of the ANWR coastal plain. The overlying Brookian sequence, derived from an orogenic southern provenance, consists of at least 13,000 ft of Lower Cretaceous through Tertiary, northeasterly and northerly prograding basin, slope, and deltaic deposits. Excellent oil-prone source rocks occur at the base of this sequence, and overlying turbidites are potential reservoirs.

Molenaar, C.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Bird, K.J.; Magoon, L.B. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Stratigraphy and sedimentology of ledge sandstone in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data collected from four measured sections of the Ledge Sandstone member of the Ivishak Formation are presented. These sections are located in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. The Ledge Sandstone is the time equivalent of the Ivishak sandstones that form the reservoir in the Prudhoe Bay field, east of the study area. The ANWR region is of interest for oil and gas exploration owing to the numerous oil seeps on the coastal plain and surficial expression of possible subsurface antiforms. The Ledge Sandstone in ANWR consists primarily of a massive, thickly bedded, very fine to fine-grained, well-sorted quartz sandstone. The thick sandstones are separated by thin siltstone intervals ranging from less than an inch to several feet in thickness. Although the thicker siltstones appear laterally continuous, the thinner beds generally are lenticular over short distances (10 to 20 ft; 3 to 6 m). Cementation of the siltstone appears sporadic, varying laterally and vertically within the unit. Burrowing is extensive in the siltstone intervals. Typically, burrowing cannot be detected in the sandstones because of the obliteration by lithification and diagenetic processes. Fossils are sparse throughout the unit, even in the poorly lithified silts. These data are consistent with a shallow marine environment, within wave base. This contrasts with the nonmarine conglomerates and sandstones of Prudhoe Bay. Time-equivalent units to the south and west consist primarily of cherts and shales of probable deep marine origin, with some arkosic sandstones dolomites occuring in NPRA. Thus a paloshoreline is probably located somewha north of the measured sections.

Cloft, H.S.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Petroleum geochemistry of oils and rocks in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen oil seeps or oil-stained outcrops in or adjacent to the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska indicate that commercial quantities of hydrocarbons may be present in the subsurface. The area is flanked by two important petroleum provinces: the Prudhoe Bay area on the west and the Mackenzie delta on the east. Organic carbon content (wt. %), organic matter type, and pyrolysis hydrocarbon yield show that rock units such as the Kingak Shale (average 1.3 wt. %), pebble shale unit (2.1 wt. %), and Canning Formation (1.9 wt. %) contain predominantly type III organic matter. The exception is the Hue Shale (5.9 wt. %), which contains type II organic matter. Pre-Cretaceous rocks that crop out in the Brooks Range could not be adequately evaluated because of high thermal maturity. Thermal maturity thresholds for oil, condensate, and gas calculated from vitrinite reflectance gradients in the Point Thomson area are 4000, 7300, and 9330 m, respectively (12,000, 22,500, and 28,000 ft). Time-temperature index (TTI) calculations for the Beli-1 and Point Thomson-1 wells immediately west of ANWR indicate that maturity first occurred in the south and progressed north. The Cretaceous Hue Shale matured in the Beli-1 well during the Eocene and in the Point Thomson-1 well in the late Miocene to early Pliocene. In the Point Thomson area, the condensate and gas recovered from the Thomson sandstone and basement complex based on API gravity and gas/oil ratio (GOR) probably originated from the pebble shale unit, and on the same basis, the oil recovered from the Canning Formation probably originated from the Hue Shale. The gas recovered from the three wells in the Kavik area is probably thermal gas from overmature source rocks in the immediate area.

Magoon, L.B.; Anders, D.E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Environmental Impact Research Program and Defense Natural Resources Program: Section 7. 5. 7, US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources Management manual. Final report. [ELAEAGNUS UMBELLATA  

SciTech Connect

A plant materials report on autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is provided as Section 7.5.7 of the US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources management Manual. The report was prepared as a guide to assist project/installation natural resources personnel with the selection, establishment, and management of appropriate plant materials for wildlife and habitat development programs. Major topics covered are description, distribution, habitat requirements, wildlife and land management value, establishment, maintenance, and cautions and limitations. Autumn olive is a hardy shrub or small tree introduced into the United States from Asia. It is widely used in the East in habitat improvement projects designed to attract wildlife, provide barriers, beautify existing landscapes, and reclaim disturbed sites. Autumn olive is tolerant of a wide range of soils and climatic conditions. Plants grow best on well-drained soils that are deep, sandy, loamy, or moderately fine-textured. Establishment of autumn olive is often recommended for borders, hedgerows, windbreaks, and disturbed sites. Planting stock of autumn olive is readily available, and some commercial nurseries produce propagules in quantity. Four cultivars (Cardinal, Ellagood, Elsberry, and Redwing) have been developed and are adapted to geographically specific regions. This report provides information on management objectives, site selection and preparation, propagule selection, planting methods, and maintenance requirements for autumn olive throughout its area of potential use. Management cautions and limitations are discussed, and guidelines are provided on the appropriate use of autumn olive in wildlife and habitat management programs.

Dittberner, P.L.; Dietz, D.R.; Wasser, C.H.; Martin, C.O.; Mitchell, W.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Transmission Services J7000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C T D E S E R T S O U T H W E S T R E G I O N R O C K Y M O U N T A I N R E G I O N Transmission Services J7000 Ensuring the Reliability of the Bulk Electric System Western's...

439

Serviceability Modeling Of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides an update on our continuing research and describes the results of a series of completed research projects. These projects/studied are part of a systematic program intended to determine the current condition of FR-treated plywood roof sheathing and to develop methods to predict its residual serviceability out over an additional 2-3 yeat period. -47-

Fire-Retardant-Treated Plywood Roof; Jerrold E. Winandy; Usda Forest Service

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Client-side service composition using generic service representative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, composition of web services is performed at the server-side. This requires transferring client data among collaborating web services, which may cause data privacy violation, security breaches, or network traffic overloading. In this context, ...

Mehran Najafi; Kamran Sartipi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife service usgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Product Service Codes Description: Product Service Codes used at Headquarters Proc Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Codes Description: Product Service Codes used at Headquarters Proc Services Filters: Date Signed only show values between '10/01/2006' and '09/30/2007', Contracting Agency ID show only ('8900'), Contracting Office ID show only ('00001') Contracting Agency ID: 8900, Contracting Office ID: 00001 Product or Service Code Product or Service Description Actions Action Obligation D399 OTHER ADP & TELECOMMUNICATIONS SVCS 285 $131,825,633 R799 OTHER MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES 239 $128,006,080 R408 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT/SUPPOR T SERVICES 278 $59,852,844 S206 GUARD SERVICES 11 $26,628,827 B546 STUDY/SECURITY (PHYSICAL & PERSONAL 11 $22,187,799 AD26 SERVICES (MANAGEMENT/SUPPO RT) 56 $21,689,198 R499 OTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 153 $17,482,267 D301 ADP FACILITY MANAGEMENT 28 $16,265,159 R425 ENGINEERING AND

442

Utility Data Collection Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Collection Service Data Collection Service Federal-Utility Partnership Working Group 4 May 2006 Paul Kelley, Chief of Operations, 78 th CES, Robins AFB David Dykes, Industrial Segment Mgr, Federal, GPC Topics  Background  Commodities Metered  Data Collection  Cost  Results Background  Robins AFB (RAFB) needed to:  Control electricity usage and considered Demand Control  Track and bill base tenants for energy usage  Metering Project Originated in 1993  $$ requirements limited interest  Developed criteria for available $$  Energy Policy Act 2005:  All facilities sub-metered by 2012  $$ no longer restricts metering project Metering Criteria prior to EPACT 2005  All New Construction - (per Air Force Instructions)

443

Cooperative Extension Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperative Extension Services The Cooperative Extension Services of each state can help with many common inquiries. We recommend you contact your local state cooperative extension web site to get help with tricky insect problems, best varieties to plant in your area, or general maintenance of your garden. Alabama www.aces.edu Alaska www.uaf.edu/coop-ext Arizona extension.arizona.edu/ Arkansas www.uaex.edu California www.ucanr.org Colorado www.ext.colostate.edu Connecticut www.cag.uconn.edu/ces/ces/ Deleware ag.udel.edu/extension Florida solutionsforyourlife.ufl.edu/ Georgia extension.uga.edu/ Hawaii http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/site/ extprograms.aspx Idaho www.extension.uidaho.edu/ Illinois web.extension.illinois.edu/state/ Indiana www.ag.purdue.edu/extension/

444

Fuel Economy Web Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FuelEconomy.gov Web Services FuelEconomy.gov Web Services Data Description atvtype - alternative fuel or advanced technology vehicle Bifuel (CNG) - Bi-fuel gasoline and compressed natural gas vehicle Bifuel (LPG) - Bi-fuel gasoline and propane vehicle CNG - Compressed natural gas vehicle Diesel - Diesel vehicle EV - Electric vehicle FFV - Flexible fueled vehicle (gasoline or E85) Hybrid - Hybrid vehicle Plug-in Hybrid - Plug-in hybrid vehicle drive - drive axle type 2-Wheel Drive 4-Wheel Drive* 4-Wheel or All-Wheel Drive* All-Wheel Drive* Front-Wheel Drive Part-time 4-Wheel Drive* Rear-Wheel Drive *Prior to Model Year 2010 EPA did not differentiate between All Wheel Drive and Four Wheel Drive salesArea - EPA sales area code. The area of the country where the vehicle can legally be sold. New federally certified vehicles can be sold in all states except California

445

Charter Buses | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charter Buses for Tours and Special Events Charter Buses for Tours and Special Events Bus Request: Requests for tours and special events may be made by contacting the Transportation Office at 631-344-2535. Cancellation Policy: All cancellations must be made by phone to 631-344-2535 only during BNL business hours. Reservation must be canceled ten (10) business days prior to avoid penalty. Cancel two (2) to nine (9) business days prior - $150.00 penalty. Cancel within 24 hours - full fee will be charged. Staff Services maintains a contract that includes drivers for the rental of coaches, school buses, and vans for on-site tours and the transportation of large numbers of employees and visitors off-site. Our contract bus service rates are shown below: Hampton Jitney - Coaches Equipment Rates 8 Hour Day 4 Hour

446

Offset Printing, Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printing Printing Our full service print shop provides prepress services, single and multicolor offset printing, and complete bindery. We print Reports Forms Brochures, leaflets and flyers Name tags and meal tickets Newsletters, etc Prepress Electronic files and paper copy prepared for printing. Complete Bindery Apply address labels or tabs to printed material. Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing. Laminate printed items up to 35" wide. Numbering and perforating. Trimming, drilling, padding and stitching. Special Printing Special reports, full color printing, continuous and carbon forms printed through the U.S. Government Printing Office. Additional Information Printing can be reached on X2953 The supervisor is Rick Backofen who can be reached on X6183

447

NSLS Services | Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computing Services Computing Services Individual Computer Scanning To run a Nessus scan on your system or get existing Nessus Scan data go to http://scanner.bnl.gov/myresults.html General Desktop Support Please contact: itdhelp@bnl.gov or (631) 344-5522 Cybersecurity Requirements The following information contains links viewable only from BNL's internal network. You should review this information once you are on site. ALL COMPUTERS OR OTHER NETWORK DEVICES MUST BE REGISTERED WITH BNL IF THEY ARE TO BE USED ON THE BNL NETWORK. Please read "A visitors guide to BNL networks" regarding policies and procedures: http://intranet.bnl.gov/itd/networking/NWdns.asp "Cyber Security Unclassified" as defined by The Standards-Based Management System (SBMS), https://sbms.bnl.gov/standard/2j/2j00i011.htm

448

ARMY SERVICE FORCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ARMY SERVICE FORCES ARMY SERVICE FORCES ' -, 1 MANHATTAN ENGINEER DISTRICT --t 4 IN "LPLI RC,' LR io EIDM CIS INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY DIVISION CHICAGO BRANCH OFFICE i ., -,* - P. 0. Box 6770-A I ' 1 .' CHICAGO 80. ILLINOIS /lvb 15 February 1945 Subject: shipment Security Survey at &Uinckrodt Chemical Works. MEMORANDUM to the Officer in Charge. 1. The Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri, was contacted by the undersigned on 16 November 1944, for the purpose of -king an investigation to determine security provided shipments of interest to the Manhattan Engineer District. The investigation in- cluded shipments of vital materials originating with the Mallinckrodt Company and those received by them. Particular attention has been given to the future production and shipment schedules of these materials.

449

Service/Product Provider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wheatstone Energy Frito-Lay Wheatstone Energy Frito-Lay 1975 The Exchange, Ste. 320 7701 Legacy Dr. Atlanta, GA 30339 Plano, TX 75024 Business: Lighting, Electrical, HVAC Business: Snack Foods James B. Dore, Director, Sales and Marketing Rob Schasel, Director, Energy & Utilities Phone: 770-916-7107 Phone: 972-334-5567 Email: jim.dore@wheatstoneenergy.com Email: robert.d.schasel@fritolay.com Frito-Lay leverages its energy effort by partnering with Wheatstone Energy to identify and implement lighting improvements resulting in savings of $2.2 million. Project Scope Wheatstone provided turnkey services in upgrading the lighting systems at 96 distribution centers and 16 snack food production plants across North America. Project Summary In addressing lighting retrofits and lighting control strategies, Wheatstone's turnkey services included

450

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management study. The objective of this report is to give an out- line of this work and some results to date plots was established at the Station (Warrack 1949). More recently the Forest Service has worked or height to live crown. Each treatment plot is approxi- mately 0.5 ha and encloses a 0.13 ha measurement

451

DICE Diagnostic Service Joe Metzger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DICE Diagnostic Service DICE Diagnostic Service Joe Metzger metzger@es.net Joint Techs Measurement Working Group January 27 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Background Each of the DICE collaborators are defining and delivering services to their users. A subset of these services will be a lot more useful for everyone if all of the DICE participants deploy them in an interoperable fashion. A decision was made last winter to add more rigor or structure to our collaborative efforts and focus on a small set of services. * Network Diagnostic Service * Dynamic Circuit Provisioning Service * End user performance portal service Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science

452

Archives and History Office: Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Services See our What Can I Do to Help Preserve SLAC's History? brochure (print and fold into thirds) What should you keep? We provide guidance and assistance in managing...

453

Restful web services, First edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Every developer working with the Web needs to read this book." -- David Heinemeier Hansson, creator of the Rails framework "RESTful Web Services finally provides a practical roadmap for constructing services that embrace the Web, instead of trying to ...

Leonard Richardson; Sam Ruby

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

102nd Official Services Contractor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Official Service Contractor & Freight Forwarder Freeman is the appointed Official Service Contractor and Freight Forwarder for the 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo. Freeman is the official provider of furnishings, carpet, signs and graphi

455

Development Methods for Web Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Services, such as location services for GSM, fleet-management (e.g. taxi-companies), maps, hotel reservations, holiday planning, ticket booking etc. The chosen implementa- tion will include optional utility

456

2013 AOCS Technical Services Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Technical Services workshop includes educational sessions designed for lab technicians. 2013 AOCS Technical Services Workshop Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control

457

Protocols and Systems Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current data-centers rely on TCP/IP over Fast- and Gigabit-Ethernet for data communication even within the cluster environment for costeffective designs, thus limiting their maximum capacity. Together with raw performance, such data-centers also lack in efficient support for intelligent services, such as requirements for caching documents, managing limited physical resources, load-balancing, controlling overload scenarios, and prioritization and QoS mechanisms, that are becoming a common requirement today. On the other hand, the System Area Network (SAN) technology is making rapid advances during the recent years. Besides high performance, these modern interconnects are providing a range of novel features and their support in hardware (e.g., RDMA, atomic operations, QoS support). In this paper, we address the capabilities of these current generation SAN technologies in addressing the limitations of existing data-centers. Specifically, we present a novel framework comprising of three layers (communication protocol support, data-center service primitives and advanced data-center services) that work together to tackle the issues associated with existing data-centers. We also present preliminary results in the various aspects of the framework, which demonstrate close to an order of magnitude performance benefits achievable by our framework as compared to existing data-centers in several cases.

Balaji Vaidyanathan Narravula; P. Balaji; K. Vaidyanathan; S. Narravula; H. -w. Jin; D. K. Panda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Argonne TDC: Technical Services Agreemens  

Technical Services Agreements with Industrial Partners . Argonne researchers provide short-term technical assistance to companies with technical problems requiring ...

462

Project: Manufacturing Services Network Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... expressivity of a pattern library for manufacturing service capability information, by demonstrating the target information retrieval behavior enabled ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

463

Flexible provisioning of web service workflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web services promise to revolutionize the way computational resources and business processes are offered and invoked in open, distributed systems, such as the Internet. These services are described using machine-readable metadata, which enables consumer ... Keywords: Web services, semantic Web services, service composition, service provisioning, service-oriented computing, workflows

Sebastian Stein; Terry R. Payne; Nicholas R. Jennings

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z