Sample records for wildlife service usfws

  1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  3. Wildlife Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    with the Federal Aviation Administration and commercial and military airports to reduce wildlife hazards to aircraft. ? Protecting facilities, structures and other property from damage caused by rats, mice, raccoons, skunks, opossums, squirrels, beavers, birds...'s health, safety and prop- erty from damage caused by wildlife. Wildlife Services accomplishes this goal as a member of the cooperative Texas Wildlife Services Program. This cooperative federal, state and private program includes the Wildlife Services...

  4. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

  6. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  7. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation,

  8. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

  9. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  10. FISHERY LEAFLET 260 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INTERIOR #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, J. A. ICn;ig, Secretary Fish and Wildlife LEGISLATION Compiled by MILTOK J. LIHDNEE Aquatic Biologist, Office of Foreign Activities and Chief, United

  11. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  12. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service Fishery Leaflet 99 Chicago 54. fact. and the eVident nec.eulty for maxImum vllamln recovery from eXI.tlng re- .o\\!r ~c: the F..h 4"J ue. All cooks wen" made with live steam , the cooking time be n g of tc n minutes dUfa ∑ tion

  13. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  14. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road ClosingsPermitting...

  15. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  16. Avian and Bat Assessment at the Lewes Wind Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the advisory committee on February 14, 2013. On the call were Genevieve LaRouche (US Fish & Wildlife Service-USFWS), Julie Thompson (USFWS), Holly Niederriter (Delaware...

  17. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cumulative Impacts to Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the clock to protect and rescue wildlife that is at risk from the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill Impacts to Wildlife and Actions to Protect Wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico The Deepwater Horizon/BP Oil Spill Response Protection Strategy The Unified Area Command's Wildlife Branches, staffed by experts from

  18. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  19. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    54650 Acknowledgments Many agencies, institutions, and individuals contributed their time, energy benefits. The Emergency Wetlands Resources Act requires the Service to update its wetland status and trends and in the private sector. Some readers will use this information to gain insights on the effectiveness of wetland

  20. WETLANDS. Vol. 18. No.3. September 1998. pp. 329-334 1998. The Society of Wetland Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Fish and Wildlife Service. NOl1h American Waterfowl and Wetlands Office. Patuxent Wildlife Research River and Big Sioux River Watersheds. 1982, typed report on file, USFWS. Pierre. SD, USA), and the USFWS

  1. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Kru , Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert 1. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Kru , Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert 1 ∑.∑.∑.∑....∑..... Wet Reduction Equipment∑∑∑∑∑∑ Continuous Cooker∑∑∑∑∑∑∑ Continuous Press ∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑ Oil Recovery by Centrifuges∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑ Direct-Heat Drier∑∑∑.∑∑∑ Steam-Tube Drier∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑ 2 3 3 5 5 6 6 Pap: Wet Reduction

  2. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 57 1 Research Wildlife Biologist, Oregon Cooperative Wildlife Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    to maintain or increase ecosystem goods and services while protecting downstream and coastal ecosystems be inflicted on the ecosystem. Fifthly, both pre- and post- assessment must be completed and data made publicly

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the above mentioned EISs and RODs. Pursuant to its obligations under the Endangered Species Act, BPA has made a determination of whether its proposed project will have any effects on any listed species under the jurisdiction of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). A species list was obtained from USFWS on June 12, 2003, identifying bald eagles, Canada lynx, and bull trout as potentially occurring in the project area. A site assessment was conducted on July 15, 2003 to determine if these species were present and the potential effects of project activities. A ''No Effect'' determination was made for all ESA-listed species. There were no listed species under the jurisdiction of NOAA Fisheries present in the project area. As management activities proceed in the future, BPA will annually re-assess potential effects of planned activities on listed species. The Burns-Paiute Tribe conducted a literature search for historic and archaeological sites on the property on January 11, 1999. No known sites were identified. Further site-specific surveys will be conducted for individual ground disturbing activities. The results of these surveys will be sent to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and BPA. BPA will annually summarize and submit a report to the State Historic Preservation Office. On December 29, 1999, Fred Walasavage of BPA completed a Phase I Site Assessment and concluded that the site did not reveal any environmental factors that would pose a significant liability for remedial action or cleanup under the Comprehensive Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act. A public meeting was held when the property was initially acquired where the property acquisition and proposed activities were discussed. Subsequent public involvement was conducted on July 23, 2002 for commenting on the proposed Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan.

  4. DOE/EIS-0380

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and Infrastructure Division Office US United States USFS US Forest Service USFWS US Fish and Wildlife Service VTF Volunteer Task Force WFMP Wildland Fire Management Plan WFOP...

  5. File:DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of this preview:File EditSWDOE-USFWS Migratory Bird

  6. Microsoft Word - FEIS-0285-SA-453-Rivergate-KeelerPPA2109_WEB...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    species potentially occurring within the project boundaries from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Based on the ESA review conducted, BPA made a...

  7. Microsoft Word - FEIS-0285-SA-455-Bandon-Rogue_DTs PPA 2178_WEB...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    species potentially occurring within the project boundaries from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Based on the ESA review conducted, BPA made a...

  8. Document Title

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    organic gases SO x oxides of sulfur TCP Traditional Cultural Property USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service VMT vehicle miles traveled WAC Washington Administrative Code WTP...

  9. Microsoft Word - LLNL 2011 CRD_8_1.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Modernization TRU Transuranic Radioactive Waste UC University of California USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service WCI Weapons and Complex Integration Units of Measure Ciyr curies...

  10. EA-1934-DEA-2012.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    organic gases SO x oxides of sulfur TCP Traditional Cultural Property USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service WAC Washington Administrative Code WTP Waste Treatment Plant DOE...

  11. Professional internship with the Houston Lighting and Power Company Radiological Services: wildlife collection manual report and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Tina Borghild

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    game wardens, wildlife refuge managers in Texas, and who to contact about specific animal species or trapping techniques. An Equipment Sources Appendix and Literature Cited and Available in Wildlife Documents File were also included. This file...

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  13. United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishes. S..::aleless warm- water fish are particularly susceptible. High water temperature decreases fish resistance to this disease. RANGE Best known in America. Excessively hot summer temperatures are favorable and Wildlife INTRODUCTION Columnaris disease attacks many species of fresh -water fishes. Also known as "Cotton

  14. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  15. Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University

  16. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Concerns and Recommendations Our specific comments on the Council's draft recommendations address several issues, broadly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and power needs of the people of the Pacific Northwest. In our perspective it is one of your most Balancing the Fish and Wildlife Program under the Northwest Power Act.Instead of reanalyzing the projects for the Fish and Wildlife Program was established by the Bonneville Power Administration in their electricity

  17. Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

  18. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

  19. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. Department of Agriculture USEC United States Enrichment Corporation USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service USGS U.S. Geological Survey VOC volatile organic compound WM PEIS...

  20. PROPOSED INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF A

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. Department of Agriculture USEPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service VOC Volatile Organic Compound VPP Voluntary Protection Program...

  1. U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    threatened and endangered TA technical area USC United States Code USFWS United States Fish and Wildlife Service Final SA for the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research...

  2. Microsoft Word - Summary.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TNT 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene TTR Tonopah Test Range U.S. United States USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service WM Waste Management Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement...

  3. NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    strategic sustainability performance plan Tc-99m metastable technetium-99 USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service USGS U.S. Geological Survey WDNR Wisconsin Department of Natural...

  4. DOE/RL-94-150

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    delisting, new management guidelines for bald eagles were published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to advise landowners on how to comply with the regulations...

  5. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is a ¬ďShut-down¬ĒWholeWildlife Studies Studying

  6. Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folsom, Wendy Ann

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this bi-national study was to determine the type, nature, and extent of existing extension and technology-transfer activities provided to livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers in south ...

  7. Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folsom, Wendy Ann

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this study, the numbers of registered UMAs as of April 2001 were as follows: Coahuila, 500; Nuevo Leon, 650; and Tamaulipas, 513 (Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, 2001). Research suggests that many wildlife managers seek outside expertise when making...

  8. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  9. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  10. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  11. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  12. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  13. An Evaluation of Seagrass Community Structure and Its Role in Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Forgaging Dynamics in the Lower Laguna Madre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherall, Tracy F.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    unconditionally. viii NOMENCLATURE CITES Convention on International Trade and Endangered Species CPUE Catch-Per-Unit Effort ESA Endangered Species Act IUC World Conservation Union NMFS National Marine Fisheries Service SCL... Straight Carapace Length STFERL Sea Turtle and Fisheries Ecology Research Lab TPWD Texas Parks and Wildlife Department USFWS United States Fish and Wildlife Service ix TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT...

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  15. Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

  16. Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry -Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-988 Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry - Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service United States Department of Agriculture - Forestry Service Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Natural Resources Conservation Service Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food

  17. Genetic analysis of the endangered silver rice rat (Oryzomys palustris natator) and Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crouse, Amanda Louise

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 1996; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 1999). These include roadway mortalities (USFWS 1999; Harveson et al. 2004), increased predation by feral cats (Felis domesticus; Forys and Humphrey 1999), competition from black rats (Rattus rattus...; Mace 2004). In a conservation context, this means that management efforts are established on what is perceived, based on taxonomy, as the best way to preserve biological diversity. This is of even greater importance when the taxonomic status...

  18. Wildlife Photography Market Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Miles

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Private landowners who are considering offering fee-based wildlife photography opportunities on their land as a way to diversify their income will be interested in the results of this 2007 pilot survey of members of the North American Nature...

  19. Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Management provides many of the services that keep the Department of Energy Headquarters offices operational.† Other Program Offices also provide services to the employees at...

  20. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 ChgQuestionsReportingan

  1. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 ChgQuestionsReportinganof

  2. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

  4. Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills Opportunity Areas #12;#12;Energy Development and Impacts on Wildlife #12;Allocation of Water Resources · Cost/Share #12;Canby Ferry Muddy Creek Green Island Mt Pisgah, Sorenson Meadows South Pasture

  5. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Population and Habitat Assessment Branch, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Veit R.R., T.P. White, M. Martin, and M.J. Steinkamp. 2010. At-Sea...

  6. Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

  7. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  8. Biosolids and Wildlife Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biosolids and Wildlife Sally Brown University of Washington People sometimes express concern that while using biosolids for restoration or for forest fertilization can provide the necessary nutrients for plant growth, contaminants in the biosolids can pose a danger to wildlife that will use these treated

  9. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human≠Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284≠290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  10. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human≠Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):205≠213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to corn at reducing wildlife damage to row crops rely on information concerning the spatial nature of wildlife damage at local and landscape scales. In this study we explored spatial patterns of wildlife damage within

  11. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0Ė234).

  12. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  13. HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Other Animals: Vertebrates as Pests 8-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    or endanger health and safety. At the same time, all animals have value, whether it is ecological, aesthetic starling, house sparrow, and rock pigeon to be "nuisance" birds; the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS as "nuisance species" in Virginia are the house mouse, Norway rat, black rat, coyote, feral hog, nutria

  14. albeni falls wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES A. MARTIN, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries 5 Wildlife Landscape Ecology -Syllabus FS599 Fall Term 2010 Geosciences Websites Summary: 1 Wildlife Landscape Ecology -...

  15. Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-Organic Frameworks |Services

  16. A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran Jane

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    agency mission and record-keeping, as well as public demand for information and agency response concerning non-traditional wildlife issues, including: conflicts between humans and wildlife; human health and safety; attracting wildlife; viewing wildlife...

  17. Aspects of Key Largo woodrat ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleery, Robert Alan; Lopez, Roel R.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    or climax hammock habitat (DOI 1973, Brown 1978, Hersh 1978, Barbour and Humphrey 1982, Goodyear 1985, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS] 1999). These conclusions stemmed from observations of high densities of woodrat stick-nests within mature... hammock (Brown ____________ The format and style follow the Journal of Wildlife Management. 2 1978, Hersh 1978, Barbour and Humphrey 1982). Other studies have reported the KLWR will use hammock forests in varying degrees of succession (Goodyear...

  18. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) ∑ Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes ≠ discussion groups, ∑ Choice experiments, ∑ Fellowships / Placements, ∑ Newsletters

  19. Wildlife Category Review: Planning Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    budget and scope adjustments, project durations, and the results from the science review) categorical projects for up to eight years. Periodic budget and performance check-ins would occur duringWildlife Category Review: Planning Introduction Category and Geographic Reviews To implement

  20. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  1. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  2. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  3. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X December 2, 2014 8:00AM MST to December 4, 2014 5:00PM MST Broomfield, Colorado The biennial Wind Wildlife...

  4. USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines The following guidelines broadly outline the framework used by the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC to the submitting agency, its wildlife populations, or domestic animal and human health. Type of Specimens

  5. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  6. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  7. Multiscale Assessment of Wildlife Sustainability in Switchgrass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiscale Assessment of Wildlife Sustainability in Switchgrass Biofuel Feedstock Production Jun 29 2015 03:30 PM - 04:30 PM Chris Lituma, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville...

  8. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  9. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1980 a s outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994.Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOEEA-1023)...

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  11. The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

  12. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  13. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest Total Annual Average Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions1/ 226 5 24 41 8 310 137 750 1/ FY 2012 White Sturgeon. These actions may include such things as dredging, restoration of channel complexity

  14. Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook Wildland fire safeTy Course Module Revised from the "Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course ≠ Forest Harvesting and Silviculture." Jeff Mc contributions to this current course workbook. #12;Danger Tree Assessor's Course July 2010 ii Library

  15. Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook Forest Harvesting and Silviculture: Ministry of Forests and Range Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook: Forest Harvesting and Silviculture Module May 2008 iii DANGEROUS TREE ASSESSMENT IN BRITISH

  16. Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ∑ Walleye ∑ Smallmouth bass ∑ Northern pike ∑ Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12;∑ At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control ∑ Implement

  17. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yde, Chris A.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

  18. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

  19. Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  20. 6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

  1. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  2. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  3. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terra-Berns, Mary

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

  4. Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

  5. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  6. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  7. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

  8. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  9. Riparian Buffers for Wildlife Benefits of Riparian Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    , develop- ment, and recreation. Losing these buffers has negatively affected wildlife habitat and water the information you will need to create an effective riparian buffer for wildlife while pro- tecting water quality for wildlife; but they also improve water quality for humans. In general, the wider and more diversely planted

  10. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biochemical indices of quality. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Engineering studies on freezing and cold storage systems . · · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Storage of fish in refrigerated sea water . . . 5 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen seafoods 5 to meet the needs of industry. Funda- ment al research has been continued in the field of fish - mus cle

  11. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the knife blade so that it will scrape along the backbone, then, splits the fish along the back without from the washing tank they are allowed t o drain for a short time. They are then rubbed thoroughly

  12. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recipe and then cooled quickly and shredded, forks ∑o e ir:r~ us,O!d to t 3-ir the fibers apart. 1 pOW1d cup top milk 2 egg yolks, beaten 1 tablespoon chopped parsley Fimento or green pepper strips for garnish Combine flour, melted shortening and cayenne. Blend well. Add the top milk and the hot water

  13. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stagnant or muddy pools where their breathing movements attract attention on warm af,ternoons. The swimming, is known to pass readily to and from fresh and saltwater. \\ .JJ In general, information is from Fishes

  14. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be kept in good condition can be greatly extended by freezing and holding in cold storage. Brining before smoking and freezing. using moistureproof paper wrappers. and storing at a low temperature retard and ham. These products are no longer smoked as a means of preserving the meat but rather beeause

  15. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status and Trends of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S., 2005. Acknowledgments Manyagencies,organizations, andindividualscontributedtheir time,energy,OR;Dr.N.ScottUrquhart ResearchScientist,Departmentof Statistics,ColoradoStateUniversity, Fort courtesy of FWS. #12; Funding for this study was provided by the following agencies: Environmental

  16. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of quicklime, the destructi,e effect of which is produced by direct cantact. Particles of the chemicaI pread usually follow in a short time. Once spread o,er the oyster beds. the lime retains its effectiveness- ne_ to oysters and many other commercial species all indicate that it is a practical weapon for use

  17. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Mississippi Flyway. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DDT accumulation by waterfowl in an Ohio marsh Reproductive success in a DDT-contaminated population of herring gulls . . . . . 11 Kinetics of pesticide pOisoning in Dutch elm disease control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Bird mortality following DDT spray for Dutch elm

  18. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service letterhead] Mark Walker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the analysis. As with many preliminary review efforts, rolling up "readily available data" into a cost, detailed data that would be important in the type of cost-effectiveness analysis attempted here, data analysis techniques, and other inconsistencies in the cost/cost-effectiveness analysis

  19. United states Department of the Iaterior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , hung evenly on a hemp or manila head rope of 1/2-inch difu'TI.eter strung wi th ordinary 3-inch cork b

  20. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accessible sources of this and other hard fibers. Hemp grown in Italy and Hungary, where abundant supplies the production of the fine hemp grown there, Jute from India has been partially cut off by action in the Orient were early and wisely placed under the control of the War Production Board.~ More "Manila hemp, " which

  1. US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypefor Africa |Green6 Product: US

  2. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver Redirect

  3. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

  4. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

  5. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind L-5508 11/08 Kenneth A. Cearley, Extension Wildlife Specialist, The Texas A&M System; and Chuck Kowaleski, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department T he Conservation...

  7. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

  8. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  9. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

  10. Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Calispell Creek Watershed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Calispell Creek watershed in Pend Oreille County, Wash. BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key...

  11. antibiotics threaten wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daszak et al., 2000; Friend et Ambiente, Gran Via de San Francisco 4, 28005 Madrid, Spain. Summary The impact on wildlife health and the effects of bacterial antibiotic...

  12. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  13. Cloud Services Cloud Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

  14. EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOEEIS-0246SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch...

  15. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  16. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(2), 2005, pp. 291297 Wildlife Disease Association 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    of northern California and southern Oregon (USA), the Texas Panhandle, and the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska Department, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Current address: U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 204 Russell Lab

  17. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline ∑ Introduction ∑ Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif∑ Impacts on wildlife ∑ Guidelines ∑ Future directions ∑ References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? ∑ The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

  18. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a system of economic incentives and develop cost effective solutions to agricultural and wildlife issues#12;ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the Potential for Use of Economic and Associated Floodplains prepared by Richard M. Porter for Socio-Economic Section Sustainability Division

  19. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  20. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  1. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutron LogWildlife Jump

  2. Annual Coded Wire Program Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, S.M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Vancouver, WA (United States). Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ``Missing Production Groups``. Production fish released by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980`s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ``Missing Production Groups`` program are: to estimate the total survival of each production group, to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern.

  3. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  4. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):198203, Fall 2011 Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973, Blokpoel 1976). Since the inception of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NationalHuman≠Wildlife Interactions 5(2):198≠203, Fall 2011 Commentary Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi concerns to the aviation industry worldwide. Recent events such as the ditching of US Airways Flight 1549

  5. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human≠Wildlife Conflicts 2(1):136≠138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

  6. iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK 98501-1091 Prepared by Pat E. Fowler, District Wildlife Biologist January 2001 Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Date #12;iiJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife TABLE OF CONTENTS

  7. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  8. FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

  9. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto the People

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    personal care items to donate to the Hospice Care of Tri County for their Santa Store. During their Spring of the awards at Clemson University. Belger began his volunteer service with the Kershaw County 4-H program on his farm. Two county 4Hers recently have won state awards with the 4H Wildlife FACE (food and cover

  11. Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

  12. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  13. alaska linking wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Research Report--2011 Environmental Sciences and...

  14. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  15. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  16. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  17. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablyís...

  18. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

    2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-18)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition and preservation of approximately 99 acres of native wet prairie and oak woodland habitat in Lane County, Oregon. Title to the land will be held by The Nature Conservancy, who will convey permanent mitigation rights to BPA in the form of a conservation easement. These newly acquired parcels will become part of the existing 330-acre Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Area. Passive management practices may take place on the land until a wildlife mitigation and management plan is developed and approved for the property. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Cathy MacDonald with The Nature Conservancy and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive wildlife mitigation and management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the proposed acquisition of the subject property. Through contact with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Oregon Natural Heritage Program, staff from The Nature Conservancy identified a number of federal and state listed species that have the potential to occur at the project site. ESA Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and The Nature Conservancy, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. A cultural resource survey was conducted at the Eugene Wetlands Phase II site on July 9, 2001. No prehistoric or historic cultural materials were observed during the survey and no landforms considered likely to be archaeological sites were noted. The nearest recorded archeological find consists of two prehistoric sites that are located within a mile of the project area along Willow Creek. Based on the findings of this survey, BPA concluded that there would be no effect on prehistoric or historic artifacts associated with the Eugene Wetlands acquisition project. The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office concurred with BPA's determination on September 18, 2001. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that may occur on the site, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Phase I Environmental Site Assessments were conducted on the Eugene wetland site by staff from The Nature Conservancy and Hahn and Associates, Inc. The surveys did not reveal evidence of recognized environmental conditions in conjunction with the subject properties. Fred Walasavage an Environmental Specialist with BPA reviewed the Phase I assessments and reported to The Nature Conservancy on May 14, 2001 that he concurred with these findings. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations. Public response from the solicitation indicated general support for the project. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  20. Darrick Weissenfluh Facility Manager/Fish Biologist, USFWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    underground tank that the over-flow water is sent to in order to control water-out for a future field, if needed. The design was based on a water flow of 2.2 gallons/minute and the storage volume/energy in the tank. ~9.17MM btu available

  1. Description 200751800 Reviewer USFWS CRFPO Date 7/23/07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the objectives? Y 3. Are the resources proposed (staff, equipment, materials) appropriate to achieve of the infrastructure reliability to consistently provide water to artificial upwelling areas, especially if chum salmon

  2. BLM-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurleyBLMUSFWS Migratory Bird

  3. DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs andCrops Ltd Jump to: navigation,contest116 Jump

  4. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  5. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  6. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  7. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  8. act provisions fishing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    context and implications Road map of today's discussion: Power plan 8 USFWS Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act Grant301811J187 CiteSeer Summary: I would like to thank...

  9. A multistakeholder perspective on human interactions with the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Crystal River, Florida, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorice, Michael Gregory

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . Property owned by Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Swim corridor to King Spring initial outcomes of manatee encounters Dimensions used by SMC to judge harassment Outcome of manatee encounters using the USFWS definition of harassment 10 12 27...

  10. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  11. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  12. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  14. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  15. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  16. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  17. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  18. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  19. INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995 to 6 percent by 2015 to rebuild weak fish and wildlife populations, the Council's program calls for participation and funding funding and staffing fish and wildlife rebuilding measures, or run the almost certain risk

  20. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife.............................................................................................................. 1 Integrating the Fish and Wildlife Program and Power Planning Under the Northwest Power Act 2 Power Resource Planning that Accommodates the Power System Effects of the Fish and Wildlife Program

  1. Response of breeding seaside sparrows to fire on the upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitbeck, Matthew W

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Error bars represent standard deviations. Histogram represents precipitation recorded in 2000 and 2001 on Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, Chambers County, Texas (USFWS, unpubl. data) 23 Mean number of Seaside Sparrows/survey for four years post..., Chambers County, Texas 1986 - 2001 (J. Neaville, unpubl. data). Error bars represent standard deviations. Histogram represents precipitation recorded in 2000 and 2001 on Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, Chambers County, Texas (USFWS, unpubh data). 24...

  2. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  3. Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness interest in the future of forestry? · Do you feel there should be changes made to forest practices? · Do at www.unbc.ca/forestry BSc Natural Resources Management Forest Ecology and Management #12;Some Career

  4. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Wind Energy Development & Wildlife ≠ Striving for Co-existence Caroline Jezierski Nebraska Wind #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 30m http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/30m_US_Wind.jpg #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 50m http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/US-50m-wind-power-map.jpg #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 80m

  5. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  6. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  7. ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M of acoustic pollution in the oceans and effects on marine mammals Where do we go from here? #12;4/17/2011 2 ON ACOUSTIC POLLUTION Anthropogenic sound generation Transportation Army/Navy Research Commercial Birds

  8. Estimation of wildlife populations using the quadrat method of sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hribar, John Richard

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    area under consideration) into squares of equal area. Appendix A illustrates such a pattern. It is an actual map of the Rob aud. Bessie Welder Wildlife Refuge in Southern Texas and will be used. extensively for the purpose of examples and sample...

  9. Indigenous Services Services for Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    STUDENT SERVICES Indigenous Services Services for Students with Disabilities Learning Skills Distance Studies Continuing Studies Student Success CentreLEARNING SERVICES TEACH ING& DEVELOPM E NTCENTRE collaborative and student- focused efforts make a difference. John Doerksen Vice-Provost (Academic Programs

  10. Prepared in cooperation with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Southern Nevada Water Authority,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards drinking water and the hydropower to provide electricity for major cities including Las Vegas, Phoenix, Los to the importance of Lake Mead, multiple agencies are actively involved in its monitoring and research

  11. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree Guy7 Abstract New dangerous tree assessment guidelines have recently been developed by the Wildlife snag was replaced with "dangerous tree." According to section 26.1 of these regulations, a dangerous

  12. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  13. Unbiased estimators of wildlife population densities using aural information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durland, Eric Newton

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peters' Data . 3. 4 Suggestions for Improvements DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS 18 20 22 25 28 BIBLIOGRAPHY. VITA. . . . ~ 4. 1 Situation I. 4. 2 Situation II 4. 3 Situation III. . ~ . . ~ ~ - . ~ 4. 4 Combining Aural and Visual Information 4. 5... with much promise among people in wildlife when compared with other methods of estimation. Peters [15] found that the call-count index of mourning doves seems to be sub)ect to less variation than road count data. The Southeastern Association [18] found...

  14. Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

  15. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  16. Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Tommie L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sharing Texas Resources: Interpretation Handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tommie L. Herrick Nay 1994 Record of Study SHARZNG TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK POR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT A... Department Natural Resources Development SHARING TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK FOR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTNENT A Professional Paper by Tommie L. Herrick Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Edward H. Heath (Chairman...

  17. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  18. Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

  19. Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

  20. Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Buglť Wildlife Use in Western Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derek Anthony

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

  1. Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology Organizations Hiring Students in Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Inc Rocky Mountain Research Station Savannah River Site December 2012 / May 2013 Schlumberger of Health Public Lab Minnesota Dept of Ag Missouri Department of Conservation Missouri Solar Applications Nantucket Conservation Foundation National Park Service Nebraska Game and Parks Commission NICHES Land Trust

  2. FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services Presidential Briefing #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services (FBS) · FBS currently has approx. 140 employees · We) ­ Financial Solutions (6) ­ Travel, Training & Policy Development (6) #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Our

  3. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  4. Wildlife Society Bulletin 2005, 33(2):745748 Peer refereed Distance sampling from roads is a common pop-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    on the Matador Wildlife Management Area (WMA) (352.4 km2), located northwest of Paducah in Cottle County along

  5. FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics The Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville invites applications have at least one degree in Forestry from an SAF-accredited program. Demonstrated experience in field

  6. New Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    preservation and other activities associated with traditional game management. Fortunately, much of the knowledge and techniques developed for game #12;management can be transferred to considerations of wildlifeNew Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1 Tamsie

  7. INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

  8. SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM ∑ determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

  9. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 to Columbia River Basin fish and wildlife by hydropower development and operations in the past. But the future drainage basins that contain important anadromous fish habitat. However, most new hydroelectric development

  10. HumanWildlife Conflicts 5(2):204209, Fall 2011 Using dietary analyses to reduce the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reported to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) during 1990 to 2008 (Dolbeer et al. 2009 (wildlife strikes) pose a serious safety risk to aircraft and cost civil aviation >$614 million annually, Dolbeer and Wright 2009). Analyzing information from the FAA's National Wildlife Strike Database regarding

  11. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):3138, Spring 2014 Integrating mammalian hazards with man-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wildlife collisions (i.e., incident) frequencies taken from Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) National Wildlife) or general aviation (GA; Federal Aviation Administration 2012). Certificated airports are those that receive required by the Federal Aviation Administrator to hold a certificate (Federal Aviation Administration 2012

  12. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  13. Wildlife Category Review. NWPCC. Final Recommendation to BPA. July 2009 Attachment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years of proposed funding by the project sponsors. A five-year planning budget allows Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and the sponsor flexibility in contracting and spending fluctuations over the five Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Project Funding Recommendations for the Wildlife

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia Erika Alacs for effective regulation of legitimate commercial trade and effective policing of illegal trade is likely and fauna are endemic and it is this very attribute that attracts traders of illegal wildlife worldwide

  15. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  16. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):58, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):5­8, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural.O. Box 5496-30100, Eldoret, Kenya nsifuna@ yahoo.com Key words: human­wildlife conflicts, Kenya Wildlife depredation in Laikipia, Kenya Kenya's Laikipia District is located on the equator in the central part

  17. A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system for use in wildlife capture are described, including the standard 3-rocket system, are presented. Keywords: Rocket net, wildlife capture, trapping, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Arizona

  18. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy)Peteforsyth JumpWzeng JumpWildlife Resources

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | DepartmentDepartment of Energy LewisDepartmentEnergy Wildlife Fund

  20. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York:Governor s Energy Office Jump to:Parks and Wildlife

  1. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , north-south temperature gradient occurs in the western Gulf between Sabine Bank and the Gulf of Campeche

  2. UNITED STATES DEPAR.TMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a clear oil. At this stage the #12;oil is ready for market as crude marine oil. Marine oils have been by filtration, and the filtrate is marketed as light cold- pressed marine oil. Thus, light cold FISHERIES WASHINGTON, D.C. FISHERY LEAFLET 528 #12;MARINE OILS - ') NEW AVENUES FOR VENTURE Marine oils

  3. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, STEWART L. UDALL, SECRETARY Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " this, verification can bt: made '-)nly by hlsl 'JI " gl " il methods. SOURCE AND RESERVOIR OF INFL' water supply are the usual sour":L', The-.p"r

  4. ) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . DRY SALTING. AND SMOKmG SAIMON B.y Norman D. Jarvis, Technologist, Branch of Commercial Fisheries Mild are not wanted; (3) the skin must be bright--there must be ne "water marks" or other blemishes, (4) the flesh must not be bruised or broken--there must be no pew marks or other signs of rough handling, (5

  5. Graduate internship with the Wildlife and Fisheries Program Unit of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Christopher Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the previous week. Singles and pairs are landing on the ponds which are strung on 50 foot centers. Ponds strung on 25 foot centers seem to be suffering no significant depredation. 23 March- Arrived at 12:30 porno Observed 14 birds on 12 acre lake, 2 birds...

  6. United Stat es Department of t he Int erior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ---------~--- --·----·-· -_ .._--._--- _...- ashington 25, D. C. Oct ober 1945i - - --------- - -- - -i PRELIMINARY RWORT ON THE USE OF DDT AS A first large s ca le apnlicP.ttions of DDT fo r civilia n use r ec ent l y was carried out in the fishery doub t r ega r di ng the eff ectivenpss of DDT in r educing the hous e- fly ·oonulat ions in fi sh

  7. US Fish and Wildlife Service biomonitoring operations manual, Appendices A--K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, D.F.; Rope, R.C.; Mondecar, M.; Breckenridge, R.P.; Wiersma, G.B.; Staley, C.S.; Moser, R.S.; Sherwood, R.; Brown, K.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 contains Appendices and Summary Sheets for the following areas: A-Legislative Background and Key to Relevant Legislation, B- Biomonitoring Operations Workbook, C-Air Monitoring, D-Introduction to the Flora and Fauna for Biomonitoring, E-Decontamination Guidance Reference Field Methods, F-Documentation Guidance, Sample Handling, and Quality Assurance/Quality Control Standard Operating Procedures, G-Field Instrument Measurements Reference Field Methods, H-Ground Water Sampling Reference Field Methods, I-Sediment Sampling Reference Field Methods, J-Soil Sampling Reference Field Methods, K-Surface Water Reference Field Methods. Appendix B explains how to set up strategy to enter information on the ``disk workbook``. Appendix B is enhanced by DE97006389, an on-line workbook for users to be able to make revisions to their own biomonitoring data.

  8. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis). Skipjack tuna are the basis of by far the largest fishery in Hawaii

  9. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E Ambassadors and C3EDepartment3 AnnualANNOUNCEMENTof

  10. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation&

  11. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation,Book:Closings | Open

  12. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 603 FW 2 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation,Book:Closings |

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973 |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver Redirect page(RedirectedOpen

  14. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

  15. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

  16. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  17. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  18. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  19. 1995 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys performed at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) from January through December of 1995 as compared with results from previous years. These surveys were performed as part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and describing fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in species using RFETS. The NRPCP provides support to the Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as Natural Resource Trustee, and provides data essential to accomplishing the goal of preserving the unique ecological values of RFETS in keeping with the Rocky Flats Vision presented in the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Public Comment Draft. Wildlife population densities vary due to natural pressures and human influences, and only long-term monitoring can verify which factors influencing wildlife populations are the consequence of natural fluctuations, and which are due to human influences. The wildlife monitoring described in this report provides qualitative data that give an indication of the ecological health of RFETS. Monitoring numbers, habitat affinities, and apparent health of the wildlife populations makes it possible to evaluate the overall ecological health of the site. Monitoring and surveys such as those carried out by the NRPCP can indicate trends of this sort, and act as an {open_quotes}early warning system{close_quotes} for impending ecological problems.

  20. A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

  1. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services PrintServices Print

  2. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services PrintServices

  3. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services PrintServicesUser

  4. The Importance of Wildlife Harvest to Human Health and Livelihoods in Northeastern Madagascar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Christopher DeWeir

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strict monetary valuations of ecosystem services may vastlyand epidemiology. Ecosystem service valuations are useful tomonetary valuation schemes. Ecosystem services provision

  5. Review of an internship with Ouray District United States Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caddy, Mark W

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Uncompahgre National Forest Z. Record of Vegetative Development 3. Record of Utilization by Height-Weight Method Percent of Height Grazed Computation Table Height-Weight Table APPENDIX H. Aspen Management Guidelines. APPENDIX C. Results of CDOW Survey...-winter range (Map 3). Wildlife work was not limited to revegetation and water improvements. The Forest Service also conducts habitat manipulation in the form of aspen (~Po ulus tzemuloides) management, burning, and Knutson-Vandenbuzg (K-V) work. The percent...

  6. How does the public process impact the selection of a nuisance wildlife management plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Julianne (Julianne Susan)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1950s the human relationship with wildlife in the United States shifted dramatically; from primarily consumptive to primarily recreational. Over the same time period a trend of humans moving into suburban communities ...

  7. Loxahatchee Non-profit Sends Mobile Wildlife Laboratory to Island of Dominica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gear, veterinary supplies, and wildlife monitoring and surveillance equipment, and can support six Dominica. The national bird is revered as the icon of Dominica, adorning the nation's flag and coat

  8. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the wave conditions in the channel in order to evaluate the respective energies...

  9. Assessing Variation in Wildlife Biodiversity in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan Using Ancillary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Assessing Variation in Wildlife Biodiversity in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan Using of Kyrgyzstan and assessed their usefulness for biodiversity surveys of larger animal species. The study: Camera-trapping; biodiversity; conservation; mammals; protected areas; Tien Shan Mountains; Kyrgyzstan

  10. The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Etienne Samuel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

  11. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  12. Fact Sheet - Acquisition of 0.5 acre wildlife habitat in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Falls Dam. The 0.5-acre parcel will be owned and managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for the purpose of wildlife mitigation. A fee in lieu of taxes will be paid to...

  13. Lake Chelan Fishery Management Plan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................... Monitoring changes in cutthroat and rainbow trout management........ Creel survey methods1 Appendix D Lake Chelan Fishery Management Plan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife 2002 #12;2 LAKE CHELAN FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  15. SampleSize 1.1 Sample Size Calculations for Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208-3621 Project of design variables. This project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, US Department of Energy

  16. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):206211, Fall 2008 Evaluation of physical barriers to prevent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -footed ferret programs (M. Brennan, biologist, Boulder County, personal communication). However, resource ludovicianus) colonies on public and private lands can result in damage to property. Physical barriers, wildlife damage management Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) pose many challenges

  17. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  18. Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Regulatory Oversight of Commercial Wildlife Control Activities in the United States. (August 2007) Kieran J. Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Commite: Dr. Clark E. Adams Urbanization decreases... PRIVATIZATION AND REGULATORY OVERSIGHT OF COMERCIAL WILDLIFE CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES A Disertation by KIERAN J. LINDSEY Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  19. Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : b - Butterflies, bees and other insects STP - South Texas Plains i - White-tailed deer EP - Edwards Plateau o - Small mammals (e.g. squirrels, rabbits) B - Songbirds F - Game birds (quail, turkey, doves) Table 1. Classes of wildlife...Woody Plants and Wildlife Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily...

  20. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VEGETATION RESPONSE TO BURNING THICKETIZED LIVE OAK SAVANNAH ON THE ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesi. s by DAVID MITCHELL KELLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 6 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... irma f Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( lambe-) (Member) Memos Memoerl '. !ay 98O ABSTRACT Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (May 1980) David Mitchell Kelley, B. S...

  1. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  2. Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devilís Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

  3. Personal Services Agreements Waivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Type of Service 1. Consultant Services: Include consulting services, program evaluators, standards, or the School does not have the equipment necessary to perform these services. 6. Graphic and Journalistic Service: Services including graphic design, writing and editing and bookbinding for which CSM does

  4. Applications of Data-driven Modeling to Infectious Diseases in Africa: Anthrax in Wildlife and HIV in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Steven Edward

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating wind turbine-caused bird mortality. Journal ofestimation of wildlife mortality due to wind farms (Flint etsurveillance of mortality due to disease, wind farms,

  5. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drais, Gregory

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

  6. Understanding Participation in Wildlife Conservation Programs on Private Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorice, Michael G.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    with the authority to specify resource use designates and/or actively manages that land so that other goals (e.g., economic) are prioritized over ecological goals (including but not limited to ecosystem function, ecosystem services, biodiversity protection....e., maintaining biodiversity) in order to support ecosystem function and services that enhance human well-being. Endangered species recovery often is not situated in a social dilemma framework. As a result, it can be relatively easy to overlook the perverse...

  7. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4.CCSM4large.jpg BER:Services Print The

  8. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4.CCSM4large.jpg BER:Services Print TheUser

  9. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4.CCSM4large.jpg BER:Services Print

  10. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4.CCSM4large.jpg BER:Services PrintUser

  11. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4.CCSM4large.jpg BER:Services PrintUserUser

  12. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services Print The User

  13. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services Print The UserUser

  14. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services Print The

  15. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services Print TheAuthor

  16. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUser Services Print

  17. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  18. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  19. UNBC Continuing Studies -WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9 TEL: 250-960-5980 FAX: 250-960-5984 TOLL FREE: 1-866-843-8061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Continuing Studies - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 form. Name Telephone Number Email Address COURSE INFORMATION - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE ASSESSOR

  20. Hungry Horse Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project: Long-Term Habitat Management Plan, Elk and Mule Deer Winter Range Enhancement, Firefighter Mountain and Spotted Bear Winter Ranges.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals are to rehabilitate 1120 acres of big game (elk and mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus) winter range on the Hungry Horse and Spotted Bear Districts of Flathead National Forest lands adjacent to Hungry Horse Reservoir. This project represents the initial phase of implementation toward the mitigation goal. A minimum of 547 acres Trust-funded enhancements are called for in this plan. The remainder are part of the typical Forest Service management activities for the project area. Monitor and evaluate the effects of project implementation on the big game forage base and elk and mule deer populations in the project area. Monitor enhancement success to determine effective acreage to be credited against mitigation goal. Additional enhancement acreage will be selected elsewhere in the Flathead Forest or other lands adjacent'' to the reservoir based on progress toward the mitigation goal as determined through monitoring. The Wildlife Mitigation Trust Fund Advisory Committee will serve to guide decisions regarding future enhancement efforts. 7 refs.

  1. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  2. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  3. Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  4. Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 60 (2013) LAKEWATCH Continues to be a Large Part of Florida Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a largemouth bass during a sampling event for the long-term fish monitoring program Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Long-Term Fish Monitoring Program in their water bodies. Focusing more on fish and wildlife (biological integrity

  5. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  6. The distribution and contaminant exposure of Rafinesque's Big-Eared Bats in South Carolina with an emphasis on bridge surveys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.M. Bennett; S.C. Loeb; W.W. Bowerman

    2003-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Rafinesque's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii), an insectivorous mammal indigenous to the southern United States, has long been referred to as one of the least known bats in North America. Although there has been a moderate increase in the number of peer-reviewed articles published on this species in the past 6 years, the basic ecology and status of Rafinesque's big-eared bat remains largely obscure. Prior to 1996, when the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) discontinued the list of Candidate Species, Rafinesque's big-eared bat was listed as a Federal Category 2 Candidate species. Currently, Rafinesque's big-eared bat is recognized as a ''species of special concern'' across most of its range but receives no legal protection. Nonetheless, the USFWS and numerous state agencies remain concerned about this species. Further biological research and field study are needed to resolve the conservation status of this taxona. In response to the paucity of information regarding the status and distribution of Rafinesque's big-eared bat, statewide survey of highway bridges used as roost sites was conducted.

  7. Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G.; Munz, Carrie S. [U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2006 through March 2007 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 26922. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). Funding from USFWS was for work to contribute to a study of potential interactions between introduced Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and wild steelhead O. mykiss. Funding from LCFEG was for work to evaluate the effects of nutrient enrichment in small streams. A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2006 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

  8. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

  9. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  10. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  11. PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 APPENDIX L Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife Plans and Programs This inventory was conducted in the spring of 2003 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under contract to WRI. The following pages are printed from the spreadsheet used in the inventory

  12. Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Wildlife, Fish of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees in Environmental Conservation (ECo) and is designed

  13. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):210217, Fall 2011 Using radar cross-section to enhance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D; Brand 2010a) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA; FAA 2010, Herricks et al. 2010). The testing, airfield management, alert, aviation safety, BASH, bird strike, human≠ wildlife conflicts, radar, radar cross-section, situational awareness, wildlife hazard Birds pose a threat to aviation safety and cost

  14. FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Procurement &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Procurement & Payment Summary Accounts Payable Perry H. Hull #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Agenda · Accounts Payable: Who we are...what we do... · Accounts Payable;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Accounts

  15. Personal Services Agreements Waivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these services. 4. Support and Maintenance Agreements: Services include preventive maintenance as well - Equipment Maintenance/Repair Services in this category are used for all types of equipment maintenance the equipment necessary to perform certain services. 2. Equipment Maintenance and Repair: Services include

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  17. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  18. Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie [U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2005 through March 2006 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 22095. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2005 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

  19. Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narolski, Steven W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

  20. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  1. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POTENTIAL NA7ARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WI~ DLIFE WHEN USED IN TliE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AfM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Wild'life and Fisheries Sciences POTENTIAL HAZARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WILDLIFE WHEN USED IN THE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Approved as to style...

  2. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POTENTIAL NA7ARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WI~ DLIFE WHEN USED IN TliE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AfM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Wild'life and Fisheries Sciences POTENTIAL HAZARDS OF COMPOUND 1080 TO SELECTED NONTARGET WILDLIFE WHEN USED IN THE TOXIC COLLAR A Thesis by WARREN GEORGE EASTLAND Approved as to style...

  3. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  4. 354 STUDENT SERVICES AND PROGRAMS Student Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    , a vending area, a lounge, and a laundry room. A meal service contract is required in the high-rise residence the suite communities also require a meal service contract, except Squires Hall. On-campus apartments offer

  5. 390 Student Services and Programs Student Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    , a vending area, a lounge, and a laundry room. A meal service contract is required in the high- rise buildings housing the suite communities also require a meal service contract, except Squires Hall. On

  6. DIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    a centralized resource of regional health care services for persons with developmental disabilitiesDIRECTORY OF HEALTH SERVICES FOR BRONX RESIDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 2012 Compiled Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with Health Services Committee, Bronx Developmental

  7. University Services Pamela Wheelock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    University Services Pamela Wheelock Vice President MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS University Services Human Resources Linda Bjornberg Director open position CIO OPERATIONS Auxiliary Services Laurie Scheich Berthelsen Associate VP Public Safety Gregory Hestness Assistant VP University Health & Safety Craig Moody

  8. SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    derived from rangelands Link between the biophysical world and the social systems humans use Basic Fish Huntable or Catchable fish and wildlife Biofuels Fiber Biochemicals Genetic material #12 Assess biological, hydrological, atmospheric, and other physical resources (supply) Describe the market

  9. IBM Global Technology Services Server Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ServerTM, Power SystemsTM, pSeriesģ, #12;2 PowerVMTM, PowerHATM, System StorageTM disk systems, System pģ, System xģ and other IBM selected products with the option to purchase as a ServicePacģ including: IBM Implementation Services for Power Systems-- AIX V6.1 remote implementation IBM Implementation Services for Power

  10. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  11. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

  12. As I travel across the country talking with wildlife professionals about leadership and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that many wildlife professionals still lack basic people skills. We obviously have historically understood skills is the type of people our pro- fession attracts; we simply don't attract many people, relative our profession. Unfortunately, many of us lack an under- standing of how to develop better people

  13. Indicators of sustainable forestry: The association between wildlife species and forest structure in Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Indicators of sustainable forestry: The association between wildlife species and forest structure et al., 2008). Today forests should be managed according to the principles of sustainable forestry and Forestry, 2008). The implementation of economic and ecological sustainability goals is a challenging task

  14. Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign 61820 ABSTRACT.--Brush pile creation is a common habitat of brush pile creation and the indirect effects of brush piles on multi-species interactions. Here we

  15. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTENSIVELY MANAGED FORESTS TO THE SUSTAINABILITY OF WILDLIFE COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Mike

    Sciences, 11 West Jones Street, Raleigh, NC 27601-1029 (JAG); Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken University, Box 8002, Raleigh, NC, 27695-8002 (RAL); Savannah River Ecology Lab, Drawer E, Aiken, SC, 29802 to sustaining wildlife communities in the South. National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, Inc., PO Box

  16. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  17. Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

  18. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

  19. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):235244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animalvehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human≠Wildlife Interactions 8(2):235≠244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animal≠vehicle collisions, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People's Re- public of China, 100083 Abstract: Animal≠vehicle collisions (AVCs) cause animal death, human injury, and vehicle damage. Uncovering the general patterns

  1. ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix D STAFF ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS During the course. This report provides the results of the biological analysis of the adopted actions. The package was termed

  2. FY 2006 Council Recommended Fish and Wildlife Start of Year budgets Province Subbasin Project # Title Sponsor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project # Title Sponsor BPA Project Manager FY 2005 Council SOY Budget Budget Request July memo issue, Joe $175,000 3 $175,000 Washington Wildlife Agreement project.Base O&M until management plan Province Subbasin Project # Title Sponsor BPA Project Manager FY 2005 Council SOY Budget Budget Request

  3. Spatial and Temporal Survey of Feral Pig Ectoparasites in Three Texas Wildlife Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Anthony

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Two hundred fifty six fleas, Pulex porcinus (Jordan and Rothschild), were collected from all gender and age classes of feral pigs at the South Texas Plains wildlife district. No fleas were collected at either the Hill Country or Post Oak Savannah...

  4. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):257265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human≠Wildlife Interactions 4(2):257≠265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition to North Dakota's program. Therefore, we analyzed fragmentation patterns and lead deposition in carcasses fragments and lead deposits throughout the entire abdominal cavity of carcasses. We also used 2 types

  5. Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

  6. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):214223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):214­223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada geese Columbus Avenue, Sandusky, OH 44870, USA Abstract: Overabundant populations of Canada geese (Branta these concerns. The objective of this study was to determine if captive Canada geese exhibited a foraging

  7. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):242250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 3(2):242­250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada geese near, Castleton, NY 12033-9653, USA Abstract: Canada geese (Branta canadensis) often cause significant damage when. We placed alpha-numeric neck collars on 300 Canada geese within 8 km of both John F. Kennedy

  8. RWU 4201 Wildlife Ecology in Rocky Mountain Landscapes Wolverine Population Assessment in Glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RWU 4201 Wildlife Ecology in Rocky Mountain Landscapes Wolverine Population Assessment in Glacier. Beckwith, Missoula, MT 59801 Problem Statement Glacier National Park (GNP) is one of the few National Parks patterns of Glacier NP wolverine. Trapping will continue through the winter of 2004 and will focus

  9. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):186198, Fall 2009 Developing bird-strike risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , YO41 1LZ Abstract: Mineral extraction sites that are restored to open water can increase bird that attract wildlife are planned for mineral extraction sites near airports. These conflicts arises primarily-strike risk if they are planned near airports. This can generate conflict between the minerals industry

  10. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs with mineral-rich bedrock, at the base of cliffs and steep slopes, or in ravines--places that accumulate is a GPS unit. Global positioning systems (GPS) are used in the field to record the location of plant

  11. SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):235248, Fall 2011 Increasing trend of damaging bird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2005; 2008; Dolbeer, unpublished data). The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated efforts at airports because various historical analyses of bird-strike data for civil aviation have the U.S. National Wildlife Strike Database for Civil Aviation, 1990 to 2009, indicates that this tenet

  13. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2): Fall 2012 Effects of grassland alteration from mowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Dolbeer et al. 2009). According to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the average annual cost and aircraft (i.e., bird strikes) have occurred since the beginning of aviation and have resulted in human of bird and other wildlife strikes in the United States to the civil aviation industry is estimated

  14. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):261270, Fall 2014 Soil quality manipulation to reduce bird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are a worldwide threat to aviation safety. From 1990 to 2012, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) received Abstract: Aviation safety is an important concern in wildlife management as bird strikes risk human lives. Further, the FAA estimates that only about 20% of bird strikes are reported. The probability of bird

  15. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):296297, Fall 2009 Richard A. Dolbeer: scientist, innovator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a series of interagency agreements with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to conduct research on wildlife hazards to aviation. In collaboration with the FAA, Richard and scientists under his guidance have.S.A. and the FAA Excellence in Aviation Research award. The Air Line Pilots Associationhonoredhimfor

  16. Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife Caitlin Kight by anthropogenic noise pollution, which is often louder, has a different frequency emphasis, and may occur over a different temporal scale, than natural noise. Although a handful of studies have indicated that acoustically

  17. Incorporating risk into the feasibility assessment of alternative brush management strategies for the Welder Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Keith D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    grazed for almost 100 years up until 1954. In that year, a portion of the ranch was designated as the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation and work began to accurately account for the range operations. At this time, it was estimated that the total...

  18. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

  19. Wildlife conservation and reduced emissions from deforestation in a case study of Nantu National Park,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Wildlife conservation and reduced emissions from deforestation in a case study of Nantu National Measures of success a b s t r a c t Discussions on how to reduce carbon emissions from deforestation of the role of protected area (PA) status in reducing tropical deforestation. This study employs a range

  20. COMPARATIVE PROPERTIES OF BAGASSE PARTICLEBOARD School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARATIVE PROPERTIES OF BAGASSE PARTICLEBOARD Qinglin Wu School of Forestry, Wildlife panels (6.35 mm x 1.22 m x 2.44 m in size) were manufactured from hammer milled bagasse. A combination be successfully developed. Keywords: bagasse, laminate floor, particleboard, pMDI, stability, and strength

  1. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  2. Landowners' perceptions on coordinated wildlife and groundwater management in the Edwards Plateau†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limesand, Craig Milton

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Land, Water, and Wildlife Habitat Dynamics in Texas............................. 7 Aquifers of the Edwards Plateau.............................................................. .9 Groundwater Conservation Districts... from the Edwards-Trinity and Trinity aquifers in three central Texas counties. ??????????????????............... 11 2. Appraisal list statistics of counties in sample population, grouped by region...

  3. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project of potential risk to the species. #12;Corn Snake ­ Fairly common in Delaware, but is not likely to be present

  4. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):216225, Fall 2009 Personal and corporate liability in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    managers and operators are being sued personally for human injuries and death, as well as property damage, state, and provincial wildlife management programs have contributed to population increases in large that airport operators and managers must address the issues of organizational and personal liability. Airport

  5. The Web Services Vision Definition of Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheverst, Keith

    1 The Web Services Vision Overview Definition of Web Services Key concepts Difference from traditional web model Context Service-oriented architecture Distributed computing Overview Microsoft .NET vision Web Services Difference from traditional web model Context Service-oriented architecture

  6. Personal Services Agreements Waivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , State Controller's Office). All personal services contract activity will be reported through the state

  7. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  8. Service Level Agreement University ServicesPurchasing with University Services customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Peter

    be determined individually with each customer for each service contract. USP provides services that can

  9. Aster jessicae Jessica's aster Status: State Endangered, USFWS Species of Concern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Gss; General Description Robust

    creeping rhizomes that tends to grow in large clumps. Plants grow to be 5 feet tall, but average about 3 feet. The herbage, particularly the upper portion, is covered with a dense, uniform, soft pubescence. Leaves are abundant, broadly lance-shaped and entire. Middle stem leaves generally partially clasp the stem and lower leaves tend to dry up and wither as the season progresses. Flowers are generally numerous, lavender in color, 1-1.5 inches in diameter, and form a broad cluster at the top of the plant. Identification Tips: A. jessicae is distinct in its unusually robust nature, dense pubescence, and cordate leaf bases. The only other aster found in the vicinity of Jessicaís aster is A. occidentalis var. intermedius. This species generally inhabits more mesic microhabitats, has smaller flowers, is less robust, possesses few to no hairs, and lacks cordate leaf bases. Phenology: Flowering occurs in late summer and early fall (from late July through mid September). Fruit and seed maturation occurs in September and early October, with seed dispersal likely in mid to late October. Range: Local endemic; southeastern WA (Whitman Co.) and adjacent ID. Occurs in the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Habitat: The species occurs in Palouse grasslands and prairie/ forest transition zones, often in association with small drainages, but above water level on dry ground, 2500-2800 feet in elevation. It occurs primarily in the following habitat types (Daubenmire 1970): ponderosa pine/snowberry, Idaho fescue/snowberry, black hawthorn/snowberry, Idaho fescue/Nootka rosa, and Douglas fir/ ninebark. Other associated species include bluebunch wheatgrass, balsamroot, and yarrow. ©1955 University of Washington Press. Illustration by John H. Rumely. Known distribution of

  10. of these taxa have been proposed for listing under the Federal Endangered Species Act (USFWS 1991).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including road con- struction, mineral extraction, processing plant construc- tion and deposition of waste

  11. File:BLM-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of this preview: 463 √óApschem.pdf

  12. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3910, Forestry and Natural Resources Practicum, the intern must complete

  13. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3900, Forestry and Natural Resources Internship, the intern must work

  14. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):139149, Spring 2014 Evaluation of foliar sprays to reduce crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the anthraquinone-based product, Avipel (44 minutes/day) than on reference plots (132 minutes/day; P and economical in the field. Key words: anthraquinone, Canada geese, crop damage, human­wildlife conflicts

  15. Information Management Software Services IMS Services Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Management Software Services IMS Services Overview You know how powerful and important performance and available manner. This requires that the IMS systems, applications, databases, and supporting and then create a written report on recommendations to improve setup, procedures and processes associated

  16. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Signature Service Oil Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    UNM Staff EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Jiffy Lube Signature Service Oil Change Fast - No Appointment We change your oil with up to 5 quarts of major brand motor oil We install a new oil fi We visually inspect. ASE training programs ∑ Jiffy Lube uses top quality products that meet or exceed vehicle warranty

  17. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II - ESTIMATED ANNUAL COST OF OWNERSHIP EXCLUSIVE OF CAPITAL CHARGES 28. REAL ESTATE TAXES 29, and zip code) SECTION I - ESTIMATED ANNUAL COST OF SERVICES AND UTILITIES FURNISHED BY LESSOR AS PART) represent my best estimate as to the annual costs of services, utilities and ownership. 34. SIGNATURE

  18. Center for Health & Counseling Services Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    College How is West Nile diagnosed? If a health care provider suspects WNV, samples of the patient's bloodCenter for Health & Counseling Services Health Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430 Nile Virus outbreak is the biggest since the virus was first identified in the United States, health

  19. Nonresident Alien Professional Services Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Nonresident Alien Professional Services Contract (This Contract form should be completed before Services: #12;Nonresident Alien Professional Services Contract Michigan State University is an affirmative

  20. WHY ARE STREAMWHY ARE STREAM IMPROVEMENTSIMPROVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    of degraded stream are in need of36,000 miles of degraded stream are in need of restoration (USFWS)restoration Restore, enhance and protect riparian wildlife corridors STREAM RESTORATIONSTREAM RESTORATION The process ecological value Stream restorationStream restoration is an improvementis an improvement to cha

  1. Flexible Service Choreography†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Adam

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service-oriented architectures are a popular architectural paradigm for building software applications from a number of loosely coupled, distributed services. Through a set of procedural rules, workflow technologies ...

  2. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  3. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  4. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  5. UGIES Midstream Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UGI Corporation UGI Energy Services, LLC. 2 UGI Corporation Domestic Propane International Propane Midstream & Marketing Regulated Utilities UGI Utilities UGI...

  6. Transmission Services J7000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Business Unit - J7300 CRSP - DSW - RMR Open Access Transmission Tariff Management Transmission Service Requests Interconnection Requests OASIS...

  7. Wellness services --Promoting relaxation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    . Complimentary fruit-infused water and assorted hot teas are available before or after services. All of our

  8. United States Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the yolume and value of the catch, productio n of manufactured fishery products, freezings and cold storage , manufacturer s of fishery byproducts, and cold- storage operators freezing or stqring fish and shellfish By C. E. Peterson · To operate efficiently, an industry must have readily available accurate current

  9. tat-es Department of the Interior, j. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert ~!r. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and deter~ination *F.L. 206 Fish Processing Machinen', F.1. 207 Q,uick Freezing and Cold storage of Fish, F. Reay, Dep3.rtnent of SCier:tific and Industrial Research, and Lt. H. ~. M. Farrer, Herring Industry

  10. United states Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary ~"ish and Wildlife Service, Albert !,~. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing l3.!1d Cold Storage of Fish, F.L. 208 SI'loke Curing of Fish, F.L. 209 The Pr~serv9.tion of Fish, Department of Soientific and Industrial Research, and Lt. H. "':. ~.~. Farrer, Herring Industry Board, for th difficulty of obtaining hand labour for ttis job in the future, the Herring Industry Board are mucli c

  11. united States Department of the Interior, J . A. Krug, Secre ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Da y , Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · · · · · · · 2 Glas s j ars · · · · · · · · · · ·Cold storage looker faoilities. · 2 Appli oation of sharp freez, and if the fish are not held beyond a reasonable period prior to packaging and freezing. COLD STORAGE LOCKER

  12. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert r~:. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    70 percent oil): 1/ This leaflet supersedes Sep. 100) a reprint from Fishery Market News, April 1945 the usual methods in tli~t neither the oil content nor the oil potency are determined. Specifically used to dissolve oil and vitamin A from the . liver sample. s ~ weight of liver sample. f =average

  13. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Stewart L. Udall, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Clarence F. Pautzke, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ___________________________________ 423 The surface dynamic topography ~ __ ____ _______ __ __ 424 Characteristic advection diagrams, surface salinity, and the dynamic topography are described. (2) With the aid of a simplified heat (salt-416 Distribution of the surface temperature 417-422 Distribution of the surface salinity

  14. United states Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Descr1pt1on ∑ ∑ Lift Nets ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Figure 7 Staple Dip Net. Description ∑ Figure 8 RiTer Boat ∑ Description ∑ Figure 14 Four-boat Lift Net. Description ∑ Net ∑ ∑ ∑ Page ∑ 4 5 ∑ 5 8-15 ∑ 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 48 Artificial Bait. ∑ 102 Description ∑ ∑ ∑ 103 Figure 49 Small AnglIng Boat. 104 Description ∑ 105

  15. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, J. A. KRUG, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, ALBERT :M. DAY, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ___ ______________ ___ ___ __ ____ _____ ____ __ _ ___ 207 Structures examined ~ 207 Area of fish from which scale samples were taken Preparation and method of examining scale samples. . ∑______ 209 Examination of scale materiaL ∑______ 209_____________________________________ 208 Collection of scale data__ ____ _____ __ ____ __________ _____ ________ _________________ 208

  16. United States Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Seoretary Fish and Wildlife Service,. Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    facilities ·············· ········ Literature Cited························ ············ List of Tables Page 18 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 21 22 22 22 22 23 24 1. Rates for Electricity in Nome conoerted efforts made by residents and business men of that area to interest government in exploration

  17. United State$ Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risheries, but little attention has been given the use of kites in expanding the vertical fishing range with Danleno. As may oe seen in Figure 2, the method by which toe net is connected to the otter boards or ground cable (sweep) are used in this method of attachment of the otter boards to the net. This setup

  18. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ∑........................ ........................... A rAcomroe~ed procedure for the determination of breaking load∑......... ..S~ , mary strength studi es∑∑∑ ∑∑.∑∑∑∑.∑∑∑ ∑∑ ∑∑ ∑∑..∑ 5 Figur e 2. A typical stress-s train curve for agar gels∑∑ ∑∑ ∑∑∑∑∑∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑∑∑ ∑ ∑∑ 7 Fi gure 3. The breaking load of agar gela of graded concentration∑∑∑∑∑∑∑∑ 12 Fi gure 4. Breaking

  19. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Stewart L. Udall, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Clarence F. Pautzke, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . April 1946, 8 p. Superseded by FL 418. Available publications on fisheries (subject index). By Office of attractive low~cost sea food from the Atlantic cQast. By Wm. C. Herrington and Leslie W. Scattergood. Construction of farm ponds. By Branch of Game-fish and Hatcheries. February 1951, 13 p., 6 figs. Home

  20. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resistance to infection when their diets are high in protein. Another result. of protein in the diet i8. The lack of protein in the morning meal probably accounts for that mid-morning let-down of which we have not follow this breakfast plan is the farmers. They eat hearty breakfasts including foods high in protein

  1. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR , STEWART L. UDALL, SECRETARY Fish and Wildlife Service , Claren ce F. Pautzke , Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the genu BOTTOM - Sex organs, antheridium on left . oogonium on right. These are usually found only eggs. Under experimental conditions, living eggs (which were in no way crowded) were not in- vaded to complete a minimum life cycle of reproductive spore to mycelium to reproductive spore . TRANSMISSION

  2. United States Depar'bnent of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    c~aoi ty ····.·. ......···..···. ···· Lubricating oil cspacit,y ·····..·····.·· Fresh water ca

  3. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Fred A.' Seaton, ,Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MvOll:US pelamis), little tunny (E1£thynnus yaito), and frigate maekerel (A1£xi.~ thazard Skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) .. .. _.. .. ______ 40 Little tunny (Euthynnus yaito of distribution .. "___ __ __ ____ 57 Latitudinal distribution of Katsuwon·u.~ pelamis and Neothu.n- nus mac

  4. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, J. A. KRUG, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, ALBERT M. DAY, Drector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page Spawning of yellowfin tuna (Neothunnus macropterus) and skipjack (Katsu- lI'onus pelamis skipjack (KatsulVonus pelamis) and yello,wfin tuna (Neothunnus macropterus) in the northern Marshall (NEOTHUNNUS MACROPTERUS) AND SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN OFF CENTRAL AMERICA

  5. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OSCAR L. CHAPMAN, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, ALBERT M. DAY, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    skipjack, Ka,tsuwonus pelamis. These young fish, measlUwg 35 mm. and 48 mm. in total length,2 were captmed. Yee,3 caught three additional specimens of juveuile K. pelamis. Total lengths of these Bsh were 20 mm of Kats1twon'us pelamis as shown by Kishinouye (1923), Frade and de Buen (1932), and Godsil and Byers

  6. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of juvenile oceanic skipjack (Kats'/noonus pelamis) 116 Occurrence of bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) 117Ipjack (RiJtIl£Wonltl pelamis) _ Bla~k marli.n (Makaira mazara) ::::::::::::::::::::::::::: White marlm

  7. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Anabiosis V. Preparation for Freezing VI. Methods of Freezing a. General b. Comparison of Methods c. Blast. Aboard Ship VII. Glazing and Surface Protection VIII. Packaging IX. Effect of Freezing a. General b. On Organisms x. Changes in Storage a. General b. Effect of Temperature on Changes o. Desiocation in Storage d

  8. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Frug, Secre.tary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    b. Comparison of Methods c. Blast FreezlDg d. Indirect Contact FreeziDg e. Direct Contact Freezing f-S04 806-807 808 809-822 823-832 --- 833-878 #12;INDEX - Cont. Numbers U. Effect of Freezing 879-GSZ a. General 87~-881 b. On Organisms 882 x. Changes in Storage 883-908 a. Gcnera.l 883-690 b. Effect

  9. United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,w shrimp. 2. Rinse shrimp in cold running water to remove extraneous matter. 3. Soak shrimp in 50-degree are sufficiently cooked). Shrimp may be boiled in salted water, and Step 3 eliminated. 5. Spt"ead the shrimp be given longer processing to impart a heavy smoke flavor and dark color. Drying of the shrimp on the trays

  10. United states Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. pay, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transpor'~a tion ·· ~ ······· ·Uotortruck transportation ···· Coast~~se a~dintercoastal shipping Bureau of AgricUltural Eco~om:tcs of the U. S. Dcpcr-t-:lcnt of AgricUlture ns reported jjy the 1947

  11. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Stewart L. Udall, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development at different constant temperatures ________________________________ 130 Materials and methods_ _________ _ __ _ 130 Account of individual experiments________________________________________ 132 Development at 45į F of the embryo until it became the anus. Gas- trulation resembles teleostean gastrulation in some characteristics

  12. ~..~ I,~.!j"". ------.....-...... --UnIted Stc~tes -Departcient -of the Interio-r-------------Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) as \\Veekl~T unenploY:'1cnt benefits, less wa~es, if any, in exc(o ss of :-:3. (2) Maxir!1WTI nU!:1b,_,r of w

  13. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarchC.DepartmentTexas to Call forDepartmentrefuge

  14. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

  15. Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service Module Implementation for Concept University of Science and Technology Software Systems Institute (STS) #12;Abstract Nowadays web services in order to initiate the communication. A web services endpoint communication interface utilizes

  16. BNL Technical Services Awarded Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BNL Technical Services Awarded Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business of the Year BNL Technical Services Awarded Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business of the Year...

  17. Wildlife conservation education efforts by Information and Education (I&E) divisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Richard Alan

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Wende Swank (Member) 3LI , J hn K. Thomas (Member) Da id Schmidly (Department Head) December 1987 ABSTRACT Wildlife Conservation Education Efforts by Information and Education Divisions (I&E) (December 1987) Richard Alan Stone, B. S.... John K. Thomas in the construction and interpretation of the survey. Not to be forgotten are the survey respondents whose time spent on the surv ey and patience with me on the phone proves that there are commited individuals in conserv ation...

  18. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  19. Business Services Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Business Services Strategic Plan Updated September 2008 New Synergies: Launching Tomorrow's Leaders Discovery with Delivery Meeting Global Challenges Excellence in Business and Support Services #12;Introduction The mission of Business Services at Purdue University is to enable, serve, and support others

  20. Horizon Health EAP Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Andrew

    /09) HorizonCareLinkSM ≠ All the help you need online Horizon Health EAP also provides services through counselors- Child care or elder care services- Pet care and veterinarians- Adoption resources- Health clubsHorizon Health EAP Services Employee Assistance Program with Telephone and 3 Face

  1. Mail Services User's Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information on using Department of Energy (DOE) mail services in accordance with U.S. Postal Service, General Services Administration (GSA), and DOE regulations. Cancels DOE M 573.1-1. Canceled by DOE N 251.89.

  2. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  3. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  4. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  5. Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Reconciling Components and Services The Apam Component-Service Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Reconciling Components and Services The Apam Component-Service Platform Jacky Estublier, German as with SOC. No platform today satisfies both needs. This paper presents the Component-Service model-service platform. Keywords-Service; CBSE, SOC, SOA, service platform, component platform, adaptability . I

  7. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  8. Web Service Interface (API)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6...

  9. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Rates Loveland Area Projects Firm Power Rates Open Access Transmission Tariff Rates Chart of Loveland Area Projects Historical Transmission Rates...

  10. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2015 Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2014 Rates BCP Annual Rate Process Central Arizona Project Transmission Rate Process...

  11. Utility Data Collection Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the utility data collection service and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

  12. IT Security IT Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ∑ Firewall management ∑ VPN Service ∑ SSL certificates ∑ Vulnerability scanning ∑ Tripwire 4 #12;Incident area VPNs 8 #12;SSL Certificates ∑ SSL Server certificates ∑ Coming soon ≠ Extended Validation 9 #12

  13. Energy Service Companies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy service companies (ESCOs) develop, design, build, and fund projects that save energy, reduce energy costs, decrease operations and maintenance costs at their customers' facilities.

  14. Mail Services User's Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed information on using the Department of Energy (DOE) mail services. Canceled by DOE G 573.1-1.

  15. Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1991-1995 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.; Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnken, Conrad V.W.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), presents research findings and guidelines for development and evaluation of innovative culture techniques to increase postrelease survival of hatchery fish. The Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) described in this report is a collection of experimental approaches designed to produce hatchery-reared chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that exhibit wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology. The NATURES culture research for salmonids included multiple tests to develop techniques such as: raceways equipped with cover, structure, and natural substrates to promote development of proper body camouflage coloration; feed-delivery systems that condition fish to orient to the bottom rather than the surface of the rearing vessel; predator conditioning of fish to train them to avoid predators; and supplementing diets with natural live foods to improve foraging ability. The underlying assumptions are that NATURES will: (1) promote the development of natural cryptic coloration and antipredator behavior; (2) increase postrelease foraging efficiency; (3) improve fish health and condition by alleviating chronic, artificial rearing habitat-induced stress; and (4) reduce potential genetic selection pressures induced by the conventional salmon culture environment. A goal in using NATURES is to provide quality fish for rebuilding depleted natural runs.

  16. MasteringWeb Services Security MasteringWeb Services Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preview of MasteringWeb Services Security Preview of MasteringWeb Services Security Konstantin introduction Highlights of the book Web Services security problem XML Security WS-Security Security mechanisms for ASP.NET Web Services Planning and building secure Web Service systems ≠ Architectural and policy

  17. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  18. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-34)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  2. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  3. WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah:Information Wildlife Classified as

  4. WAC - 232-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah:Information Wildlife Classified

  5. Service Assessment HURRICANE FRAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service Assessment HURRICANE FRAN August 28 - September 8, 1996 U.S.Department of Commerce National-12 Visible, 753 a.m. EDT, September4, 1996. #12;Service Assessment HURRICANE FRAN August 28 Bureau Hurricane Series ERRATA NOTICE One or more conditions of the original document may affect

  6. STORM SURGE WARNING SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    warnings Early indication of storm surges 2 ≠ 10 days before ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System 3-48 hrs1 STORM SURGE WARNING SERVICE SVSD by Jan Kroos Rijkswaterstaat / RIKZ #12;2 Overview ∑ Organisation Storm Surge Warning Service ∑ Allocation of tasks Authorities ∑ Process of Storm Surge Warning

  7. IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    (regardless of insurance coverage), as well as current staff and faculty. We offer medical care, health1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one timeEdu and Haven Courses completed by: August 11, 2014 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH-SERVICES Questions? Contact us at 412

  8. IMMUNIZATION HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    . We offer medical care, health promotion and insurance services, including: Alcohol and Drug1 HEALTH AND IMMUNIZATION GUIDE #12;2 HEALTH SERVICES CHECKLIST Immunization Form due (one time ≠ September 5, 2014 Spring Semester 2015 ≠ January 31, 2015 Summer Semester 2015 ≠ June 15, 2015 WWW.CMU.EDU/HEALTH

  9. Enabling Services Dyslexia Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Enabling Services Dyslexia Support Information for students Support for students with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyspraxia Email: enable@soton.ac.uk Tel: 023 8059 7726 Student Services Centre Building (37) Highfield Campus #12;2 Contents About Dyslexia Support

  10. Enabling Services Dyslexia Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    Enabling Services Dyslexia Support Information for Students Website: www.soton.ac.uk/edusupport/dyslexia Contact details Telephone: 023 8059 7726 Email: enable@soton.ac.uk #12;2 About Dyslexia Support · We are a team of specialist dyslexia practitioners within the University of Southampton's Enabling Services

  11. Dyslexia Services Student Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Dyslexia Services Student Information Handbook 2010 - 2011 Education Support Supporting you to succeed #12;2 Dyslexia Services 45 University Road University of Southampton Highfield Southampton SO17 1BJ Telephone: 023 8059 2759 (internal: 22759) email: dyslexia@soton.ac.uk www.soton.ac.uk/edusupport/dyslexia

  12. SERVICE MANUAL AUTORANGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SERVICE MANUAL AUTORANGING DC POWER SUPPLY AGILENT MODELS 6010A, 6011A, 6012B and 6015A Agilent pay for return of products to Customer. Warranty services outside the country of initial purchase, the Customer shall be entitled to a refund of the purchase price upon return of the product to Agilent

  13. Corporate Information & Computing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen John

    Corporate Information & Computing Services High Performance Computing Report March 2008 Author The University of Sheffield's High Performance Computing (HPC) facility is provided by CiCS. It consists of both Graduate Students and Staff. #12;Corporate Information & Computing Services High Performance Computing

  14. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  15. Frequency Measurement & Analysis Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    NIST Frequency Measurement & Analysis Service #12;A Complete Solution To All Frequency Measurement & Calibration Problems The NIST Frequency Measurement and Analysis Service makes it easy to measure and calibrate any quartz, rubidium, or cesium frequency standard. All measurements are made automatically

  16. DOMESTIC SERVICES FEDERAL EXPRESS UPS US POSTAL SERVICE OTHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    SERVICES FEDERAL EXPRESS UPS US POSTAL SERVICE OTHER ___ First Overnight ___ Air ___ Regular Post _____________________________________ ___ Express Saver ___ Ground FEDERAL EXPRESS UPS US POSTAL SERVICE OTHER ___ Int. First ___ Air ___ Air Mail. Economy _____________________________________ Fill in complete mailing address. FedEx and UPS

  17. Enlisting the support of the Texas birding community into the wildlife management process, with comparisons to Texas waterfowl hunters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifester, Jason Andrew

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example, habitat damage and disturbance of wildlife often occur due to the actions of large numbers of birders in pursuit of a new or rare species (Wilkes 1977; Boyle and Samson 1985). These activities bear resemblance to consumptive use of wildlife... in their overall effect on habitats. Other actions of recreational birders are much like hunters. Birders stalk their quarry. Many birders also keep lists of the species they have identified. When new birds are seen, they are added to the birders' lists...

  18. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Overview...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Overview Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Overview Presentation covers the utility energy service...

  19. Business Agreements Printing & Mail Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Business Agreements Storehouse Printing & Mail Services Receiving Equipment Management Director Planning/ Resource Planning Space ManagementAccounting Services Student Business Services Education Administration Finance and Business Operations Organization Risk Management Finance & Business Operations

  20. Versioning of Web service interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Anamika, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the problem of "design for change" in the context of Web Service based information systems. It describes the current status of architecting Web Services, an implementation of the Service Oriented ...

  1. On-line Service Scheduling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ßWarwick Business School, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, United ... corresponding service policy in order to use the limited service resource efficiently. ... manner, customer requirements, service efficiency, and system workload, etc. ...... of Scheduling: Algorithms, Models, and Performance Analysis (

  2. RESIDENTIAL SERVICES STUDENT CHARTER Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    RESIDENTIAL SERVICES STUDENT CHARTER Introduction This Charter sets out the standards of provision. Residential Services are committed to encouraging diversity and inclusiveness within University residences via the Residential Services Annual Report and the internet. Consultation This Charter was developed

  3. Whole-Organism Concentration Ratios for Plutonium in Wildlife from Past US Nuclear Research Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    johansen, M.; Kamboj; Kuhne, W.

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo-media}) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR{sub wo-media} values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR{sub wo-media} values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt.

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  5. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  6. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  7. Utility Service Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any upgrade to utility service provides an opportunity to revisit a Federal building's electrical loads and costs, but it also may provide an economic way to bundle the upgrade with an onsite renewable electricity project during renovation. Upgrading utility service to the site may involve improving or adding a transformer, upgrading utility meters, or otherwise modifying the interconnection equipment or services with the utility. In some cases, the upgrade may change the tariff structure for the facility and may qualify the property for a different structure with lower overall costs. In all cases, the implementation of renewable energy technologies should be identified during the design phase.

  8. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartment ofServices ServicesServices

  9. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartment ofServicesServices Services

  10. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartment ofServicesServicesServices

  11. Renewable Energy Catalog of Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Catalog of Services U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program November 2014 Renewable Energy Catalog of Services Contacts Contacts Jesse Gary...

  12. Customer Service Reliability Program Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in Transmission Services Planning and Asset Management, in the Customer Service Engineering (TPC) organization. A successful candidate in this position will be a...

  13. Service Request Form Today's Date: ______________________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    User I. SPENDING LIMIT or ESTIMATED PRICE FOR SERVICES: SERVICE DESCRIPTION PRICE EACH NUMBER OF UNITS TOTAL PRICE) _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ b. (NANO-IMMUNOASSAY): Title of Project

  14. GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat impacts, and then examine other anthropogenic sources of avian mortality. Next, we provide a broad

  15. An Energy Services Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beasley, R. C.; Tipton, J. K.; Ehmer, R. C.

    , and power quality needs. The subsidiary will continually search the horizon for emerging technologies to enhance its ability to deliver comprehensive and customized energy solutions. The approach to marketing these services supplements the electric utility...

  16. Monetising cultural ecosystem services?†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinci, Igor

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT In the context of increasing degradation of the environment, the economic valuation of ecosystem services represents an attempt to quantify the contribution of nature to human wellbeing. This approach has been ...

  17. Experiments in service learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banzaert, Amy, 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service learning, an educational method that involves the application of academic work to projects that benefit under-served communities, was explored in two complementary forms. First, the development of an alternative ...

  18. Transmission Services Bulletin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standard Time On the first Sunday in November Transmission Services sets clocks from Daylight Savings Time (PD) back to Standard Time (PS). At 02:00 the time becomes 01:00. In...

  19. Quality of service profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misailovic, Sasa

    Many computations exhibit a trade off between execution time and quality of service. A video encoder, for example, can often encode frames more quickly if it is given the freedom to produce slightly lower quality video. A ...

  20. Enabling Services Dyslexia Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Enabling Services Dyslexia Support information for students website: www.soton.ac.uk/edusupport/dyslexia, George Thomas Building (37), Highfield Campus #12;2 Contents About Dyslexia Support.........................................................11 National and Local Organisations: .....................................12 #12;3 About Dyslexia

  1. Accessibility to dental services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evenden, Craig Andrew

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Accessibility indexes need to be developed that incorporate a number of characteristics that are currently affecting accessibility to dental services. More research needs to be conducted at a local level to provide better advice to health planners and policy...

  2. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartment ofServices Services

  3. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartment ofServicesServices

  4. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartmentServices Services LOAN

  5. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGrads &AlternativeDepartmentServices Services

  6. Service Proveider's Optimal Pricing for PVC and SVC Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Service Proveider's Optimal Pricing for PVC and SVC Service Yuhong Liu and David W. Petr ITTCReport The University of Kansas #12;2 Service Provider's Optimal Pricing for PVC and SVC Service Abstract This report examines ATM Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) and Switched Virtual Circuit (SVC) pricing from the network

  7. NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

  8. Student services fee The student services fee is distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    to services covered by the fee (health plan excluded). Regents Scholarship recipients and Senior CitizenStudent services fee The student services fee is distributed among various student programs/tuition_and_fees/student_ser- vice_fees.html). If you are enrolled for 6 or more credits, you must pay a student services fee of $368

  9. Wildlife Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    stages. At first there are ?flu-like? symptoms such as fatigue, fever, sore throat, nausea and cough- ing. According to the Texas Department of Health, many of those infected develop a small red lesion around the site of the tick or flea bite...

  10. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological resource publications Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and...

  11. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program90803 ResponsivenessPlasma Physics

  12. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program : Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. It can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened or endangered stocks. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. Between 120,000 and 200,000 fish are marked for groups at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  13. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. More than 100,000 fish per group are usually marked at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  14. UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2009-2010 UHS Mission: To enhance learning and student to student-focused services. o A commitment to providing culturally competent and respectful services to all Services meets the changing needs of all university students in a culturally competent and respectful

  15. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  16. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

  18. Service Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 -No Service will be provided.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Level 0 ≠ Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: Hazardous Material, mechanical, storage, issue, stockService Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 - No Service will be provided. Service Level 1- Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: offices, copy, file, mail, hallways, vestibules

  19. About Genco Energy Services Genco Energy Services has been servicing the rental equipment needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    About Genco Energy Services Genco Energy Services has been servicing the rental equipment needs of the oil business since 1996. The company leases more than 2,000 pieces of equipment like light towers. Situation Working in the fast-paced oil industry, Genco Energy Services could not track its large inventory

  20. Domain-specific Web Service Discovery with Service Class Descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocco, D; Caverlee, J; Liu, L; Critchlow, T J

    2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents DynaBot, a domain-specific web service discovery system. The core idea of the DynaBot service discovery system is to use domain-specific service class descriptions powered by an intelligent Deep Web crawler. In contrast to current registry-based service discovery systems--like the several available UDDI registries--DynaBot promotes focused crawling of the Deep Web of services and discovers candidate services that are relevant to the domain of interest. It uses intelligent filtering algorithms to match services found by focused crawling with the domain-specific service class descriptions. We demonstrate the capability of DynaBot through the BLAST service discovery scenario and describe our initial experience with DynaBot.

  1. Spatial and temporal patterns of Lycium carolinianum Walt., the Carolina Wolfberry, in the salt marshes of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butzler, Rachel Elizabeth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which are utilized by the cranes each winter. Past research indicates that the Carolina wolfberry (Lycium carolinianum) contributes 21-52% of crane energy intake early in the wintering period (Chavez 1996...

  2. Improving the Predictable Assembly of ServiceOriented Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malloy, Brian

    services. All of the services are constrained by the web service contract, as expressed by the Web Service

  3. Improving the Predictable Assembly of Service-Oriented Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malloy, Brian

    services. All of the services are constrained by the web service contract, as expressed by the Web Service

  4. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  5. Services Bldg. Veterinary Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    of Agriculture--138 Curtiss Hall--D4 Cy-Ride--Ames Bus Facility--I3 Financial Aid--12 Beardshear Hall--C4--A4 Student Services Building--B4 University Book Store--Memorial Union--D5 College of Agriculture Nuclear Engineering Sweeney Hall Durham Center Coover Hall Snedecor Hall Atanasoff Communications Building

  6. Housing services Zinfandel Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Housing services Zinfandel Hall (707) 664-2541 Fax: (707) 664-4158 e-mail: ssu.housing@sonoma.edu www.sonoma.edu/housing On-Campus Housing The Residential Community provides comfortable, convenient cam- pus housing for 3,000 single students. The Community is a unique mix of nontraditional resident

  7. Safety & Environmental Protection Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    of care in waste storage and disposal is available on Safety and Environmental Protection Service's (SEPS sustainably and to protect the environment and, in line with this, recycles waste wherever practicable to biological properties). In addition some activities produce radioactive waste. Radioactive waste

  8. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  9. Services Breakout: Expressiveness Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    industry standards? a) What to accomplish? b) How? 5. Address specific DAML+OIL challenges for DAML with existing standards ≠ WSDL, uPnP, Corba?, ... #12;1 (cont'd.) Requirements ∑ "Web of Services" ≠ Compositional architecture ≠ API mechanisms supporting modularity, reuse ≠ Distinguish API from implementation

  10. Handleiding Remote Desktop Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    Handleiding Remote Desktop Service Versie: 1.3 Remote Desktop Datum: 29-08-2013 #12;2 Configureren Remote Desktop Connection 1) Type in de zoekbalk van Windows 7: "remote" of "mstsc" en start de applicatie "Remote Desktop Connection" zoals in onderstaand voorbeeld wordt getoond. 2) Selecteer "Show

  11. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    responsibility. Embracing the policies of the larger university, Parking and Transportation Services has institution, to take a leadership role in encouraging environmental responsibility on a statewide level Development at the U of M ≠ for purchasing practices from diverse suppliers ∑ 2010 Transit System of the Year

  12. LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    LIBRARY SERVICES LIBRARY HOURS Up-to-date library hours are posted at http Wesleyan ID that is linked to the library circulation database is needed to charge out library materials to visit the Circulation Office in Olin Library 115 to set up their borrowing privileges. If you have

  13. Library Services Customer Charter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    Library Services Customer Charter Our commitment to you is to: ∑ ensure your needs are the focus you informed of progress. To help us achieve this we ask you to: ∑ treat your fellow users and library staff with respect and courtesy ∑ carry your College ID or Library membership card in order to access

  14. OKLAHOMA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    OKLAHOMA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY of animal manure in acid and neutral soils. One study conducted in Eastern Oklahoma a few years ago found and reduce aluminum toxicity. In Oklahoma, many fields are acidic and animal manure would be an good

  15. Residential Services Headlease residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Residential Services Headlease residents handbook 2013-2014 #12;Map of Brighton inside front cover packs Rent 5 Residential Advisor (RA) network 6 Senior residential advisors Residential Student Support Contents Contents Brighton 1 #12;Welcome Congratulations on securing your place at Sussex. Residential

  16. Service Entry Delivery Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Catheter Lab Boiler House Main Entry Short Street ChapelStreet Vehicle Exit 23. Gray Street Car ParkingService Entry Waste Handling Area Delivery Area Admissions Entrance Inquiries Desk Cafeteria Coffee in July 2000 Vehicle Entry Emergency Main Entrance TOKOGARAHRAILWAYSTATION LEGEND Areas under construction

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

  18. Revision Date: May 22, 2014 MATERIAL & DISBURSEMENT SERVICES, DISBURSEMENT SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Revision Date: May 22, 2014 MATERIAL & DISBURSEMENT SERVICES, DISBURSEMENT SERVICES Web Vendor Purpose: The web vendor system is an electronic solution for departments to update and add a vendor with Online Check Request, Web Travel, and InDEPTh. #12;Material & Disbursement Services Training for Web

  19. Lead User's theory adapted to services: Towards Service User's Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    1 Lead User's theory adapted to services: Towards Service User's Toolkit E. Stevens Prof under the perspective of networks and communities. Lead User's theory (LUT) focused mainly is to adapt lead user's theory and practice to the specific case of the intangible processes and services

  20. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services Review Group Type Activity Grant the obligation to comply with Public Health Services terms and conditions if a grant is awarded as a result/PI SUBTOTALS CONSULTANT COSTS EQUIPMENT (Itemize) SUPPLIES (Itemize by category) TRAVEL INPATIENT CARE COSTS