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Sample records for wildlife refuge anwr

  1. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  2. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  3. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  4. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: National Wildlife Refuge System...

  5. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1002 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by the USGS are Indicated fig2.jpg (30091 bytes) Source: Edited from U.S. Geological Survey, "The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska," Open File Report 98-34, 1999.

  6. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

  7. Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge December 21, 2012 - 11:27am Addthis The Rocky Flats Plant was first established in 1951 as a nuclear weapons manufacturing facility. Today, almost 4,000 acres make up the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. Located just 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, the refuge provides a habitat for migratory birds and mammals. | Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Rocky Flats Plant was first established in

  8. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  9. Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions March 16, 2005 - 10:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement today regarding Senate approval of ANWR provisions in the budget resolution: "The Senate's vote today to clear the way for environmentally responsible oil and gas exploration in a small portion of ANWR is a victory for American consumers, America's economy and America's

  10. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  11. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of...

  12. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  13. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  14. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  15. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Abbreviations

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AEO: Annual Energy Outlook AEO2012: Annual Energy Outlook 2012 AFUE: Average Fuel Use Efficiency ANWR: Artic National Wildlife Refuge ARRA2009: American Recovery and...

  16. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The ...

  17. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    between Pantex, West Texas A&M University, and the U.S. Geological Survey's Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Texas Tech University.

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development

  19. igure 1. Map of N. Alaska and NW Canada Showing the Locations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure 1. Map of Northern Alaska and Northwestern Canada Showing the Locations of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), 1002 Area,...

  20. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area of 1.5 million acres. The ANWR Coastal Plain Area includes the 1002 Area, State of Alaska lands to the 3-mile limit from the coast line, and approximately 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands.

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS.

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information

  3. igure 1. Map of N. Alaska and NW Canada Showing the Locations of the NPR-A,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ANWR, 1002 Area, Current Productive Area, and TAPS 1. Map of Northern Alaska and Northwestern Canada Showing the Locations of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), 1002 Area, Current Productive Area, and Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) fig1.jpg (122614 bytes) Source: Edited from U.S. Geological Survey, "The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska," Open File Report 98-34, 1999.

  4. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  5. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  6. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-03

    First they had a vision: welcome people into a building embracing environmental stewardship on land that is steeped in history. The designers of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took this vision and designed a new energy-efficient and environmentally friendly visitor center for the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge located in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

  7. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Wildlife Protecting Wildlife We monitor and protect the wildlife and their habitats on Laboratory property. February 2, 2015 Mule deer on LANL property LANL has been home to mule deer since its creation in 1942 and has seasonally been home to elk since their reintroduction to New Mexico in the 1960s. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Protecting our wildlife Since the early 1940s, LANL's

  8. Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable Oil at 95 Percent, Mean, and 5 Percent Probabilities for Given Oil Prices as a Percentage of Technically Recoverable Oil for the ANWR 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope fig8.jpg (38547 bytes) Source: United States Geological Survey, "Economics of Undiscovered Oil in the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge," 1998

  9. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- tory birds and other wildlife. The design team's vision became a reality when the new visitor's center opened its doors in 2010. The 5,879-square foot building provides a starting point for visi- tors to to learn about the wildlife on the refuge. The facility also houses hands-on exhibits, office and classroom space, and a nature-themed store. "The design of this visitor center exemplifies the U.S. Fish and

  10. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Encounters Report Wildlife Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email If you find an injured bird, contact the Santa Fe Raptor Center. Have a close encounter? Report the following Any wildlife incidents or encounters Migratory bird injury or

  11. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Planning and Policy organization (EWP) in the Division of Environment, Fish & Wildlife, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and reports to the EWP manager....

  12. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

  13. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact...

  14. Breaking Barriers Wildlife Refreshment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barriers Wildlife Refreshment Walker becomes first black battalion commander. NSTec Aviation Safety Officer, RSL team honored by DOE. NNSS helping wildlife with new watering holes. See pages 8. See page 4. NSTec and UNLV Bring Technology Community Together at PDV Workshop In June 2014, National Security Technologies (NSTec) and University Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) co- hosted a Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) Workshop at the UNLV Science and Engineering Building (SEB). More than 125 attendees

  15. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address: 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place:...

  16. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name: Fish and Wildlife Service Place: Washington, DC Year Founded: 1940 Phone Number: (303) 275-2370...

  17. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  18. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife (NDOW) is the state agency responsible for the restoration and management of fish and wildlife resources, and the promotion of boating safety on Nevada's waters. NDOW is...

  19. Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address: 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80203 Phone Number: (303) 866-3437...

  20. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Abbreviation: WDFW...

  1. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  2. California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

  3. DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National Wildlife Refuge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the transfer of nearly 4,000 acres of its former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's...

  4. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  6. wildlife | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    wildlife | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home

  7. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  8. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Wildlife Diversity Plans used to guide the State of Oregon's Department of Fish and Wildlife when managing non-game wildlife. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural ...

  10. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, ...

  11. Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans...

  12. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not...

  13. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Provides guidance on conservation oriented development. Authors State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Organizations State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Published...

  14. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Parks and Wildlife Department Name: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address: 4200 Smith School Rd Place: Austin, TX Zip: 78744 Phone Number: (512) 389-4800 Website:...

  15. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - ...

  16. Post-Closure Land Jurisdiction Transfer to the US Fish and Wildlife Service at Rocky Flats: Surviving the Safari Through Old Records and Other Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiesswohl, S.; Hanson, M.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site (Rocky Flats), located near Denver, Colorado, was listed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Subsequent cleanup and closure activities were completed in October 2005 and the final remedy was selected in September 2006. The remedy is 'no further action' for the generally un-impacted Peripheral Operable Unit (OU), formerly known as the Buffer Zone, and institutional and physical controls with continued monitoring for the Central OU, formerly the industrialized area. The Peripheral OU has been deleted from the NPL and jurisdiction over the majority of land in that OU (3,953 acres) was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) on July 12, 2007, to establish the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. The remaining approximately 929 acres in the Peripheral OU were retained by DOE's Office of Legacy Management where outstanding mineral leases and mining operations exist. As mineral rights are purchased or mining operations and mineral leases are completed and fully reclaimed, jurisdiction of portions of the 929 acres will also be transferred to USFWS for inclusion into the refuge. During the almost 2 years since cleanup and closure work was completed at Rocky Flats, DOE and USFWS have worked the specific legal parameters, timing, and constraints of the 3,953-acre transfer. Many lessons have been learned, based on these early experiences. (authors)

  17. The Wildlife Society 22nd Annual Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wildlife Society‚Äôs 22nd Annual Conference will be held Oct. 17‚Äď21, 2015, in Winnipeg, Canada. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Sustainability Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking on how partnerships with key stakeholders lead to the research, development, and demonstration of technologies that produce advanced bioenergy and bioproducts from lignocellulosic and algal biomass. Several activities supported by BETO provide insights into how habitat and wildlife can be considered when designing bioenergy systems. Strong public and private collaboration can help meet simultaneous goals of expanding the bioeconomy while also incorporating the needs of wildlife, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and providing other environmental and socio-economic benefits.

  18. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of...

  19. OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  20. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  1. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  2. TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife...

  3. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference October 13, 2015 8:00AM MDT to October 15,...

  4. US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower...

  5. 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife Properties | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife PropertiesLegal Abstract Regulations governing all wildlife...

  6. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  7. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  8. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wildlife Fund Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund World Wildlife Fun (WWF) works in 100 countries and is supported by 1.2 million members in the United States and close to 5 million globally in their conservation efforts. WWF's unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation in science, involves action at every level from local to global, and ensures the delivery of innovative solutions that

  9. Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife October 27, 2015 - 9:33am Addthis Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife Jocelyn Brown-Saracino Jocelyn Brown-Saracino Environmental Research Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Thanks to a first-of-its-kind in-depth study of wildlife distribution and movements, the nation's Eastern Seaboard is better prepared than

  10. Micrometeorological data for energy-budget studies near Rogers Spring, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, W.D.; Rapp, T.R.

    1996-05-01

    The data were collected at two sites near Rogers Spring for use in energy-budget studies beginning in 1994. The data collected at each site included net radiation, air temperature at two heights, dew- point temperature at two heights, windspeed at two heights, soil heat flux, and soil temperature in the interval between the land surface and the buried heat-flux plates.

  11. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting | Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting This presentation was given on March 29, 2013, by Kristen Johnson to the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and addresses BETO's work and sustainability efforts. PDF icon

  12. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    This preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities are analyzed: Habitat protection; Habitat enhancement; Operation and maintenance; and Monitoring and evaluation. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  14. NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (45) Apply Africa filter...

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability ...

  16. Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A current challenge facing wind energy developers in the United States is how to protect wildlife while responsibly deploying and operating this reliable source of clean energy. As ...

  17. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  18. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  19. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  20. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  1. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  2. India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Environment, Forests and Wildlife1 Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers...

  3. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of...

  4. EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

  5. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on harvest methods, forest service, and more.

  6. OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    availability: http:crossref.org Citation Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOAR-Division100-WildlifeDiversityPlan&oldid792434" Feedback Contact...

  7. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  8. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  9. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  10. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  11. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  12. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973Legal Abstract This page links to...

  14. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  15. FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: FSM 2600...

  16. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rules and Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations Abstract This web page lists...

  17. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  18. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainably’s...

  19. Title 50 CFR 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50...

  20. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  1. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  2. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  3. WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 232-12-014...

  4. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming Abstract Covers the basics of mitigation...

  5. Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Primer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer Abstract Covers the basics of...

  6. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Address: 1594 W North Temple, Suite 2110, Box 146301 Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84114-6301 Phone Number: 801-538-4745 Website:...

  7. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential | Department of Energy Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential February 24, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Adding offshore wind to the U.S. renewable energy portfolio promises access to a large,

  8. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  9. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  10. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  11. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  12. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  13. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  14. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan ... Division of Migratory Bird Management U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Daniel Martin I.M. ...

  15. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a...

  16. File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife...

  17. I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife...

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REFUGE AUGUSTA STUTTGART HELENA WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE GREERS FERRY RESERVOIR N Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * Watershed Comprises -...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2009 (final).ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REFUGE AUGUSTA STUTTGART HELENA WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE GREERS FERRY RESERVOIR N Little Rock District, Southwestern Division *Watershed Comprises -...

  20. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as ďAlternative 6, Balanced Action (BPAís Preferred Alternative).Ē This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  1. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim

    2008-11-03

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  2. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  3. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  4. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  5. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  6. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  7. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  8. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) What is WILD? The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and main- tained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic power systems, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife. For the wind energy sector, WILD serves as an

  9. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given on March 29, 2013, by Kristen Johnson to the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies and addresses BETO's work and sustainability efforts.

  11. 2010 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Jim Burby Forrest Cameron Lisa Langelier Karl Lautzenheiser U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Inland Northwest National Wildlife Refuge Cheney, ...

  12. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Debbie Beck, Tiffany Breske, Andrew McDermott, James Nissen, Craig Swedenborg U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge...

  13. Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

    1993-04-01

    The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

  14. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J.

    1997-06-26

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  15. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  16. An ecosystem approach to fish and wildlife conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeper, N.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) has embraced an ecosystem approach as a more effective way to protect and conserve the nation`s wildlife and the habitat upon which it depends. This does not represent a sharp reversal in our past policies. Rather, it formalizes, builds upon, and expands past efforts that were already moving away from short-term fixes and toward long-term solutions; away from artificially mimicking natural processes and towards restoration of natural processes. The Service reorganized nationwide and established cross-program watershed-based teams to overcome internal barriers and to better incorporate input from our partners. Although watershed are an important way to delineate boundaries, boundaries are actually issue-dependent and therefore quite fluid. Two examples of an ecosystem approach demonstrate the Service`s commitment to policies, decisions, and actions that are based on ecological principles, stress prevention over restoration, support long-term solutions based on natural time scales and over large geographic areas, and consider input from our partners.

  17. 1995 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-25

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys performed at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) from January through December of 1995 as compared with results from previous years. These surveys were performed as part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and describing fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in species using RFETS. The NRPCP provides support to the Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as Natural Resource Trustee, and provides data essential to accomplishing the goal of preserving the unique ecological values of RFETS in keeping with the Rocky Flats Vision presented in the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Public Comment Draft. Wildlife population densities vary due to natural pressures and human influences, and only long-term monitoring can verify which factors influencing wildlife populations are the consequence of natural fluctuations, and which are due to human influences. The wildlife monitoring described in this report provides qualitative data that give an indication of the ecological health of RFETS. Monitoring numbers, habitat affinities, and apparent health of the wildlife populations makes it possible to evaluate the overall ecological health of the site. Monitoring and surveys such as those carried out by the NRPCP can indicate trends of this sort, and act as an {open_quotes}early warning system{close_quotes} for impending ecological problems.

  18. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-24

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  19. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  20. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  1. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data | Department of Energy Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. PDF icon Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to

  2. Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiilsgaard, Chris

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

  3. 516 DM Chapter 8 Managing the NEPA Process U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 Managing the NEPA Process U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: 516 DM Chapter 8 Managing...

  4. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 603 FW 2 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 603 FW 2PermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook...

  5. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road ClosingsPermitting...

  6. OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 635-415 -...

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  8. WAC - 232-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    32-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 232-12-064 Live...

  9. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  10. Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Plants | Department of Energy Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind Energy Plants Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind Energy Plants April 14, 2015 - 1:08pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced more than $1.75 million for five projects that will develop and demonstrate technologies to reduce the potential impacts of wind farms on sensitive bat species. A current challenge facing wind energy developers in the United States is how to

  11. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  12. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  13. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  14. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  15. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  16. Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

  17. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  18. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  19. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  20. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  1. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  2. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  3. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  4. New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

  6. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  7. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  8. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information

  9. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral

  10. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National

  11. Striving to Reduce Environmental Impact Inside and Out | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Striving to Reduce Environmental Impact Inside and Out Striving to Reduce Environmental Impact Inside and Out November 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis The 112-panel solar photovoltaic system at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge's visitor center and administrative building generates about 35% of the facility√ʬĬôs average electricity needs. | Photo courtesy of Parker River National Wildlife Refuge The 112-panel solar photovoltaic system at Parker River National Wildlife Refuge's visitor

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  13. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  14. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W.

    2010-08-04

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  15. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

    2010-09-01

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability Lead Bioenergy Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy 2 Overview * National priorities and the Renewable Fuel Standard * Overview of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) - Mission - Key RDD&D Activities * DOE's Billion-Ton Update: National Resource Assessment * DOE's Commitment to Sustainability *

  18. A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2010 (final).pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE Lock and Dam No 1 Little Rock District, Southwestern ... Pine Mountain Dam * Authorized in 1965 and reevaluated in 1980 * Authorized plan includes ...

  20. SREL Reprint #3071

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Wildlife Refuge, Brooksville, MS 39739 5U.S. Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette, LA 70506 Abstract: Wood Storks (Mycteria americana)...

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic ...

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the ...

  3. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  4. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  5. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. ... "With the transfer of nearly 4,000 acres from the Department of Energy, the U.S. Fish and ...

  7. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at the Rocky Flats Site...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    as a buffer zone surrounding the former industrial area, was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in July 2007 for a national wildlife refuge. DOE's Office of...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Flats External Resources

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    External Resources Rocky Flats Site, Colorado External Resources Rocky Flats Stewardship Council Disclaimer Rocky Flats Cold War Museum Disclaimer U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Disclaimer Last Updated: 5/1/2013

  9. Regeneration of kaolin mined lands to maximize loblolly pine growth and wildlife habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEvoy, K.E.; Morris, L.A.; Hendrick, R.L.; Ogden, E.A.

    1999-07-01

    Compliance with the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and Georgia Surface Mining Act of 1968 requires that land equal in area to each year's disturbance by reclaimed and a vegetative cover established. Approximately 60% of kaolin mined areas are reclaimed to pine forest. Current methods of reclamation after grading involve fertilization, seeding with a cover crop of grass and legumes, followed by planting of tree seedlings. Restrictive soil physical conditions, a lack of organic matter and nutrients, and competition by cover crop species can reduce survival and growth of loblolly pine seedlings. Also, current cover crop species have only marginal value for wildlife. In this research, the authors evaluated alternative methods of reforestation that (1) control erosion while providing greater benefits for wildlife and reduced competition with loblolly pine seedlings, (2) ameliorate adverse soil physical conditions through deeper tillage (subsoiling vs. disk harrowing), and (3) improve spoil fertility and structure by application of a composted paper mill by-product. Results from field trials indicate control of erosion by wildlife grasses is comparable to seed mixtures currently used in the industry. Subsoiling and disking both had ameliorative effects on soil physical properties with seedling survival at 92% and 88% respectively, compared to 45% of the surrounding area. Composted paper mill by-product served as an additional source of organic matter, nutrients, and protective mulch, thereby enhancing seedling growth as well as ameliorating pine seedlings mulched with the paper mill compost was greater than twice the size of seedlings grown under current reclamation practices.

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  11. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-18

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  12. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  13. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  15. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome

    1988-02-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their studies, biologists help the Lab understand and protect the diversity of the land. Elk on Laboratory Land Taking Care of the Land The Lab's scientific work is balanced...

  17. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Found in Pellets of Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) from Los Alamos, New Mexico Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu...

  18. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    July 24-25, 2012 July 2013 Final Report Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication July 24 - 25, 2012 Silver Spring, Maryland Workshop and report sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Publication Date: July 2013 Jocelyn Brown-Saracino 1 , Courtney Smith 2 , and Patrick Gilman 3 New West Technologies 1 Wind and Water Power

  19. SREL Reprint #3191

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Use of an Artificial Nesting Mound by Wood Turtles (Glyptemys insculpta): A Tool for Turtle Conservation Kurt A. Buhlmann1 and Colin P. Osborn2 1University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29802 2US Fish and Wildlife Service, Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, 241 Pleasant Plains Road, Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 Abstract: We constructed an artificial nesting mound for Glyptemys insculpta (Wood Turtle) in the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, NJ. The original nesting

  20. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  1. NIOSH tests refuge chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-04-15

    A NIOSH report questions the viability of the shelters already certified by West Virginia. 1 tab., 6 photos.

  2. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program : Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald L.; Woodward-Lilengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo J.

    1999-09-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and streams after eggs are laid in the gravel. Supplementation of native fish stocks in conjunction with effective habitat restoration will be the primary means of achieving these biological goals. Overarching goals for the program include: (1) Protection, mitigation, and enhancement of Columbia River Basin native resident fish resources. (2) Develop, increase, and/or reintroduce natural spawning populations of westslope cutthroat trout into reservation waters. (3) Provide both short and long-term harvest opportunities for the reservation community. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-targeted fish populations to a minimum.

  3. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Combs, Mitch

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

  4. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  5. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

  6. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

  7. 2009 Federal Register, 74 FR 50239; Centralized Library: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - FR Doc E9-23556

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0239 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 188 / Wednesday, September 30, 2009 / Notices Dated: July 13, 2009. Cynthia K. Dohner, Acting Regional Director. [FR Doc. E9-23559 Filed 9-29-09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-55-P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R8-ES-2009-N141; 80221-1112- 0000-F2] Amendment of the Clark County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan and Issuance of an Amended Incidental Take Permit, Clark County, NV AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

    1996-09-01

    More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

  9. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Baron, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

    1995-08-01

    Historically, ecological risk assessment at CERCLA sites [such as the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)], has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source operable unit. Consequently the species that are generally considered are those with home ranges small enough such that multiple individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the contaminated site. This approach is adequate for sites with single, discrete areas of contamination that only provide habitat for species with limited requirements. This approach is not adequate however for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. Because wide-ranging wildlife species may travel between and use multiple contaminated sites they may be exposed to and be at risk from contaminants from multiple locations. Use of a particular contaminated site by wide-ranging species will be dependent upon the amount of suitable habitat available at that site. Therefore to adequately evaluate risks to wide-ranging species at the ORR-wide scale, the use of multiple contaminated sites must be weighted by the amount of suitable habitat on OUs. This reservation-wide ecological risk assessment is intended to identify which endpoints are significantly at risk; which contaminants are responsible for this risk; and which OUs significantly contribute to risk.

  10. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

  11. Effects of Alaska Oil and Natural Gas Provisions of H. R. 4 and S. 1766 on U.S. Energy Markets, Addendum

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This addendum provides projections on the increase in U.S. oil production from opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the decease in net petroleum imports, and the change in net petroleum expenditures across a range of cases.

  12. Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the Alaska North Slope fig8.jpg (38547 bytes) Source: United States Geological Survey, "Economics of Undiscovered Oil in the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge," 1998...

  13. Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton not vetoed the ANWR drilling bill in 1995, we would have at least an ...

  14. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Ė Air and Water Volume 2 Ė Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  15. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quickly screen for siting issues at a high level. The model resolution is suitable for state or multi-county siting but users are cautioned against using these models for micrositing. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently released voluntary land-based wind energy guidelines for assessing impacts of a wind facility to wildlife using a tiered approach. The tiered approach uses an iterative approach for assessing impacts to wildlife in levels of increasing detail from landscape-level screening to site-specific field studies. Our models presented in this paper would be applicable to be used as tools to conduct screening at the tier 1 level and would not be appropriate to complete smaller scale tier 2 and tier 3 level studies. For smaller scale screening ancillary field studies should be conducted at the site-specific level to validate collision predictions.

  16. Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10 federal land organizations ó including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges ó in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyomingís borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear.

  17. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix A, Workshop Agenda

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A: Workshop Agenda July 2013 Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication Dates: July 24-25 Location: NOAA's Silver Spring headquarters: NOAA Science Center 1301 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910 July 24 - Science Center 8:00-8:30 - Arrival and check-in (please allow half an hour to go through security and sign- in) 8:30-8:45 - Welcome and Introductions 8:45-9:00 - Meeting Scope and Objectives

  18. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  19. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

  20. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix C, Compendium of Pre-Workshop Answers for Mid-Atlantic Survey & Modeling Efforts

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appendix C: Compendium of Pre-Workshop Answers for Mid-Atlantic Survey & Modeling Efforts July 2013 Appendix C: Compendium of Pre-Workshop Answers 1 Mid-Atlantic Survey & Modeling Efforts Prepared by Participants in Advance of: Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication 1 These responses were provided by workshop participants in advance of the workshop. This appendix records the verbatim responses of participants. 56

  1. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Economic Impact Economic analyses of the various scenarios of this report are not presented. An economic analysis of the ANWR 1002 Area (excluding Native and State lands) performed ...

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Environmental considerations and the possibility of drilling restrictions would directly impact the time interval to reach first production. The USGS economic analysis of the ANWR ...

  3. Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the...

  4. Figure 6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2015.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOUTHWESTERN FEDERAL HYDROPOWER MEETING Chad Dulaney District Water Resources Manager Little Rock, Arkansas 18 June 2015 BUILDING STRONG ¬ģ WHITE RIVER BASIN COMPREHENSIVE STUDY BUILDING STRONG ¬ģ WHITE RIVER BASIN, AR & MO HARRISON NEWPORT JONESBORO PARAGOULD POPLAR BLUFF PIEDMONT LITTLE ROCK FORREST CITY SPRINGFIELD NORFORK CLEARWATER RESERVOIR MISSOURI ARKANSAS Lock and Dam No 1 10 CACHE RIVER LEGEND EXISTING RESERVOIR OR LAKE WHITE RIVER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE CACHE RIVER WILDLIFE

  6. Microsoft Word - springs_restoration_ea_formatted.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR FAIRBANKS SPRING AND SODA SPRING RESTORATION EA #84550-10-01 Submitted to: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge HCR 70, Box 610Z Amargosa Valley, Nevada 89020 775.372.5435 Submitted by: BIO-WEST, Inc. 1063 W. 1400 N. Logan, Utah 84321 September 2009 BIO-WEST, Inc. Environmental Assessment September 2009 Fairbanks Spring and Soda Spring Restoration i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION

  7. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Enclosure File Nos. 84320-2008-F-0416 and 84320-2008-B-0015 been used to determine the relative abundance of desert tortoise throughout the range of this species in the United States (Berry and Nicholson 1984; Luckenbachl982; Karl 1980; Berry 1986). An ELU is an area with similar vegetation, slope, aspect, and soils. A total of 206 ELUs were surveyed for desert tortoises within desert tortoise habitat previously characterized as unknown in the 1996 programmatic biological opinion. Transects

  8. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of covered, raven-proof trash receptacles; disposal of edible trash in trash receptacles following the end of each work day, and disposal of trash in a designated sanitary landfill at the end of each work week. Material placed in a sanitary landfill will be covered daily when the landfill is open, as per NNSAMSO standard operating procedures. h. NNSAMSO submitted a habitat reclamation plan to the Service that describes the methods of stabilizing and revegetating sites (DOE 2004). The goal of

  9. Analyses of Selected Provisions of Proposed Energy Legislation: 2003

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This study responds to a July 31, 2003 request from Senator Byron L. Dorgan. The study is based primarily on analyses the Energy Information Administration has previously done for studies requested by Congress. It includes analysis of the Renewable Portfolio Standard, Renewable Fuels Standard, production in the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge, the construction of an Alaskan Natural Gas pipeline, and various tax provisions.

  10. Figure ES1. Map of Northern Alaska

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Figure ES1. Map of Northern Alaska figurees1.jpg (61418 bytes) Source: Edited from U.S. Geological Survey, "The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska," Open File Report 98-34, 1999. Return to the Executive Summary.

  11. Wildlife Monitoring and Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar series supports the¬†International Energy Agency‚Äôs Wind Task 34 (also known as WREN ‚Äď Working Together to Resolve Environmental Effects of Wind Energy)¬†goal to facilitate international...

  12. Wildlife Densities and Habitat Use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final Report to the Department of Energy EERE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kathryn A.; Stenhouse, Iain J.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Connelly, Emily E.

    2015-10-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project helped address environmental barriers to offshore wind energy development in the mid-Atlantic region by providing regulators, developers, and other stakeholders with comprehensive baseline ecological data and analyses. Project funders and collaborators from a range of academic institutions, non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, foundations, and private companies came together to study bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal distributions, densities, and movements on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf between 2012 and 2014. Specific project activities and goals included the following: (1) Conduct standardized surveys to quantify bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal densities seasonally and annually throughout the study region and identify important habitat use or aggregation areas. (2) Develop statistical models to help understand the drivers of wildlife distribution and abundance patterns. (3) Use individual tracking data for several focal bird species to provide information on population connectivity and individual movements that is complementary to survey data. (4) Identify species that are likely to be exposed to offshore wind energy development activities in the mid-Atlantic study area. (5) Develop U.S.-based technological resources and assessment methods for future monitoring efforts, including a comparison of high resolution digital video aerial surveys to boat-based surveys. (6) Help meet data needs associated with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Marine Mammal Protection Act, and Endangered Species Act requirements, by contributing several years of data and analysis towards future Environmental Impact Statements. This report consists of six parts: Project overview (executive summary and Chapters 1-2); Examining wildlife distributions and relative abundance from a digital video aerial survey platform (Chapters 3-6); Examining wildlife distributions and abundance using boat-based surveys (Chapters 7-12); Integrating data across survey platforms (Chapters 13-19); Individual movements and habitat use for focal bird species (Chapters 20-25); and Nocturnal avian migration monitoring (Chapters 26-27). Boat-based and digital video aerial surveys each had specific advantages and disadvantages, but were largely complementary (Chapters 1, 5, 13-14). Digital aerial surveys were particularly useful for covering offshore areas at broad scales, where general distributions of taxonomic groups were a priority; boat surveys could provide more detailed data on species identities and behaviors, but were more limited in geographic scope due to their slower survey pace. The mid-Atlantic study area was important for wintering and breeding taxa, and its location also made it a key migratory corridor. There was considerable variation in species composition and spatial patterns by season, largely driven by dynamic environmental conditions (Chapters 12, 15, and 20-22). Habitat gradients in nearshore waters, however, were reliable influences on productivity and patterns of species distributions and abundance. Areas within about 30-40 km of the coast offshore of the mouths of Chesapeake and Delaware Bays, as well as to the south of Delaware Bay along the coast, were consistent hotspots of abundance and species diversity, regardless of survey methodology or analytical approach (Chapters 2, 12, 17). Inter-annual variation was substantial, and the importance of certain environmental variables in predicting animal distributions indicates that these species may well respond to future environmental shifts brought about by anthropogenic effects and climatic change. This study is an important first step, however, towards understanding how bird, marine mammal, and sea turtle populations in the mid-Atlantic may be exposed to offshore wind energy development and other anthropogenic activities. The results of this study provide insight to help address environmental permitting requirements for current and future offshore development projects, and serve as a starting point for more site-speci

  13. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  14. Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  15. Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  16. Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kav, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  17. Final Land Configuration for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, R. L.; Kapinos, J. M.; Wehner, J. P.; Snyder, B.; Davis, R. W.

    2006-07-01

    Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has been completed. The future land use of the site is designated as a National Wildlife Refuge. A joint effort between Kaiser-Hill, Department of Energy, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Environmental Protection Agency, State of Colorado, and other stakeholders was initiated to provide direction for developing the final land configuration. Through early identification of issues and developing mutually agreeable solutions, the final land configuration of the site was successfully completed. (authors)

  18. Kenaitze Indian Tribe - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Kenaitze Indian Tribe Kenai, Alaska Department of Energy Renewable Energy Feasibility Study 2005 Report Tribal Context * ~1000 Tribal members; Dena'ina Athabascan traditional culture * Involved in commercial and subsistence fishing (salmon) * Surrounded by oil and gas development * Very little Tribal land (corporation land) * Municipalities and federal land (Kenai National Wildlife Refuge) Tribal Context (Cont'd) * Tribal Programs: - Housing - Cultural - Environmental - Elders - Head Start -

  19. igure 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the Statistical Mean of Recovering 10.3 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska...

  20. Figure 5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 5 Percent Probability of Recovering 16.0 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

  1. Figure 3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 95 Percent Probability of Recovering 5.7 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

  2. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by ...

  3. Figure 3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 95 Percent Probability of Recovering 5.7 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska fig3.jpg (32189 bytes)

  4. Figure 6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of Technically

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Recoverable Oil 6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig6.jpg (41132

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of the Alaska gas pipeline. The opening of ANWR might reduce the gas resource risk of building an Alaska gas pipeline, as the area has an estimated 3.6 trillion cubic...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of the Alaska gas pipeline. The opening of ANWR might reduce the gas resource risk of building an Alaska gas pipeline, as the area has an estimated 3.6 trillion cubic...

  7. World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 References About "For more than 45 years, WWF has been protecting the future of nature. The world's leading conservation organization, WWF works in 100 countries and is...

  8. Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Earth’s climate is changing. In some places such as the Arctic, the change is rapid and profound, while in other areas change has been less dramatic and more gradual. But virtually everywhere,...

  9. EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially...

  10. A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ronald J.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

  11. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Larger than the state of Rhode Island, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) occupies approximately 1,375-square miles (approximately 880,000 acres) in southern Nevada, making it one of the largest restricted-access areas in the United States. The NNSS is surrounded by approximately 6,500 square miles of federal land used for the U.S. Air Force Nevada Test and Training Range, and the Desert National Wildlife Refuge. Located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, the NNSS is vast,

  12. New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include two new iPad apps. "Owls and Bats of Los Alamos," allows museum visitors to identify various species of bats and owls living in local habitats, listen to owl calls,...

  13. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

  15. Final Department of Energy US Fish & Wildlife Service Migratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the conservation and management of migratory birds and ... * Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977, as amended ... of documents, including journal articles, conference ...

  16. An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-15

    The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

  17. Figure 5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 5 Percent

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Probability of Recovering 16.0 Billion Barrels 5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 5 Percent Probability of Recovering 16.0 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska fig5.jpg (3770

  18. Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate of Technically

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Recoverable Oil 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig7.jpg (43335 bytes) Source

  19. igure 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the Statistical

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mean of Recovering 10.3 Billion Barrels 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the Statistical Mean of Recovering 10.3 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska fig4.jpg (4109

  20. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  1. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  2. DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  3. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  4. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  5. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  6. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surovchak, S.; Kaiser, L.; DiSalvo, R.; Boylan, J.; Squibb, G.; Nelson, J.; Darr, B.; Hanson, M.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site was established in 1951 as part of the United States' nationwide nuclear weapons complex to manufacture nuclear weapons components. In 1992 weapons production halted, and the Rocky Flats mission changed to include environmental investigations, cleanup, and site closure. In October 2005, DOE and its contractor completed an accelerated 10-year, $7 billion cleanup of chemical and radiological contamination left from nearly 50 years of production. The cleanup required the decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and removal of more than 800 structures; removal of more than 500,000 cubic meters of low-level radioactive waste; and remediation of more than 360 potentially contaminated environmental sites. The final remedy for the site was selected in September 2006 and included institutional controls, physical controls, and continued monitoring for the former industrial portion of the site. The remainder of the site, which served as a buffer zone surrounding the former industrial area, was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in July 2007 for a national wildlife refuge. DOE's Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of Rocky Flats, which includes remedy implementation activities and general site maintenance. Several factors have complicated the transition from closure to post-closure at Rocky Flats. The early experiences associated with the two years since the physical cleanup and closure work were completed have led to several valuable lessons learned. (authors)

  7. Vascular flora of the Rocky Flats area, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2010-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Site (Site) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility near Golden, Colorado that produced nuclear weapons components during the Cold War. Like many federal properties that have been off-limits to public access for decades, it has become a refugia for biodiversity as surrounding landscapes have been lost to agriculture and urbanization. A floristic study of the area was conducted on approximately 2,505 ha (6,189 ac) and includes the parcels currently managed and operated by DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge). A flora of 630 species of vascular plants in 84 families and 340 genera was documented, including 12 species endemic to the southern Rocky Mountains and seven species considered rare or imperiled by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. The flora of the Site is characterized by a predominantly Western North American floristic element, however, an Adventive floristic element contributes the greatest number of species. The vegetation is dominated by xeric tallgrass prairie and mixed grass prairie, with areas of wetland, shrubland, and riparian woodland.

  8. Vascular flora of the Rocky Flats area, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2010-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Site (Site) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility near Golden, Colorado that produced nuclear weapons components during the Cold War. Like many federal properties that have been off-limits to public access for decades, it has become a refugia for biodiversity as surrounding landscapes have been lost to agriculture and urbanization. A floristic study of the area was conducted on approximately 2,505 ha (6,189 ac) and includes the parcels currently managed and operated by DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge). A flora of 630 species of vascular plants inmore¬†¬Ľ 84 families and 340 genera was documented, including 12 species endemic to the southern Rocky Mountains and seven species considered rare or imperiled by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. The flora of the Site is characterized by a predominantly Western North American floristic element, however, an Adventive floristic element contributes the greatest number of species. The vegetation is dominated by xeric tallgrass prairie and mixed grass prairie, with areas of wetland, shrubland, and riparian woodland.¬ę¬†less

  9. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2005-07-01

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

  10. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2001-06-01

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

  11. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2002-07-01

    Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

  12. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  13. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  14. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Density Surface Models (number of individualskm 2 ) Resolution: 2km 2 165 DSM of Common Loons in winter (individualskm 2 ) Ship-based Line Transect Surveys (DSMs) Winter: Common ...

  15. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret

    2003-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

  16. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2004-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2003 were below average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (79%) and The Dalles Dam (82%). The year 2003 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that met the spring seasonal Biological Opinion flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam, McNary Dam and Priest Rapids Dam. However, summer seasonal flows at Lower Granite Dam and McNary Dam were considerably below the Biological Opinion objectives of 50.7 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam and 2000 Kcfs at McNary Dam. Actual summer seasonal flows were just 32.3 Kcfs and 135.5 Kcfs, respectively. In most instances spill was provided as described by the Biological Opinion program for fish passage, within the constraints of the State waivers for total dissolved gas supersaturation levels. Spill was altered during spill testing and most notably during the month of August at Ice Harbor dam. At this project spill was modified from a 24-hour program to a 12-hour nightly spill period pending the evaluation of studies being conducted in-season. Spill was not returned to full implementation of the Biological Opinion levels even after data showed that spillway passage had the highest associated fish survival. This experience demonstrated the difficulty of managing the hydrosystem for fish passage based on preliminary data and data collected in-season. Increased hatchery releases and higher wild fish production resulted in a population of yearling chinook at Lower Granite Dam being one of the highest observed in recent years. However, the increased hatchery production may have been offset to some extent by decreased survival from release to Lower Granite Dam as suggested by the lower than average survival observed for the PIT tagged trap released fish to Lower Monumental Dam. Travel times were also longer for hatchery spring chinook compared to recent past years. The short duration of high flows that occurred in the Lower Snake River was too late for yearling chinook, but likely was a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

  17. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A.S. Blix, L. Walle and . Ulltang, 69 - 75. The Netherlands: Elsevier Science B.V. ... San Diego: Elsevier. Martin, T. G., B.A Wintle, J.R. Rhodes, P.M. Kuhnert, S.A. Field, ...

  18. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  19. NMAC 19.34.3 Wildlife Habitat and Lands Use of State Game Commission...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico state game commission with the authority to acquire lands, to provide for use of game and fish for use and development for public recreation. Published NA Year Signed or...

  20. US Fish and Wildlife Service biomonitoring operations manual, Appendices A--K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, D.F.; Rope, R.C.; Mondecar, M.; Breckenridge, R.P.; Wiersma, G.B.; Staley, C.S.; Moser, R.S.; Sherwood, R.; Brown, K.W.

    1993-04-01

    Volume 2 contains Appendices and Summary Sheets for the following areas: A-Legislative Background and Key to Relevant Legislation, B- Biomonitoring Operations Workbook, C-Air Monitoring, D-Introduction to the Flora and Fauna for Biomonitoring, E-Decontamination Guidance Reference Field Methods, F-Documentation Guidance, Sample Handling, and Quality Assurance/Quality Control Standard Operating Procedures, G-Field Instrument Measurements Reference Field Methods, H-Ground Water Sampling Reference Field Methods, I-Sediment Sampling Reference Field Methods, J-Soil Sampling Reference Field Methods, K-Surface Water Reference Field Methods. Appendix B explains how to set up strategy to enter information on the ``disk workbook``. Appendix B is enhanced by DE97006389, an on-line workbook for users to be able to make revisions to their own biomonitoring data.

  1. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Richard Veit) * VA CZM Large Whale Surveys (Mark Swingle) * VAMD Section 6 Sea Turtle Surveys (Mark Swingle) * Navy Integrated Comprehensive Monitoring Program (ICMP) (Bob ...

  2. Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-10-15

    Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning process and offers suggestions as to how the technical and institutional issues could have been resolved faster through early adoption of some of the core principles of sound EDSS design.

  3. DOE/BP-3391, 2002 Supplemental Power Rate Case

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 4-21 4.4 Implementation of Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles and Other Fish and Wildlife Issues......

  4. Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Fish and Wildlife...

  5. Homeland security: safeguarding America's future with energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    The State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) presents this 10th annual report following the one-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This event has had profound impacts on all segments of American society, not the least of which is this countryís energy sector. Long before September 11, a number of energy issues grabbed the nationís attention, including opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and natural gas exploration, the power crisis in California, nationwide natural gas and gasoline price increases, and the administrationís May 2001 National Energy Policy. However, the events of September 11 refocused attention on the prominent role energy plays in the countryís homeland security. For the most part, the energy aspects of homeland security have focused on the physical security of critical energy emergency planning and energy infrastructure, such as power plants, refineries, and power and fuel transmission systems. While STEAB recognizes the importance of protecting our existing energy infrastructure, this should not be the sole focus of homeland security as it relates to energy.

  6. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  7. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  8. Resistance and resilience of tundra plant communities to disturbance by winter seismic vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, N.A.; Raynolds, M.K.; Jorgenson, J.C.; DuBois, K.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Effects of winter seismic exploration on arctic tundra were evaluated on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, four to five growing seasons after disturbance. Plant cover, active layer depths, and track depression were measured at plots representing major tundra plant communities and different levels of initial disturbance. Results are compared with the initial effects reported earlier. Little resilience was seen in any vegetation type, with no clearly decreasing trends in community dissimilarity. Active layer depths remained greater on plots in all nonriparian vegetation types, and most plots still had visible trails. Decreases in plant cover persisted on most plots, although a few species showed recovery or increases in cover above predisturbance level. Moist sedge-shrub tundra and dryas terraces had the largest community dissimilarities initially, showing the least resistance to high levels of winter vehicle disturbance. Community dissimilarity continued to increase for five seasons in moist sedge-shrub tundra, with species composition changing to higher sedge cover and lower shrub cover. The resilience amplitude may have been exceeded on four plots which had significant track depression.

  9. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  10. Tru-ly Clean - What Does It Mean?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The evolution and genesis of the definition of transuranic waste (known as TRU) and its application to the cleanup criteria applied to soils contaminated with transuranics, specifically plutonium, has been a matter of discussion at contaminated sites in the United States and elsewhere. Cleanup decisions and the processes that led up to those decisions have varied at several plutonium contaminated sites within the United States and without the pacific region. The sites with radionuclide soil action levels include Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Johnston Atoll, Hawaii; the Hanford Site in Washington State; the Nevada Test Site; the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Colorado; the Chariot Site in north Alaska; and the Maralinga Site in Australia. The soil-action level developed for Rocky Flats by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for plutonium is one of the higher soil-action levels approved by regulatory agencies that is considered protective for future use of land at a cleanup site. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has adopted a relatively conservative cleanup standard to accommodate the subsistence lifestyle of the islanders, while the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has been transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior to be used as a fish and wildlife refuge, a land use that resulted in a less conservative plutonium soil cleanup level. (authors)

  11. Mitigation options for fish and wildlife resources affected by port and other water-dependent developments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dial, R.S.; Deis, D.R.

    1986-06-01

    Ten past restoration projects in Tampa Bay were evaluated. Habitats included Spartina marsh, mangrove forests, Juncus marsh, and subtidal habitat. Success was difficult to determine because goals for each project had not been defined. In-kind losses of habitat occurred in all but one project. Permanent losses occurred in at least three projects. Restoration of Spartina and Juncus marshes was recommended. Mangroves will recruit into Spartina marshes, provided a seed source is available; planting of mangroves alone is not recommended. Seagrass restoration is not recommended at this time. Twelve sites, most less than 50 ha, were identified as potential restoration sites to give 344 ha of subtidal habitat to be made shallower and 176 ha of uplands to be scraped down. The current management program's legal and policy needs for improving environmental management, the role of mitigation, and the information needed to develop mitigation plans are discussed. This report will be useful to decisionmakers concerned with wetland habitat loss and restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida, and other areas with similar habitats.

  12. Appendix C of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the third appendix to the report, the compendium of pre-workshop answers.

  13. Appendix E of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fifth appendix to the report, the bibliography of references.

  14. Appendix A of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the first appendix to the report, the workshop agenda.

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/12-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    take wildlife from the wild without permission from the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The WDFW issues Live Wildlife Taking Permits under WAC 232-12-064....

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/20-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on one of the following: Indian lands; Wilderness areas; Wild and scenic rivers; Wetlands; Units of the National Park System, National Refuges, or National Fish Hatcheries;...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on one of the following: Indian lands; Wilderness areas; Wild and scenic rivers; Wetlands; Units of the National Park System, National Refuges, or National Fish Hatcheries;...

  18. SREL Reprint #3106

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Ecology of Chicken Turtles (Deirochelys reticularia) in a Seasonal Wetland Ecosystem: Exploiting Resource and Refuge Environments Kurt A. Buhlmann1,2, Justin D. Congdon1,...

  19. Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Arizona and the House of Refuge Sunnyslope are partnering to install solar hot water systems at five Phoenix-area housing sites for homeless men.

  20. Strategy for Long-Term Stewardship and Monitoring of Amchitka Island - 12190

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautsky, Mark; Nguyen, Jason; Darr, Paul S.; Picel, Mary

    2012-07-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan (LTSMP) for Amchitka details how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at and around the sites on Amchitka Island. The LTSMP calls for monitoring to be performed every 5 years, at least in the initial phase of the project. The purpose of the monitoring is to develop a baseline of activity concentrations for selected radionuclides in biota, water, and soil, both on Amchitka and at the reference location on Adak Island, approximately 322 km (200 miles) northeast of Amchitka. Data compiled by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP, 2006) are being included as part of the baseline data set. The specific biological, water, and sediment samples collected during the 2011 sampling event were developed through close coordination with the primary stakeholders, including the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Amchitka is managed by the USFWS as part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Two plans were developed to address specific needs of the biological- and the terrestrial-monitoring programs. Results from these monitoring programs will help determine whether the environment is being impacted by radionuclide migration and uptake, and if subsistence and commercial-catch seafood is safe for human consumption. The RESRAD-BIOTA code is being used to evaluate ecological health relative to the radionuclide levels determined from this sampling event. The samples were sent to three laboratories for analysis. With the exception of the seawater samples, most of the samples were sent to the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A smaller subset of rock-weed samples, Star reindeer lichen samples, and soil samples collected from beneath the lichen were sent to UAF for cesium-137 analysis. Marine sediment samples were also collected and sent to UAF for testing. The seawater samples were sent to the University of Miami Tritium Laboratory for enriched tritium analysis. Results from the seawater samples for tritium were received in September 2011. Results from the 2011 sampling are expected to be available on the LM web site in 2012. (authors)

  1. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and seawater samples from the marine and terrestrial environment of Amchitka Island adjacent to the three detonation sites and at a background or reference site, Adak Island, 180 miles to the east. Consistent with the goals of the Amchitka LTS&M Plan, four data quality objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 2011 sampling event.

  2. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Forestry and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Address: Kalanimoku Building...

  3. EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County This review is to ensure that project activities continue to be consistent with the Wildlife...

  4. STATEMENT OF CLAUDIA ANDREWS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER BONNEVILLE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FISCAL YEAR 2017 BUDGETS OF THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, THE NATIONAL OCEANIC ... Bonneville also invests to fulfill regional commitments for fish and wildlife restoration. ...

  5. Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 12, 2013 DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service ... DOE and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have entered ...

  6. WY FONSI DRAFT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife, and their habitats, affected ... To help accomplish this, the Act requires BPA to fund fish and wildlife protection, ...

  7. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Job Summary: This position is located in the Oregon Implementation unit (EWL) of the Fish and Wildlife Program (EW), Environment, Fish and Wildlife (E), Bonneville Power...

  8. EIS-0312: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt the Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) Policy Direction in its Fish and Wildlife...

  9. EIS-0312-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Supplement Analysis for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS (DOE...

  10. EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creek parcels, adjoins the Umatilla National Forest, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Asotin Creek Wildlife Area, and other state lands. Title to the...

  11. ACE-II: Areas of Conservation Emphasis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California's biological richness and biodiversity Organization California Department of Fish & Wildlife Published California Department of Fish & Wildlife, Date Not Provided DOI...

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/3-FD-m | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Fish and Wildlife Service Right-of-Way Application Process (3-FD-m) The National Wildlife...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/12-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not in range. Flowchart Narrative 12-MT-a.1 - Consult Regarding Potential Impacts on Fish and Wildlife Building with Wildlife, a guide developed by private landowners,...

  14. CAPS: Crucial Areas Planning System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    projects, conservation opportunities, and environmental reviews. Organizations Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Published Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Date Not Provided DOI...

  15. 550 FW 3 NEPA Decision Documents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Handbook Abstract Outlines required NEPA documents for FWS NEPA process. Author Fish and Wildlife Service Published Fish and Wildlife Service, 1996 DOI Not Provided Check...

  16. Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wildlife connectivity areas in Montana. The aim of the mapping system is to consider fish, wildlife, and recreational resources earlier on when planning for future development....

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/12-CA-a (1) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (FERC) to consult with state agencies responsible for the oversight and protection of fish, wildlife, and botanical resources. The California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW)...

  18. FWS NEPA Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract Provides overview of FWS's NEPA process. Author Fish and Wildlife Service Published Fish and Wildlife Service, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check...

  19. EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hatchery release evaluation is consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, BPA's Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS and ROD, and the...

  20. APPENDIX A DISTRIBUTION LIST Federal Government Agencies Army...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ms. Kim Turner, Assistant Field Supervisor ESA Regulatory Division Bay - Delta Fish & Wildlife Office U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 650 Capital Mall, Suite 8-300...

  1. Biodiversity Research Institute Mid-Atlantic Baseline Study Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and temporal patterns of wildlife distribution and abundance. Presented by Kate Williams, Wildlife and Renewable Energy Program Director at BRI, this webinar will last...

  2. Microsoft Word - 3-20-12 Final Testimony _Wright_ _BPA_.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... transmission, generation, energy efficiency, and fish and wildlife restoration efforts. ... development and operations on the Columbia River and its tributaries on fish and wildlife. ...

  3. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  4. Using multispectral videography to distinguish the pattern of zonation and plant species composition in brackish water marshes of the Rio Grande Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, F.W.; Lonard, R.I.; Everitt, J.H. [Univ. of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Cyclical flooding of the Rio Grande and movement of floodwater into distributary channels formerly constituted significant freshwater input into the marshes of the Rio Grande Delta, but dams and flood control projects have eliminated this source of freshwater. The marshes are now dependent on rainfall alone for freshwater input and may be experiencing significant change in species of vegetation, abundance and patterns of distribution. Unfortunately, little is known of the ecology of these marshes. As a first step in providing needed information, multispectral videography was used to distinguish species composition and patterns of zonation in a brackish water marsh at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron County, Texas. The line intercept method of vegetation analysis provided ground truth and quantified species distribution and abundance. The vegetation of a typical brackish water marsh is organized into three zones along an elevation gradient. At the lowest elevations there is a distinct zone dominated by maritime saltwort, Batis maritime. At the lowest elevations in this zone where rainwater remains the longest, stands of California bulrush, Scirpus californicus, occur. An intermediate zone supports shoregrass, Monanthochloe littoralis, as the dominant species. A third (highest) zone is dominated by Gulf cordgrass, Spartina spartinae. The upper margin of this zone grades gradually into a shrub-grassland community that occurs on lomas (clay dunes). Each of the zones is distinguished by a distinctive signature in the multispectral videography. The Batis maritime community has a bright pink to red image response. Monanthochloe littoralis has a dark brown color and Spartina spartinae has a light gray to pinkish-tan color. Brackish water marshes may be distinguished from saltwater marshes by the relative positions of the Monanthochloe littoralis and Spartina spartinae communities, but additional data are needed before this possibility is confirmed.

  5. The Wahluke (North) Slope of the Hanford Site: History and present challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-04-16

    The Hanford Site was founded in early 1943 for the top secret government mission of producing plutonium for the world`s first atomic weapons. A great deal of land was needed, both to separate various Site facilities from each other, and to provide buffer zones for safety and security purposes. In total, 640 square miles were occupied by the original Hanford Site and its buffer zones. Much of this land had been earmarked for inclusion in the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project (CBP). After World War II ended, a series of national decisions led to a long-term mission for the Hanford Site, and area residents learned that the Site lands they had hoped to farm would be withheld from agricultural production for the foreseeable future. A long set of negotiations commenced between the federal management agency responsible for Hanford (the Atomic Energy Commission -- AEC), and the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Department of the Interior that managed the CBP. Some lands were turned back to agriculture, and other compromises made, in the Site`s far northern buffer lands known as the Wahluke Slope, during the 1950s. In the mid-1960s, further negotiations were about to allow farming on lands just north of the Columbia River, opposite Hanford`s reactors, when studies conducted by the BOR found drainage barriers to irrigation. As a result of these findings, two wildlife refuges were created on that land in 1971. Today, after the Hanford Site plutonium production mission has ended and as Site cleanup goes forward, the possibility of total release of Wahluke Slope lands from the control of the Department of Energy (DOE -- a successor agency to the AEC) is under discussion. Such discussion encompasses not just objective and clearly visible criteria, but it resurrects historical debates about the roles of farming and government presence in the Columbia Basin.

  6. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  7. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

    2002-11-01

    Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in 1997 because diet data revealed predation on salmonids during these years. We could not determine the absolute impact of piscivores on each salmonid species because identification of fish prey was limited to families. Our estimate of salmonid consumption by walleye in 1996 and northern pikeminnow in 1997 shows that losses of stocked kokanee and rainbow trout could be substantial (up to 73% of kokanee) if piscivores were concentrating on one salmonid species, but were most likely lower, assuming predation was spread among kokanee, rainbow trout, and whitefish. Dissolved oxygen was never limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout, but temperatures were up to 6 EC above the growth optimum for kokanee from July to September in the upper 33 meters of water. Critical data needed for a more complete analysis in the future include species composition of entrainment estimates, entrainment estimates expanded to include unmonitored turbines, seasonal growth of planktivorous salmonids, species composition of salmonid prey, piscivore diet during hatchery releases of salmonids, and collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen data throughout all depths of the reservoir during warm summer months.

  8. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

  9. Appendix D of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fourth appendix to the report, the presentations from the workshop.

  10. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: A study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Courtney A.

    2012-01-15

    Cumulative effects analysis (CEA) allows natural resource managers to understand the status of resources in historical context, learn from past management actions, and adapt future activities accordingly. U.S. federal agencies are required to complete CEA as part of environmental impact assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Past research on CEA as part of NEPA has identified significant deficiencies in CEA practice, suggested methodologies for handling difficult aspects of CEA, and analyzed the rise in litigation over CEA in U.S. courts. This article provides a review of the literature and legal standards related to CEA as it is done under NEPA and then examines current practice on a U.S. National Forest, utilizing qualitative methods in order to provide a detailed understanding of current approaches to CEA. Research objectives were to understand current practice, investigate ongoing challenges, and identify impediments to improvement. Methods included a systematic review of a set of NEPA documents and semi-structured interviews with practitioners, scientists, and members of the public. Findings indicate that the primary challenges associated with CEA include: issues of both geographic and temporal scale of analysis, confusion over the purpose of the requirement, the lack of monitoring data, and problems coordinating and disseminating data. Improved monitoring strategies and programmatic analyses could support improved CEA practice.

  11. Appendix B of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the second appendix to the report, the workshop participants.

  12. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix B, Workshop Participants

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    B: Workshop Participants July 2013 Appendix B: Workshop Participants Evan Adams Biodiversity Research Institute Krisa Arzayus Marine Data Stewardship Division NOAA/NESDIS/NODC James Bail Offshore Aerial Imagery Company Dana Belden Office of Naval Research David Bigger Office of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Mary Boatman Office of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Jocelyn Brown-Saracino New West Technologies/Wind and Water Power Technologies

  13. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix E, Bibliography of References Provided by Participants

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    E: Bibliography of References Provided by Participants July 2013 Appendix E: Bibliography of References Provided by Participants Reports on Activities in the Mid-Atlantic New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (prepared by Geo-Marine, Inc.). 2010. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Baseline Studies Final Report. http://www.nj.gov/dep/dsr/ocean-wind/report.htm. Northeast Fisheries Science Center. 2011. Preliminary summer 2010 regional abundance estimate of loggerhead

  14. 2009 Federal Register, 74 FR 66147; Centralized Library: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - FR Doc E9-29639

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6147 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 238 / Monday, December 14, 2009 / Notices * Mail: Gregory Helseth, BLM Southern Nevada District Office, 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada 89130-2301; * In person: At any EIS public scoping meeting. Documents pertinent to this proposal may be examined at the BLM Southern Nevada District Office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gregory Helseth, Renewable Energy Project Manager, (702) 515-5173; or e-mail NorthSolar_Proj@blm.gov. You may also use

  15. Y E A R I N R E V I E W B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Smart Grid Demonstration Project . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Fish and Wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  16. EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, on the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington

  17. EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington

  18. WINDExchange: Siting Wind Turbines

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Siting Resources & Tools Siting Wind Turbines This page provides resources about wind turbine siting. American Wind Wildlife Institute The American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) facilitates timely and responsible development of wind energy, while protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. AWWI was created and is sustained by a unique collaboration of environmentalists, conservationists,

  19. Connecting Sustainability to the Agencyís Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    Institutional change case study details the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Energy Management Program.

  20. EIS-0312 DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration Fiscal Years 2007‚Äď2009 Fish and Wildlife Project Implementation Decision

  1. EIS-0312: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration Fiscal Year 2007‚Äď2009 Fish and Wildlife Project Implementation Decision

  2. Quickstart Resume Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES C. BEASLEY Savannah River Ecology Lab Phone: (803) 725-5113 P.O. Drawer E Fax: (803) 725-3309 Aiken, SC 29802 Email: beasley@srel.uga.edu RESEARCH INTERESTS Spatial ecology and population dynamics of carnivores, effects of anthropogenic stressors on wildlife, wild pig ecology and management, human-wildlife conflicts, wildlife disease ecology, scavenging ecology EDUCATION: Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, Purdue University 2010 Advisor: Dr. Olin Rhodes, Jr. M.S., Wildlife Ecology, Purdue University

  3. Faculty and Scientists | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faculty photo of Rhodes RHODES, Olin E. Jr. (Gene) Director, SREL Wildlife ecology and genetics, including the application of genetic tools to issues in wildlife management and conservation; disease ecology; molecular genetics as a tool for examining wildlife behavior and population structure; sustainability of wildlife species in human-dominated landscapes and resolution of human-wildlife conflicts photo of Seaman SEAMAN, John Assistant Director, SREL Research Professor of Biogeochemistry, UGA

  4. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    USDOE NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

  5. Energy Ambassadors to Provide Front Line Support for Alaska Native...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    held at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Regional Office in Anchorage in September. ... held at the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Regional Office in Anchorage in September. ...

  6. FWS - Candidate Species List under the Endangered Species Act...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    what a candidate species is under Section 4 of the Endangered Species Act. Author U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Published U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2011 DOI Not Provided...

  7. ESA Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ESA Forms Abstract Fish and Wildlife Service Fish and Wildlife Permit Application Forms Author U.S. Fish and...

  8. FWS - Habitat Conservation Plans and Incidental Take Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    webpage outlines the requirements for incidental take permits from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Author U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Published U.S. Fish and...

  9. Quarterly Financial Report - 3rd quarter - 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Fish and Wildlife) for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan...

  10. Questions and Answers on the New England Flow Policy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    staff and others with an interest in instream flow methods and policy. Author U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Published U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1999 DOI Not Provided...

  11. 1st Quarter Financial Report - February 1, 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Fish and Wildlife) for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan...

  12. Quarterly Financial Report - 2nd quarter - 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Fish and Wildlife) for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan...

  13. Civil Engineer (Hydraulics/Hydrologic)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This position is located in the Oregon Implementation unit (EWL) of the Fish and Wildlife Program (EW), Environment, Fish and Wildlife (E), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The Fish and...

  14. SREL Reprint #3062

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road, Central Point, Oregon 97502 U.S.A. 2U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Wildlife Forensic Laboratory, Ashland, Oregon, 97520 U.S.A. 3Bulmer and Associates, Auckland, New...

  15. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix B

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ......... 2 1.4 Wind Energy and Terrestrial Wildlife ... 2011. Effects of Wind Energy Production on Growth, Demography, and ...

  16. 2014 4th Qtr Package

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydro system replacements, transmission expansion and replacements, energy efficiency, fish and wildlife, and information technology projects. Power Services Power Services...

  17. 2015 4th Qtr Package

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transmission system expansion and replacements, large energy efficiency projects, fish and wildlife facilities, and new information technology systems. Power Services ...

  18. 2013 4th Qtr Package

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydro system replacements, transmission expansion and replacements, energy efficiency, fish and wildlife, and information technology projects. Power Services Power Services...

  19. September 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydro system replacements, transmission expansion and replacements, energy efficiency, fish and wildlife, and information technology projects. Power Services Power Services...

  20. August 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydro system replacements, transmission expansion and replacements, energy efficiency, fish and wildlife, and information technology projects. Power Services Power Services...

  1. FMC Presentation September

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydro system replacements, transmission expansion and replacements, energy efficiency, fish and wildlife, and information technology projects. Energy Efficiency capital spending...

  2. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome to the Beasley Wildlife Lab. Research in our lab is focused on addressing both theoretical and applied questions in wildlife ecology and management. In particular, much of our research is interdisciplinary in nature and uses a combination of field and laboratory approaches to develop science-based solutions to facilitate the management and conservation of wildlife populations. Although much of our research is focused on carnivores, we work on a diversity of other taxa including birds,

  3. SREL Reprint #3344

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Recoveries of Ring-necked Ducks banded on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, South Carolina Robert A. Kennamer University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802 Introduction: Each year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Canadian Wildlife Service and state and provincial wildlife management agencies band about 300,000 migratory game birds (USFWS 2001). These management agencies, ornithological institutions, researchers,

  4. PRESENTATION TITLE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STRONG ¬ģ Projects Impacting Federal Power Tulsa District Dan Brueggenjohann 9 June 2010 BUILDING STRONG ¬ģ 303(d) Listing of Broken Bow Tailwaters Impairment Impaired Use Cadmium Fish and Wildlife Propagation - Trout Fishery Lead Fish and Wildlife Propagation - Trout Fishery Water Temperature* Fish and Wildlife Propagation - Trout Fishery The 303(d) List reports on waters identified as impaired. These waters: Have elevated portions of one or more pollutants. Do not meet one or more water

  5. U.S. Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development/Wildlife Challenges | Department of Energy Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy Development/Wildlife Challenges U.S. Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy Development/Wildlife Challenges May 18, 2015 - 5:46pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is leading a new International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task to address concerns about the environmental effects of wind energy technology. Task 34, also known as WREN (Working together to

  6. shem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shem D Unger Savannah River Ecology Lab Phone: cell (765) 414-5435 P.O. Drawer E Phone: office (803)725-5324 Aiken, South Carolina 29802 email: unger@srel.edu EDUCATION Ph.D. Purdue University Wildlife Genetics 2012 M.S. Missouri State University Biology 2003 B.S. Texas A & M University Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences 1999 RESEARCH INTERESTS Conservation Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Amphibian & Reptile Ecology, Proteomics, Stream Ecology PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Postdoctoral Researcher

  7. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Williams Biodiversity Research Institute 27 Oct. 2015 Wildlife distributions and habitat use on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf © Jonathan Fiely-BRI U.S. Dept. of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources Maryland Energy Administration Other sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sea Duck Joint Venture The Bailey Wildlife Foundation Collaborators: Biodiversity Research Institute North Carolina State University

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.3 Existing Regulations B3.3: Research related to conservation of fish, wildlife, and cultural resources Field and laboratory research, inventory, and information collection activities that are directly related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources or to the protection of cultural resources, provided that such activities would not have the potential to cause significant impacts on fish and wildlife habitat or populations or to cultural

  9. Wind Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Program Innovative Study Helps Protect Wildlife Innovative Study Helps Protect Wildlife Thanks to a first-of-its-kind in-depth study of wildlife distribution and movements, the nation's Eastern Seaboard is better prepared than ever for offshore wind energy. Read more New Wind Technology Resource Center Launched New Wind Technology Resource Center Launched The Energy Department recently announced the launch of its new, user-friendly online information resources portal that provides a central

  10. EIS-0312-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    -SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan The attached Supplement Analysis for Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Environmental Impact Statement (FWIP EIS) provides a review of whether BPA should prepare a new or supplemental FWIP EIS in light of the the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (Council) newly amended 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program (2009 Program). PDF icon Supplement

  11. Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P.; Nesta, S.; Anderson, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

  12. Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, James A.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hlava, Kevin J.; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B.; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2014-02-24

    This report, Analysis of Potential Energy Corridors Proposed by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). The intent of WECC’s work was to identify planning-level energy corridors that the Department of Energy (DOE) and its affiliates could study in greater detail. Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the WECC Proposed Energy Corridors in five topic areas for use in reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. In compliance with Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Secretaries of Energy, Agriculture, and the Interior (Secretaries) published a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in 2008 to address the proposed designation of energy transport corridors on federal lands in the 11 western states. Subsequently, Records of Decision designating the corridors were issued in 2009 by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The 2012 settlement of a lawsuit, brought by The Wilderness Society and others against the United States, which identified environmental concerns for many of the corridors requires, among other things, periodic reviews of the corridors to assess the need for revisions, deletions, or additions. A 2013 Presidential Memorandum requires the Secretaries to undertake a continuing effort to identify and designate energy corridors. The WECC Proposed Energy Corridors and their analyses in this report provide key information for reviewing and revising existing corridors, as well as designating additional energy corridors in the 11 western states. Load centers and generation hubs identified in the WECC analysis, particularly as they reflect renewable energy development, would be useful in reviewing and potentially updating the designated Section 368 corridor network. Argonne used Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to analyze the proposed energy corridors in the WECC report in five topic areas: Federal land jurisdiction, Existing Section 368 corridors, Existing transmission lines, Previously studied corridor locations, and Protected areas. Analysis methods are explained and tables and maps are provided to describe the results of the analyses in all five topic areas. WECC used a rational approach to connecting the hubs it identified, although there may be opportunities for adapting some of the proposed WECC routes to previously designated Section 368 corridors, for example: The WECC proposed energy corridors are in fact centerlines of proposed routes connecting hubs of various descriptions related to electric energy transmission. Although the centerlines were sited to avoid sensitive areas, infrastructure proposed within actual pathways or corridors defined by the centerlines would sometimes affect lands where such development would not normally be allowed, such as National Parks and Monuments, National Wildlife Refuges, and Wilderness Areas. Many WECC proposed energy corridors are sited along centerlines of existing roads, including Interstate Highways, where in some cases additional width to accommodate energy transmission infrastructure may not be available. Examples include the WECC Proposed Corridor along Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon in Colorado, and along U.S. Highway 89 across Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona. Several WECC proposed energy corridors are parallel to designated Section 368 corridors that have already cleared the preliminary steps to right-of-way approval. In many of these cases, the WECC hub connection objectives can be met more efficiently by routing on the designated Section 368 corridors.

  13. Eelgrass Enhancement and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River Estuary, Period of Performance: Feb 2008-Sep 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, C.; Thom, R; Borde, A.

    2009-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to enhance distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the Columbia River Estuary to serve as refuge and feeding habitat for juvenile salmon, Dungeness crab, and other fish and wildlife. We strongly suspected that limited eelgrass seed dispersal has resulted in the present distribution of eelgrass meadows, and that there are other suitable places for eelgrass to survive and form functional meadows. Funded as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's call for Innovative Projects, we initiated a multistage study in 2008 that combined modeling, remote sensing, and field experimentation to: (1) Spatially predict habitat quality for eelgrass; (2) Conduct experimental plantings; and (3) Evaluate restoration potential. Baseline in-situ measurements and remote satellite observations were acquired for locations in the Lower Columbia River Estuary (LCRE) to determine ambient habitat conditions. These were used to create a habitat site-selection model, using data on salinity, temperature, current velocity, light availability, wave energy, and desiccation to predict the suitability of nearshore areas for eelgrass. Based on this model and observations in the field, five sites that contained no eelgrass but appeared to have suitable environmental conditions were transplanted with eelgrass in June 2008 to test the appropriateness of these sites for eelgrass growth. We returned one year after the initial planting to monitor the success rate of the transplants. During the year after transplanting, we carried out a concurrent study on crab distribution inside and outside eelgrass meadows to study crab usage of the habitat. One year after the initial transplant, two sites, one in Baker Bay and one in Young's Bay, had good survival or expansion rates with healthy eelgrass. Two sites had poor survival rates, and one site had a total loss of the transplanted eelgrass. For submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) restoration projects, these are reasonable success results and represent a small net gain in eelgrass in the LCRE. Crabs used both the eelgrass and unvegetated substrate, though in neither were there great abundance of the young-of-the-year crabs. During the field assessment of 12 potential transplant sites, divers discovered one site in southern Young's Bay that contained a previously undocumented eelgrass bed. This integrated project developed the first predictive maps of sites suitable for eelgrass and other SAV in the lower estuary. In addition, techniques developed for this project to assess light levels in existing and potential submerged habitats have great potential to be used in other regions for nearshore and coastal monitoring of SAV. Based on these preliminary results, we conclude that eelgrass distribution could likely be expanded in the estuary, though additional information on current eelgrass locations, usage by species of interest, and monitoring of current conditions would help develop a baseline and verify benefit. Our recommendations for future studies include: (1) Site Monitoring. Continued monitoring of restoration sites along with physical metrics of light, temperature and salinity within beds. Continued monitoring will both assist managers in understanding the longevity and expansion rate of planted sites and inform practical guidance on the minimum planted eelgrass required to develop a resilient meadow. (2) Natural bed documentation and monitoring. Document current eelgrass habitat conditions in the Columbia River by mapping eelgrass and other SAV species and monitoring physical metrics in natural beds. This will assist by better defining the factors that control the annual and spatial variation in eelgrass in the estuary, and thus lead to improved management. Improved information on conditions will help refine a habitat suitability model that can more accurately predict where eelgrass can be restored or areas under duress. (3) Monitor Species Use. Expanded monitoring of Dungeness crab and salmon use and benefit from eelgrass in the estuary to evaluate how

  14. Understanding Contaminant Transport Pathways at Rocky Flats - A Basis for the Remediation Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paton, Ian

    2008-01-15

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a Department of Energy facility located approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Processing and fabrication of nuclear weapons components occurred at Rocky Flats from 1952 through 1989. Operations at the Site included the use of several radionuclides, including plutonium-239/240 (Pu), americium-241 (Am), and various uranium (U) isotopes, as well as several types of chlorinated solvents. The historic operations resulted in legacy contamination, including contaminated facilities, process waste lines, buried wastes and surface soil contamination. Decontamination and removal of buildings at the site was completed in late 2005, culminating more than ten years of active environmental remediation work. The Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision was subsequently approved in 2006, signifying regulatory approval and closure of the site. The use of RFETS as a National Wildlife Refuge is scheduled to be in full operation by 2012. To develop a plan for remediating different types of radionuclide contaminants present in the RFETS environment required understanding the different environmental transport pathways for the various actinides. Developing this understanding was the primary objective of the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) project. Findings from the AME studies were used in the development of RFETS remediation strategies. The AME project focused on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in surface water, groundwater, air, soil and biota at RFETS. For the purposes of the AME studies, actinide elements addressed included Pu, Am, and U. The AME program, funded by DOE, brought together personnel with a broad range of relevant expertise in technical investigations. The AME advisory panel identified research investigations and approaches that could be used to solve issues related to actinide migration at the Site. An initial step of the AME was to develop a conceptual model to provide a qualitative description of the relationships among potential actinide sources and transport pathways at RFETS. One conceptual model was developed specifically for plutonium and americium, because of their similar geochemical and transport properties. A separate model was developed for uranium because of its different properties and mobility in the environment. These conceptual models were guidelines for quantitative analyses described in the RFETS Pathway Analysis Report, which used existing data from the literature as well as site-specific analyses, including field, laboratory and modeling studies to provide quantitative estimates of actinide migration in the RFETS environment. For pathways where more than one method was used to estimate offsite loads for a specific pathway, the method yielding the highest estimated off-site was used for comparison purposes. For all actinides studied, for pre-remediation conditions, air and surface water were identified to be the dominant transport mechanisms. The estimated annual airborne plutonium-239/240 load transported off site exceeded the surface water load by roughly a factor of 40. However, despite being the largest transport pathway, airborne radionuclide concentrations at the monitoring location with the highest measurements during the period studied were less than two percent of the allowable 10 milli-rem standard governing DOE facilities. Estimated actinide loads for other pathways were much less. Shallow groundwater was approximately two orders of magnitude lower, or 1/100 of the load conveyed in surface water. The estimated biological pathway load for plutonium was approximately five orders of magnitude less, or 1/100,000, of the load estimated for surface-water. The pathway analysis results were taken into consideration during subsequent remediation activities that occurred at the site. For example, when the 903 Pad area was remediated to address elevated concentrations of Pu and Am in the surface soil, portable tent structures were constructed to prevent wind and water erosion from occurring while remediation activitie

  15. DOE HQ Special Needs in an Emergency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ) Go to Stairwell or Area of Refuge 2) Contact Emergency Responders 3) Follow Instructions Key Points to remember During an Emergency What an employee should do during an emergency: 1) Go to the nearest stairwell or area of refuge. 2) Contact emergency responders using the emergency call butt on or a telephone. Provide responders with your name, the name of anyone with you, your locati on and the assistance you need. 3) Follow the instructi ons provided. You may be told: Ôā∑ÔĆ Remain in your

  16. Title 50 CFR ß 10 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Implementing regulations for wildlife and fisheries, including the Migratory Bird Treaty Act Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2010 Legal Citation 50 CFR 10...

  17. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstrate knowledge of wildlife sampling procedures, study design, and population monitoring techniques Use molecular techniques to extract and amplify DNA from non-invasive ...

  18. Articles about Next-Generation Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    27, 2015 Articles about Next-Generation Technologies Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife The Biodiversity Research Institute's (BRI) new report on a...

  19. REGULATORY SIDE-BY-SIDE GOVERNING PERMITTING OF CROSS-BORDER...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Wildlife CANADA Yukon Yukon Utilities Board Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board * Environment Yukon British Columbia British Columbia Utilities Commission...

  20. Small Wind Guidebook/Presentations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Presentations < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Presentations K. Sinclair. (July 2014) Historical Perspective of Wind-Wildlife Challenges: How This May Affect...

  1. Asset Management Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency and Fish and Wildlife asset categories. The CAB, in consultation with affected business units and the Asset Management Executive Sponsors, determines whether and how...

  2. Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Eagle Conservation Plan (ECP) process and requirements. Calls for: 1) Preliminary landscape-level assessments to assess potential wildlife interactions; 2) Site-specific...

  3. OpenEI Community - Section 7

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Wed, 05 Sep...

  4. MEMORANDUM FOR SEAN LEV DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL FOR ENVIRONMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eradicate Burning, and Revegetation Methods on the 150,000 noxious weeds and invasive plants, and promote desirable plant species and wildlife Hanford Site, Richland,...

  5. ____________________________________________________________...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purdue University, 193pp. Current Position: Molecular Plant Breeder, Hartmann's Plant Company O. E. Rhodes, Jr. - 21 Retamosa, M.I. 2006. Modeling wildlife damage to crops...

  6. Avian and Bat Assessment at the Lewes Wind Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish & Wildlife Service-USFWS), Julie Thompson (USFWS), Holly Niederriter (Delaware ... cause of deathvisible injuries, and estimated time of death (e.g., <1day, <2 days). ...

  7. Record of Decision (ROD) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0, 2003 EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project October 31, 2003 EIS-0312: Record of Decision Fish and Wildlife...

  8. EIS-0246: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Record of Decision EIS-0246: Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements)...

  9. Turkey-Low Carbon Plan (LCP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Carbon Plan (LCP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Turkey-Country Specific Low Carbon Plans (LCP) AgencyCompany Organization World Wildlife Fund Sector Energy Topics...

  10. WWF-Country-Specific Low Carbon Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country-Specific Low Carbon Plans Jump to: navigation, search Name WWF-Country-Specific Low Carbon Plans AgencyCompany Organization World Wildlife Fund Sector Energy, Land,...

  11. Philippines-Low Carbon Plan (LCP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plan (LCP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Low Carbon Plan (LCP) AgencyCompany Organization World Wildlife Fund Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Low...

  12. Microsoft Word - 2011_07_05_KHP Draft EIS.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Marine Fisheries Service Bureau of Indian Affairs Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation July 2011 Abstract -...

  13. Proposed Southline Transmission Line Project - Volume 4 of 4...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    These resources include recreation, rangelands, timber, minerals, watershed, fish and wildlife habitat, wilderness, air, and scenic quality, as well as scientific and...

  14. EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Yakima County, Washington BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres...

  15. Gateway West Transmission Line | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    surveys and literature review; (b) the federal and state laws regarding protection of plants and wildlife; (c) the importance of these resources; (d) the purpose and necessity...

  16. STATEMENT FOR THE RECORD MR. KENNETH E. LEGG ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHEASTER...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FISCAL YEAR 2017 BUDGETS OF THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, THE NATIONAL OCEAN ... Once authorized purposes such as recreation, water supply, water quality, fish and ...

  17. FONSI signed 5/14/2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kootenai White Sturgeon and other native fish, would complement other restoration on the ... to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife, and their habitats, affected ...

  18. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING FOR HYDROPOWER SUSTAINABLE HYDROPOWER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONTINUING: Validation and Analysis of Alden Fish-Friendly Turbine ......FOA funding opportunity announcement FWS Fish and Wildlife Service FY fiscal year HAC ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. ... Installation of instream fish habitat structures was completed on four miles of Ramsey ...

  20. Bonneville Power Administration: 10 Year Financial Plan, January...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (FCRPS) capital investments exceeding a projected 7 billion for energy resource acquisition, transmission construction and replacements, and fish and wildlife projects. During...

  1. Federal Energy and Water Management Award winner poster | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications EIS-0496: Draft Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings California Valley Solar Ranch...

  2. EIS-0246-SA-36: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent...

  3. EIS-0353: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program In cooperation with Montana, Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to implement a...

  4. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power...

  5. EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Columbia Basin Riparian Conservation Easement Program. The action area for the...

  6. EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flathead County, Montana Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks that proposes to block migrating...

  7. EIS-0312: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement EIS-0312: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan for the Bonneville Power Administration Throughout the...

  8. EIS-0408: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Programmatic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, announced the availability of the Upper...

  9. 3-4-10_Final_Testimony_(BPA)_(Wright).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    investments in the region's transmission, generation, energy efficiency, and fish and wildlife restoration efforts. In FY 2009, Bonneville made its full planned payment...

  10. EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife propose to expand their monitoring and evaluation for the Grande Ronde...

  11. EIS-0340: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Administration (BPA) has a responsibility to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System (Northwest Power Act,...

  12. EIS-0353: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department's (MFWP) South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope...

  13. EIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. PDF icon DOEEIS-0265-SA-163: Supplement Analysis for the...

  14. EIS-0312: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0312: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated...

  15. EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with...

  16. EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program In cooperation with Montana, Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to implement a...

  17. Administration of State Lands Interagency MOA July 2012 | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Parks and Recreation; Department of Environmental Conservation; and Department of Fish and Wildlife, with respect to agency administration of State lands. Authors FPR, DEC...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    taking of endangered and threatened species (plants and animals). . The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and or the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)...

  19. BPA 2001 Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and new technologies. The agency funds the region's efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations in the Columbia River Basin and works in partnership with...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biological Resource Considerations (12-NM-a) The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF) preserves endangered or threatened wildlife in the state against any direct...

  1. Managementźs Discussion and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  2. EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SUMMARY The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS...

  3. Steigerwald Floodplain Restoration Project (DOE/EA-2027)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Forest, Evening Sky EFW - Deer in River Advanced Search About BPA Newsroom Integrated Fish & Wildlife Program Information for Contractors Environmental Services BPA Home Triangle...

  4. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  5. Managementźs Discussion and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development and operations in...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regulatory Commission (FERC),Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) provide guidance on...

  7. RepoRt B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy and new technologies. It also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development in the Columbia...

  8. Microsoft Word - Q3 MDA 8_11_2015 Update of $172M for Reposting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to deliver on its mission. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  9. 50 CFR 13 - General Permit Procedures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    denial, suspension, revocation, and general administration of permits issued by the Fish and Wildlife Service. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation 50...

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-h | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Fish and Wildlife Service Marine Mammal Protection Act Incidental Take Letter of...

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/12 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can support a finding that subsequent biological surveys are unnecessary, although the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) must concur. 12.2 - Conduct Biological Surveys as Needed To...

  12. McNary-John Day | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    where appropriate. * Construct any required culverts using Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife culvert installation guidelines. Methods may include avoiding installation...

  13. BPA-2015-00273-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    minutes and other correspondence between the Bonneville Power Administration and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding dam operations in bull trout critical habitat since...

  14. Microsoft Word - nmn282==LEWIS COUNTY PUD--Official Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service to eligible customers and to undertake certain other programs, such as fish and wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement. The District is a municipal...

  15. ARM 12-14-110 - Commercial Use Permitting: Exceptions to Applicability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    requirements for land use within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2007 Legal Citation ARM...

  16. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    maplayers.html?openChapterschpboundchpbound Four agencies-the National Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in the Department of the...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    correspondence between the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) (together the "Services"), an action agency (a federal...

  18. Document

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    settlement agreement signed by it and the National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation....

  19. BPA 2009 Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy and new technologies The agency funds regional efforts to protect and enhance fish and wildlife populations affected by federal hydropower development in the Columbia...

  20. ARM 12-14-145 - Commercial Use Permitting: Restricted Use Permit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    use permits for land use within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2007 Legal Citation ARM...

  1. Microsoft Word - NMN271==CITY OF TACOMA--Official Statement 2003...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service to eligible customers and to undertake certain other programs, such as fish and wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement. The City is a municipal...

  2. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Environmental Conservation Montpelier, Vermont United States Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife Montpelier, Vermont United States Vermont Watershed Management Division...

  3. Oregon State Endangered Species List | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Web Site: Oregon State Endangered Species List Author Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Published State of Oregon, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  4. EIS-0408: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Programmatic EIS The Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will as joint lead agencies prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-l | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 requires federal agencies, including the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), to consider the potential environmental impacts of their...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/6-WA-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of a Hydraulic Project Approval Permit issued by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. State waters include all marine waters and fresh waters of the state,...

  7. Montana Restricted Use Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Use Permit Application Abstract Application for conducting commercial use with Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks jurisdiction. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Restricted Use...

  8. ARM 12-14-101 - Commercial Use Permitting Requirements: Definitions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    permitting requirements for land within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2009 Legal Citation ARM...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act's implementing regulations provide for many types of permits. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) manages the various permitting processes. For energy...

  10. Federal Migratory Bird Depredation Permit 3-200-13 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the problem. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Migratory Birds Organization US Fish and Wildlife Service Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not...

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/12-OR-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    illustrates the biological resource considerations in Oregon. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife deals with the protection of endangered species. The Oregon State Fish and...

  12. Endangered Species Act Section 7 Consultation Handbook | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    section 7 processes and providing examples of various types of consultations. Author Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service Published Fish and...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/17-FD-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act (WSRA), in order to protect rivers of particular scenic, recreational, geologic, fish and wildlife, historic, cultural or other similar values from impact on their...

  14. Northern Wasco County Peopleźs Utility District

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service to eligible customers and to undertake certain other programs, such as fish and wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement. Security for the 2012 Bonds The...

  15. Power Function Review Final Report, June 24, 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Payments to IOUs 323M* Transmission Purchases, ReserveAncillary Services 184M Fish and Wildlife Direct Program 143M Other 105M Internal Operations Charged to Power...

  16. Public Utility District No. 1 of Lewis County, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service to eligible customers and to undertake certain other programs, such as fish and wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement. PURPOSE OF THE 2013 BONDS AND...

  17. Bonneville Power Administration's Power Function Review II Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas. * Changes in capital cost recovery o Amortization periods for conservation and Fish and Wildlife investments o Columbia Generating Station debt life and additional capital...

  18. Five Fast Facts About Scientist Rachel Carson | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    subject of our Women's History Month ThrowbackThursday. | Photo courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Rachel Carson, renowned environmentalist and author of "Silent...

  19. BPA, Committed to NW Values - REVISED - Nov 2010.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    promoting energy effi ciency, facilitating development of renewable power, protecting fish and wildlife affected by hydro development, honoring treaty obligations to tribes and...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/12-OR-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (12-OR-b) This flowchart illustrates the...

  1. BLM-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Department of Interior and Bureau of Land Management; United States Fish and Wildlife Service Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect Not Provided Legal...

  2. Programmatic Biological Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    may also be present. Threatened, Endangered, and Culturally Sensitive Species The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) list of threatened, endangered, candidate, and proposed...

  3. BPA 2000 Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and new technologies. The agency funds the region's efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations in the Columbia River Basin and works in partnership with...

  4. DOE-USFWS Migratory Bird MOU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department of Energy Organization United States Department of Energy; United States Fish and Wildlife Service Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect Not Provided Legal...

  5. Asset Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assets in transmission, federal hydro, facilities, information technology (IT), fish and wildlife, energy efficiency, and other capital program areas. This policy is...

  6. BPA-2015-01207-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acknowledgement letter sent to you on April 29, 2015. You requested: Six Environment, Fish & Wildlife papers authored by Terraqua, Inc., between 2008-2009. * A Field Manual of...

  7. BPA-2010-02066-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (a) the Washington Department of Natural Resources; (b) the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; (c) Weyerhaeuser and its affiliated companies; (d) Longview Timber...

  8. EIS-0265-SA-99: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    partnership among the CTUIR, Grand Rhonda Model Watershed Program, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Natural Resource Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture,...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/12-VT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toolkit related to hydropower are currently under development and subject to change ANR Fish and Wildlife Conditions and Recommendations (12-VT-a) The Federal Power Act (FPA)...

  10. Incidental Take Permits Associated with a Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notice Form Topic Native Endangered and Threatened Species Organization U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not...

  11. ARM 12-14-150 - Commercial Use Permitting: Restricted Use Permitting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    use permits for land use within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2009 Legal Citation ARM...

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    be obtained from the Department of Environmental Quality, or may be waived by Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks during its review process under the Natural Streambed and Land...

  13. Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    attention to sound business principles is the only way to strengthen our commitment to fish and wildlife, environment, and other community values. The time for dramatic change is...

  14. BPA-2015-00301-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    groups) where the subject matter was the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program's fish passage and reintroduction provisions, toxics provisions,...

  15. BPA-2010-02066-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (a) the Washington Department of Natural Resources; (b) the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; (c) Weyerhaeuser and its affiliated companies; (d) Longview Timber...

  16. Endangered Species Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. It is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries Service...

  17. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the Administration have helped immensely by stabilizing BPA's contribution to fish and wildlife. In sum, through the efforts, contributions and support of its employees,...

  18. File:USFWSList.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1,650 pixels, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: applicationpdf, 5 pages) Summary US Fish and Wildlife Service Species List - Salt Wells Geothermal Drilling Project EA Licensing...

  19. Microsoft Word - NMN292==CARES--2003 Refunding Bonds Official...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service to eligible customers and to undertake certain other programs, such as fish and wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement. The 2003 Bonds are special limited...

  20. EIS-0408: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy...

  1. BPA 2003 Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and new technologies. The agency funds the region's efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations in the Columbia River Basin and works in partnership with...

  2. Sikes Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department of Defense with State agencies in planning, development and maintenance of fish and wildlife resources on military reservations throughout the United States. Published...

  3. 96REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    competitive rates. We revamped our hydro operations to comply with increased needs for fish and wildlife protection. We adjusted our surplus power sales to fit the new hydro...

  4. PFR Meetings and Workshops (rates/meetings)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic(s): Conservation; Renewables; Amortization of conservation investments and fish and wildlife capital; Internal Operations Charged to PowerEPIP; Spokane settlement...

  5. BPA-2015-01485-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the final response regarding documents transferred from the Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS-2015-00279) for Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA)...

  6. BPA-2015-01207-FCorrespondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    any correspondence with the agency about your request. You requested: Six Environment, Fish & Wildlife papers authored by Terraqua, Inc., between 2008-2009. * A Field Manual of...

  7. BPA-2013-00361-FOIA Response1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of Defense, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, City of Longview, City...

  8. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/12-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us State Biological Resource Considerations (12-ID-a) The Idaho Department of Fish & Game preserves wildlife against any direct take, including wild animals, birds, and...

  10. ARM 12-14-120 - Commercial Use Permitting: Permits | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    requirements for land use within the jurisdiction of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2009 Legal Citation ARM...

  11. EIS-0408: DOE Notice of Availability of a Programmatic Draft...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy...

  12. Brochure: Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these agencies maximize the use of the Columbia River by generating power, protecting fish and wildlife, controlling floods, providing irrigation and navigation, and sustaining...

  13. Washington State Species of Concern Lists | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Web Site: Washington State Species of Concern Lists Author Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife Published State of Washington, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  14. First Quarter Financial Report - 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the operation and maintenance costs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Facilities. Northwest...

  15. Administrator's Interim Final ROD on Environmental Redispatch...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    purpose projects that are operated for many public purposes, including flood control, fish and wildlife protection, irrigation, power production, navigation, recreation,...

  16. RAPID/Hydropower/Roadmap | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development 2 Site Considerations United States Forest Service National Park Service Fish and Wildlife Service Bureau of Land Management Western Governors' Association 3 Land...

  17. Previous PFR Announcements (pfr/announcements)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Note: See also the EFW "News & Events" page for announcements regarding fish and wildlife componenets of the Power Function Review. July 14, 2005 - Presentation...

  18. Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Notice of Availability for Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Final...

  19. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy...

  20. BPA-2010-02131-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the following links that should provide all the information you are requesting: Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS documents and Record of Decision (ROD) under the...