Sample records for wildlife refuge anwr

  1. Spatial and temporal patterns of Lycium carolinianum Walt., the Carolina Wolfberry, in the salt marshes of Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butzler, Rachel Elizabeth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which are utilized by the cranes each winter. Past research indicates that the Carolina wolfberry (Lycium carolinianum) contributes 21-52% of crane energy intake early in the wintering period (Chavez 1996...

  2. Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

  3. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  4. Visitors to Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia--their characteristics, attitudes, satisfactions and preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Ronald Lynn

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's influence. (7) Wildlife and wild-lands oriented recreation: Activities which permit people to enjoy wildlife and wild-lands. This recre- ation, whether on-site or off-site, is derived or generated on or from the refuge and its resources. (81 W'1dl...

  5. MAPS Stations on National Wildlife Refuges in the USFWS Pacific Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSante, David F.

    MAPS Stations on National Wildlife Refuges in the USFWS Pacific Region Current Status and Future ............................................................................................. 3 Capture Rates of Adult Birds at MAPS Stations on NWR Lands .................... 3 Identifying ................................................................................. 4 Identifying Gaps in the Distribution of MAPS Stations in the Pacific Region ...... 5 Assessing

  6. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of live oak stems by height class in February, April, and July of 1976 after burning on several dates on the Aransas National Wildife Refuge near Austwell, Texas, ~ . . . ~ . . . ~ ~ ~ 48 15 Canopy cover (/) of live oak, grass, and f orbs in February... 1977 on areas burned at various dates on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge near Austwell, Texas. . 49 16 Total Standing crop and new growth (kg/ha) of live oak and standing crop increase (/) represented by new growth in April and July, 1976...

  7. An internship at the Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coltman, Suzanne Dale

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. 1. V TABLE OF CONTENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. LIST OF TABLES. Vii Viii INTRODUCTION. REFUGE SYSTEM. DESCRIPTION OF BRAZORIA NWR COMPLEX Habitat Types. Saline Prairies. Nonsaline Pr air ies. Salt Flats. Fresh... Idf' Id th(A'td~t' th). ybh t hpM(hb ~lt h ) A t* p M(I )M p i. . A small grove of trees, primarily consisting of black willow (Salix nigra) dl k(G ~), ' I t& White I k C k d Cocklebur Slough. Cn Brazoria NWR, a small stand of salt cedar (Tamerix...

  8. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  10. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the wind waves and ship induced water motions. The wind wave analysis is examined in this thesis with a brief summary of the ship induced water motions. The wind wave characteristics were measured at the refuge and are compared to the characteristics...

  11. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  12. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  13. Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherry, Dawn Ann

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and habitat use by wading birds. I found considerable variation among three sites, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Texas; Marsh Island Wildlife Refuge (MIWR), Louisiana; and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), Florida. Species comprising...

  14. Incorporating risk into the feasibility assessment of alternative brush management strategies for the Welder Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Keith D.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    be produced from it over time. Historically, the significant revenue source from rangelands has been grazing domestic animals for the production of consumer goods. More recently, a growing ecotourism industry, which includes hunting, hiking, bird watching... or failure is significant. Precautions must also be taken when developing a cost-effective brush management scheme to ensure that wildlife habitat disturbance is minimized if ecotourism rents are a desired goal. Problem Statement The purpose...

  15. Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devilís Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

  16. WILDLIFE REFUGE BACA NATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Rio Grande National Forest Rio Grande National Forest San Isabel National Forest Solar Energy Study Great Sand Dunes National Preserve 285 160 160 160 285 Carson National Forest Grand Mesa National Forest Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6/5/2009) BLM Lands Being Analyzed for Solar

  17. Reserves, Refuges, and Sanctuaries (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter provides rules for the establishment of wildlife reserves, refuges, sanctuaries, and other natural areas on land and water bodies. The Game and Parks Commission has the authority to...

  18. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Analysis ANWR Coastal Plain Assessment 3. Summary Glossary References Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated...

  20. Vegetational analyses and the determination of range condition classes on selected areas of the Welder Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Thadis W

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prai- xies was x'sported, as early as half a century ago by 0offey (1909). He desoribed the vegetation of the Victoria clay series as native grassland that had been invaded by run. "4ng mesquite, He attributed the invasion of the mesquite... grasses. Boils In a reconnaissance soil survey, Coffey (1909) classified the soils of the genex'al area containing the Welder Wildlife Hefuge as part of. the Victoria series. Tue black soils that comprise the Victoxia series were formed from a deposit...

  1. igure 1. Map of N. Alaska and NW Canada Showing the Locations...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. Map of Northern Alaska and Northwestern Canada Showing the Locations of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), 1002 Area, Current...

  2. Whooping crane (Grus americana) demography and environmental factors in a population growth simulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil de Weir, Karine

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Whooping Crane (Grus americana) is among North America¬?s most charismatic species. Between 1938 and 2004, the population that migrates between Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP), grew from 18 to 217...

  3. Professional internship with the Houston Lighting and Power Company Radiological Services: wildlife collection manual report and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Tina Borghild

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    game wardens, wildlife refuge managers in Texas, and who to contact about specific animal species or trapping techniques. An Equipment Sources Appendix and Literature Cited and Available in Wildlife Documents File were also included. This file...

  4. Essays on U.S. energy markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightwell, David Aaron

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    renewing interest in U.S. energy policy. In the resulting debates, both sides stressed the economic risks associated with energy price volatility and believed that the U.S. needed to reduce dependence on oil. The central question is how to achieve... Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Within ANWR is a potentially large oil reservoir along the coastal plain. In section 1002 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980, Congress deferred land management decisions regarding oil and natural gas...

  5. Movements, site fidelity, and surfacing patterns of Bottlenose Dolphins on the central Texas coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Spencer Kendall

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). She traveled rapidly between sites on at least three occasions, in order to spend time either at the northeastern (near Port O' Connor) or the southwestern (near ANWR) portion of her range. On one occasion she traveled... station at ANWR observation tower, or airplane. The other seven dolphins showed more confined ranges, traveling within a usual radius of about 12 km from Home Base (Fig. 6b ? c). No differences were found in range size by age, sex, or reproductive...

  6. Wildlife Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Wildlife Services, part of Texas Cooperative Extension, is an agency created to assist the public in managing the problems sometimes caused by wildlife. Its objectives are to protect wildlife, crops, livestock, property and human health...

  7. Water and Environmental Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources at times during the year. A good example is the North Slope of Alaska, where long, cold winters, on the North Slope of Alaska, obtaining water for many uses in the winter months is a significant management extraction (metals, oil and gas, etc.) such as ANWR (Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) and NPRA (National

  8. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  9. Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    getfeature.cfm?FeatureNumberf20130107-00">Learn more about the 2013 FIRST Robotics Competition. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Photo of the Week: I,...

  10. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

  11. Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

  12. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP SignInWho do IWhyWhy:Wildlife

  13. Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program: Wildlife Biology http://www.bw.uaf.edu/ University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Wildlife://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ProspectiveStudents/degrees.htm Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Programs: Wildlife Fisheries Biology http

  14. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

  15. Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

  16. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  17. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

  18. Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

  19. Helminth parasites of feral swine from the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruddle, William Dale

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) was followed by employment as an automobile mech- anic until September 1969. On 15 September 1967 Dale married Anita DeLores Harris of Schertz, Texas. In September 1969 Dale entered Texas ASM University where he received his Bachelor of Science Degree.... Dale's permanent address is Box 905, College Station, Texas, 77840. The typist for this thesis was Anita H . Ruddle. ...

  20. A pilot test to measure attitudes toward recreational uses of National Wildlife Refuges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, William Harold

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . -addressed envelope in which to return it. Identical procedure and the same num'ocr of addresses were used to sample local busine smen in these two cities, except that the names and addresses were selected from classified business directories oi each... directories. Therefore, only one representative was chosen from eacn selected business category by this method. The classified business directories are divided into categories such as "cement, cemeteries, ceramic products, chemical manufacturers", etc. Two...

  1. Effect of Woody Debris abundance on daytime refuge use by cotton mice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkelman, Travis, M.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Daytime refuges are important to nocturnal rodents for protection from predators and environmental extremes. Because refuges of forest-dwelling rodents are often associated with woody debris, we examined refuge use by 37 radio-collared Peromyscus gossypinus (cotton mice) in experimental plots with different levels of woody debris. Treatment plots had six times (? 60 m3/ha) the volume of woody debris as control plots (? 10 m3/ha). Of 247 refuges, 159 were in rotting stumps (64%), 32 were in root boles (13%), 19 were in brush piles (8%), and 16 were in logs (6%); 10 refuges could not be identified. Stumps were the most common refuge type in both treatments, but the distribution of refuge types was significantly different between treatment and control plots. Root boles and brush piles were used more on treatment plots than on control plots, and logs were used more on control plots than on treatment plots. Refuge type and vegetation cover were the best predictors of refuge use by cotton mice; root bole refuges and refuges with less vegetation cover received greater-than-expected use by mice. Abundant refuges, particularly root boles, may improve habitat quality for cotton mice in southeastern pine forests.

  2. arctic national wildlife: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Refuge flora. Aggressive species such as narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia), common reed (Phragmites australis), and willow (Salix spp.), all prevalent on the Refuge,...

  3. Wildlife Photography Market Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Miles

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    programs to reach existing groups such as photography clubs. Joining tourism organizations is also likely to be helpful. Private Landowners? Responses The data gathered from the landowners? survey responses illustrates the limited nature of wildlife... wildlife photography, most have not yet reached the levels desired by operators. This is partly due to a lack of development as a tourism enterprise, which includes marketing and well-defined operational limits.It does seem that satisfaction is very...

  4. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

  5. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

  6. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

  7. Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

  8. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  9. Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University Fisheries and Wildlife United States Geological Survey United States Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife of this report in any way is withheld pending specific authorization from the Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  11. Relationships between soils and vegetation on four range plant communities on the Welder Wildlife Refuge in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Thadis W.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissertation By THADIS W f BOX LBBWDVGF UC MD CMXiG UsF eDsMGsM rXt EGUsDa AGBUWMoGsM LnunCM bmdm LhclHOfgAxgpglRI RqYC BUBGW 1UC oUFG BDCCYriG MqWDnuq MqG qGiB Da oUsX BGDBiG UsF YM 1DniF rG YoBDCCYriG MD YssnoGWUMG Uii MqDCG 1qD eDsMWYrnMGF MD YMC BWGB...FGWCMUsFYsu5 UsF sGVGW GsFYsu GseDnWUuGoGsM MqWDnuqDnM MqG CMnFX UsF aDW qGW qGiB Ys MqG BWGBUWUMYDs Da MqG oUsnCeWYBMN RLSfg H) hHlRglRI H S w g h R T : g I NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN NNNN 3 (g:TgO H) f...

  12. Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

    2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

  13. Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Miles

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . *Extension Ecotourism Program Specialist, The Texas A&M University System WILDLIFE Photography Miles Phillips* for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds B-6187 3/06 Types of Blinds Surface blinds Most photographers...

  14. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1980 a s outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994.Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOEEA-1023)...

  15. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  16. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  17. JUVENILE BLUE CRAB, CALLINECTES SAPIDUS, SURVIVAL: AN EVALUATION OF EELGRASS, ZOSTERA MARINA, AS REFUGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JUVENILE BLUE CRAB, CALLINECTES SAPIDUS, SURVIVAL: AN EVALUATION OF EELGRASS, ZOSTERA MARINA to examine rates ofpredation on juvenile blue crabs in different den- sities of eelgrass near Manahawkin, New provided the best refuge for blue crabs while crabs in low- and high-density eelgrass suffered higher rates

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  19. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

  20. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown,...

  1. The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sielecki, Leonard E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

  2. NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation For students entering fall 2010 graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. 1 - Earth Science elective ­ GEO-SCI 100 (f more of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

  3. NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester interested in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

  4. NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective options - BIOL of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

  5. Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ∑ Walleye ∑ Smallmouth bass ∑ Northern pike ∑ Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12;∑ At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control ∑ Implement

  6. CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

  7. anwr northeastern alaska: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Late Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of the Fish Lake valley, northeastern Alaska Range, Geosciences Websites Summary: in the...

  8. Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruary 4, 2014Biogas andManagedAugustEnergy On Senate

  9. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

  10. An internship with Redfish Unlimited, focused on design, construction and operation of a thermal refuge for the protection of red drum from winter cold-kill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Michael H.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 16 18 20 33 35 37 APPENDIX 38 VITA 39 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 2 3 4 5 Refuge design . Simulation: heater on when pond below 6 C. Simulation: maintenance of refuge at 8 C when pond below 6 C. Simulation: heater on when pond... below 8 C. . . . . . Simulation: maintenance of refuge at 6 C when pond below 6 C. Simulation: maintenance of refuge at 8 C when pond below 8 C. 10 22 24 26 28 30 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 3 4 5 6 Calculation of hole size in discharge...

  11. 6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

  12. An integrated study of dietary lipid manipulation and thermal-refuge technology for overwintering red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) in outdoor ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boren, Ronald Scott

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of consuming these diets, subgroups of fish were stocked into 8, 0.04-ha earthen ponds, with or without thermal refuges, during January 1994. The thermal refuges, consisting of air-inflated domes of plastic sheeting covering one end of affected ponds, were...

  13. Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugherty, Brad Ellis

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and slopes found on Gus Engeling Wildlife Management Area (GEWMA) and Richland Creek Wildlife Management Area (RCWMA). The resulting model output was displayed as a map, depicting the spatial distribution of habitat suitability for each of the 3 species...

  14. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  15. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  16. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  17. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  18. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

  19. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  20. FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idaho Wildlife Mitigation-Middle Snake #12;2 A. Abstract The Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation project (SIWM) of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) proposes implementation of wildlife mitigation and/or scientific background In both the Mid and Upper Snake Provinces, human development

  1. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

  2. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

  3. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Wildlife Exclusion Fencing Temporary Hourly Technicians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technical support, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities and mammals that present a threat to aircraft operations. In order to prevent wildlife from burrowing under sponsorship for this position. Candidates must be physical able to conduct repetitive actions; eye, hand

  5. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

  6. Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking: Design Tradeoffs and Early Experiences with ZebraNet Philo Juang Hidekazu Oki Yong Wang Margaret Martonosi Li-Shiuan Peh Dan Rubenstein Dept. of Electrical Princeton University ZebraNet Project VET TES EN NOV TAM TVM Current Tracking Technology Most common: VHF

  7. Dispersal and disturbance as factors limiting the distribution of rare plant species at the Savannah River Site and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primack, Richard; Walker, Joan.

    2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was conducted to identify effective methods of creating new populations of herbaceous species in managed upland longleaf pine forest at two locations in the Fall-line Sandhills of South Carolina. We included thirteen species and a variety of site treatments. All sites were burned and lightly raked prior to planting. Sowing seeds on untreated or fertilized treatments resulted in the lowest establishment of all treatments. Digging the planting area to remove belowground plant structures and using hardware cloth cages to exclude potential mammalian seed predators and herbivores led to increased establishment of target species. Establishment was higher using seedling transplants compared to seeds. Success rate was highly variable among sites so population establishment efforts should try to incorporate many sites initially to find the sites that give the greatest chance of success, or increase efforts to carefully identify species, habitat requirements and screen potential sites accordingly. Some species showed very low rates of success despite the variety of methods used; for such species additional work is required on their basic ecology, in particular germination biology and site requirements, as part of a restoration project. The overall low rate of establishment success emphasizes the need to protect and manage existing populations of uncommon Sandhills species, and to recognize that establishing large, long-term, reproducing populations of such species will be difficult.

  8. NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

  9. The wildlife orientation of selected student populations in Victoria, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Phyllis Ann Bradley

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Approved as to style and content by...

  10. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  11. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  14. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

  15. EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

  16. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 40(3), 2004, pp. 493500 Wildlife Disease Association 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    . Pepper,1 Thomas R. Rainwater,1 Steven G. Platt,2 Jennifer A. Dever,3 Todd A. Anderson,1 and Scott T. Mc and cost associated with CAM collection and the specific life history traits of the wildlife species. Key often involves killing animals for collection and analysis of various biologic samples (e.g., internal

  17. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(2), 2005, pp. 291297 Wildlife Disease Association 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    of northern California and southern Oregon (USA), the Texas Panhandle, and the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska Department, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Current address: U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 204 Russell Lab

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - atoll national wildlife Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Changed Pupping and Hauling Summary: . Atoll Research Bulletin 103. 3 pp. US.Fish and Wildlife Service. 1986. Hawaiian IslandsNational Wildlife... Islands National...

  19. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  20. Trains, Grains, and Grizzly Bears: Reducing Wildlife Mortality on Railway Tracks in Banff National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pissot, Jim

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the causes and solutions to train-wildlife collisions. Whilepopulations, relatively few trains strike wildlife on thegrizzlies were struck by CPR trains, and none of the five

  1. World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWoodWildlife Fund Jump to:

  2. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  3. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a system of economic incentives and develop cost effective solutions to agricultural and wildlife issues#12;ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the Potential for Use of Economic and Associated Floodplains prepared by Richard M. Porter for Socio-Economic Section Sustainability Division

  4. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

  5. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

  6. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  7. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  8. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

  10. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human≠Wildlife Conflicts 2(1):136≠138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

  11. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):250259, Fall 2013 Winter habitat use by juvenile greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 S. W. Williston Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA The historic range

  12. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablyís...

  13. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  14. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  15. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  16. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

    2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

  17. Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

  18. A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran Jane

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT A National Assessment of Wildlife Information Transfer to the Public. (August 2003) Kieran Jane Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clark E. Adams A self-administered questionnaire was developed using... A NATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF WILDLIFE INFORMATION TRANSFER TO THE PUBLIC A Thesis by KIERAN JANE LINDSEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  19. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  20. Cold tolerance of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and thermal-refuge technology to protect this species from cold-kill in aquaculture ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorsett, Paul Wesley

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    .004 to 0.006 min-' for the 1992-93 version (r > 0.99). A second phase of the research focused on cold tolerance of red drum in ponds at Palacios, from 6 February to 2 April 1993. Values of the 24-h lower lethal temperature of fish sampled from refuge...

  1. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  2. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  3. Collaboratives for Wildlife-Wind Turbine Interaction Research: Fostering Multistakeholder Involvement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster highlights the various wildlife-wind collaboratives (specific to wildlife-wind turbine interaction research) that currently exist. Examples of collaboratives are included along with contact information, objectives, benefits, and ways to advance the knowledge base.

  4. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  5. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  7. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  8. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  9. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  11. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  12. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  14. Assessment of Background E. coli Levels in Runoff from Grazed & Ungrazed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Three locations: · Welder Wildlife Refuge · Sinton · Chaparral-mixed grass communities · USDA

  15. NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron Fish and Wildlife Service -760/431-9440 ext. 205

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron ­ Fish and Wildlife Service - 760/431-9440 ext. 205 Jan Bedrosian ­ Bureau of Land Management ­ 916/978-4614 Timothy J. DiCintio ­ National Fish and Wildlife. The REAT is comprised of representatives of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management

  16. DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Will Clements in fish, wildlife and conservation biology. The course format will include lectures, group discussion Assignments and Homework......................................... 15% #12;FW 370- DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

  17. TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH VALLEY by Kim Cherie: Tourism Product Development: A Case Study of Wildlife Viewing In the Squamish Valley PROJECT: 284 #12;iii ABSTRACT Wildlife viewing is an increasingly important form of tourism in British Columbia

  18. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Debbie Beck, Tiffany Breske, Andrew McDermott, James Nissen, Craig Swedenborg U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service | Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge...

  19. Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness, treaty rights, public involvement in forest policy, or international trade issues? Contact Information · Silviculture · Consulting Company · Urban Forestry · Tourism · GIS · Computer Modeling · Professional Biologist

  20. ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M of acoustic pollution in the oceans and effects on marine mammals Where do we go from here? #12;4/17/2011 2 ON ACOUSTIC POLLUTION Anthropogenic sound generation Transportation Army/Navy Research Commercial Birds

  1. EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

  2. Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    1 Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation Great Lakes Natural Resource Center Ann Arbor context #12;2 Source: Cassedy and Grossman, Introduction to Energy, 1998 #12;3 Coal Ranks · Anthracite ­ highest rank, high energy content · Bituminous ­ second highest rank, high energy content; typically

  3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

  4. Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics Marc Choisy1,* and Pejman Rohani1 extinction. Surprisingly, infectious diseases have not been accounted for in harvest models, which is a major and harvesting can substantially increase both disease prevalence and the absolute number of infectious

  5. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  6. Volunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Hampshire Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer University of New Hampshire, UVolunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter Term: One Year Duties; (2) Actively publicize the availability of SFW presentations in your community; (3) For field walks

  7. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

  8. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  9. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansion 5 Figure 2. Natural gas supply

  10. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jump to:

  11. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jump to:December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:58,

  12. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jump to:December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of

  13. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, Brian

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

  15. Predator Control as a Tool in Wildlife Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Dale

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    the individual predator profiles beginning on page 11). For example, coyote scat is generally cigar shaped and smaller than that of a domestic dog. Game monitoring systems can be useful in studying game and predator species. Managers can view wildlife via video... containing chicken eggs) to measure depredation. Then a strategic predator management plan can be developed to address specific problems (for example, only raccoons) or areas (for example, around deer feeders). Camera systems range in price from about $200...

  16. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Lawswith Wildlife

  17. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  18. Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

  19. The Tiger and the Sun: Solar Power Plants and Wildlife Sanctuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuigan, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss separate and integrated approaches to building scalable solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries. Both solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries need a lot of land. We quantify some of the requirements using various estimates of the rate of solar power production as well as the rate of adding wildlife to a sanctuary over the time range 2010-2050. We use population dynamics equations to study the evolution of solar energy and tiger populations up to and beyond 2050.

  20. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - abu wildlife sanctuary Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FORESTRY SECTOR IN GHANA Ben N. Donkor Summary: wildlife sanctuaries and one strict nature reserve (Figure 1.7). Management plans based on biological... and sociological surveys...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - administration wildlife mitigation Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IntroductionI. Introduction The Northwest Power Act of Summary: , mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, on the Columbia... to...

  3. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  4. Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiilsgaard, Chris

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

  5. Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Buglť Wildlife Use in Western Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derek Anthony

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

  6. Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

  7. Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

  8. Characterization of sediment movement in tidal creeks adjacent to the gulf intracoastal waterway at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Austwell, TX: study of natural factors and effects of barge-induced drawdown currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, John Bryan

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , these are the rarest cranes in the world. The wetlands in which they winter are a part of the San Antonio Bay system, a bay that receives constant fresh water flow from the Guadalupe River. Currently there is a plan for using water diverted from the Guadalupe River...

  9. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista Capital LLCFish, Wildlife

  10. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  11. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia Erika Alacs* and Arthur Georges Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia Australian flora and fauna are highly sought for the international black market in wildlife. Within Australia

  13. INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

  14. SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM · determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

  15. wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Biology Biology and several local offices of the federal and state conservation agencies. These agencies often--Wildlife Diseases................................................................3 WLF F433--Conservation

  16. FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics The Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville invites applications have at least one degree in Forestry from an SAF-accredited program. Demonstrated experience in field

  17. Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchens, John

    Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa) Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experi- mentally

  18. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  19. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  20. Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    Chapter 4 Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman, and Joshua D. Stafford Abstract Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires

  1. A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

  2. A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system for use in wildlife capture are described, including the standard 3-rocket system, are presented. Keywords: Rocket net, wildlife capture, trapping, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Arizona

  3. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):100­105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for cavity-nesting birds WILLIAM C. PITT, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center elevation areas of the Alakai Plateau. Puaiohi nest primarily on steep streamside cliffs

  4. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):58, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):5­8, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural.O. Box 5496-30100, Eldoret, Kenya nsifuna@ yahoo.com Key words: human­wildlife conflicts, Kenya Wildlife depredation in Laikipia, Kenya Kenya's Laikipia District is located on the equator in the central part

  5. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, Brian

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

  6. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, Brian

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

  7. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

  8. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  9. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  10. Dioxin hazards to fish, wildlife, and invertebrates: a synoptic review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisler, R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs) are present as trace impurities in various manufactured chemicals and in combustion products. The chemical and environmental stability of PCDDs and their tendency to accumulate in fatty tissues have resulted in their widespread detection throughout the global ecosystem. The most toxic and extensively studied PCDD isomer is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Accidental contamination of the environment by 2,3,7,8-TCDD has resulted in deaths in many species of birds, wildlife, and domestic animals, and in the closing of rivers to fishing due to high residues in fish, i.e., >50 parts per trillion (ppt) wet weight. Laboratory studies with birds, mammals, aquatic organisms, and other species have conclusively demonstrated that exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD can be associated with acute and delayed mortality, carcinogenic, teratogenic, reproductive, mutagenic, histopathologic, and immunotoxic effects.

  11. NIOSH tests refuge chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A NIOSH report questions the viability of the shelters already certified by West Virginia. 1 tab., 6 photos.

  12. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  13. Reprinted from Wildlife Society Bulletin Volume 27, Number I, Spring 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B/7-tJ Reprinted from Wildlife Society Bulletin Volume 27, Number I, Spring 1999 Estimation of ring magnetic field and measuring the impedance change in the radiating coil (EM-SCAN Inc. 1993

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - albeni falls wildlife Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future 1. Population-specific goals Summary: -specific goals should be adopted for fish and wildlife affected by hydropower in the Columbia River Basin... in order to improve...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska linking wildlife Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Life Sciences Summary: of the state and federal agencies in Alaska (e.g. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Department of Fish... in FY08, close to 75 percent are...

  17. Fact Sheet - Acquisition of 0.5 acre wildlife habitat in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Falls Dam. The 0.5-acre parcel will be owned and managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for the purpose of wildlife mitigation. A fee in lieu of taxes will be paid to...

  18. HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    31 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Department that the density of animals in a habitat #12;MEASURING HABITAT QUALITY · Johnson Trans. W. Sect. Wildl. Soc. 41

  19. Loxahatchee Non-profit Sends Mobile Wildlife Laboratory to Island of Dominica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gear, veterinary supplies, and wildlife monitoring and surveillance equipment, and can support six Dominica. The national bird is revered as the icon of Dominica, adorning the nation's flag and coat

  20. Determining the effects of fluctuating lake levels on wildlife habitat using GIS and remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabella, Raymond Jacob

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water level fluctuations in the Lake Granger Corps of Engineers (COE) reservoir project are the result of flood control management of the lower Brazos River basin. These fluctuations periodically submerge wildlife habitat surrounding the lake...

  1. The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Etienne Samuel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

  2. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Population and Habitat Assessment Branch, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Veit R.R., T.P. White, M. Martin, and M.J. Steinkamp. 2010. At-Sea...

  3. Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiilsgaard, Chris

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

  4. How does the public process impact the selection of a nuisance wildlife management plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Julianne (Julianne Susan)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1950s the human relationship with wildlife in the United States shifted dramatically; from primarily consumptive to primarily recreational. Over the same time period a trend of humans moving into suburban communities ...

  5. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):206211, Fall 2008 Evaluation of physical barriers to prevent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -footed ferret programs (M. Brennan, biologist, Boulder County, personal communication). However, resource ludovicianus) colonies on public and private lands can result in damage to property. Physical barriers, wildlife damage management Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) pose many challenges

  6. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Economic Decisions with Wildlife in Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Warminski , Patrick; Jones, DeDe

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    on lands that have never been cultivated and up to 75 percent of the cost of restoring grasslands that were previously cropped. Income Potential on Wildlife Land Land managed for wildlife can provide additional income sources, such as nature tourism..., camping, and hiking?depends on the natural amenities of an area. Driving this market is the desire of many to experience nature, and observe plant and animal life. Nature-based tourism provides economic incentives for landowners to conserve...

  7. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Conser- vation Service office about the Environmental Quality Incentive Program, which offers cost-share funding for cross-fencing, watering, controlling brush, managing grazing and prescribed burning. Carefully consider wild- life needs when managing... brush. Landowners who want to provide habitat for rare or declining species should check on cost-share funding for these practices. The Natural Resources Conservation Service?s Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  8. Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and Regulatory Oversight of Commercial Wildlife Control Activities in the United States. (August 2007) Kieran J. Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Commite: Dr. Clark E. Adams Urbanization decreases... PRIVATIZATION AND REGULATORY OVERSIGHT OF COMERCIAL WILDLIFE CONTROL ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES A Disertation by KIERAN J. LINDSEY Submited to the Ofice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  9. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  10. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  11. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  12. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  13. Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

  14. Applications of Data-driven Modeling to Infectious Diseases in Africa: Anthrax in Wildlife and HIV in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Steven Edward

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating wind turbine-caused bird mortality. Journal ofestimation of wildlife mortality due to wind farms (Flint etsurveillance of mortality due to disease, wind farms,

  15. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drais, Gregory

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

  16. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  17. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

  19. Zena conservation easement protects habitat in Willamette Valley...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    central Willamette Valley for fi sh and wildlife habitat mitigation. Located in the Eola Hills about eight miles northwest of Salem (see map), this property provides refuge for...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - andre gregor kyriakos Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Valmont Organ Spaceport City Sunland Park Las Palomas White Sands Missile Range Fort Bliss McGregor Range... San Andres National Wildlife Refuge White Sands National...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - andres reservoir foster Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE... Reservoir Elephant Butte Reservoir Afton Red Sand Mason Draw Fort Bliss McGregor Range White Sands Missile Source: Laughlin, Robert B. - Department of...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - andre gregor eron Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Valmont Organ Spaceport City Sunland Park Las Palomas White Sands Missile Range Fort Bliss McGregor Range... San Andres National Wildlife Refuge White Sands National...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - andre gregor mart Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Valmont Organ Spaceport City Sunland Park Las Palomas White Sands Missile Range Fort Bliss McGregor Range... San Andres National Wildlife Refuge White Sands National...

  4. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  5. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-014 Tools9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  6. Technical Report TR-013 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-013 Hydrology March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest: Pre-harvest chemical characteristics of three S6 creeks-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  7. Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 60 (2013) LAKEWATCH Continues to be a Large Part of Florida Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a largemouth bass during a sampling event for the long-term fish monitoring program Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Long-Term Fish Monitoring Program in their water bodies. Focusing more on fish and wildlife (biological integrity

  8. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  9. PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 APPENDIX L Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife Plans and Programs This inventory was conducted in the spring of 2003 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under contract to WRI. The following pages are printed from the spreadsheet used in the inventory

  10. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  11. Technical Report TR-014 May 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife just like Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  12. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  13. Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narolski, Steven W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

  14. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  15. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  16. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs air pollution, urban sprawl, intro- duced insects and diseases, catastrophic weather events, demand. With expanding world-wide trade and transport (50% of the toys sold in the U.S. come from China) natural barriers

  17. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):214223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):214­223, Fall 2007 Foraging preferences of captive Canada geese Columbus Avenue, Sandusky, OH 44870, USA Abstract: Overabundant populations of Canada geese (Branta these concerns. The objective of this study was to determine if captive Canada geese exhibited a foraging

  18. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):242250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 3(2):242­250, Fall 2009 Observations of neck-collared Canada geese near, Castleton, NY 12033-9653, USA Abstract: Canada geese (Branta canadensis) often cause significant damage when. We placed alpha-numeric neck collars on 300 Canada geese within 8 km of both John F. Kennedy

  19. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs with mineral-rich bedrock, at the base of cliffs and steep slopes, or in ravines--places that accumulate is a GPS unit. Global positioning systems (GPS) are used in the field to record the location of plant

  20. Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Acoustics of Anthropogenic Habitats: Noise Pollution and its Impacts on Wildlife Caitlin Kight by anthropogenic noise pollution, which is often louder, has a different frequency emphasis, and may occur over a different temporal scale, than natural noise. Although a handful of studies have indicated that acoustically

  1. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

  2. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

  3. Marine Conservation UK's national charity dedicated to the protection of marine wildlife.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will urge all troops in Iraq to uphold international law and will welcome "the firm commitmentMarine Conservation UK's national charity dedicated to the protection of marine wildlife. Public Discussion Contact Us Sitemap Japan-EU summit in Tokyo to focus on enlargement, investment 20 June 2004

  4. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  5. Perth & Kinross Red Squirrel Group update for SSG National Lottery: Community Wildlife fund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perth & Kinross Red Squirrel Group ­ update for SSG National Lottery: Community Wildlife fund PKRSG's Red squirrel conservation efforts were significantly boosted by receipt of a funding award from and 23rd ) and with the help of the Royal Mail some 36,470 `Reds on your doorstep' leaflets were

  6. Spatial and temporal variation in fruit use by wildlife in a forested landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Spatial and temporal variation in fruit use by wildlife in a forested landscape John P. Mc of fruit from 22 common plant species over 2 years in five habitats of a managed landscape in South Carolina (USA). Our long-term goal is to determine the importance of fruit as a resource for vertebrates

  7. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  8. ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS APPENDIX D FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM D-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix D STAFF ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS During the course. This report provides the results of the biological analysis of the adopted actions. The package was termed

  9. Wildlife conservation and reduced emissions from deforestation in a case study of Nantu National Park,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    more effective than the PAs without international investment. In contrast with the recent hopes Park, Sulawesi 1. The effectiveness of forest protection--many measures, one goal Ewan A. Macdonald a o Published on line 3 April 2011 Keywords: Protected area Sulawesi REDD Wildlife conservation

  10. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):315320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):315­320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement in South% in 2006 and 80% in 2007, but the timing was important. Fields where abatement practices were applied early in the growing season had less damage than fields where they were applied later. Abatement practices that were

  11. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

  12. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  13. Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

  14. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(1):89, Spring 2009 The Soap Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of controlling wildlife were (1) the field success of poison against meadow mice during a Nevada mouse plague not be transmissible to other vertebrates. Because this was not successful, it searched for a poison bait or lethal gas that any accurate knowledge of the food habits of such pests and effective means for reducing their numbers

  15. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  16. SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

  17. As I travel across the country talking with wildlife professionals about leadership and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that many wildlife professionals still lack basic people skills. We obviously have historically understood skills is the type of people our pro- fession attracts; we simply don't attract many people, relative our profession. Unfortunately, many of us lack an under- standing of how to develop better people

  18. Spatial and Temporal Survey of Feral Pig Ectoparasites in Three Texas Wildlife Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Anthony

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    wildlife districts. This is the first report of these fleas on feral pigs. Lice and ticks were collected from all gender and age classes of feral pigs from all sample sites. Only hog lice, Haematopinus suis, were collected at all three sample sites. Seven...

  19. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):299312, Fall 2013 Do artificial nests simulate nest success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):299­312, Fall 2013 Do artificial nests simulate nest success State University, Logan, UT 84322- 5230, USA Abstract: Artificial nests have been used to study factors affecting nest success because researchers can manipulate them more than natural bird nests. Many

  20. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

  1. Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Long Term Vegetation Data and Ecological Sites: A Strategy for Wildlife Management Kevin of data grouped by Ecological Site with management and environmental variables to determine mechanisms project goals. Benefits are overlapping and include: · State and Transition Models (STMs): Inference

  2. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):251256, Fall 2009 Burrowing owl and other migratory bird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), including the burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hazard, burrowing owl, Edwards Air Force Base, human­wildlife conflicts, Migratory Bird Treaty Act (Dolbeer 2006). Most are federally protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) of 1918, which

  3. Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

  4. Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL 1 Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife progress. Subbasin assessments provide technical information upon which subbasin plans and other planning but are separate and distinct technical exercises. Assessments help to estimate the resource potential of each

  5. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project of potential risk to the species. #12;Corn Snake ­ Fairly common in Delaware, but is not likely to be present

  6. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):216225, Fall 2009 Personal and corporate liability in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    managers and operators are being sued personally for human injuries and death, as well as property damage, state, and provincial wildlife management programs have contributed to population increases in large that airport operators and managers must address the issues of organizational and personal liability. Airport

  7. DOE's Former Rocky Flats Weapons Production Site to Become National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's (DOI) U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. After more than a...

  8. C C

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    lands that will be retained by DOE, and those that are planned to be turned over to the Fish and Wildlife Service as a Wildlife Refuge, Figure 1-3, a Site Location map, and Figure...

  9. Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production site to the Department of the Interior's U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for use as a National Wildlife Refuge. Additionally the Rocky...

  10. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  11. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  12. Description and analysis of vehicle and train collisions with wildlife in Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada, 1951-1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertwistle, Jim

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measures that have been used in Jasper National Park is alsoCOLLISIONS WITH WILDLIFE IN JASPER NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTANational Park Warden, Jasper National Park, 780-852-6235,

  13. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3910, Forestry and Natural Resources Practicum, the intern must complete

  14. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Forestry, Wildlife, Water and Soil to receive academic credit for FANR 3900, Forestry and Natural Resources Internship, the intern must work

  15. Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat appiness Zero Carbon Zero Waste Sustainable Transport Sustainable Materia munity Equity & Local Economy Health & Happiness Zero Carbon Zero Was Water Land Use

  16. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(1):139149, Spring 2014 Evaluation of foliar sprays to reduce crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the anthraquinone-based product, Avipel (44 minutes/day) than on reference plots (132 minutes/day; P and economical in the field. Key words: anthraquinone, Canada geese, crop damage, human­wildlife conflicts

  17. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  18. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  19. Wildlife conservation education efforts by Information and Education (I&E) divisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Richard Alan

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Wende Swank (Member) 3LI , J hn K. Thomas (Member) Da id Schmidly (Department Head) December 1987 ABSTRACT Wildlife Conservation Education Efforts by Information and Education Divisions (I&E) (December 1987) Richard Alan Stone, B. S.... John K. Thomas in the construction and interpretation of the survey. Not to be forgotten are the survey respondents whose time spent on the surv ey and patience with me on the phone proves that there are commited individuals in conserv ation...

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  1. I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe SecondInformation 3 - Wildlife

  2. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  3. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  4. Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

  5. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  6. South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  8. Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    managemen t Lyons, R. K. and T. F. Ginnett. 1998. Integrat- ing Deer, Quail, and Tu rkey Habitat. L-5196, Te xas Agri c u lt u ral Ext en si o n Service. Lyons, R. K., M. K. Owens, and R. V. Machen. 1998. Juniper biology and management in Texas. B-6074...Woody Plants and Wildlife Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily...

  9. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  10. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  12. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-34)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  13. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

  15. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the U.S. Department of Energy that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one and wildlife mitigation. Also, direct-funding payments to the other federal agencies for theERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act

  16. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Concerns and Recommendations Our specific comments on the Council's draft recommendations address several issues, broadly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and power needs of the people of the Pacific Northwest. In our perspective it is one of your most Balancing the Fish and Wildlife Program under the Northwest Power Act.Instead of reanalyzing the projects for the Fish and Wildlife Program was established by the Bonneville Power Administration in their electricity

  17. FW370 -Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects -Spring 2012 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 10-11:40, Wagar 107 (Lecture & Discussion) or NR 232, CLL West (Lab)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FW370 - Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects - Spring 2012 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 10 of this course is to introduce you to the principles of conducting sound scientific research in fish, wildlife of the scientific method in fish, wildlife, and conservation biology research (from asking good questions

  18. FW370 Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects Spring 2011 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 1011:40, Wagar 107 (Lecture & Discussion) or NR 232, CLL West (Lab)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FW370 Design of Fish and Wildlife Projects Spring 2011 Course Meeting Times/Places: Tu/Th 1011 is to introduce you to the principles of conducting sound scientific research in fish, wildlife, and conservation of the scientific method in fish & wildlife research (from asking good questions to designing experiments

  19. Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Buck: Wildlife Monitoring on Shrublands of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B. [NSTec; Greger, Paul D. [NSTec

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers 3,561 km2 and extends over portions of both the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts. The resulting diverse and complex flora and fauna exhibit elements of both deserts. There are 20 vegetation associations, composed primarily of shrubs, nested within 10 vegetation alliances. Of the more than 1,200 invertebrate and 339 vertebrate species found in these shrubland habitats, 267 are considered sensitive or protected/regulated by federal or state laws. Wildlife and wildlife habitat monitoring ensures NTS activities comply with all federal and state laws enacted for the protection of these valuable biological resources and provides ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and current activities on these resources. This paper describes the monitoring approach used at this large site. Monitoring strategies include conducting preactivity surveys, proactively monitoring sensitive species, monitoring long-term population trends, and collaborating with other agencies and biologists. Ways to make monitoring more efficient and examples of successful monitoring and collaborations are discussed.

  20. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  1. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  3. Wildlife Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    stages. At first there are ?flu-like? symptoms such as fatigue, fever, sore throat, nausea and cough- ing. According to the Texas Department of Health, many of those infected develop a small red lesion around the site of the tick or flea bite...

  4. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bees as Indicators of Radionuclide Contamination (pdf) Great Horned Owls at the Los Alamos Environmental Research Park: Population Survey, Nesting Biology, and Management...

  5. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for Plutonium CleanupProposalTeam:RightsProtecting

  6. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):311326, Fall 2012 An investigation into the use of road drain-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - age structures by wildlife in Maryland, USA JAMES L. SPARKS JR., University of Maryland Center, targeting a restricted number of culverts, time periods, or locales (Foster and Humphrey 1995, Rodriguez et) to determine the effect of culvert and land-use and land-cover (LULC) characteristics on use (Rodriguez et al

  7. GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat impacts, and then examine other anthropogenic sources of avian mortality. Next, we provide a broad

  8. United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishes. S..::aleless warm- water fish are particularly susceptible. High water temperature decreases fish resistance to this disease. RANGE Best known in America. Excessively hot summer temperatures are favorable and Wildlife INTRODUCTION Columnaris disease attacks many species of fresh -water fishes. Also known as "Cotton

  9. Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service A National Streamflow Network Gap Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Analysis U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2013 13039500, Henrys Fork near Lake, Idaho; photograph by Nathan Jacobson, USGS. USGS streamgage 10336660, Emily B. Osborne, and Ken Eng Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Scientific

  10. On the merits and feasibility of wildlife monitoring for conservation: a case study from Katavi National Park,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, Tim

    wildlife populations, it is currently carried out in surprisingly few protected areas in Africa. Here, data, are presented. These data provide information on large mammal densities, identify declines in populations of sev managers especially in identifying population declines; counts should be employed more often in East Africa

  11. Improving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Conservation Biology Vietnam is a tropical country rich in biodiversity. However, biodiversity in Vietnam has forests. Improving the conservation of biodiversity in Vietnam is a contemporary issue of concern. MyImproving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  13. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  14. Correlations Among Gender, Career Interests, Conservation Issues, And Curriculum Choice By Students In Wildlife And Fisheries Sciences At Texas A&M University From 2000 To 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woldhagen, Ashley N.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    enrolled in a mandatory class, Conservation and Management (WFSC 201). Among other questions, the survey asked students to provide information about their curriculum choice, agreement with value statements about wildlife and conservation issues, career...

  15. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  16. Characterizing and Modeling Arctic Shrub Expansion on the North Slope of Alaska, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naito, Adam Takashi

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    plain of ANWR .................................................................... 279 Figure A-29 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR images... ....................................................................................... 280 Figure A-30 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR images, subsection 1 ................................................................. 281 Figure A-31 Location of the flightlines for the 1984/1985 ANWR...

  17. Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

  18. Figure 8. Technically Recoverable and Commercially Developable...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the Alaska North Slope fig8.jpg (38547 bytes) Source: United States Geological Survey, "Economics of Undiscovered Oil in the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge," 1998...

  19. Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A program or project that requires the use of a public park, recreational area, scientific area, wildlife refuge, or historic site may not be approved by any department, agency, political...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - actual site soil Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bosque Del Apache Wildlife Refuge. The first soil at the Sevilleta site... % clay. The bulk density of the soil is approximately 1.6 ... Source: Borchers, Brian - Department of...

  1. A multistakeholder perspective on human interactions with the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Crystal River, Florida, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorice, Michael Gregory

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . Property owned by Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Swim corridor to King Spring initial outcomes of manatee encounters Dimensions used by SMC to judge harassment Outcome of manatee encounters using the USFWS definition of harassment 10 12 27...

  2. NOAA ARL Monthly Activities Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activities Report April 2005 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory. The fourth meeting will be held at the Patuxent Research Refuge National Wildlife Visitor Center in Laurel

  3. A Networked Telerobotic Observatory for Collaborative Remote Observation of Avian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ken

    , Berkeley, California Welder Wildlife Foundation, Sinton, Texas Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Sinton, Texas (28E6'51.1" N, 97E25'2.2" W). The region in which the refuge is located has the highest

  4. By Matthew J. Kotchen o drill or not to drill? That is the ques-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. With oil and gas prices hitting record highs in an election year not be available immediately and would take several decades to extract. Forecasts predict peak production after

  5. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  6. Range Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scifres, C.J.; Kelly, D.M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TABLE 9. TOTAL STANDING CROP OF LIVE OAK AND NEW GROWTH (KGIHA) AND STANDING CROP INCREASE ( REPRESENTED BY NEW GROWTH IN APRIL AND JULY, 1* ON AREAS BURNED AT VARIOUS DATES ON THE ARANS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE NEAR AUSTWELL, TEXAS' New growth2... Response of live oak-dominated vegetation on thicketized uplands to burning in the fall 1974, spring 1975, and fall 1975 was evaluated through 1977 on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Standing crop, species diversity, and botanical composition...

  7. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

  8. BIOLOGY AT NCBS, BANGALORE AND DBS, MUMBAI (PhD/Int-PhD/ M. Sc.-by-Research/ M. Sc. in Wildlife & Conservation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhalla, Upinder S.

    BIOLOGY AT NCBS, BANGALORE AND DBS, MUMBAI (PhD/Int-PhD/ M. Sc.-by-Research/ M. Sc. in Wildlife & Conservation) (Please check the websites: `Admissions' at www.ncbs.res.in; http at both Bangalore and Mumbai campuses. Internet access, e-mail and bibliography search support are also

  9. FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have fish in the water of a particular stream before their release into that stream. Act -- See Northwest of different elements of the system are better understood. adult equivalent population The number of fish

  10. R E V I E W : W I L D L I F E E C O L O G Y Emerging Infectious Diseases of Wildlife--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    and the persis- tence of rinderpest in eastern Africa contin- ues to threaten bovid populations. Pandemics the emergence of EIDs via increasing population density, especially in urban areas (dengue, cholera epizootiological criteria: (i) EIDs associated with "spill-over" from domestic animals to wildlife populations

  11. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  12. Establishing a Birding-Related Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David; Callahan, Ashley

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The economic impact of birding ecotourism on the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge Area, Texas, 1993-1994. Report the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Kerlinger, P., T. Eubanks and R. H. Payne. (1994b). The economic impact of birding ecotourism on the Laguna...

  13. Contributed Paper Potential Effects of the United States-Mexico Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    Church, Suite 4292, Tucson, AZ 85701, U.S.A. §U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, 1611 North Second Avenue, Ajo, AZ 85321, U.S.A. Abstract: Security infrastructure along behaviors of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owls (Glaucidium brasilianum), and satellite telemetry, gene-flow estimates

  14. Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

  15. HAS 222d/253e Intro to Energy and Environment (Life under the pale sun) P.B. Rhines, J.Wright

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ANWR's oil reserves. When I Google `anwr oil reserves barrels day' the following are the first 3 critique of the conflicting factors involved with drilling for oil there. What is your opinion about Google

  16. Sunnyside Wildlife Area Wildlife Area Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primary Treatment Morgan Lake Secondary Treatment So. Morgan Wetland- Tertiary New Johnson Wetland;#12;Moist Soil and Wetland Management Giffen LakeRice Paddies Brady Wetland 90-Acre Field #12;Smartweed Seeds #12;#12;#12;#12;N.A. Wetlands Conservation Act Grant (NAWCA) Sulphur Cr. Wasteway Bridgeman Pond

  17. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Ė Air and Water Volume 2 Ė Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  18. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

  19. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  20. Wildlife Management Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities at the Metals Reduction Plant 2010 Completed demolition of the East End Smelter 2010 Began operation of the C-400 TCE Source Removal System 2010 Completed removal of...

  1. Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 264 miles · 30% decline in small floodplains along tributaries-70% decline of islands in tributaries developments and habitat loss Land matrix: small parcels with high value #12;Willamette Subbasin Plan." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills

  2. Chapter 18 Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding FriedelIron-Sulfur3-1 November 2012 Words in17-18-1

  3. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051SoilWindFraud to theReport

  4. Breeding biology and habitat associations of the Altamira Oriole and Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Scott Michael

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the nest camera. Personnel at the Santa Ana/Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge Complex provided helpful information on the focal species, logistical support, and housing for myself and my field assistants. I would particularly like to thank... Species with the five greatest importance values determined by foliage hits in the shrub and tree layers at Altamira Oriole nest plots and non-use plots at Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, 2002-2003????????. 52 12 Species with the five greatest...

  5. Manipulation of huisache communities with herbicides, burning, and mechanical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontrager, Orvin Eli

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    bottomland range sites on the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Refuge near Sinton, Texas. Low-energy grubbing to an average depth of 14 cm in August 1975, controlled 75X of the plants. Discing once in August and again in October killed 22% of the huisache... LITERATURE CITED. 93 APPENDIX. 97 VITA. 100 LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE Chemical and physical characteristics of the Odem and Sinton soils collected in July and August, 1975, from the research areas on the Welder Wildlife Refuge near Sinton, Texas. 12...

  6. Effects of cattle grazing systems on shrub-grassland birds in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Douglas Wayne

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CITED. APPENDIX A. APPENDIX B. VITA. Page 47 47 50 50 62 73 79 . 83 88 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Pastures, grazing systems, stocking rates, and transect length, Welder Wildlife Refuge, Sinton, Texas... Summary of results for 1983. Table 16 Summary of results for 1984. Page 51 53 64 68 69 LIST OF FIGURES Fig. 1 Vicinity map of the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge, Sinton, Texas. Fig. 2 Plant communities and pastures, Welder...

  7. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

  8. A study of the plant composition and utilization by mixed classes of livestock and white-tailed deer on the Kerr Wildlife Management area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Morton

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ^ z*\\ ^ z * A A M CULlEGE OF TEXAS A STUDY OF THE PLOT COMPOSITION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES OF LIVESTOCK AND WHITE-TAILED DEER ON THE KERR WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA A MCUULlEGECOF TOlEOF TGX S18cCEEL- EO E2L (lG-1GEL So2OOp Oe E2L... AnlCo1pE1lGp GF- TLo2GFCoGp ;OppLnL Oe )LsGU CF hGlECGp e1peCppcLFE Oe E2L lLa1ClLcLFEU eOl E2L MLnlLL Oe MOoEOl Oe d2CpOUOh2X JGF1GlXP 1959. Major Subject; Range Management A STUDY OF THE PLANT COM?031 ?ION AND UTILIZATION BY MIXED CLASSES...

  9. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

  11. Design and evaluation of deer guards for Florida Key Deer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebesta, Jason Daryl

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , deer guard prototypes were constructed and tested within a deer-holding facility at the Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge near Sinton, Texas. Wild-trapped Texas white-tailed deer (O. v. tenanus) were used as test animals. Deer-guard prototypes were...

  12. Metapopulation Dynamics of a Burr owing Owl ( Speotyto cunicularia ) Population in Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over time at the 6,900-ha Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMANWR), Colorado fr om 1990. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study Ar ea We studied Burr owing Owls on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National W yucca ( Yucca spp.), sand sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia), and rubber rabbitbrush ( Chrysothamnus

  13. Why Springs Are Valuable Natural springs are important aquatic resources.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    source of clean, high-quality groundwater that flows at a relatively constant rate and temperature hot weather and droughts. Spring streams and riparian lands provide critical water, food, refuge. Because springs are dependable, they are an increasingly valuable supply of water for people and wildlife

  14. Appendix 57 Predicted Distributions of Terrestrial Vertebrates Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , some National Wildlife Refuges. i #12;3 An area having permanent protection from conversion of natural Tables 4.1 and 4.3, Redmond et al. 1998): Code Management Status 1 An area having permanent protection, National Parks, Research Natural Areas (RNAs), Special Interest Areas (SIAs), some Areas of Critical

  15. Three E's: Education, Experience, and Employment 2011 Field Trip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risk." Miche!e Gutierrez " Fire Management Officer, Mary Kay Hicks, Texas Forest Service, taught us Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma #12;National Weather Center, Norman, Oklahoma #12;Flint Hills Research Unit, Manhattan, Kansas #12;"Pine bark beetle damage in the black hi!s national forest - Recent

  16. BIOE 103CS Environmental Science and Society Spring 2014 Course website: www.montana.edu/kalinowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalinowski, Steven T

    Wildlife Refuge 19 Apr 9 Nuclear energy 20 Apr 11 Renewable energy 21 Apr 14 Climate 17 Apr 16 Global ways humans have altered the natural world. Academic misconduct Students violating MSU's Academic growth 3 Feb 3 Population growth 3 Feb 5 Biomes & Climate 4 Feb 7 Nitrogen cycle 5 Feb 10 Carbon cycle 5

  17. 2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    : Bruce Herbert (O) 979-845-2405 herbert@geo.tamu.edu #12;Heather R. Miller 2004-05 TWRI Mills 2 Water2004-2005 Texas Water Resources Institute Mills Scholarship Application Water Management, Soil Salinity and Landscape Ecology in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge Heather R. Miller Department

  18. National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

  19. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

  20. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

  1. Spatial and temporal winter territory use and behavioral responses of whooping cranes to human activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFever, Kristin E.

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    cranes during winter 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 at ANWR, Texas, USA? 20 3 Percent time spent in locomotion and flight by territorial whooping crane families throughout winter 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 at ANWR, Texas, USA...????????????????????????? 22 4 Mean movement velocity (meters traveled/min) of 5 whooping crane families during winter 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 at ANWR, Texas, USA?. 34 5 Area (ha) of each habitat type within the winter territory of 5 whooping...

  2. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Resources requesting an EIA Service Report "with plausible scenarios for ANWR supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments." This...

  3. Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "I applaud the House's passage of a bill that allows responsible, environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton...

  4. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME |Supplement5869Google EarthUSE 4.1

  5. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME |Supplement5869Google EarthUSE 4.1of

  6. Roost dynamics and site fidelity of snow geese wintering in southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennings, Ann Fortenberry

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Texas coast. 10 HIRRIS SASTROP 8AYOU 0 BASTROP BAY REFUGE BOUNDARY CHRISTMAS BAY SALT LAKE Q a p~ ga Fig. 2. Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge. S4+ 8p 4~O yyy py y Qlly eyo goo%. flOyD DOffo olVEyf eyo ~ly & yff Cpfy4~ Cyy Cyyp... Institute and State Oniversity Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. Douglas Slack Roost dynamics and site fidelity of lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) wintering in southeast Texas were investigated at Brazoria and San Bernard National...

  7. Summer fire impacts and isotopic assessment of vegetation dynamics in Texas coastal Quercus virginiana communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kelley Ann

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abundance of woody plants has been documented in grasslands and savannas in many parts of the world, including Africa, Australia, and North and South America (Archer 1994). These successional changes have been rapid (50-100 years), non- linear, and non... REFUGE J, g 6yP @4 MATAGOILDA ISLANP I 1 FALF InaAS Y I I Ksascr MEMOIUAL FOUNPAtt RANCH N LEGEND ? ? COUNTY LINE ? SOUNDARY = ROAD Q STATE HIGHWAY US HIGHWAY Fig. 1. Geographic locations of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge...

  8. Biosolids and Wildlife Sally Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    collected at the Jasper County, MO Superfund site. This site is part of the Tri-State mining district of habitat. At four of these sites, Bunker Hill, ID, Leadville, CO, Jasper County, MO and Palmerton, PA tailings in Jasper County, MO before and after biosolids amendment. Small mammals were tested from

  9. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit Jump to:UtilityRateFinderRetrievedWilderness

  10. Our definition of sustainability reflects what the UN and the World Wildlife Fund suggest as the process of improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting eco-systems. We use the definition where human, societa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, H√ľseyin

    Our definition of sustainability reflects what the UN and the World Wildlife Fund suggest as the process of improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting eco are fundamentally integrated dimensions that are mutually reinforcing. The new School of Global Sustainability

  11. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

  12. Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  13. Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  14. Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energyís Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each siteís sampling program.

  15. Characterization of freshwater as a treatment for amyloodiniosis in red drum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Courtney Elaine

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) because the number of parasites per fish is relatively small in situations where fish density is low. In September 1997, however, scientists determined that a fish kill of over one million tilapia at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge in California... was the result of infestation by A. ocellatum (F WS 1997). High temperatures and salinities present in the Salton Sea at that time apparently were conducive to rapid development of lethal infestations. The red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) is a marine, warmwater...

  16. Response of breeding seaside sparrows to fire on the upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitbeck, Matthew W

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as Schoerioplectus americanns (Chabreck 1981). On the National Wildlife Refuges of the Texas Chenier Plain, fire is one of the primary tools used to manage marshes (U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1994, USFWS 2000). Most of the work done regarding Seaside... to levels similar to first year post-fire by the Fire is one of the primary tools used to manage marshes of the Texas Chenier Plain, yet we know little about its etfects on Louisiana Seaside Sparrow habitat and populations. This study examined the effects...

  17. Figure 6. Projected Production for the Low Development Rate of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Low Development Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig6.jpg (41132...

  18. Figure 7. Projected Production for the High Development Rate...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Rate of Technically Recoverable Oil Estimated at 5 Percent, Mean, and 95 Percent Probabilities for the ANWR Coastal Plain of the Alaska North Slope fig7.jpg (43335 bytes) Source...

  19. Per Ovidio parla Amore, sž come se fosse persona umana (V.N. XXV): The case for Ovid's figure of Amore in Dante's Vita Nuova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roglieri, Maria Ann

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Ovid's originai MARIA ANN ROGLIERI Ali Latin quotationsDante's Vita Nuova Maria Ann Roglieri Department of Romancel OL. 2 12007) I MARIA ANN ROGLIERI Remedia, Anwres, Hewides

  20. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

  1. Figure 3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 95 Percent Probability of Recovering 5.7 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

  2. Figure 5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the 5 Percent Probability of Recovering 16.0 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of...

  3. igure 4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Production Schedules at Two Development Rates for the Statistical Mean of Recovering 10.3 Billion Barrels of Technically Recoverable Oil from the ANWR Coastal Plain of Alaska...

  4. Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and greatly appreciate their input regarding this proposed project. We would like to take this chance of decreased internal nutrient loading, may take a number of years to realize. But a single season is enough is annually stocked into Twin Lakes and it is the pri

  5. Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality enhancement and reduction in internal cycling of nutrients and toxic chemicals such as phosphorous

  6. Oregon State University Fisheries and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , shuttles, buses V. Campus Resources o On campus workshops o Scholarships o Valley Library o Research Office centered around research and fun o Some events: · Friday evening happy hour at Squirrels · RAFWE (Research

  7. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and perspectives) Monitoring Integrated Collaborative Output Power to act Knowledge & Information Networks are increasingly encountered in peri-urban areas. ∑ New `drivers' and `impacts' ∑ Interactions between people an understanding of the relationship between people and deer in peri-urban areas. 2. To identify, scale and map

  8. CAMPUS WILDLIFE Sharing space with rabbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    program. Story on page 5. TECH TRANSFER Ocean tech park coming? University ofVictoria Properties Inc The University of Victoria's community newspaper ring.uvic.ca 3OF7 NUMBER OF LEED CERTIFIED BUILDINGS IN VICTORIA resources. Orientation events began at the end of August and continue to mid-September. Details at http

  9. Invited Paper Wildlife Conservation Planning Under the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Martin

    the need for additional listings under the Endangered Species Act and facilitate delisting. Although

  10. EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially...

  11. Bridges and wildlife: issues and solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carey, Marion

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applicable regulations (Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and stateto identify any Migratory Bird Treaty Act issues that may

  12. Wildlife Crediting Forum Report on Forum Deliberations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................................................................... 6 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR HEP........................................................... 6........................................................................................................... 12 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE (O

  13. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithunCenter Jump to:2 Jump to: navigation,Department

  14. Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MWCommission| OpenDivision of

  15. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview,GeothermalHawaii:Sage grouse sitting in grassland.

  16. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to:Siting.pdf JumpFirelandsOpen Energy(RedirectedService

  17. Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHome Kyoung's picture Submitted by

  18. OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahoma Jumpcommunity 2013InvitationFOA aimedTeam!

  19. Acquisition of wildlife habitat in Okanogan County

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide theis proposing to

  20. Putah Creek Terrestrial Wildlife Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    ;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;MAP EXHIBITS C1-36 Avian Focal Species Distribution Maps Putah Creek and Yolo-Sutter Bypass Sites, OX=Oxbow, DC=Dry Creek Confluence, WN=Winters Putah Creek Park, YH=Yolo Housing, LB=Center for Land

  1. The influence of distance to refuge on flight initiation distance in the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    , with Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziezii) the dominant species. The ground surface was packed soil, fine gravel

  2. A Second Refuge: French Opera and the Huguenot Migration, c. 1680 - c. 1710

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrendt, Rebekah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    convenient for an opera company in search of patronage. Asearch. William III. A further relationship between the company and

  3. RESEARCH PAPER Effects of Structural Refuge and Density on Foraging Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    empirical studies in this general area have helped shape our current understanding of the starvation-0310.2011.01927.x Abstract Theoretical models of prey behaviour predict that food-limited prey engage in risk be influenced by factors including prey density and structural cover, such that the pre- sumed role of prey

  4. Neighborhood as refuge : environmental justice and community reconstruction in Boston, Barcelona, and Havana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anguelovski, Isabelle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Justice (EJ) scholarship has revealed that communities of color and low-income neighborhoods have been disproportionally affected by 'brown' contaminating facilities and excluded from decision-making on their ...

  5. A landscape approach to reserving farm ponds for wintering bird refuges in Taoyuan, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Wei-Ta

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    regression with error back-propagation into the paradigm of artificial neural networks (ANN). The model considers pond shape, size, neighboring farmlands, and developed areas in calculating parameters pertaining to their respective and interactive influences...

  6. Extreme habitats are not refuges: poeciliids suffer from increased aerial predation risk in sulphidic southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlupp, Ingo

    Autónoma de Tabasco (UJAT), C.P. 86150, Villahermosa, Tabasco, México Received 31 March 2010; revised 13 al., in press). In several extreme habitats in Tabasco, southern Mexico, live-bearing fishes

  7. 12 The Wildlife Professional, Fall 2009 The Wildlife Society Credit: Wiley-Blackwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    disturbed landscapes. Flesch's team also studied the gene flow and movement of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis nearly five kilometers wide, and genetic analyses indicated that sheep populations shared genes across and the Environment (v. 7/6), a report details the forensic work of biologists who carefully analyzed feathers

  8. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(1), 2005, pp. 4857 Wildlife Disease Association 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    REGION Michael D. Samuel,1,2,4 Daniel J. Shadduck,1 Diana R. Goldberg,1 and William P. Johnson3 1 US of methods developed in laboratory challenge trials (Samuel et al., 2003a) and a serotype- specific caerulescens) breeding colo- nies (Samuel et al., 1999a). In addition, chronic transmission and infection might

  9. Coal-Mac, Inc. Phoenix No. 1 mine provides wildlife haven. 2007 Wildlife West Virginia Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, A.

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Mac, Inc.'s Harless Wood Industrial Park off Holden 22 Mines Road in Logan Country, West Virginia is an award-winning reclamation site in the mountains frequented by geese, wild turkey, deer and black bears. Orchard grass and rye is a temporary cover for the timothy, clover and other seedlings. The area was mined several years ago. Some 40,000-50,000 tons of coal per month are surfaced mined with the current permit that takes in 1,500-2,000 acres. After removing the coal, valleys are backfilled as part of the mining and reclamation plan. 10 photos.

  10. Red-billed Quelea Impacts of wildlife on agriculture Impacts of wildlife on agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    70000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Populationestimate DelistedDelisted 5-day season 5-day season 16-day

  11. Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fi h d Wildlif PFish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Burbot) Kootenai River Operation Mitigation & Evaluation Building on Success · All Tribal projects objectives, and to guide and refine future project design and implementation Monitoring Corrective Evaluation Meets objectives Does not meet objectives Corrective action #12;4/11/2013 5 Integrated Ecosystem Based

  12. Fact Sheet - Acquisition of wildlife habitat in the Pend Oreille River Wildlife Management Area - March 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FYRANDOM DRUG TESTING TheMay 2012 B O N Nparcel

  13. Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology Organizations Hiring Students in Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Health Public Lab Minnesota Dept of Ag Missouri Department of Conservation Missouri Solar Applications Service Utah Fish and Widlife Dept. Vail Resorts Veterans United Home Loans Walt Disney World Weyerhaeuser

  14. PLANT AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES minors MAP Sheet Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    Chem 481 Biochemistry 1 3.0 Econ 440 Natural Resources and Environmental Econ 3.0 Geog 101 Global 3.0 Phil 205 Deductive Logic 3.0 Pl Sc 535 Natural Resources Policy 3.0 Pl Sc 536 Environmental.0 PWS 288 Mentored Laboratory Techniques 2.0 PWS 303 Soils Conservation and Resources 3.0 PWS 306 Soil

  15. PLANT AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES minors MAP Sheet Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    ­Nonmajors 2.0V Chem 481 Biochemistry 3.0 Econ 440 Natural Resources and Environmental Econ 3.0 Geog 101 Mgt 3.0 PWS 288 Mentored Laboratory Techniques 2.0 PWS 303 Soils Conservation and Resources 3.0 PWS Special Topics in PWS 3.0V PWS 402 Soils & Water in Urban Environment 3.0 PWS 405 Environmental Chemistry

  16. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 45(2), 2009, pp. 542546 # Wildlife Disease Association 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunn, Charles

    available digital thermometer. Thereafter, the data were obtained from both humans and chimpanzees thermometer or a digital thermometer [Data-Logger ther- mometer 306, Voltcraft, Germany]) was placed approximately every 20 sec or 2 sec, depending on the thermometer that was used; shorter intervals were possible

  17. Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, S.R. [Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

  18. The influence of prescribed burning on small mammal populations of the Texas Gulf Coastal Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Wennona Ann

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -existant in the wip ter and increased to its highest point, 2e8 percentp -'n spring. After spring, forb cover declined to 1. 6 per- cent; of the relative otal cover in summer and continued to de& ine to 1. 3 percent in the fall, , I':~1. 1 19'+4 ~B~ ~, The two... College Chairman of Advisory Committees Dr. Brian W. Cain Experimental burning for brush control was conducted on a 2, 025 ha area of the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Aransas County, Texas. Three burns of approximately equal size were conducted...

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on the U.S. Natural GasWildlife Refuge:

  20. Food habits of wild hogs on the Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Marlin David

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    table to select the point of origin of each line transect. Designated routes were driven by vehicle to systemati- cally cover the study area. By matching single numbers from the random numbers table with the "tenth" reading on the odometer... from f ive randomly placed 100 step-point sampling transects on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (1973-74). Species No. of No. of transects Percent of Hits of occurrence total sample Grasses P~l hy ~dh'* h ' P A~d Sl P~l d '1 A~ 11' ~PA 11...

  1. A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ronald J.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

  2. A review of "Irelandís Huguenots and Their Refuge, 1662-1745, An Unlikely Haven." by Raymond Hylton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidi Murphy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Ireland and the fate of those who subsequently settled there has been woefully neglected. In Ireland Huguenot ancestry is prized and respected even to this day, but sadly miscon- ceptions and embellishments, which for centuries remained unchallenged, have...

  3. Water voles, mink & rabbits So far, the Scottish Highlands have provided water voles with a natural refuge from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambin, Xavier

    Water voles, mink & rabbits So far, the Scottish Highlands have provided water voles with a natural, an abundance of rabbits may open the way for an untimely invasion of mink. WATER VOLES, MINK AND RABBITS W hen re-introducing extinct species is on the conservation agenda, the prospect of losing the water vole

  4. Placing Refuge: Shell Mounds and the Archaeology of Colonial Encounters in the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Tsim Duncan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fragment unIDed seed unIDed shell/testa Wood (g) Residue (g)Shellfishing, and the Shell Mound Archaic. In Engendering1991b Normative Thinking and Shell-Bearing Sites. In

  5. Multi-scale environmental factors explain fish losses and refuge quality in drying waterholes of Cooper Creek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    . BalcombeA and Martin C. ThomsC A Australian Rivers Institute and eWater Cooperative Research Centre

  6. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Status and Trends of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S., 2005. Acknowledgments Manyagencies,organizations, andindividualscontributedtheir time,energy,OR;Dr.N.ScottUrquhart ResearchScientist,Departmentof Statistics,ColoradoStateUniversity, Fort courtesy of FWS. #12; Funding for this study was provided by the following agencies: Environmental

  7. FWB 260: Principles of Wildlife Management Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    majors, but will be incorporating other natural resource fields where applicable. Course Objectives: 1 use of the material; 2) ensure better retention because you study and review material regularly; and 3

  8. Notes From the Chair 2 Fish and Wildlife Amendment 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comes the Sun: Innovations in Solar Technology As fuel costs rise and concerns about climate change- ral gas prices, many people are taking another look at solar energy's potential. In a recent interview Decisions 11 Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin Spring 2008

  9. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of quicklime, the destructi,e effect of which is produced by direct cantact. Particles of the chemicaI pread usually follow in a short time. Once spread o,er the oyster beds. the lime retains its effectiveness- ne_ to oysters and many other commercial species all indicate that it is a practical weapon for use

  10. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -430. 1867~ }3ergstrom, Sune. The aetive group of heparin. Haturwi ssenschaften 23: 706. 1935, [ Carrageen

  11. Catalina Munteanu Dept. of Forest and Wildlife Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    in the Romanian Carpathians". Advisors: Clemens Geitner, Kurt Scharr 2004 ­ 2005 Erasmus Socrates Programme

  12. ALDO LEOPOLD: .. . wildlife once fed us and shaped our culture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conduct thinning operations in nearby pine plantations. Fortunately, no calamities have occurred, and Mike

  13. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Mississippi Flyway. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DDT accumulation by waterfowl in an Ohio marsh Reproductive success in a DDT-contaminated population of herring gulls . . . . . 11 Kinetics of pesticide pOisoning in Dutch elm disease control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Bird mortality following DDT spray for Dutch elm

  14. Wildlife Sustainability and Human Food Security in Cameroon, Central Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinbaum, Karen Zohar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Use Of Renewable Resources. Science 262:828-829.Exploitation Of Renewable Resources. Annual Review OfAdaptive management of renewable resources. Blackburn Press,

  15. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is...

  16. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Volunteer Field Assistants (3 positions)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    machines and hand tools), flashing research plots, and installing soil moisture sensors. Work weeks. Project Background: In arid ecosystems throughout the western United States, successful restoration

  17. Research into wildlife/vehicle collisions in Jasper National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertwistle, Jim

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that have been used in Jasper National Park is also providedVEHICLE COLLISIONS IN JASPER NATIONAL PARK Jim Bertwistle (M.Sc. , National Park Warden, Jasper National Park, Box 10

  18. Wildlife Monitoring and Conservation in a West African Protected Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Andrew Cole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local processes in species extinctions. Proceedings Of Theare a precursor to species extinction, yet the dynamics ofbe closed (i.e. , no species extinctions or colonizations),

  19. Gary C. Matlock Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAGUNA MADRE .. MEXICO 1988, and size, bag, and possession limits were imposed for each species by 1988 al. 1988, Green et al. 1990). Potential yields may be underestimated when based on growth rates- ically from the late 1950s through the early 1970s (Green 1986) when fishing effort was presumably lower

  20. Acquisition of fish and wildlife habitat along Upper Yakima River

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    factsheet The Bonneville Power Admin- istration is working with the Yakama Nation to acquire and manage a 105 acre parcel in Kittitas County, Washington. BPA funds the acquisition...

  1. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    monitoring birds, bats, and aquatic animals such as marine mammals, sea turtles, and fish in the offshore wind farm environment. Informed by monitoring results and research...

  2. Understanding Participation in Wildlife Conservation Programs on Private Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorice, Michael G.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    behavioral responses environmental issues and policy changes including ecotourism (Hearne and Salinas 2002), environmental risk (Casey et al. 2008; Travisi and Nijkamp 2008), wetland mitigation (Bauer et al. 2004), forest management (Boxall and Macnab 2000...

  3. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ;Whooping Cranes in Nebraska · The ONLY natural, self sustaining migratory flock · In the winter of 1941

  4. EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

  5. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  6. BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY IN AFRICA MPALA WILDLIFE FOUNDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the current storage capacity with either underground storage or above ground storage. #12;iv We began our

  7. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be kept in good condition can be greatly extended by freezing and holding in cold storage. Brining before.. . ................. 4 Keeping Quality.......... ___ _.... _. . _. ......... 5 Cold storage o[ frozen smoked product, are usually frozen and held in cold storage until needed, when they are withdrawn, smoked, and then 1 #12

  8. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biochemical indices of quality. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Engineering studies on freezing and cold storage systems . · · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Storage of fish in refrigerated sea water . . . 5 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen seafoods 5 to meet the needs of industry. Funda- ment al research has been continued in the field of fish - mus cle

  9. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

  10. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . JUly 1945 WFA NET WEIGHTS AND CONVERSION FACTORS FOR FISHERY PRODUCTS SU1I'ilift.ARIZED The fishery cacmodities listed in Se~tions A and B of the War Food Administration's booklets on Conversion Factors tabulations ,--Sect ion A. Conversion Factors. is composed primarily of factors used to convert food supplies

  11. LADD MARSH WILDLIFE AREA 2010 2012 ONGOING PROJECT PROPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restored #12;Limiting FactorsLimiting Factors · Habitat Conversion/Draining · Habitat Alteration from Water · Water Quality · Habitat Conversion/Draining · Habitat Alteration from Water Diversions · Habitat

  12. DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Limited NZ20027j April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Anadromous Fish Extinct Listed Anadromous Fish Species Listed Resident Fish - Bull Trout Listed...

  13. United states Department of the Iaterior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , hung evenly on a hemp or manila head rope of 1/2-inch difu'TI.eter strung wi th ordinary 3-inch cork b

  14. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accessible sources of this and other hard fibers. Hemp grown in Italy and Hungary, where abundant supplies the production of the fine hemp grown there, Jute from India has been partially cut off by action in the Orient were early and wisely placed under the control of the War Production Board.~ More "Manila hemp, " which

  15. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    /convective heat loss. Eastern red bats roosting in fragmented habitats, such as urban areas and farmland, may to population declines, which, when coupled with their slow reproductive rate, could lead to a slow population two at the New Boston Air Force Base in New Boston (Hillsborough County). Based on echolocation calls

  16. DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to either minimize delay of adults or minimize counting difficulties that reduce count accuracy (NMFS Biological Opinion Action Table Dec. 2000). The Corps shall develop and...

  17. Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fish and Wildlife Dept.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by defining the problem, understanding ecological functions and processes, identifying restoration processes that were historically supported by nutrients supplied by the natural flood pulse of the Kootenai), and evaluation of new opportunities and incentives to create long-term, sustainable floodplain restoration

  18. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stagnant or muddy pools where their breathing movements attract attention on warm af,ternoons. The swimming, is known to pass readily to and from fresh and saltwater. \\ .JJ In general, information is from Fishes

  19. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area BPA Project #1996-094-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles 0 100 Miles #12;Area History: Landscape · Early settlement · Homesteaded in late 1800's, first Suplementation #12;Immediate Management Needs ·Continue Maintenance on previous enhancements to ensure quality on new acquisitions #12;Long-term Management Needs ·Equipment/vehicle maintenance and/or replacement

  20. OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)ReferencesNuiqsut, Alaska:Nutley, NewEnergyO2Diesel Corporation-

  1. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)ReferencesNuiqsut, Alaska:Nutley, NewEnergyO2DieselOAR 635-100 -

  2. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarterVirginia.Land or Waterbody

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruary 4, 2014 BioenergyDepartment ofPyrolysis

  4. NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff Here you willWindNREL -

  5. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS) | OpenEnergyGovernor s Energy Office JumpRules

  6. Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of Energyof Energy This webinar is part of the U.S. Department

  7. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of EnergyofDepartment of Energy| Department ofWestarEnergy

  8. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq.NorthUniopolis,ParcelDefenseOpen Energythe

  9. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on OurSempriusEnergy PARTDepartment

  10. Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    None 2372 Montane mixed conifer forest 3653 High 813 Low 2660 Medium 89 None 91 Open water - lakes 47895 High 14560 Low 33061 None 274 Open water - lakes, rivers, streams 523 High 250 Low 217 None 55 Salamander Oregon Slender Salamander Tailed Frog Yes Great Basin Spadefoot Yes Yes Western Toad Yes Yes

  11. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-632

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which prevents the killing of most non- game birds

  12. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Migratory Bird Treaty Act 1.4 Population and Habitat Distribution Population sizes are unknown at state

  13. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-602

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which prevents the killing of most non- game birds and collection of their nests

  14. USGS-National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Federal authority o Migratory birds under Migratory Bird Treaty Act or Eagle Protection Act o Federal

  15. USGS National Wildlife Health Center Diagnostic Case Submission Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    federal authority o Migratory birds under Migratory Bird Treaty Act or Eagle Protection Act o Federal

  16. 42 BBC Wildlife September 2010 ChristianZiegler/Minden/FLPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    per cent, but transformed the almost unbroken expanse of wetland into a mostly dry landscape pepperedCandisani/Minden/FLPA To stay or not to stay? The dry season forces Amazonian manatees to make tough decisions. Damnedifyoudon of their `stickiness' in a few steps. How it works has yet to be clarified, but both types of foot exude a fluid

  17. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organizations in Central America 24 Organizations in South America 24 INTRODUCTION Following the practice^foundland, Mexico, the West Indies, Central America, and South America. Including chiefly the organizations in Central America 24 Organizations in South America 24 INTRODUCTION FolloAving the practice of the Bureau

  18. Wildlife Monitoring and Conservation in a West African Protected Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Andrew Cole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is community-based ecotourism a good use of biodiversityThe potential contribution of ecotourism to African wild dog

  19. Unbiased estimators of wildlife population densities using aural information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durland, Eric Newton

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Using L' = 1. 99, and p = 1/3, from (30) an estimate of the density is n 108. 85 f A ] 99(3)(4QQQ)(] /3) . 0136 dove pairs/acre s = 1. 36 dove pairs/100 acres. 25 This is the same estimate we obtained using DI. The reason for this is explained...(7. 50) 1. 12 ? (2 422) (3) (40) (1(3) (0. 96, l. 28) 3. 4 Suggestions for Improvements At present, the call-count technique for estimating the density of mourning doves seems satisfactory for establishing a relative density index, but to get a good...

  20. Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    University will develop and test coatings that alter the surface texture of wind turbine towers to potentially deter bats from approaching them. Frontier Wind, Rocklin,...

  1. India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany:Information IDSDloomis's

  2. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark Jump to:TetraSun Jump to:Department Jump to: navigation,

  3. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84111 Phone Number:Resources Jump to:

  4. California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis a city inCCSE Jump to: navigation,Resources | Open

  5. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is a county in Florida. ItsOregon Department

  6. 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife Properties | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin:YBR14 CCR §ResourcesMile JumpDesignated2

  7. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2 2013CalhounControlWebpage | Open

  8. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2 2013CalhounControlWebpage |

  9. Acquisition of fish and wildlife habitat along Upper Yakima River

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide the

  10. A LANDOWNER'S GUIDE TO INVENTORYING AND MONITORING WILDLIFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Bridges, NH Fish & Game Dept. Meade Cadot, Harris Center for Conservation Education Christine Costello

  11. Mark E. Chittenden Jr. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Station. Texas 77843 Present address: College of William and Mary. Virginia Institute of Marine Science and Schroeder 1928, Anderson and Geh- ringer 1965, Anderson 1968, Wilk and Silverman 1976), it is abundant and Mary, Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Our paper describes maturation, spawning periodicity

  12. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serves 6 3 tablespoons minced celery 1/3 teaspoon salt 6 drops tabasco sauce Mix the last fiVG ingredi

  13. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):251260, Fall 2014 Wildlife strikes with U.S. military rotary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but unstudied, physical hazard to military rotary-wing aircraft used in conducting overseas flight operations to military rotary-wing aircraft during these operations has been conducted. The objectives of this project deployed overseas to conduct a variety of noncombat and combat missions. Our objective was to conduct

  14. MAD-AIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N. A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with stress- related illness rather than the anwr that spells RELIEF. Air flow in, through ad arourd a house is an important concern in the building we call haw. !lb enhance air flow and change the various corditions or properties of the air, a variety...

  15. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  16. DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  17. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  18. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  19. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  20. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.