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Sample records for wildlife mitigation project

  1. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  2. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  4. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  5. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  6. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  7. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  8. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  9. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    This preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities are analyzed: Habitat protection; Habitat enhancement; Operation and maintenance; and Monitoring and evaluation. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  10. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  11. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  12. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  13. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  14. Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

  15. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  16. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  17. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  18. EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

  19. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  20. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  1. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  2. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  3. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  4. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2001-03-01

    This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  5. Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2000-04-01

    This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  6. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  7. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  8. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  9. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  10. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  11. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not...

  12. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  13. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  14. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  15. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  16. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming Abstract Covers the basics of mitigation...

  17. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  18. Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Primer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer Abstract Covers the basics of...

  19. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J.

    1997-06-26

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  20. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  2. OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 635-415 -...

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  4. Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind Energy Plants Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind Energy Plants April 14, 2015 - 1:08pm Addthis ...

  5. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  6. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  7. Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

  8. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  9. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  10. EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

  11. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome

    1988-02-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Implementing mitigative actions on the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, T.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The Super Collider is the first project for which a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) was prepared under a DOE Order that became effective in 1990. The policy requires a MAP for any project where environmental findings were predicated on taking mitigative actions. The MAP must be approved prior to the start of preliminary design and thus cannot be site or facility-specific because the requisite level of detail would not be available. This gap is filled by a series of environmental compliance plans (ECP) that are prepared by the architect-engineer/constructions manager under the direction of the DOE Management and Operations Contractor for the Super Collider. A given ECP identifies the environmental protection measures applicable to the respective contract package. The designated design team uses the ECP as one of its requirements documents and the environmental staff uses it during design reviews to verify compliance with the MAP. Site audits and monitoring data are used to document compliance and verify the effectiveness of mitigative actions, or identify required corrective actions. The applicability of this process to other projects falling within the scope of the National Environmental Policy Act is discussed.

  13. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    between Pantex, West Texas A&M University, and the U.S. Geological Survey's Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Texas Tech University.

  14. Mitigation options for fish and wildlife resources affected by port and other water-dependent developments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dial, R.S.; Deis, D.R.

    1986-06-01

    Ten past restoration projects in Tampa Bay were evaluated. Habitats included Spartina marsh, mangrove forests, Juncus marsh, and subtidal habitat. Success was difficult to determine because goals for each project had not been defined. In-kind losses of habitat occurred in all but one project. Permanent losses occurred in at least three projects. Restoration of Spartina and Juncus marshes was recommended. Mangroves will recruit into Spartina marshes, provided a seed source is available; planting of mangroves alone is not recommended. Seagrass restoration is not recommended at this time. Twelve sites, most less than 50 ha, were identified as potential restoration sites to give 344 ha of subtidal habitat to be made shallower and 176 ha of uplands to be scraped down. The current management program's legal and policy needs for improving environmental management, the role of mitigation, and the information needed to develop mitigation plans are discussed. This report will be useful to decisionmakers concerned with wetland habitat loss and restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida, and other areas with similar habitats.

  15. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSION PROJECT DOE/EIS-0486 MARCH 2016 3 1 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1021.331) require completion of a mitigation action plan (MAP) following each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and its associated Record of Decision (ROD) to address mitigation commitments expressed in the ROD. The DOE Notice

  16. Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Plants | Department of Energy New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind Energy Plants Energy Department Announces New Projects to Help Protect Wildlife at Wind Energy Plants April 14, 2015 - 1:08pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced more than $1.75 million for five projects that will develop and demonstrate technologies to reduce the potential impacts of wind farms on sensitive bat species. A current challenge facing wind energy developers in the United States is how to

  17. Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    countries. The database currently holds 497 project entries from 11 different databases, including formal crediting scheme registries and third party compilations."...

  18. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while increasing resilience and productivity. The project will contribute to ongoing research and implementation...

  19. L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

    2013-09-26

    This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

  20. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In CarbonMitigation Forestry Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing acceptance that the environmentalbenefits of forests extend beyond traditional ecological benefits andinclude the mitigation of climate change. Interest in forestry mitigationactivities has led to the inclusion of forestry practices at the projectlevel in international agreements. Climate change activities place newdemands on participating institutions to set baselines, establishadditionality, determine leakage, ensure permanence, and monitor andverify a project's greenhouse gas benefits. These issues are common toboth forestry and other types of mitigation projects. They demandempirical evidence to establish conditions under which such projects canprovide sustained long term global benefits. This Special Issue reportson papers that experiment with a range of approaches based on empiricalevidence for the setting of baselines and estimation of leakage inprojects in developing Asia and Latin America.

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  3. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  4. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  5. Bonneville’s “Balanced Scorecard” Approach to Mitigation, Monitoring, and Adaptive Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), DOE’s power marketing organization in the Pacific Northwest, will spend more than $300 million on mitigation projects to meet its mandate under the 1980 Northwest Power Act to “protect, mitigate and enhance” fish and wildlife affected by construction and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. How is BPA meeting its responsibility to ratepayers to ensure that these mitigation funds are spent effectively?

  6. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  7. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James

    2002-09-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

  8. Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  9. Mitigation Action Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  10. System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truitt, R.W.; Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O.

    1994-08-24

    This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

  11. Status of national CO{sub 2}-mitigation projects and initiatives in the Philippine energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tupas, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Philippines has a huge energy requirement for the next 30 years in order to achieve its economic growth target. Based on an expected annual GDP growth rate of 6.9 percent, the Philippines total energy requirement is estimated to increase at an average of 6.6 percent annually from 1996 to 2025. Gross energy demand shall increase from 219.0 million barrels of fuel oil equivalent (MMBFOE) in 1996 to 552.4 MMBFOE in 2010 and 1,392.6 MMBFOE by 2025. These energy demand levels shall be driven primarily by the substantial increase in fuel requirements for power generation whose share of total energy requirement is 28.3 percent in 1996, 48.0 percent in 2010 and 55.0 percent in 2025. With the expected increase in energy demand, there will necessarily be adverse impacts on the environment. Energy projects and their supporting systems - from fuel extraction and storage to distribution - can and will be major contributors not only to local but also to regional and global environmental pollution and degradation. International experiences and trends in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory have shown that the energy sector has always been the dominant source of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) - the principal contributor to global climate change. The energy sector`s CO{sub 2} emissions come primarily from fossil fuels combustion. Since energy use is the dominant source of CO{sub 2} emissions, efforts should therefore be concentrated on designing a mitigation strategy in this sector.

  12. WREP Mitigation Action Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electrical Interconnection of the Whistling Ridge Energy Project 1 Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 Mitigation Action Plan for the Whistling Ridge Energy Project Measure Implementation Timeline Implementation Responsibility Earth (geology, soils, topography, and geologic hazards) Prior to Project construction, confirm subsurface soil and rock types and strength properties through a detailed geotechnical investigation of the specific locations of all wind Project elements, including wind

  13. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  14. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  15. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  16. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim

    2008-11-03

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  17. EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within the Mitigation Action Plan for the Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project. Mitigation...

  18. EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

  19. 2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

    2009-09-30

    This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

  20. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2005-06-01

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

  1. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Wildlife Protecting Wildlife We monitor and protect the wildlife and their habitats on Laboratory property. February 2, 2015 Mule deer on LANL property LANL has been home to mule deer since its creation in 1942 and has seasonally been home to elk since their reintroduction to New Mexico in the 1960s. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Protecting our wildlife Since the early 1940s, LANL's

  2. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2013. PDF icon EIS-0026-AMR-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report

  3. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2014. PDF icon EIS-0026-MAP-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan

  4. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry

    2004-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  5. EIS-0464: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, Lake Charles, Louisiana and Brazoria County, Texas This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) briefly describes the mitigation actions ...

  6. EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE...

  7. EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan ...

  8. EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern ...

  9. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Studies Studying Our Environment A rich diversity of plants and animals call this area home. Through their studies, biologists help the Lab understand and protect the diversity of the land. Elk on Laboratory Land Taking Care of the Land The Lab's scientific work is balanced with our responsibility to take care of the land we're on. READ MORE Lab Biologist, Chuck Hathcock Studying the Land and Wildlife Biologists conduct annual and multi-year studies of animals and plants on Lab land.

  10. EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project DOE issued a Mitigation Action Plan that explains how mitigation measures, which have been designed to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with the course of action directed by the Record of Decision, will be planned and implemented. For more information visit the project page: http://energy.gov/node/583039. Download Document PDF icon EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan More

  11. The monitoring, evaluation, reporting, and verification of climate change mitigation projects: Discussion of issues and methodologies and review of existing protocols and guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.; Sathaye, J.

    1997-12-01

    Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, the US and other countries are implementing, by themselves or in cooperation with one or more other nations (i.e., joint implementation), climate change mitigation projects. These projects will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or sequester carbon, and will also result in non-GHG impacts (i.e., environmental, economic, and social impacts). Monitoring, evaluating, reporting, and verifying (MERV) guidelines are needed for these projects in order to accurately determine their net GHG, and other, benefits. Implementation of MERV guidelines is also intended to: (1) increase the reliability of data for estimating GHG benefits; (2) provide real-time data so that mid-course corrections can be made; (3) introduce consistency and transparency across project types and reporters; and (4) enhance the credibility of the projects with stakeholders. In this paper, the authors review the issues and methodologies involved in MERV activities. In addition, they review protocols and guidelines that have been developed for MERV of GHG emissions in the energy and non-energy sectors by governments, nongovernmental organizations, and international agencies. They comment on their relevance and completeness, and identify several topics that future protocols and guidelines need to address, such as (1) establishing a credible baseline; (2) accounting for impacts outside project boundaries through leakage; (3) net GHG reductions and other impacts; (4) precision of measurement; (5) MERV frequency; (6) persistence (sustainability) of savings, emissions reduction, and carbon sequestration; (7) reporting by multiple project participants; (8) verification of GHG reduction credits; (9) uncertainty and risk; (10) institutional capacity in conducting MERV; and (11) the cost of MERV.

  12. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

  13. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program : Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald L.; Woodward-Lilengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo J.

    1999-09-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and streams after eggs are laid in the gravel. Supplementation of native fish stocks in conjunction with effective habitat restoration will be the primary means of achieving these biological goals. Overarching goals for the program include: (1) Protection, mitigation, and enhancement of Columbia River Basin native resident fish resources. (2) Develop, increase, and/or reintroduce natural spawning populations of westslope cutthroat trout into reservation waters. (3) Provide both short and long-term harvest opportunities for the reservation community. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-targeted fish populations to a minimum.

  14. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  15. EIS-0425: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan for the Mid-Columbia Restoration Project

  16. 2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

  17. 2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

    2007-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

  18. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  19. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  20. Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wessel, Silvia; Harvey, David

    2013-06-28

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications that target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 40,000 hours by 2015, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different structural compositions and under different fuel cell conditions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project was to address catalyst durability by using a dual path approach that coupled an extensive range of experimental analysis and testing with a multi-scale modeling approach. With this, the major technical areas/issues of catalyst and catalyst layer performance and durability that were addressed are: 1. Catalyst and catalyst layer degradation mechanisms (Pt dissolution, agglomeration, Pt loss, e.g. Pt in the membrane, carbon oxidation and/or corrosion). a. Driving force for the different degradation mechanisms. b. Relationships between MEA performance, catalyst and catalyst layer degradation and operational conditions, catalyst layer composition, and structure. 2. Materials properties a. Changes in catalyst, catalyst layer, and MEA materials properties due to degradation. 3. Catalyst performance a. Relationships between catalyst structural changes and performance. b. Stability of the three-phase boundary and its effect on performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release Stage 2 - Beta Release o The model code repository is opened to the general public on a beta release concept, with a mechanism for bug tracking and feedback from a large user group o Code will be tracked and patched for any discovered bugs or relevant feedback from the user community, upon the completion of three months without a major bug submission the code will be moved to a full version release Stage 3 - Full Version Release o Code is version to revision 1.0 and that version is frozen in development/patching

  1. EIS-0419: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ridge Energy Project; Skamania County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) adopted all the mitigation measures described in the Whistling Ridge Energy Project...

  2. EIS-0323: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan for the Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project which is prepared to accompany the Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project Supplement Environmental Impact...

  3. EIS-0323: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    approval is implemented. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project Prepared to Accompany The Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project...

  4. EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EIS-0473: Mitigation Action Plan W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Fort Bend County, Texas This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) briefly describes the ...

  5. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  6. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  7. Project Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published its Record of Decision announcing and explaining DOE’s chosen project alternative and describing any commitments for mitigating potential environmental impacts. The NEPA process...

  8. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  9. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Encounters Report Wildlife Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email If you find an injured bird, contact the Santa Fe Raptor Center. Have a close encounter? Report the following Any wildlife incidents or encounters Migratory bird injury or

  10. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Planning and Policy organization (EWP) in the Division of Environment, Fish & Wildlife, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and reports to the EWP manager....

  11. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigating Wildland Fires Mitigating Wildland Fires Our interactive wildland fire map displays the locations of wildland fire mitigation activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Open in Google Earth | View in Google Maps What we are doing to mitigate wildland fires Recent large wildfires in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire

  12. Neutralize & Mitigate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities » Neutralize & Mitigate Neutralize & Mitigate Scientists are developing technologies designed to mitigate the effects of IEDs, protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects of these and other types of explosives. v Protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects At Los Alamos, scientists are developing technologies designed to mitigate the effects of IEDs, protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects of these and other types

  13. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... linear facilities may cross this additional buffer land. ... when duct firing natural gas (for supplemental energy ... mitigation requirements, andor monitoring ...

  14. EIS-0389: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action Plan EIS-0389: Mitigation Action Plan Trinity Public Utilities District Direct Interconnection Project Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to...

  15. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture, including assessment of mitigation options for...

  16. EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the...

  17. EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Walla...

  18. EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact for the...

  19. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington November 1, 2011 EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building...

  20. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

  1. Step 4: Project Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... expected * Technology O&M Assumed low, mitigable or allocatable Sources: Adapted from Holland & Hart, RE Project Development & Finance & Infocast, Advanced RE Project Finance & ...

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substitutions should result in a more accurate evaluation of the ecological conditions on Precious Lands, and provide better information for decision making. A baseline HEP analysis was initiated on the Precious Lands in 2000, and data collection continued throughout the 2001 and 2002 field seasons. In the future, HEP analysis will be used to evaluate habitat changes resulting from management activities. Repeat surveys will be useful in assessing long-term trends in plant community health, weed encroachment, wildlife limiting factors, habitat degradation, and establishing desired future condition guidelines for the management program.

  3. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact...

  4. Breaking Barriers Wildlife Refreshment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barriers Wildlife Refreshment Walker becomes first black battalion commander. NSTec Aviation Safety Officer, RSL team honored by DOE. NNSS helping wildlife with new watering holes. See pages 8. See page 4. NSTec and UNLV Bring Technology Community Together at PDV Workshop In June 2014, National Security Technologies (NSTec) and University Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) co- hosted a Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) Workshop at the UNLV Science and Engineering Building (SEB). More than 125 attendees

  5. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  6. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address: 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place:...

  7. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name: Fish and Wildlife Service Place: Washington, DC Year Founded: 1940 Phone Number: (303) 275-2370...

  8. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  9. Making the Most of Mitigation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Making the Most of Mitigation Making the Most of Mitigation September 2, 2014 - 1:41pm Addthis The current site-wide approach for long-term protection of LANL’s threatened and endangered species originated from the 1995 discovery of a nesting pair of Mexican spotted owls near a proposed explosives testing facility. (See LLQR, June 1999, page 1.) (Photo: Chuck Hathcock, Wildlife Biologist, LANL Environmental Protection Division) The current site-wide approach for long-term protection of

  10. wildlife | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    wildlife NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds named NNSA's Pantex Plant one of five finalists for the 2016 Presidential Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award for its excellence in conservation of migratory birds through research collaboration. The... A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant The Pantex Plant's wildlife monitoring program Approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas,

  11. EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

  12. MHK Projects/Newfound Harbor Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesKESC Tidal Generator Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  13. MHK Projects/Old River Outflow Channel Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization UEK Corporation Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/Humboldt County Wave Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Energy Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesAquaBuoy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Grand Manan Channel Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization Mananook Associates Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Aquantis Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization Aquantis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. MHK Projects/Maine 1 Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesOcean *MHK TechnologiesKensington Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. MHK Projects/Ogdensburg Kinetic Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization AER NY Kinetics LLC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. MHK Projects/Luangwa Zambia Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesUnderwater Electric Kite Turbines Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. MHK Projects/Chitokoloki Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesUnderwater Electric Kite Turbines Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization UEK Corporation Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  2. MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesUnderwater Electric Kite Turbines Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  3. MHK Projects/Griffin Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Power Technologies Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesPowerBuoy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  4. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  5. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Project Portugal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Tidal Energy Pty Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDavidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  6. MHK Projects/Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesArchimedes Wave Swing Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  7. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  8. MHK Projects/ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    50.705279, -1.498938 Project Technology *MHK Technologies Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  9. EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and...

  10. EIS-0460: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FutureGen 2.0 Project, Morgan County, Illinois This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) briefly ... DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1021.331. ...

  11. EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project Western Area Power Administration proposes to reconductor approximately 61 miles of 230-kV transmission line from the Davis Substation at Davis Dam near Bullhead City, Arizona, to the Mead Substation near Boulder City in southern Nevada. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project, DOE/EA-1595 (November 2007) More Documents &

  12. Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, Norm

    2009-02-18

    The overarching goals of the 'Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation' Project (BPA Project No.2002-011-00) are to: (1) assess abiotic and biotic factors (i.e., geomorphologic, hydrological, aquatic and riparian/floodplain communities) in determining a definitive composition of ecological integrity, (2) develop strategies to assess and mitigate losses of ecosystem functions, and (3) produce a regional operational loss assessment framework. To produce a scientifically defensible, repeatable, and complete assessment tool, KTOI assembled a team of top scientists in the fields of hydrology, hydraulics, ornithology, entomology, statistics, and river ecology, among other expertise. This advisory team is known as the Research Design and Review Team (RDRT). The RDRT scientists drive the review, selection, and adaptive management of the research designs to evaluate the ecologic functions lost due to the operation of federal hydropower facilities. The unique nature of this project (scientific team, newest/best science, adaptive management, assessment of ecological functions, etc.) has been to work in a dynamic RDRT process. In addition to being multidisciplinary, this model KTOI project provides a stark contrast to the sometimes inflexible process (review, re-review, budgets, etc.) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project RDRT is assembled annually, with subgroups meeting as needed throughout the year to address project issues, analyses, review, and interpretation. Activities of RDRT coordinated and directed the selection of research and assessment methodologies appropriate for the Kootenai River Watershed and potential for regional application in the Columbia River Basin. The entire RDRT continues to meet annually to update and discuss project progress. RDRT Subcontractors work in smaller groups throughout the year to meet project objectives. Determining the extent to which ecological systems are experiencing anthropogenic disturbance and change in structure and function is critical for long term conservation of biotic diversity in the face of changing landscapes and land use. KTOI and the RDRT propose a concept based on incorporating hydrologic, aquatic, and terrestrial components into an operations-based assessment framework to assess ecological losses as shown in Figure E-1.

  13. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  14. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT)1 Briefly about Ex-ACT A set of linked Microsoft Excel sheets (19) Based on land use and management practices Using IPCC* default...

  15. Peru-Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ECN and Ecofys on supported mitigation activities such as NAMAs, low carbon development (LCD) strategies and technology innovation centers to bring a portfolio of projects from the...

  16. Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  17. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife (NDOW) is the state agency responsible for the restoration and management of fish and wildlife resources, and the promotion of boating safety on Nevada's waters. NDOW is...

  18. Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address: 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80203 Phone Number: (303) 866-3437...

  19. Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, R. Dennis

    2008-01-01

    On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

  20. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power...

  1. NEPA mitigation and monitoring activities on Army installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinke, D.C.; Robitaille, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Army National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation regulation AR 200-2 (Army Regulation) requires only mitigation measures that can reasonably be accompanied as part of a proposed alternative be identified in the NEPA document. Failure of the identified mitigation actions to be executed or to perform as expected leads to a required reevaluation of the project and the significance of its impacts. The USAEC has undertaken a study of mitigation and monitoring actions listed in Army NEPA documents. As part of the USAEC NEPA program the study has outlined three major tasks (1) collection of a significant sample of Army NEPA documents, (2) review environmental documentation management and retention, and (3) review in detail a subsample of documents and follow-up with site visits. Some 242 Army NEPA documents, Environmental Assessments (EA) and Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) were collected and evaluated for mitigation requirements. Ninety seven of the 242 NEPA documents committed to one or more mitigation actions. While a wide array of mitigating activities have been identified in these documents, the four most common are (1) management plans and practices, (2) training actions, (3) revegetation actions, and (4) construction practices. Site visits to selected Army installations showed that mitigation practices were for the most part being done, but were poorly documented. No installation visited had a mitigation monitoring plan in place as required by AR 200-2.

  2. 2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

    2011-11-14

    This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractors revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  3. 2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

    2010-09-30

    This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contracts revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

  4. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation The Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation (ATDM) subprogram includes laboratory code and computer engineering and science projects that pursue long-term simulation and computing goals relevant to the broad national security missions of the NNSA. It addresses the need to adapt current integrated design codes and build new codes that are attuned to emerging computing technologies. Performing this work within the scope of

  5. Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds a wide variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in an effort to assist tribes in realizing their energy visions.

  6. MHK Projects/Cygnet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Swanturbines Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesSwanturbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  7. MHK Projects/Marenergie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrohelix Energies Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesHydro Helix Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  8. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Abbreviation: WDFW...

  9. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  10. California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

  11. MHK Projects/CETO Precommercial Pilot Project | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Main Overseeing Organization SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc Carnegie Corporation Ltd Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation...

  12. MHK Projects/White Alder Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMHKProjectsWhiteAlderProject&oldid679556...

  13. MHK Projects/Douglas County Wave Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Douglas County Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-12743 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island Energy Group LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13092 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Algiers Cutoff Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity (MW) 16 Number of Devices Deployed 40 Main Overseeing Organization MARMC Enterprises LLC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  16. Projecting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Projecting the scale of the pipeline network for CO2-EOR and its implications for CCS infrastructure development Matthew Tanner Office of Petroleum, Gas, & Biofuels Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration October 25, 2010 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions ex- pressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Author: Matthew Tanner, matthew.tanner@eia.gov

  17. MHK Projects/Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  18. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

    1994-06-01

    In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

  19. EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  20. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  1. Fuel Flexibility: Landfill Gas Contaminant Mitigation for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Kass, Michael D; FINNEY, Charles E A; Lewis, Samuel; Kaul, Brian C; Besmann, Theodore M; Thomas, John F; Rogers, Hiram; Sepaniak, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This research project focused on the mitigation of silica damage to engine-based renewable landfill gas energy systems. Characterization of the landfill gas siloxane contamination, combined with characterization of the silica deposits in engines, led to development of two new mitigation strategies. The first involved a novel method for removing the siloxanes and other heavy contaminants from the landfill gas prior to use by the engines. The second strategy sought to interrupt the formation of hard silica deposits in the engine itself, based on inspection of failed landfill gas engine parts. In addition to mitigation, the project had a third task to develop a robust sensor for siloxanes that could be used to control existing and/or future removal processes.

  2. Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, A.

    1995-12-31

    What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

  3. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  4. MHK Projects/Oregon Coastal Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overseeing Organization Tillamook Intergovernmental Development Entity Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  5. Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L.; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    2003-04-01

    In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

  6. EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County This review is to ensure that project activities continue to be consistent with the Wildlife...

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  8. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-24

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  9. MHK Projects/Alaska 24 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  10. MHK Projects/Castine Harbor Badaduce Narrows | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maritime Academy Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesAtlantis AR 1000 Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  11. MHK Projects/Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Company LLC Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesTitan Platform Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. MHK Projects/Miette River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnCurrent Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  13. MHK Projects/Mississippi 7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesOcean *MHK TechnologiesKensington Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/Strait of Messina | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International S P A Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnermar Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Canoe Pass | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnCurrent Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Western Irrigation District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnCurrent Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. MHK Projects/Alaska 33 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. MHK Projects/Microturbine River In Stream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesMicroturbine River In Stream Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. MHK Projects/SWave Catalina Green Wave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Installed Capacity (MW) 6 Main Overseeing Organization Sara Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. MHK Projects/ADM 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Wavebob Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesWavebob Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. MHK Projects/New York 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesOcean *MHK TechnologiesKensington Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  2. MHK Projects/Alaska 7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  3. MHK Projects/Alaska 31 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  4. MHK Projects/Alaska 28 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  5. MHK Projects/Ocean Trials Ver 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesSurgeWEC *MHK TechnologiesAirWEC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  6. MHK Projects/New York 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesOcean *MHK TechnologiesKensington Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  7. MHK Projects/South Korea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Power Generation Project Technology *MHK TechnologieshyTide Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  8. MHK Projects/Strait of Jintang | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International S P A Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnermar Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  9. MHK Projects/Pointe du Bois | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnCurrent Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  10. MHK Projects/ADM 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Wavebob Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesWavebob Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  11. MHK Projects/Great River Journey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnCurrent Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. MHK Projects/South Africa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Energy Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesAquaBuoy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  13. MHK Projects/Alaska 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/Bluemill Sound | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Power International AB Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesExim Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Mississippi 6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesOcean *MHK TechnologiesKensington Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Alaska 13 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase ? Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. MHK Projects/Ruby ABS Alaskan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesEnCurrent Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. MHK Projects/Scotrenewables EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesScotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. MHK Projects/Alaska 17 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 0 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. MHK Projects/Sadap Indonesia SHP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Power GmbH Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesSHP Duofloat Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. MHK Projects/Third Reach District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase Phase 1 Project Installed Capacity (MW) 16 Main Overseeing Organization MARMC Enterprises LLC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  2. MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  3. MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  4. MHK Projects/QSEIF Grant Sea Testing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Tidal Energy Pty Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDavidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  5. MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overseeing Organization Tidal Generation Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDeep Gen Tidal Turbines Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  6. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-06-01

    Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

  7. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

  9. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better understanding of deposit formation mechanisms; • performing Techno-Economic-Analysis for a representative IGCC plant to investigate the impact on plant economics, in particular the impacts on the Cost of Electricity (COE), due to plant shutdowns caused by syngas cooler plugging and fouling and potential benefits to plant economics of developing strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling; and • performing modeling and pilot scale tests to investigate the potential benefits of using a sorbent (fuel additive) to capture the vaporized metals that result in syngas cooler fouling. All project milestones for BP 1 and BP 2 were achieved. DOE was provided a briefing on our accomplishments in BP1 and BP2 and our proposed plans for Budget Period 3 (BP 3). Based on our research the mitigation technology selected to investigate in BP 3 was the use of a sorbent that can be injected into the gasifier with the fuel slurry to capture vaporized metals that lead to the deposit formation in the syngas cooler. The work effort proposed for BP 3 would have focused on addressing concerns raised by gasification industry personnel for the impacts on gasifier performance of sorbent injection, so that at the end of BP 3 the use of sorbent injection would be at “pre-commercial” stage and ready for use in a Field Demonstration that could be funded by industry or DOE. A Budget Continuation Application (BCA) was submitted to obtain funding for BP3 DOE but DOE chose to not fund the proposed BP3 effort.

  10. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  12. Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillman, Jack B.

    2008-09-01

    In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

  13. MHK Projects/Winfield | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/Belleville | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Racine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Hannibal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. MHK Projects/Portland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter *MHK TechnologiesDenniss Auld Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. MHK Projects/Kennebec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology *MHK TechnologiesTidal Defense and Energy System TIDES Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. MHK Projects/Marmet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  1. Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive...

  2. Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory...

  3. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

  4. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents Mitigation Action Plans are documents DOE prepares in accordance with DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR 1021.331) that describes the plan for implementing commitments made in a DOE environmental impact statement and its associated record of decision, or, when appropriate, an EA or FONSI, to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with an action. If you have any trouble finding a specific

  5. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and ...

  6. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for...

  7. EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Annual Mitigation Report (AMR) addresses those WIPP-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  8. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Annual Mitigation Report (2007 AMR) addresses those WIPP- related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994...

  9. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 Annual Mitigation Report (AMR) addresses those WIPP-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  10. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Wildlife Diversity Plans used to guide the State of Oregon's Department of Fish and Wildlife when managing non-game wildlife. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural ...

  13. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, ...

  14. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife ...

  15. Final Department of Energy US Fish & Wildlife Service Migratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY and THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Regarding ... Department of Energy and United States Fish and Wildlife Service September 12, 2013 ...

  16. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: National Wildlife Refuge System...

  17. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Parks and Wildlife Department Name: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address: 4200 Smith School Rd Place: Austin, TX Zip: 78744 Phone Number: (512) 389-4800 Website:...

  18. Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans...

  19. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Provides guidance on conservation oriented development. Authors State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Organizations State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Published...

  20. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) What is WILD? The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and main- tained by the National Wind Technology ...

  1. MHK Projects/Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity (MW) 0 Number of Devices Deployed 2 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  2. EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

  3. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  4. Annual Adaptive Management Report for Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon: Mitigation of Pier B Development at the Bremerton Naval Facilities - Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon - Naval Underwater Warfare Center Division - Keyport, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-06-01

    Unites States Navy capital improvement projects are designed to modernize and improve mission capacity. Such capital improvement projects often result in unavoidable environmental impacts by increasing over-water structures, which results in a loss of subtidal habitat within industrial areas of Navy bases. In the Pacific Northwest, compensatory mitigation often targets alleviating impacts to Endangered Species Act-listed salmon species. The complexity of restoring large systems requires limited resources to target successful and more coordinated mitigation efforts to address habitat loss and improvements in water quality that will clearly contribute to an improvement at the site scale and can then be linked to a cumulative net ecosystem improvement.

  5. EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation...

  6. EA-1628: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa This Mitigation Action Plan specifieis the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental...

  7. Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wente, William Baker

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

  8. OLNG and WEP DEIS Appendix J - WEP Mitigation and Monitoring Plans

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    J WEP MITIGATION AND MONITORING PLANS Appendix J1: Washington Expansion Project Erosion Control and Revegetation Plan Appendix J2: Draft Unanticipated Discovery of Contamination Plan Appendix J3: Washington Expansion Project Water Quality Monitoring Plan Appendix J4: Horizontal Directional Drilling Monitoring and Contingency Plan APPENDIX J1: WASHINGTON EXPANSION PROJECT EROSION CONTROL AND REVEGETATION PLAN Washington Expansion Project Erosion Control and Revegetation Plan May 2014 Prepared by

  9. Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Phillips, Adrienne

    2015-03-31

    This research project addresses one of the goals of the DOE Carbon Sequestration Program (CSP). The CSP core R&D effort is driven by technology and is accomplished through laboratory and pilot scale research aimed at new technologies for greenhouse gas mitigation. Accordingly, this project was directed at developing novel technologies for mitigating unwanted upward leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) injected into the subsurface as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. The technology developed by way of this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP).

  10. The Wildlife Society 22nd Annual Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wildlife Society’s 22nd Annual Conference will be held Oct. 17–21, 2015, in Winnipeg, Canada. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Sustainability Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking on how partnerships with key stakeholders lead to the research, development, and demonstration of technologies that produce advanced bioenergy and bioproducts from lignocellulosic and algal biomass. Several activities supported by BETO provide insights into how habitat and wildlife can be considered when designing bioenergy systems. Strong public and private collaboration can help meet simultaneous goals of expanding the bioeconomy while also incorporating the needs of wildlife, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and providing other environmental and socio-economic benefits.

  11. EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

  12. EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado

  13. Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and Low-Carbon Development (LCD) strategies in developing countries through regionally based dialogues, web-based...

  14. Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine ...

  15. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells 2012 ...

  16. Progress Continues on Mitigation of Radiological Contamination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 13, 2015 Progress Continues on Mitigation of Radiological Contamination This week, WIPP personnel will complete the installation of the brattice cloth and salt barrier on a...

  17. OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  18. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of...

  19. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

  2. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Measures for Distributed Interconnection" Michael Coddington with National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Robert Broderick with Sandia National Laboratories July 9, 2014 2 Speakers Michael Coddington Principal Investigator Distributed Grid Integration NREL Robert Broderick Technical Lead Distributed Grid Integration Programs Sandia National Laboratories Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL 3 INTERCONNECTION, SCREENING & MITIGATION PRACTICES OF 21 UTILITIES

  3. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  4. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses the overall habitat condition of the regional area (macrohabitat), restoring the native species composition, density, and diversity by restoring the native ecosystem function. In the context of the development and implementation of this Habitat Protection Plan, it is important to understand that this is primarily a conservation tool, and is not intended to displace efforts that mitigate for lost resources. This plan is intended to primarily address long-term conservation needs and may not accommodate immediate short-term needs that address lost resources. Therefore, areas selected to address short-term mitigation needs may not be located in the high priority areas identified in this Plan. It needs to be clear that these projects and areas are no less important than those identified in this Plan.

  5. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  6. DOE Selects Nine Projects to Receive Funding for Carbon Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Intelligent Monitoring and Well Integrity and Mitigation Research DOE Selects Nine Projects to Receive Funding for Carbon Storage Intelligent Monitoring and Well Integrity ...

  7. MHK Projects/Wax Lake Outlet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    *MHK TechnologiesSmarTurbine Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14254 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  8. MHK Projects/NPI 019 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13987 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  9. MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Treader fixed *MHK TechnologiesOcean Treader floating Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  10. MHK Projects/NPI 055 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14084 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  11. MHK Projects/NPI 014 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13982 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. MHK Projects/Fort Ross North | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity (MW) 5 Main Overseeing Organization Sonoma Co Water Agency CA Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  13. MHK Projects/NPI 021 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13989 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/Alaska 36 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Devices Deployed 100 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Oceanlinx Maui | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13521 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Willow Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. MHK Projects/Galena ABS Alaskan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Devices Deployed 1 Main Overseeing Organization New Energy Corporation Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. MHK Projects/Vidal Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    *MHK TechnologiesSmarTurbine Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14018 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. MHK Projects/Niagara Community 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overseeing Organization ECOsponsible Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13840 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. MHK Projects/NPI 020 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13988 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. MHK Projects/NPI 022 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13990 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  2. MHK Projects/AWS II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    20 Main Overseeing Organization AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  3. MHK Projects/NPI 023 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13991 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  4. MHK Projects/NPI 016A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14103 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  5. MHK Projects/Vicksburg Bend | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    *MHK TechnologiesSmarTurbine Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14012 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  6. MHK Projects/Nenana Rivgen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OCGen turbine generator unit TGU Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13883 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  7. MHK Projects/Niagara Community | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overseeing Organization ECOsponsible Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13839 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  8. MHK Projects/Green Wave Mendocino | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zero Impact Water Current Turbine Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14291 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  9. MHK Projects/NPI 017 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13985 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  10. MHK Projects/New Cumberland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  11. MHK Projects/Fort Ross South | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sonoma Co Water Agency CA Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13377 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. MHK Projects/NPI 013 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13981 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  13. MHK Projects/Del Mar Landing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity (MW) 5 Main Overseeing Organization Sonoma Co Water Agency CA Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/NPI 016B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14104 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Robert C Byrd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Main Overseeing Organization McGinnis Inc Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. MHK Projects/Igiugig Risec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Igiugig Village Council Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13511 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  17. MHK Projects/NPI 018 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13986 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. MHK Projects/Seatricity Antigua | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Timeline and Milestones *712012 On schedule for deployment July 2012. Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. MHK Projects/NPI 025 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13993 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  20. MHK Projects/NPI 01 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14088 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  1. MHK Projects/NPI 027 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14071 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  2. MHK Projects/NPI 024 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13992 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  3. MHK Projects/St Clair River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Current Connections LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13694 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  4. MHK Projects/Alaska 18 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Devices Deployed 100 Main Overseeing Organization Hydro Green Energy Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  5. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this project is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The project is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. Project outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.

  6. Project Title: Tin Whisker Mitigation (4532) Program or Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exercises and simulation OBI.3 - Routine maintenance and custodial services DB 1.4 - Air conditioning installation for existing equipment DB 1.5 Cooling water system...

  7. Boyer-Tillamook Access Road Improvement Project 1 Mitigation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... temporarily divert streams around the construction site (see Table 2). Prepare a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan to reduce erosion and runoff and stabilize disturbed ...

  8. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  9. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  10. West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  12. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  13. EIS-0218: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0218: Mitigation Action Plan Implementation of a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel The ...

  14. Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory (CEQ, 1980) Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the ...

  15. Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April...

  16. National integrated mitigation planning in agriculture: A review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National integrated mitigation planning in agriculture: A review paper This review of national greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning in the agriculture sector has two...

  17. Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:...

  18. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012 ...

  19. Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo...

  20. Property:Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts Property Type String Retrieved from...

  1. National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A...

  2. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  3. Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations...

  4. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime ...

  5. Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel ...

  6. Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Abstract not provided. Authors: Altman, Susan Jeanne ...

  7. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico PDF icon Site-Wide Environmental Impact ...

  8. EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual ...

  9. Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks Mitigations for Security Vulnerabilities Found in Control System Networks Industry is aware of the need ...

  10. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  11. 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife Properties | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife PropertiesLegal Abstract Regulations governing all wildlife...

  12. TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife...

  13. US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower...

  14. Information Needs for Energy Mitigation and Siting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    esources University o f W yoming QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW - Aug. 21,2014 1. A shared language 2. Solid baseline data to guide planning and siting 3. Mitigation best practices -...

  15. Mitigating the Impacts of Glint and Glare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, Michael; Kandt, Alicen; Phillips, Steven

    2015-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, supporting the Department of the Navy Renewable Energy Program Office, has developed an innovative glint/glare analysis and visualization methodology to understand and mitigate the possible impacts of light reflecting off solar photovoltaic arrays.

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wildlife Fund Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: World Wildlife Fund Joined the Challenge: April 2014 Headquarters: Washington, DC Charging Location: Washington, DC Domestic Employees: 470 World Wildlife Fun (WWF) works in 100 countries and is supported by 1.2 million members in the United States and close to 5 million globally in their conservation efforts. WWF's unique way of working combines global reach with a foundation

  17. Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife October 27, 2015 - 9:33am Addthis Innovative Study Helps Offshore Wind Developers Protect Wildlife Jocelyn Brown-Saracino Jocelyn Brown-Saracino Environmental Research Manager, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Thanks to a first-of-its-kind in-depth study of wildlife distribution and movements, the nation's Eastern Seaboard is better prepared than

  18. EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies.

  19. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This reduction in capacity was observed to be independent of the amount of charge/discharge cycles except for the composites containing siloxane, which showed less of an impact on hydrogen storage capacity as it was cycled further. While the reason for this is not clear, it may be due to a chemically stabilizing effect of the siloxane on the metal hydride. Flow-through calorimetry was used to characterize the mitigating effectiveness of the different composites relative to the neat (no polymer) material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation, and the best performing material was the siloxane-containing composite which reduced the heat release to less than 50% of the value of the neat material. However, upon cycling the composites, all mitigating behavior was lost. The combined results of the flow-through calorimetry, hydrogen capacity, and thermogravimetric analysis tests lead to the proposed conclusion that while the polymer composites have mitigating potential and are physically robust under cycling, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride.

  20. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

    2008-12-30

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No.199202601). Work undertaken during 2007 included: (1) Starting 1 new fencing project in the NFJD subbasin that will protect an additional 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat; (2) Constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa River to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) Planting 22,100 plants along 3 streams totaling 3.6 stream miles; (4) Establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; (7) Initiated writing of a comprehensive project summary report that will present a summary of conclusions of the benefits to focal species and management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 56 individual projects have been implemented, monitored and maintained along 84.8 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams that protect and enhance 3,501 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

  1. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature of the organisms with the fluid temperature. (5) Investigation of growth surface materials continues, with Omnisil and Scotch Brite emerging as the leading candidates. More investigation of these and other material types is still needed to determine the best material for particular combinations of organisms and harvesting methods. (6) Tests of harvesting methods and harvesting system designs have shown that desirable levels of ''percentage algae removal'' can be achieved for particular organisms and growth surface materials, for example Cyanidium on polyester felt. Additional testing continues to better characterize sensitivity of the ''percentage removal'' to various system design parameters, but these tests have been delayed due to the lack of suitable organisms for the tests. (7) The solar collectors and the pilot-scale bioreactor light distribution panels for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed. One solar lighting system (solar collector tracking unit, fiber optic light transmission cables, light distribution panels) is almost completely prepared for installation during the next quarter in the pilot scale bioreactor system. (8) Pressure drop results from tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique (the translating slug flow reactor) are encouraging, with reasonable values of 2.5 psi maximum over an 11.48 meter distance between pressure taps for test conditions of 0.6 m/sec slug velocity and approximately 10 m/sec gas velocity. Preparations are under way for CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests.

  2. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  3. Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

    2010-04-01

    This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

  4. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results formore » several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.« less

  5. Disruption mitigation using high pressure gas jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis G. Whyte

    2007-10-11

    The goal of this research is to establish credible disruption mitigation scenarios based on the technique of massive gas injection. Disruption mitigation seeks to minimize or eliminate damage to internal components that can occur due to the rapid dissipation of thermal and magnetic energy during a tokamak disruption. In particular, the focus of present research is extrapolating mitigation techniques to burning plasma experiments such as ITER, where disruption-caused damage poses a serious threat to the lifetime of internal vessel components. A majority of effort has focused on national and international collaborative research with large tokamaks: DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, JET, and ASDEX Upgrade. The research was oriented towards empirical trials of gas-jet mitigation on several tokamaks, with the goal of developing and applying cohesive models to the data across devices. Disruption mitigation using gas jet injection has proven to be a viable candidate for avoiding or minimizing damage to internal components in burning plasma experiments like ITER. The physics understanding is progress towards a technological design for the required gas injection system in ITER.

  6. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  7. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact (CEQ, 2011) | Department of Energy Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact (CEQ, 2011) Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact (CEQ, 2011) The Council on Environmental Quality is issuing this guidance for Federal departments and agencies on establishing, implementing,

  8. EA-1562-SA-1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1562-SA-1: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (Mitigation Action Plan for Phase II Build Out, North Federal Campus, PNNL Site) This mitigation plan describes the compensatory mitigation and monitoring commitments under DOE resource management guidelines for the clearing and grading, and subsequent loss of mature shrub-steppe habitat associated with Phase II

  9. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

  10. Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oak Ridge, TN EM Project: Mitigation/Remediation of Hg ETR Report Date: April 2008 ETR-13 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did This Review From 1953 to 1983, ~240,000 pounds of mercury (Hg) were released to the East Fork Popular Creek during the operation of the Y-12 Plant. In 1963, direct systematic releases of mercury

  11. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

    2013-11-12

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  12. Mitigating PQ Problems in Legacy Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilinets, Boris; /SLAC

    2011-06-01

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Problems with PQ in legacy data centers still exist and need to be mitigated; (2) Harmonics generated by non-linear IT load can be lowered by passive, active and hybrid cancellation methods; (3) Harmonic study is necessary to find the best way to treat PQ problems; (4) AHF's and harmonic cancellation transformers proved to be very efficient in mitigating PQ problems; and (5) It is important that IT leaders partner with electrical engineering to appropriate ROI statements, justifying many of these expenditures.

  13. Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Yonas, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

  14. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  15. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D.; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  16. Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

  17. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.

    2000-12-01

    The authors report on their progress from April 1998 through March 1999 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report D), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report E), and the University of Idaho (UI; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 1998 through March 1999 are given.

  18. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

    2013-08-30

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives.  Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites.  Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  19. NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (45) Apply Africa filter...

  20. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on harvest methods, forest service, and more.

  1. OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    availability: http:crossref.org Citation Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOAR-Division100-WildlifeDiversityPlan&oldid792434" Feedback Contact...

  2. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability ...

  3. India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Environment, Forests and Wildlife1 Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers...

  4. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  5. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  6. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  7. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of...

  8. Update on Common-Cause Failure Experience and Mitigation Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Muhlheim, Michael David; Pullum, Laura L; Smith, Cyrus M; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi

    2014-04-01

    Experience in other industries has shown that digital technology can provide substantial benefits in terms of performance and reliability. However, the U.S. nuclear power industry has been slow to adopt the technology extensively in its instrumentation and control (I&C) applications because of inhibiting factors such as regulatory uncertainty, insufficient technological experience base, implementation complexity, limited availability of nuclear-qualified products and vendors, and inadequate definition of modernization cost recapture. Although there have been examples of digital technology usage in the nuclear power industry, challenges to the qualification of digital technology for high-integrity nuclear power plant (NPP) applications have severely constrained more widespread progress in achieving the benefits that are possible through the transition to digital. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) established the Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) technology area under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Program to coordinate the instrumentation and controls (I&C) research across DOE NE and to identify and lead efforts to address common needs. As part of the NEET ASI research program, the Digital Technology Qualification project was established. Under this project, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading the investigation into mitigation of digital common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities for nuclear-qualified applications. This technical report documents updated and expanded findings from research activities by ORNL. Specifically, the report describes CCF experience in the nuclear and nonnuclear industries, identifies the state of the practice for CCF mitigation through key examples, and presents conclusions from the determination of knowledge gaps.

  9. MHK Projects/Humboldt County WaveConnect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization Pacific Gas and Electric Company Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  10. MHK Projects/Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Marine Power Water Inc Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13350 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  11. MHK Projects/PG E Humboldt WaveConnect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MW) 40 Main Overseeing Organization Pacific Gas and Electric Company Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. MHK Projects/Mendocino County WaveConnect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization Pacific Gas and Electric Company Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  13. MHK Projects/Ocean Navitas NaREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Devices Deployed 1 Main Overseeing Organization Ocean Navitas Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  14. MHK Projects/General Sullivan and Little Bay BRI | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13503 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  15. MHK Projects/Centreville OPT Wave Energy Park | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Main Overseeing Organization California Wave Energy Partners LLC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference April 1, 2013 - 12:54pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D ...

  17. Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and ...

  18. Peru-GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from UNDP-Peru GEF Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in the Energy Generation and End-Use Sectors)...

  19. Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

  20. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2010 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record

  1. EIS-0380: Annual Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2013 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

  2. Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

  3. 300 Area Building Retention Evaluation Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. McBride

    2007-07-03

    Evaluate the long-term retention of several facilities associated with the PNNL Capability Replacement Laboratory and other Hanfor mission needs. WCH prepared a mitigation plan for three scenarios with different release dates for specific buildings. The evaluations present a proposed plan for providing utility services to retained facilities in support of a long-term (+20 year) lifespan in addition to temporary services to buildings with specified delayed release dates.

  4. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparks, Michael H.

    2001-06-12

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  6. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  7. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  8. EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  9. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  10. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  11. Are flying wildlife attracted to (or do they avoid) wind turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larkin, Ronald

    2010-03-31

    A DOE-sponsored research project found strong evidence that flying wildlife avoid or are attracted to commercial-scale wind turbines from a distance. Some nocturnally migrating birds avoid flying near turbines and few or none change flight paths to approach them. High-flying bats less often avoid flying near turbines and some are attracted to them from a distance, although bats’ flight paths were often complex and convoluted. The findings are being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed scientific journal (Larkin, in prep 2013).

  12. Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Excel tool helps agencies estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings. For example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office

  13. Webinar: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells Webinar: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells Above is the webinar recording for the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells," originally presented on November 19, 2013. In addition to this recording, you can access the presentation slides. A text version of this recording will be available soon

  14. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy Cover of the Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy report Wind development located within the line of sight of radar systems can cause clutter and interference, which at some radars has resulted in significant performance degradation. As wind turbines continue to be installed, and as advances in wind

  15. TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MITIGATIONS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MITIGATIONS TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MITIGATIONS This document provides practices that can help mitigate the potential risks that can occur to some electricity sector organizations. Each organization decides for itself the risks it can accept and the practices it deems appropriate to manage those risks. PDF icon TOP 10 VULNERABILITIES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS AND THEIR

  16. International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

    2010-11-01

    The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

  17. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0218: Mitigation Action Plan Implementation of a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel May 1, 1994 EIS-0186:...

  18. MCA 22-3-430 - Montana Antiquities Avoidance and Mitigation ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MCA 22-3-430 - Montana Antiquities Avoidance and MitigationLegal Abstract Sets forth a principle of preferred avoidance of heritage properties or paleontological remains,...

  19. Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Laboratory's Fire Management posts daily Fire Danger Ratings on their website. PDF icon Wildfire-Mitigation-at-Los-Alamos-National-Laboratory.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  20. EA-1855: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lincoln and Spokane Counties, Washington (aka DOEEA-4406) This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Creston-Bell...

  1. RAPID/Best Practices/Landscape-Scale Mitigation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    features that minimize impacts (for example, the best types of materials and structure types for visual mitigation or avian-safe structure design) would have been identified...

  2. Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    their decision making processes and operations. It presents an overview of the current science and policy of climate change, followed by self-guidance material on mitigation and...

  3. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas...

  4. EA-1739: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications EA-1951: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1739: Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - Financial Plan Risk Mitigation Master...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within acceptable bounds BPA Financial Plan Workshop 5 Financial Plan Risk Metrics Agenda Origin of the Risk Metrics Issue History of risk mitigation measures and origin of...

  6. EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    transmission line between Bonneville Power Administration's existing McNary and John Day substations. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the McNary-John Day Transmission...

  7. Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    divisionsfuture-perfect Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling1...

  8. Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name...

  9. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries...

  10. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual issues and lessons learned in studies in developing countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  11. Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for Innovations and Technology Diffusion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary...

  12. Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

    2011-09-30

    This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

  13. UNEP-Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNEP-Ethiopia-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for...

  14. EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    boiler and a 20-megawatt steam turbine at its existing paper mill in Port Angeles, Washington. PDF icon Mitigation Action Plan for the Environmental Assessment for the...

  15. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Mitigation Woekshop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    engine retrofits reduce emissions & increase efficiency * ... Infrastructure R&D and Methane Mitigation Workshop - Nov. ... type) ** not common in upstream applications (low hanging ...

  16. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials Citation Details ... and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. ...

  17. Oregon Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Basin Mitigation Agreement Author State of Oregon Recipient Bonneville Power Administration Published Publisher Not Provided, 10222010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  18. Property:NEPA Resource Imposed Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Protection) for applicable mitigation measures. Antelope Valley NesetNEPAImpactwithAirQuality + See http:ww2.wapa.govsiteswesternbusinesssellingDocuments...

  19. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi March 10, 2010...

  20. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast ... AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  1. Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  2. Central African Republic-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  3. Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  4. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  5. Cameroon-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector...

  6. International Partnership on Mitigation and MRV | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    climate experts from a variety of countries, the Partnership seeks to: foster mutual learning between peers identify best practices establish a shared mitigation-related knowledge...

  7. Understanding the contribution of non-carbon dioxide gases in deep mitigation scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernaat, David; Calvin, Katherine V.; Lucas, Paul; Luderer, Gunnar; Otto, Sander; Rao, Shilpa; Strefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-07-01

    The combined 2010 emissions of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and the fluorinated gasses (F-gas) account for about 20-30% of total emissions and about 30% of radiative forcing. At the moment, most studies looking at reaching ambitious climate targets project the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) to be reduced to zero (or less) by the end of the century. As for non-CO2 gases, the mitigation potential seem to be more constrained, we find that by the end of the century in the current deep mitigation scenarios non-CO2 emissions could form the lion’s share of remaining greenhouse gas emissions. In order to support effective climate policy strategies, in this paper we provide a more in-depth look at the role of non-CO2¬ emission sources (CH4, N2O and F-gases) in achieving deep mitigation targets (radiative forcing target of 2.8 W/m2 in 2100). Specifically, we look at the sectorial mitigation potential and the remaining non-CO2 emissions. By including a set of different models, we provide some insights into the associated uncertainty. Most of the remaining methane emissions in 2100 in the climate mitigation scenario come from the livestock sector. Strong reductions are seen in the energy supply sector across all models. For N2O, less reduction potential is seen compared to methane and the sectoral differences are larger between the models. The paper shows that the assumptions on remaining non-CO2 emissions are critical for the feasibility of reaching ambitious climate targets and the associated costs.

  8. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  9. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainably’s...

  10. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Address: 1594 W North Temple, Suite 2110, Box 146301 Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84114-6301 Phone Number: 801-538-4745 Website:...

  11. Title 50 CFR 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50...

  12. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rules and Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations Abstract This web page lists...

  13. WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WAC - 232-12-014 Wildlife Classified as Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 232-12-014...

  14. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Endangered Species Act of 1973Legal Abstract This page links to...

  15. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  16. FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: FSM 2600...

  17. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential | Department of Energy Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential February 24, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Adding offshore wind to the U.S. renewable energy portfolio promises access to a large,

  18. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  19. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  20. Electron cloud experiments at Fermilab: Formation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments at Fermilab to explore the electron cloud phenomenon. The Main Injector will have its beam intensity increased four-fold in the Project X upgrade, and would be subject to instabilities from the electron cloud. We present measurements of the cloud formation in the Main Injector and experiments with materials for the mitigation of the Cloud. An experimental installation of Titanium-Nitride (TiN) coated beam pipes has been under study in the Main Injector since 2009; this material was directly compared to an adjacent stainless chamber through electron cloud measurement with Retarding Field Analyzers (RFAs). Over the long period of running we were able to observe the secondary electron yield (SEY) change and correlate it with electron fluence, establishing a conditioning history. Additionally, the installation has allowed measurement of the electron energy spectrum, comparison of instrumentation techniques, and energydependent behavior of the electron cloud. Finally, a new installation, developed in conjunction with Cornell and SLAC, will allow direct SEY measurement of material samples irradiated in the accelerator.

  1. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  2. Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooley, Sharon

    2009-03-20

    A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and habitat conditions. The RBT were stocked in six distribution trips from June through September. The number of fish stocked and the receiving waters are identified below (see Table 2).

  3. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report FY 1990.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report FY 1990. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report FY 1990. The goal of the Fifteenmile Creek Habitat Improvement project is to improve wild winter steelhead habitat in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin. This goal was addressed under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703 (c) (1) - Action Item 4.2.

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  5. Methodology for prioritizing cyber-vulnerable critical infrastructure equipment and mitigation strategies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, Lon Andrew; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.

    2010-04-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Cyber Security Division (NSCD), Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), contracted Sandia National Laboratories to develop a generic methodology for prioritizing cyber-vulnerable, critical infrastructure assets and the development of mitigation strategies for their loss or compromise. The initial project has been divided into three discrete deliverables: (1) A generic methodology report suitable to all Critical Infrastructure and Key Resource (CIKR) Sectors (this report); (2) a sector-specific report for Electrical Power Distribution; and (3) a sector-specific report for the water sector, including generation, water treatment, and wastewater systems. Specific reports for the water and electric sectors are available from Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T

    2011-01-01

    The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

  7. Final Report. SFAA No. DEFC02-98CH10961. Technical assistance for joint implementation and other supporting mechanisms and measures for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Denise

    2001-10-15

    IIEC, a division of CERF, has developed an extensive base of experience implementing activities that support climate action by developing USIJI projects in transitional countries within Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and southern Africa. IIEC has been able to provide a range of technical and policy assistance to governments and industry in support of sustainable energy use. IIEC continues to work in key countries with local partners to develop and implement energy efficiency policies and standards, develop site-specific projects, and assist governing bodies to establish national priorities and evaluation criteria for approving GHG-mitigation projects. As part of this project, IIEC focused on promoting a series of activities in Thailand and South Africa in order to identify GHG mitigation projects and work within the national approval process of those countries. The sections of this report outline the activities conducted in each country in order to achieve that goal.

  8. Stream Classification Tool User Manual: For Use in Applications in Hydropower-Related Evironmental Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Troia, Matthew J.; DeRolph, Christopher R.; Samu, Nicole M.

    2016-01-01

    Stream classifications are an inventory of different types of streams. Classifications help us explore similarities and differences among different types of streams, make inferences regarding stream ecosystem behavior, and communicate the complexities of ecosystems. We developed a nested, layered, and spatially contiguous stream classification to characterize the biophysical settings of stream reaches within the Eastern United States (~ 900,000 reaches). The classification is composed of five natural characteristics (hydrology, temperature, size, confinement, and substrate) along with several disturbance regime layers, and each was selected because of their relevance to hydropower mitigation. We developed the classification at the stream reach level using the National Hydrography Dataset Plus Version 1 (1:100k scale). The stream classification is useful to environmental mitigation for hydropower dams in multiple ways. First, it creates efficiency in the regulatory process by creating an objective and data-rich means to address meaningful mitigation actions. Secondly, the SCT addresses data gaps as it quickly provides an inventory of hydrology, temperature, morphology, and ecological communities for the immediate project area, but also surrounding streams. This includes identifying potential reference streams as those that are proximate to the hydropower facility and fall within the same class. These streams can potentially be used to identify ideal environmental conditions or identify desired ecological communities. In doing so, the stream provides some context for how streams may function, respond to dam regulation, and an overview of specific mitigation needs. Herein, we describe the methodology in developing each stream classification layer and provide a tutorial to guide applications of the classification (and associated data) in regulatory settings, such as hydropower (re)licensing.

  9. Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  11. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan ... Division of Migratory Bird Management U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Daniel Martin I.M. ...

  12. File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife...

  13. I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife...

  14. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  15. EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This Mitigation Action Plan is an integral part of the Finding of No Significant Impact ... borrow source. This MAP includes all the integral elements and commitments made in the EA ...

  16. National Mitigation Planning in Agriculture: Review and Guidelines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Simple Website: www.fao.orgdocrep017i3237ei3237e.pdf Language: English This review of national greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation planning in the agriculture sector provides...

  17. Introduction to Administrative Programs that Mitigate the Insider Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Gretchen K.; Rogers, Erin; Landers, John; DeCastro, Kara

    2012-09-01

    This presentation begins with the reality of the insider threat, then elaborates on these tools to mitigate the insider threat: Human Reliability Program (HRP); Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Program; Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

  18. EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kV transmission line between Bonneville Power Administration's existing McNary and John Day substations. PDF icon DOEEIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan for the McNary-John Day...

  19. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  20. EA-1934: 2014 Annual Report for Mitigation Action Plan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This annual report provides a summary of DOEEA-1934 Mitigation Action Plan implementation in calendar year 2014. PDF icon EA-1934-FEA-MAP-2014...

  1. EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan Waste Isolation Pilot Plant This MAP focuses on ... Action Plan, is the central focus of this MAP and will be updated as needed to allow for ...

  2. Strategy Guideline: Mitigation of Retrofit Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) is currently developing strategies designed to promote and achieve increased energy savings and promote upgrades in the residential retrofit sector. These strategies are targeted to retrofit program managers, retrofit contractors, policy makers, academic researchers, and non-governmental organizations. This report focuses on four key areas to promote home energy upgrades: fostering accurate energy savings projections; understanding consumer perceptions for energy savings; measuring energy savings, and ensuring quality control for retrofit installations.

  3. Strategy Guideline. Mitigation of Retrofit Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) Building America team is currently developing strategies designed to promote and achieve increased energy savings and promote upgrades in the residential retrofit sector. These strategies are targeted to retrofit program managers, retrofit contractors, policy makers, academic researchers, and non-governmental organizations. This report focuses on four key areas to promote home energy upgrades: fostering accurate energy savings projections; understanding consumer perceptions for energy savings; measuring energy savings, and ensuring quality control for retrofit installations.

  4. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shepherdstown, West Virginia | Department of Energy Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia Photo of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings

  6. Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Working Group Releases New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Working Group Releases New Report Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Working Group Releases New Report February 10, 2016 - 2:48pm Addthis While wind energy presents many benefits, spinning wind turbines can interfere with weather, air traffic control, and air surveillance radar systems. As advances in wind technology enable turbines to be deployed in new regions of the country, the probability for wind

  7. EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development EERE Success Story-Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with EERE, Normandeau Associates of Bedford, New Hampshire, developed a tool that characterizes the risk for bird and bat species that may be susceptible to collisions with wind turbines. This tool will be used in environmental decision-making for the planning,

  8. Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    induced seismicity and brine migration in geologic CO2 storage (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization, induced seismicity and brine migration in geologic CO2 storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization, induced seismicity and brine migration in geologic CO2 storage Authors: Dempsey, David ; Kelkar, Sharad ; Pawar, Rajesh Publication

  9. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Bezdek, Roger; Wendling, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  10. A statistical approach to designing mitigation for induced ac voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J. [Electro Sciences, Inc., Crystal Lake, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Induced voltage levels on buried pipelines collocated with overhead electric power transmission lines are usually mitigated by means of grounding the pipeline. Maximum effectiveness is obtained when grounds are placed at discrete locations along the pipeline where the peak induced voltages occur. The degree of mitigation achieved is dependent upon the local soil resistivity at these locations. On occasion it may be necessary to employ an extensive distributed grounding system, for example, a parallel buried wire connected to the pipe at periodic intervals. In this situation the a priori calculation of mitigated voltage levels is sometimes made assuming an average value for the soil resistivity. Over long distances, however, the soil resistivity generally varies as a log-normally distributed random variable. The effect of this variability upon the predicted mitigated voltage levels is examined. It is found that the predicted levels exhibit a statistical variability which precludes a precise determination of the mitigated voltage levels. Thus, post commissioning testing of the emplaced mitigation system is advisable.

  11. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  12. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  13. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines and Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Makundi, W.; Andrasko, K.; Boer, R.; Ravindranath, N.; Sudha, P.; Rao, S.; Lasco, R.; Pulhin, F.; Masera, O.; Ceron, A.; Ordonez, J.; Deying, X.; Zhang, X.; Zuomin, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon (C) mitigation potential and costs of about 40 forestry options in seven developing countries. Each study uses the same methodological approach - Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (COMAP) - to estimate the above parameters between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios. Coupled with data on a per ha basis on C sequestration or avoidance, and costs and benefits, it allows the estimation of monetary benefit per Mg C, and the total costs and carbon potential. The results show that about half (3.0 Pg C) the cumulative mitigation potential of 6.2 Petagram (Pg) C between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries (about 200 x 106 Mg C yr-1) could be achieved at a negative cost and the remainder at costs ranging up to $100 Mg C-1. About 5 Pg C could be achieved, at a cost less than $20 per Mg C. Negative cost potential indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of these options. The achievable potential is likely to be smaller, however, due to market, institutional, and sociocultural barriers that can delay or prevent the implementation of the analyzed options.

  14. Estimating the potential of greenhouse gas mitigation in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monacrovich, E.; Pilifosova, O.; Danchuck, D.

    1996-09-01

    As part of the studies related to the obligations of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Republic of Kazakhstan started activities to inventory greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and assess of GHG mitigation options, The objective of this paper is to present an estimate of the possibility of mitigating GHG emissions and determine the mitigation priorities. It presents a compilation of the possible options and their assessment in terms of major criteria and implementation feasibility. Taking into account the structure of GHG emissions in Kazakhstan in 1990, preliminary estimates of the potential for mitigation are presented for eight options for the energy sector and agriculture and forestry sector. The reference scenario prepared by expert assessments assumes a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in 1996-1998 by about 26% from the 1990 level due to general economic decline, but then emissions increase. It is estimated that the total potential for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions for the year 2000 is 3% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the reference scenario. The annual reduction in methane emissions due to the estimated options can amount to 5%-6% of the 1990 level. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Status of research toward the ITER disruption mitigation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Izzo, V. A.; Aleynikov, P. B.; Lehnen, M.; Snipes, J. A.; Flp, T.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lukash, V. E.; Papp, G.; Pautasso, G.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    2015-02-15

    An overview of the present status of research toward the final design of the ITER disruption mitigation system (DMS) is given. The ITER DMS is based on massive injection of impurities, in order to radiate the plasma stored energy and mitigate the potentially damaging effects of disruptions. The design of this system will be extremely challenging due to many physics and engineering constraints such as limitations on port access and the amount and species of injected impurities. Additionally, many physics questions relevant to the design of the ITER disruption mitigation system remain unsolved such as the mechanisms for mixing and assimilation of injected impurities during the rapid shutdown and the mechanisms for the subsequent formation and dissipation of runaway electron current.

  16. Assessing Risk and Driving Risk Mitigation for First-of-a-Kind Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Collins

    2011-09-01

    Planning and decision making amidst programmatic and technological risks represent significant challenges for projects. This presentation addresses the four step risk-assessment process needed to determine clear path forward to mature needed technology and design, license, and construct advanced nuclear power plants, which have never been built before, including Small Modular Reactors. This four step process has been carefully applied to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. STEP 1 - Risk Identification Risks are identified, collected, and categorized as technical risks, programmatic risks, and project risks, each of which result in cost and schedule impacts if realized. These include risks arising from the use of technologies not previously demonstrated in a relevant application. These risks include normal and accident scenarios which the SMR could experience including events that cause the disablement of engineered safety features (typically documented in Phenomena Identification Ranking Tables (PIRT) as produced with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and design needs which must be addressed to further detail the design. Product - Project Risk Register contained in a database with sorting, presentation, rollup, risk work off functionality similar to the NGNP Risk Management System . STEP 2 - Risk Quantification The risks contained in the risk register are then scored for probability of occurrence and severity of consequence, if realized. Here the scoring methodology is established and the basis for the scoring is well documented. Product - Quantified project risk register with documented basis for scoring. STEP 3 - Risk Handling Strategy Risks are mitigated by applying a systematic approach to maturing the technology through Research and Development, modeling, test, and design. A Technology Readiness Assessment is performed to determine baseline Technology Readiness Levels (TRL). Tasks needed to mature the technology are developed and documented in a roadmap. Product - Risk Handling Strategy. STEP 4 - Residual Risk Work off The risk handling strategy is entered into the Project Risk Allocation Tool (PRAT) to analyze each task for its ability to reduce risk. The result is risk-informed task prioritization. The risk handling strategy is captured in the Risk Management System, a relational database that provides conventional database utility, including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. The tool's Hierarchy Tree allows visualization and analyses of complex relationships between risks, risk mitigation tasks, design needs, and PIRTs. Product - Project Risk Allocation Tool and Risk Management System which depict project plan to reduce risk and current progress in doing so.

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

  18. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  19. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  20. Toroidally resolved radiation dynamics during a gas jet mitigated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    disruption on Alcator C-Mod (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Toroidally resolved radiation dynamics during a gas jet mitigated disruption on Alcator C-Mod Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toroidally resolved radiation dynamics during a gas jet mitigated disruption on Alcator C-Mod Measurements of the radiation dynamics during an Alcator C-Mod disruption induced by a high pressure He/Ar gas jet are presented. Data are analysed from four 22-channel Absolute eXtreme UltraViolet