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1

EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), 6: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Finding of No Significant Impact Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic) July 30, 1996 EA-1096: Final Environmental Assessment Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic)

2

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Thompson Falls Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents a preliminary mitigation and enhancement plan for the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. It discusses options available to provide wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501). The options focus on mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat losses attributable to the construction of the hydroelectric project. These losses were previously estimated from the best available information concerning the degree of negative and positive impacts to target wildlife species (Wood and Olsen 1984). Criteria by which the mitigation alternatives were evaluated were the same as those used to assess the impacts identified in the Phase I document (Wood and Olsen 1984). They were also evaluated according to feasibility and cost effectiveness. This document specifically focuses on mitigation for target species which were identified during Phase I (Wood and Olsen 1984). It was assumed mitigation and enhancement for the many other target wildlife species impacted by the hydroelectric developments will occur as secondary benefits. The recommended mitigation plan includes two recommended mitigation projects: (1) development of wildlife protection and enhancement plans for MPC lands and (2) strategies to protect several large islands upstream of the Thompson Falls reservoir. If implemented, these projects would provide satisfactory mitigation for wildlife losses associated with the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. The intent of the mitigation plan is to recommend wildlife management objectives and guidelines. The specific techniques, plans, methods and agreements would be developed is part of the implementation phase.

Bissell, Gael; Wood, Marilyn

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

Soults, Scott [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE-EA-1 023 Bonneville POWER ADMINISTRATION April 1995 DISCLAIMER This report w a s prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of t h e United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or a s s u m e s any legal liability or responsibility for t h e accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents t h a t its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial, product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise d o e s not necessarily constitute or imply its

12

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin has had far-reaching effects on many species of wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the Federal portion of this system, as allocated to the purpose of power production. BPA needs to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat in the Snake River Subbasin.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribe

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creek Winter Range: Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment I F 8 - Spokane Tribe of Indians Bonneville POWER ADMINISTRATION B r n u r r o N aF THIS D O C ~ I H ~ E E 1% utifi_;'iUzi: w DOVEA-0939 November1 994 Bureay of Indian Affairs DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

17

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

Yde, Chis

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Project Management Plan for the "Dilling Addition".  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) for management of the Pend Oreille Wetland Wildlife Mitigation project II (Dilling Addition) for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on Kalispel Ceded Lands. Albeni Falls Dam is located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington-Idaho border, about 25 miles upstream of the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The dam controls the water level on Lake Pend Oreille. The lake was formerly the center of subsistence use by the Kalispel Tribe. Flooding of wetlands, and water fluctuations both on the lake and downstream on the river, has had adverse impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. An extensive process was followed to formulate and prioritize wildlife resource goals. The Kalispel Natural Resource Department provided guidance in terms of opportunities onsite. To prioritize specific goals, the Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Caucus were consulted. From this process, the top priority goal for the Kalispel Tribe is: Protect and develop riparian forest and shrub, and freshwater wetlands, to mitigate losses resulting from reservoir inundation and river level fluctuations due to Albeni Falls Dam. Indicator species used to determine the initial construction/inundation loses and mitigation project gains include Bald Eagle (breeding and wintering), Black-capped Chickadee, Canada Goose, Mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer, and Yellow Warbler.

Entz, Ray D.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

28

Conforth Ranch (Wanaket) Wildlife Mitigation Project : Draft Management Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to mitigate for loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects, including McNary dam. The proposed wildlife mitigation project involves wildlife conservation on 1140 hectares (ha)(2817 acres) of land (including water rights) in Umatilla County, Oregon. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA)(DOE/EA- 1016) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

31

EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

32

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

Howerton, Jack

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..A ..A -- South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment ig of No Significant Impact and Findi RECEIVED @ S T 1 JAN 3 1 DOEIEA-0956 September 1995 SOUTH FORK SNAKE RIVER / PALISADES WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE EA # 0956 DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an a m u n t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their ' employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- , bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer-

36

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

Merker, Christopher

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

Bedrossian, Karen L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision; 06April1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various sourcesincluding Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agenciespropose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental

43

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

Yde, Chris A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers calendar year 2001 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate for construction losses associated with Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, Deadwood, Minidoka and Palisades hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of Descriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various. sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental impacts evaluated in BPA`s Wildlife Mitigation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0246) published March, 20, 1997, and filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the week of March 24, 1997 (EPA Notice of Availability Published April 4, 1997, 62 FR 65, 16154). BPA will distribute this Record of Decision to all known interested and affected persons, groups, tribes, and agencies.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 10, 2003 October 10, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36) Joe DeHerrera- KEWN-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Project-Implemetation of Wildlife Mitigation Plan Project No: 200000900 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.0 Species Manangement

55

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

56

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

57

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material:...

59

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35) Joe Deherrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Malheur Wildlife Mitigation Project- Denny Jones Ranch Project No: 200002700 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.0 Plant Propagation Techniques; 4.0 Water Development and Management; 5.0 Water Distribution Techniques; 6.0 Fire Management Techniques (prompt fire suppression and fuels management, natural fire management), 7.0 Vegetation Management (herbicide, hand pulling, prescribed burns, water level manipulation); 8.2 Control of Predators and

60

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 11, 2002 June 11, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-25) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Purchase of Fisher River Conservation Easement (Fiscal Years 2002-2004) Project No: 2002-044-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: near Libby, Lincoln County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development

62

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246-SA-24) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife MitigationProgram EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-24) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Herbert Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Benton County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 221 acres of the Herbert parcel in Benton County, Oregon for the protection of wetland, riparian, and riverine habitats. The Herbert parcel is located within the Willamette

63

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-29) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Smith and Parsons Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of three parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 870 acres.

65

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 5/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2002 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-23) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Canby Ferry Conservation Easement Project No: 1992-068-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 16 acres of the Canby Ferry parcel in Clackamas County, Oregon for the protection

67

DOE/EIS-0246-SA-16: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (8/9/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2001 9, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-16) Brad Miller, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Johnson Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: Benewah Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase three parcels totaling 411 acres of private property on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation as partial mitigation for

68

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 7/24/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-28) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Lower Naches River Land Acquisition, Yakima River Side Channels Project Project No: 1997-051-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 2.15 Acquisition of Sensitive Riparian Resources Location: Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Yakama Nation Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project

69

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 3/7/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2002 March 7, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch Dam Phase II Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Camas and Elmore Counties, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 1,370 acres of

70

(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26): Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (07/3/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2002 3, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-26) David Sill Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Windy Bay Property Acquisition Project No: 1990-044-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Kootenai County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 150 acres of land located at the mouth of Lake Creek on Lake Coeur d'Alene on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation in Kootenai County, Idaho. Title to the land will be held by the Coeur d'Alene

71

EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS 12/12/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 12, 2001 December 12, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-19) David Sill, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Bader Property Acquisition Project No: 1992-061-06 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition. Location: St. Joe Watershed on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase approximately 650 acres of private property that border the St. Joe River near Goose Heaven Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

72

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) 5/20/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 20, 2003 May 20, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-32) Joe DeHerrera, KECU-4 TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Zumwalt Prairie Preserve Conservation Easement Project No: 2001-043-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques-1.2 Easement Acquisition. Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and The Nature Conservancy Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The

73

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37) Charlie Craig - KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Blue Creek Winter Range - Spokane Reservation (Acquisition of Sampson, Lantzy, Allotment #0065-C, and Allotment 154 Properties) Project No: 1991-062-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.1 Fee Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Spokane Tribe of Indians Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land

74

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this...

75

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-36)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compliance checklist for this project was originally completed by the Burns Paiute Tribe in 2000, and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD), as well as the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan, now being implemented, continues to be consistent with the above mentioned EISs and RODs. Pursuant to its obligations under the Endangered Species Act, BPA has made a determination of whether its proposed project will have any effects on any listed species under the jurisdiction of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). A species list was obtained from USFWS on June 12, 2003, identifying bald eagles, Canada lynx, and bull trout as potentially occurring in the project area. A site assessment was conducted on July 15, 2003 to determine if these species were present and the potential effects of project activities. A ''No Effect'' determination was made for all ESA-listed species. There were no listed species under the jurisdiction of NOAA Fisheries present in the project area. As management activities proceed in the future, BPA will annually re-assess potential effects of planned activities on listed species. The Burns-Paiute Tribe conducted a literature search for historic and archaeological sites on the property on January 11, 1999. No known sites were identified. Further site-specific surveys will be conducted for individual ground disturbing activities. The results of these surveys will be sent to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and BPA. BPA will annually summarize and submit a report to the State Historic Preservation Office. On December 29, 1999, Fred Walasavage of BPA completed a Phase I Site Assessment and concluded that the site did not reveal any environmental factors that would pose a significant liability for remedial action or cleanup under the Comprehensive Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act. A public meeting was held when the property was initially acquired where the property acquisition and proposed activities were discussed. Subsequent public involvement was conducted on July 23, 2002 for commenting on the proposed Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Plan.

N /A

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-30)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Horkley Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 120 acres of sagebrush steppe and agricultural lands in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies on the west slope of the Menan Butte Area of Critical

78

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-31)(10/28/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) 1) Allyn Meuleman TO: Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Allen Property Fee Simple Acquisition Project No: 1995-057-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition and Transfer Location: Jefferson County, Idaho Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of approximately 81 acres of forested wetlands and scrub shrub wetlands along the south bank of the South Fork of the Snake River in Jefferson County, Idaho. The property proposed for acquisition lies within

79

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

Narolski, Steven W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Integrating Wildlife Crossing into Transportation Plans and Projects in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for wildlife in future transportation projects. Traditionaleffects of existing and future transportation projects. Ourand overpasses into future transportation project, everyday

Cramer, Patricia C.; Bissonette, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Kalispel Tribe of Indians Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Albeni Falls Dam: Flying Goose Ranch Phase I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for wildlife habitat mitigation for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on and near the Kalispel Indian Reservation.

Merker, Christopher

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation...

89

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

92

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

95

EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

96

Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan Program Start 2010 References Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project[1] "The main goal of this project is to support efforts to mitigate climate change through agriculture in developing countries and move towards carbon friendly agricultural practices. The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems,

97

Fish passage mitigation of impacts from hydroelectric power projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Obstruction of fish movements by dams continues to be the major environmental issue facing the hydropower industry in the US. Dams block upstream migrations, which can cut off adult fish form their historical spawning grounds and severely curtail reproduction. Conversely, downstream-migrating fish may be entrained into the turbine intake flow and suffer turbine-passage injury or mortality. Hydroelectric projects can interfere with the migrations of a wide variety of fish. Maintenance, restoration or enhancement of populations of these species may require the construction of facilities to allow for upstream and downstream fish passage. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), by law, must give fish and wildlife resources equal consideration with power production in its licensing decisions, must be satisfied that a project is consistent with comprehensive plans for a waterway (including fisheries management plans), and must consider all federal and state resource agency terms and conditions for the protection of fish and wildlife. As a consequence, FERC often requires fish passage mitigation measures as a condition of the hydropower license when such measures are deemed necessary for the protection of fish. Much of the recent research and development efforts of the US Department of Energy`s Hydropower Program have focused on the mitigation of impacts to upstream and downstream fish passage. This paper descries three components of that effort: (1) a survey of environmental mitigation measures at hydropower sites across the country; (2) a critical review of the effectiveness of fish passage mitigation measures at 16 case study sites; and (3) ongoing efforts to develop new turbine designs that minimize turbine-passage mortality.

Cada, G.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

Drais, Gregory

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.fao.org/tc/exact/ex-act-tool/en/ Country: Brazil RelatedTo: Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) Cost: Free South America Coordinates: -14.235004°, -51.92528°

100

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning, Dworshak Reservoir : Final Report FY 1987.  

SciTech Connect

The impact to wildlife and habitat losses due to the construction and operation of Dworshak Dam on bald eagles and osprey were investigated for the 54 miles of the North Fork Clearwater River that was inundated by Dworshak Reservoir. Down stream impacts, and habitat losses due to Dworshak Dam were investigated for all target wildlife species that utilize the riparian area along the 42.5 miles of North Fork and lower Clearwater Rivers from the dam site to the confluence with the Snake River. The investigation was restricted to existing information. Changing the riverine habitat along the North Fork Clearwater River to one with unique reservoir characteristics has changed the ability of the North Fork Drainage to support past and present wildlife species that inhabited the area. The historical breeding grounds of bald eagles were reduced by increased human activities facilitated by the open access to Dworshak Reservoir and the permanent loss of historical salmon runs up the North Fork Clearwater River. The permanent loss of historical anadromous fish runs have had a negative impact on wintering eagles. The introduction of kokanee, however, has provided a replacement prey base, but only if the fishery is stable and reliable. 47 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Kronemann, Loren A.; Lawrence, Keith P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-35)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to purchase a conservation easement on the Zumwalt Prairie Preserve, which is currently owned by The Nature Conservancy. The Zumwalt Prairie Preserve encompasses 27,000 acres in Wallowa County, Oregon and is the largest and most intact palouse bunchgrass prairie in North America. The conservation easement will guarantee that the wildlife and fishery values of this property are permanently maintained. The goal of the easement is to protect the ecological condition and natural function of the Preserve's aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the species it supports by protecting it's natural resources, maintaining or enhancing its air and water quality, and preserving its underlying archaeological and cultural aspects in perpetuity.

N /A

2003-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Review of BPA Funded Sturgeon, Resident Fish and Wildlife Projects for 1990/1991.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 19--21, 1991, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. This document list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leader's presentation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Detroit Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project, North Santiam River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Detroit/Big Cliff Dam and Reservoir Project (Detroit Project) on the North Santiam River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1939, 1956, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each time period were determined. Ten wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Detroit Project extensively altered or affected 6324 acres of land and river in the North Santiam River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 1,608 acres of conifer forest and 620 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Detroit Project included the loss of winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, pileated woodpecker, spotted owl, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Detroit Project. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

Noyes, J.H.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huang ­ IREQ Doug McLaughlin ­ Southern Co. Sharma Kolluri ­ Entergy Dede Subakti ­ CAISO #12;ii Project

105

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

W-519 Sagebrush Mitigation Project FY-2004 Final Review and Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities conducted as mitigation for loss of sagebrush-steppe habitats due to Project W-519, the construction of the infrastructure for the Tank Waste Remediation System Vitrification Plant. The focus of this report is to provide a review and final status of mitigation actions performed through FY2004. Data collected since FY1999 have been included where appropriate. The Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project W-519 prescribed three general actions to be performed as mitigation for the disturbance of approximately 40 ha (100 acres) of mature sagebrush-steppe habitat. These actions included: (1) transplanting approximately 130,000 sagebrush seedlings on the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE); (2) rectification of the new transmission line corridor via seeding with native grasses and sagebrush; and (3) research on native plant species with a goal of increasing species diversity in future mitigation or restoration actions. Nearly 130,000 Wyoming big sagebrush seedlings where planted on ALE during FY2000 and FY2001. About 39,000 of those seedlings were burned during the 24-Command Fire of June 2000. The surviving and subsequent replanting has resulted in about 91,000 seedlings that were planted across four general areas on ALE. A 50% survival rate at any monitoring period was defined as the performance standard in the MAP for this project. Data collected in 2004 indicate that of the over 5000 monitored plants, 51.1% are still alive, and of those the majority are thriving and blooming. These results support the potential for natural recruitment and the ultimate goal of wildlife habitat replacement. Thus, the basic performance standard for sagebrush survival within the habitat compensation planting has been met. Monitoring activities conducted in 2004 indicate considerable variation in seedling survival depending on the type of plant material, site conditions, and to a lesser extent, treatments performed at the time of planting. The principle findings include: (1) a clear indication that in most settings, bare-root seedling survival is considerably higher than tubling survival; (2) we can expect low plant survival at sites with a high cover of large native bunchgrasses--especially bluebunch wheatgrass; (3) mycorrhizal root treatments appeared to increase growth and survival at the Coppice Dune and 98-Burn Undisturbed sites, but appeared to have little effect at the 98-Burn Disturbed, 111-Road Sitanion, or Cold Creek sites; (4) use of a hydrogel dip at planting increases survival of bare-root plants compared to dipping roots in plain water; (5) reducing leaf area via clipping after planting did not increase survival of bare-root plants; (6) seedlings planted on a south-aspect hillside at the Lower Cold Creek planting area had higher survival than seedlings planted on the hilltop or northern-aspects although these survival rates were lower than the survival rate down on the flats at this same location. Rectification of the transmission line corridor occurred in early March 2001, with the broadcast seeding of Sandberg's bluegrass and sagebrush. Success criteria for this site-of-disturbance rectification required a grass establishment after four years with greater than 25% total canopy cover with 60% of the plant cover from planted species (DOE 1998). This planting met the total canopy criterion but failed the criterion of 60% relative coverage of planted species. Although the performance standard was not met, the planting is not necessarily a failure; the communities on the tower pads appear to be developing toward the desired end state. We feel that there are no reasonable mitigative actions that can be taken at this time that would significantly alter or speed up the plant community development on these sites. In fact, most options, such as overseeding, may cause damage to the currently establishing communities on those sites.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

Sather-Blair, Signe

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Review of BPA Funded Sturgeon, Resident Fish and Wildlife Projects, 1989/1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) held a public meeting on November 6-7, 1990, for the purpose of review, coordination, and consultation of the BPA-funded projects for sturgeon, resident fish, and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin (Basin). The comments received after the meeting were favorable and the participants agreed that the meeting was stimulating and productive. The information exchanged should lead to better coordination with other projects throughout the Basin. The following pages list the projects by title, the project leaders and BPA's project officers, and an abstract of each leaders presentation. These summaries are in some cases preliminary; they are subject to change and should not be quoted without consulting the project leader.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Wildlife Impact Assessment : Bonneville, McNary, The Dalles, and John Day Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Army Corps of Engineers Bonneville project in Oregon and Washington. The project directly impacted 20,749 acres of wildlife habitat. Seven evaluation species were selected with losses and gains expressed in Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to 1 acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated a gain of 2671 HU's of lesser scaup wintering habitat. Losses of 4300 HU's of great blue heron habitat, 2443 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2767 HU's of spotted sandpiper habitat, 163 HU's of yellow warbler habitat, 1022 HU's black-capped chickadee habitat, and 1622 HU's of mink habitat occurred as a result of the project. This amounts to a total combined loss of 12,317 HU's. 18 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Rasmussen, Larry; Wright, Patrick

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mitigation Action Plan Phase I Lovell Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Phase I Lovell Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana and Big Horn County, Wyoming MITIGATION ACTION IDENTIFIER RESPONSIBLE PARTY FOR IMPLEMENTING MITIGATION ACTION LOCATION IF AVAILABLE/ STRUCTURE NUMBERS PARTY RESPONSIBLE FOR MONITORING AND ENSURING COMPLIANCE 1 Construction Contractor Western Maintenance Standard Construction Project Practices will be implemented through Phases I of Project construction and operation (Table 2.1-3 in the Final EA.) Western Construction (during Construction Phase) Western Maintenance (During maintenance of facility) NPS - WESTERN INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT FOR BIGHORN CANYON NRA 2 NPS, Western The Interagency Agreement between United

113

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2009 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Annual monitoring in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades was conducted in June 2009. MAP guidelines defined mitigation success for this project as 3000 established sagebrush transplants on a 4.5 ha mitigation site after five monitoring years. Annual monitoring results suggest that an estimated 2130 sagebrush transplants currently grow on the site. Additional activities in support of this project included gathering sagebrush seed and securing a local grower to produce between 2250 and 2500 10-in3 tublings for outplanting during the early winter months of FY2010. If the minimum number of seedlings grown for this planting meets quality specifications, and planting conditions are favorable, conservative survival estimates indicate the habitat mitigation goals outlined in the MAP will be met in FY2014.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

114

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins were ecologically rich in both the habitat types and the species diversity they supported. This was due in part to the pattern of floods and periodic inundation of bottomlands that occurred, which was an important factor in creating and maintaining a complex system of wetland, meadow, and riparian habitats. This landscape has been greatly altered in the past 150 years, primarily due to human development and agricultural activities including cattle grazing, logging and the building of hydroelectric facilities for hydropower, navigation, flood control and irrigation in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. The Burlington Bottoms (BB) wetlands contains some of the last remaining bottomlands in the area, supporting a diverse array of native plant and wildlife species. Located approximately twelve miles northwest of Portland and situated between the Tualatin Mountains to the west and Multnomah Channel and Sauvie Island to the east, the current habitats are remnant of what was once common throughout the region. In order to preserve and enhance this important site, a five-year habitat management plan has been written that proposes a set of actions that will carry out the goals and objectives developed for the site, which includes protecting, maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat for perpetuity.

Beilke, Susan G.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2001 September 13, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17) Joe HeHerrera - KEWU Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Eagle Lakes Ranch Acquisition and Restoration Project No: 2000-025-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): Resource Acquisition Techniques - 1.1 Fee-Title Acquisition Location: Franklin County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Columbia National Wildlife Refuge Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres

117

Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

119

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ADDENDUM: CHANGES TO REVISED COGENERATION PROJECT COMPENSATORY MITIGATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes requested at that meeting are discussed here under five topics and presented in the order that they are presented in the Plan. 1. East Restoration Area The wetland planned for restoration in the East Restoration Area will now be expanded to total 0.5 acre in size. As discussed in Section 4.6, the Plan had only intended to restore the 0.2 acre of existing wetland area within the East Restoration Area. Figure 3 Restoration Areas Plan Topography and Plant Community Distribution has been revised to demonstrate the change. As previously, post-mitigation topography of the East Restoration Area will direct most surface and subsurface runoff to the wetland area. A portion of this water will travel directly from the upland area to be re-created within the Restoration Area. The remaining moisture will enter the wetland as surface water diverted to the seasonally inundated wetland area from a ditch that will be installed along the south edge of the East Restoration Area. As explained in the Plan, the surface water delivery will be designed to minimize intra-seasonal water level fluctuation and prevent flooding.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

122

Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

MORRIS, K.L.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In CarbonMitigation Forestry Projects  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing acceptance that the environmentalbenefits of forests extend beyond traditional ecological benefits andinclude the mitigation of climate change. Interest in forestry mitigationactivities has led to the inclusion of forestry practices at the projectlevel in international agreements. Climate change activities place newdemands on participating institutions to set baselines, establishadditionality, determine leakage, ensure permanence, and monitor andverify a project's greenhouse gas benefits. These issues are common toboth forestry and other types of mitigation projects. They demandempirical evidence to establish conditions under which such projects canprovide sustained long term global benefits. This Special Issue reportson papers that experiment with a range of approaches based on empiricalevidence for the setting of baselines and estimation of leakage inprojects in developing Asia and Latin America.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mitigation Action Implementation Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming, and Weld County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Carbon, Albany, and Laramie Counties, Wyoming, and Weld County, Colorado September 2006 CH-MM and AU-CH Mitigation Action Plan Sept. 2006 1 Action Plan for Standard Project Practices and Mitigation Mitigation Action Identifier Resources for Which the Mitigation Will Be Implemented Responsible Party for Implementing Mitigation Action Party Responsible for Monitoring and Ensuring Compliance Land use, transportation Construction Contractor Western Maintenance The contractor will limit the movement of crews and equipment to the ROW, including access routes. The contractor will limit movement on the ROW to minimize damage to

127

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2004 14, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38) Joe DeHerrera Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Proposed Weaver Slough Conservation Easement Project No: 2002-042 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS [page A/2]): 1.2 Easement Acquisition Location: Flathead River System, Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Flathead Land Trust Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that

128

Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Mitigation Action Plan (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project DOE/EA-1636 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all of the integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. The purpose of this MAP is to explain how the mitigation measures will be

130

Railroad crossing structures for spotted turtles: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Greenbush rail line wildlife crossing demonstration project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authority, Proposed Greenbush Rail Line: Wildlife ResourcesProposed Greenbush Rail Line: Conservation Management Plan.and federal agencies. Rail corridors pose unique design

Pelletier, Steven K.; Carlson, Lars; Nein, Daniel; Roy, Robert D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Wildlife Risks of Wind and Solar Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the potential wildlife impacts resulting from wind and solar power development. The report defines the potential wildlife impacts, the business reasoning for assessing these impacts, details regarding site selection to minimize impacts, strategies to assess impacts, and management strategies to mitigate or minimize impacts. The report will assist utility generation planners and electric power company environmental staff in identifying and evaluating the wildlife impacts of wind and s...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 Air and Water Volume 2 Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources ­ Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council This project addresses greenhouse gas

134

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife; Five-year Project Report, 1986-1991 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with the mandate to collect fish health data on the anadromous fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The Washington Department of Wildlife began the project in 1986. Cumulative data and a final summary for this project are presented in this document. Fish stocks were examined monthly for length, weight, and health status at all Washington Department of Wildlife Columbia River Basin hatcheries. Assays for specific fish pathogens were conducted on all stocks of broodfish and smolts in the study area. Pathogens of interest were replicating viral agents, erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome virus (EIBSV), and Renibacterium salmoninarum. Sea-run cutthroat (SCT) were also sampled midway through the rearing cycle for R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were examined for the presence of any pathogen. Assays for Myxobolus cerebralis were conducted on fish stocks in several locations along the Columbia River. An organosomatic index analysis was made on each stock of smolts at the Cowlitz and Wells hatcheries. Results of the organosomatic index analysis were consistent between the years at each facility. However, the fish reared at Cowlitz displayed tissue changes associated with ceratomyxosis while those reared at Wells had a more desirable color and quality. Cell culture assays for viral agents in broodfish were positive for infectious hematopoeitic necrosis virus (IHNV) in all stocks at the Cowlitz Hatchery four out of five years in the study. Other stations were less consistent over the years. Only the sea-run cutthroat stock spawned at Beaver Creek was negative for any virus. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was isolated from summer-run steelhead (SS) broodfish at Wells in 1989 and 1991 and at Yakima in 1991. Inclusions that are characteristic of EIBSV were found in red blood cells of brood fish from the Wells Hatchery in 1990 and 1991. Data collected on EIBSV during the first two years of the project cannot be compared with the later three years due to changes in laboratory protocol. Isolations of IHNV in smolts were made from Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries and the Gobar Rearing Pond. Epizootics of IHN occurred at Lyons Ferry, Beaver Creek, Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries during the project, EIBSV inclusions were identified in very low levels from smolts from Beaver Creek, Chelan, Cowlitz, Eastbank, and Ringold. Assays for R. salmoninarum on broodfish and smolts revealed very low levels of infection and the disease was not a problem. Enteric redmouth disease was not observed in the project area. Cytophaga psychrophila was a chronic problem in young fish at Vancouver, Beaver Creek and Cowlitz hatcheries. Ceratomyxa Shasta was the only reportable parasite observed in the fish within the study area and caused yearly outbreaks of ceratomyxosis at the Cowlitz Hatchery. Fish at the Beaver Creek Hatchery were treated for furunculosis three of the five years of the project. An ozone water treatment plant has been installed to minimize the disease. Flow and density indexes and feed conversion did not vary significantly at the hatcheries during this project. Egg mortality averaged 12.94% throughout the project with a range from 4.39% to 29.10%. The mean fry mortality during the project was 15.08% with a range of 2.01 to 37.43%. The overall mortality for early rearing was 20.43%. Prespawning broodstock mortality was recorded for SS and SCT and averaged 5.18% with a range from 0 to 38.8%. Fungal invasion was the primary cause of death in adult fish. Epizootics of furunculosis, ceratomyxosis, bacterial coldwater disease, and IHN occurred during the project. Fewer cases were reported in more recent years. The BPA augmented fish health project helped WDW identify problem areas in fish health while they were occurring. This knowledge allowed us to develop strategies for improved fish quality. Overall the project has been invaluable in assisting us in the improvement of the health of our fish.

Kerwin, John; Roberts, Steve; Oman, Leni; Bolding, Bruce

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

Truitt, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

138

DOE/EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan for the Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado (01/19/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 19, 2009 January 19, 2009 Mitigation Action Plan Colorado Highlands Wind Project Logan County, Colorado Project Overview. Western Area Power Administration (Western) a power marketing agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to approve interconnection of the Project with Western's transmission system and the connected action of the Project. Colorado Highlands Wind LLC (CHWP) applied (via predecessor project owner Wind Energy Prototypes) to Western to interconnect a 90-megawatt (MW) wind power facility with Western's existing Sterling-Frenchman Creek 115-kV transmission line. Approval of the Interconnection Agreement would allow the Project to interconnect with Western's proposed Wildhorse Creek Switchyard. In accordance with the DOE NEPA

139

Wildlife Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some wildlife diseases can be transmitted to humans. This leaflet explains the causes and symptoms of rabies, giardiasis, bubonic plague, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, tularemia, leptospirosis and histoplasmosis.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project (DOE/EIS-0128) (12/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Date: December 3, 2003 1 2 Date: December 3, 2003 1 Western Area Power Administration Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 HISTORY AND BACKGROUND In May 2001, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham directed the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to take the first steps, including the preparation of environmental studies, toward developing the Los Banos - Gates Transmission Project, also known as the Path 15 Project. This directive was issued to carry out a recommendation in the May 2001 National Energy Policy. Western is a power marketing administration within the Department of Energy (DOE) whose role is to market and transmit electricity from multi-use water projects in the western United States, including California. The Path 15 Project, located in California's western

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

(DOE/EIS-0128): Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos-Gates Transmission project 1/28/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Date: ____________________________ 1 Date: ____________________________ 1 Western Area Power Administration Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 HISTORY AND BACKGROUND In May 2001, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham directed the Western Area Power Administration (Western) to take the first steps, including the preparation of environmental studies, toward developing the Los Banos - Gates Transmission Project, also known as the Path 15 Project. This directive was issued to carry out a recommendation in the May 2001 National Energy Policy. Western is a Power Marketing Administration within the Department of Energy (DOE) whose role is to market and transmit electricity from multi- use water projects in the western United States, including California. The

142

Work plan for upgrade of SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this effort is to upgrade the existing DACS-1 used for control and data acquisition in support of the hydrogen mitigation program for tank 101-SY. The planned upgrades will enhance the system capabilities to support additional mitigation projects and improve the system operability by implementing changes identified during operation of the system to date. Once the upgrades have been implemented, the DACS-1 system should operate as it did prior to the upgrade, but with greatly increased speed and capability. No retraining of Test Engineers will be required; the upgrade is designed to be transparent to those who operate it, with only a noticeable increase in the speed of the system. This work plan defines the tasks required for implementing the upgrade. It identifies deliverables, responsible organizations and individuals, interfaces, and schedule. This upgrade effort employs system engineering principles wherever applicable.

Truitt, R.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Distribution Wildlife and Pest Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to better understand the types of equipment most susceptible to animal electrocutions and what mitigating measures work, thereby optimizing available resources to curtail outages.

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

Calkins, Brian

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the interconnected Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large 20, 340 hectare (50, 308 acre) project area. As individual properties are secured for the Project, three site-specific activities (habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) may be subject to further site-specific environmental review. All required Federal/Tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

148

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN MITIGATION ACTION PLAN KEMPER COUNTY IGCC PROJECT KEMPER COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2010 2 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County IGCC Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. DOE prepared this MAP in accordance with 10 CFR § 1021.331. PURPOSE Section 1021.331 of the DOE regulations implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021) provides

149

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for the Wildlife Management Areas; and (2) Evaluation of the simplified YN HEP methodologies as a means of measuring mitigation progress.

Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

155

ASSESSMENT OF A FLOW ENHANCEMENT PROJECT AS A RIPARIAN AND FISHERY HABITAT MITIGATION EFFORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project in the Little Snake River Drainage, Wyoming, the flow in a previously ephemeral watercourse the North Platte River basin of southeast Wyoming, 20 miles east of Laramie within the boundaries and Crystal Lake Reservoirs. The upper 5.5 miles of stream is on national forest lands while the lower 4

156

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mitigation of Selected Hanford Site Manhattan Project and Cold War Era Artifacts  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first time that Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts from the Hanford Site have been assembled within a publication. The publication presents photographic and written documentation of a number of Manhattan Project and Cold War era artifacts that were identified and tagged during assessment walk throughs of historic buildings on the Hanford Site but which could not be curated within the Hanford collection because they were too large for long-term storage and/or exhibit purposes or were radiologically contaminated. The significance of the artifacts in this publication and a proposed future appendix is based not on the individual significance of any single artifact but on their collective contribution to the science and engineering of creating plutonium and advancing nuclear technology in nuclear fuel and power.

Kennedy, Ellen P.; Harvey, David W.

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| P | P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Golden Service Center Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EA-1923 2 | P a g e ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AMC Adaptive Management Committee CFR Code of Federal Regulations DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment ESA Endangered Species Act FONSI finding of no significant impacts MAP mitigation action plan NEPA National Environmental Policy Act USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 3 | P a g e 1.0 Introduction The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and a

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161

Libby Dam Hydro-electric Project Mitigation: Efforts for Downstream Ecosystem Restoration.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of Libby Dam, a large hydropower and flood control dam occurred from 1966 to 1975 on the Kootenai River, near Libby, Montana in the Northwestern United States. Live reservoir storage is substantial, with water residence time of about 5 1/2 months (based on mean annual discharge of about 440 m{sup 3}/s). Downstream river discharge and thermal regimes and the dependent habitat conditions have been significantly altered by dam construction and operation relative to pre-dam conditions. Highly valued Kootenai River fish populations, including white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, burbot Lota lota and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and their supporting ecological conditions have been deteriorating during post-dam years. Measurements of the presence of very low (ultraoligotrophic) concentrations of dissolved phosphorus in the river downstream from Libby Dam were identified as a critical limitation on primary production and overall ecosystem health. A decision was made to initiate the largest experimental river fertilization project to date in the Kootenai River at the Montana-Idaho border. Pre-treatment aquatic biomonitoring began in 2001; post-treatment monitoring began in 2005. A solar-powered nutrient addition system was custom designed and built to dose small releases of dissolved nutrients at rates from 10 to 40 L/hour, depending on river discharge, which averaged several hundred m3/s. Closely monitored experimental additions of ammonium polyphosphate solution (10-34-0) into the river occurred during the summers of 2005 through 2008. Targets for mixed in-river P concentrations were 1.5 {micro}g/L in 2005, and 3 {micro}g/L in subsequent years. Primary productivity and algal accrual rates along with invertebrate and fish community metrics and conditions were consistently measured annually, before and after experimental fertilization. Initial results from the program are very encouraging, and are reported.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

ERMI, A.M.

2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1985.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation approaches to document a record of credit for mitigation were developed in 1984-1985 for most of the habitat projects. Restoration of upriver anadromous fish runs through increased passage survival at main stem Columbia and Snake River dams is essential to the establishment of an off-site mitigation record, as well as to the success of the entire Fish and Wildlife program. The mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the basic measure of benefit from a habitat project. The IDFG evaluation approach consists of three basic, integrated levels: general monitoring, standing crop evaluations, and intensive studies. Annual general monitoring of anadromous fish densities in a small number of sections for each project will be used to follow population trends and define full-seeding levels. For most projects, smolt production will be estimated indirectly from standing crop estimates by factoring appropriate survival rates from parr to smolt stages. Intensive studies in a few key production streams will be initiated to determine these appropriate survival rates and provide other basic biological information that is needed for evaluation of the Fish and Wildlife program. A common physical habitat and fish population data base is being developed for every BPA habitat project in Idaho to be integrated at each level of evaluation. Compatibility of data is also needed between Idaho and other agencies and tribes in the Columbia River basin. No final determination of mitigation credit for any Idaho habitat enhancement project has been attainable to date.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real-life situations. The real-life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

167

Wildlife Trade: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real life situations. The real life situations. The teacher asks students to spend a few minutes thinking about and jotting down responses in their journals to the question, "When you have gone somewhere on vacation, what kinds of things have you brought back?" She then asks the students to turn to a partner and discuss their responses. Each pair summarizes and shares their comments with the entire group. Several answers were given: pictures, postcards, souvenirs, etc. The project on wildlife trade is expected to be a multiweek inquiry. The goal is to investigate the problem, as defined by the students, using a variety of tools. Students are assigned to base groups or teams, which are frequently reorganized based on interest, but all students return to their base group to share information and help each other fill in the information

168

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

Calkins, Brian

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Multi-Scale and Context Sensitive State-Wide Environmental Mitigation Planning Tool for Transportation Projects in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Proceedings Future Transportation Project Impacts A GISimpacts due to future transportation projects will beby all programmed future transportation projects based on

Thorne, James H.; Girvetz, Evan H; McMcoy, Mike C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

Calkins, Brian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming...

174

EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties,...

175

EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Action Plan EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within...

176

EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado Colorado Highlands Wind LLC applied to Western Area Power...

177

Wildlife at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife at Brookhaven Wildlife Protection The Laboratory has precautions in place to protect on-site habitats and natural resources. Activities to eliminate or minimize negative...

178

Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Category: NEPA Resources What links here...

179

System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, The original system was designed and implemented by LANL, supplied to WHC, and turned over to LMHC for operation. In 1999, the hardware and software were upgraded to provide a state-of-the-art, Year-2000 compliant system.

ERMI, A.M.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

Functional design criteria for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)  

SciTech Connect

Early in 1990, the potential for a large quantity of hydrogen and nitrous oxide to exist as an explosive mixture within some Hanford waste tanks was declared an unreviewed safety question. The waste tank safety task team was established at that time to carry out safety evaluations and plan the means for mitigating this potential hazard. Action was promptly taken to identify those tanks with the highest hazard and to implement interim operating requirements to minimize ignition sources.

Truitt, R.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration 41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The proposed action would allow the sponsors to ensure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

182

Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides descriptions of components and tasks that are involved in the computer system for the data acquisition and control of the mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company. The computers (both personal computers and specialized data-taking computers) and the software programs of the system will hereafter collectively be referred to as the DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System).

Truitt, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

184

Concerns About Climate Change Mitigation Projects: Summary of Findings from Case Studies in Brazil, India, Mexico, and South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico.veri~ energy and carbon savings. In Mexico, the evaluationand energy, projects. Indi~ South Africa and Mexico have

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Work plan for transition of SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this effort is to transfer operating and maintenance responsibility for the 241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS-1) from Los Alamos National Laboratory to Westinghouse Hanford Company. This work plan defines the tasks required for a successful turnover. It identifies DACS-1 transition, deliverables, responsible organizations and individuals, interfaces, cost, and schedule. The transition plan will discuss all required hardware, software, documentation, maintenance, operations, and training for use at Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The transfer of responsibilities for DACS-1 to WHC is contingent on final approval of applicable Acceptance for Beneficial Use documentation by Waste Tank Operations. The DACS-1 was designed to provide data monitoring, display, and storage for Tank 241-SY-101. The DACS-1 also provides alarm and control of all the hydrogen mitigation testing systems, as well as ancillary systems and equipment (HVAC, UPS, etc.) required to achieve safe and reliable operation of the testing systems in the tank.

McClees, J.; Truitt, R.W.

1994-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

186

Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Description of the Proposed Activity/REPORTABLE OCCURRENCE or PIAB: This ECN changes the computer systems design description support document describing the computers system used to control, monitor and archive the processes and outputs associated with the Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump installed in SY-101. There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this computer system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status.

Ermi, A.M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The monitoring, evaluation, reporting, and verification of climate change mitigation projects: Discussion of issues and methodologies and review of existing protocols and guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, the US and other countries are implementing, by themselves or in cooperation with one or more other nations (i.e., joint implementation), climate change mitigation projects. These projects will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or sequester carbon, and will also result in non-GHG impacts (i.e., environmental, economic, and social impacts). Monitoring, evaluating, reporting, and verifying (MERV) guidelines are needed for these projects in order to accurately determine their net GHG, and other, benefits. Implementation of MERV guidelines is also intended to: (1) increase the reliability of data for estimating GHG benefits; (2) provide real-time data so that mid-course corrections can be made; (3) introduce consistency and transparency across project types and reporters; and (4) enhance the credibility of the projects with stakeholders. In this paper, the authors review the issues and methodologies involved in MERV activities. In addition, they review protocols and guidelines that have been developed for MERV of GHG emissions in the energy and non-energy sectors by governments, nongovernmental organizations, and international agencies. They comment on their relevance and completeness, and identify several topics that future protocols and guidelines need to address, such as (1) establishing a credible baseline; (2) accounting for impacts outside project boundaries through leakage; (3) net GHG reductions and other impacts; (4) precision of measurement; (5) MERV frequency; (6) persistence (sustainability) of savings, emissions reduction, and carbon sequestration; (7) reporting by multiple project participants; (8) verification of GHG reduction credits; (9) uncertainty and risk; (10) institutional capacity in conducting MERV; and (11) the cost of MERV.

Vine, E.; Sathaye, J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

189

Wildlife's Winter Diet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife's Winter Diet Wildlife's Winter Diet Nature Bulletin No. 659 December 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE'S WINTER DIET Anyone who regularly feeds wild birds, and counts up the amount of food that they eat in the course of a winter, often wonders how they could get along without his help. In one day of freezing weather two or three dozen small birds commonly clean up a half pound of food -- suet, sunflower seed, cracked corn or small grain. This does not take into account raids by squirrels and rabbits. Winter in this region is a time of food crisis for all warm-blooded wildlife. Most of our summer song birds, especially the insect eaters, avoid cold by migrating to warm climates until spring. Likewise, most waterfowl and shorebirds go south during the months when our waters are locked in ice.

190

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wildlife and Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Sage grouse sitting in grassland. Photo from LuRay Parker, NREL 17429 Birds and bats are occasionally killed in collisions with wind turbines. Like any form of development, wind projects can also negatively impact wildlife by altering habitat. However, although the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of Fossil Fuels and Nuclear Power report quantifies those impacts. The study estimates that wind farms are responsible for roughly 0.27 avian fatalities

192

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

196

2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mitigation Action Plan for the McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project,(DOE/EIS-0332)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measures Adopted Measures Adopted for the McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project Land Use and Recreation Locate towers and roads so as not to disrupt irrigation circles, where possible. Locate structures and roads outside of agricultural fields, orchards, and vineyards, where possible. Coordinate with landowners for farm operations, including plowing, crop dusting, and harvesting. Redesign irrigation equipment and compensate landowner for additional reasonable costs where new right-of-way needs to be acquired. Compensate farmers for crop damage and restore compacted soils. Control weeds around the base of the towers. Keep gates and fences closed and in good repair to contain livestock. Repair damages to access roads caused by or arising out of Bonneville use, leaving roads in good or better

198

Carbon Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... project aims to develop standard reference ... more sustainable energy technologies are developed. ... prospects for developing commercially viable ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications that target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 40,000 hours by 2015, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different structural compositions and under different fuel cell conditions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project was to address catalyst durability by using a dual path approach that coupled an extensive range of experimental analysis and testing with a multi-scale modeling approach. With this, the major technical areas/issues of catalyst and catalyst layer performance and durability that were addressed are: 1. Catalyst and catalyst layer degradation mechanisms (Pt dissolution, agglomeration, Pt loss, e.g. Pt in the membrane, carbon oxidation and/or corrosion). a. Driving force for the different degradation mechanisms. b. Relationships between MEA performance, catalyst and catalyst layer degradation and operational conditions, catalyst layer composition, and structure. 2. Materials properties a. Changes in catalyst, catalyst layer, and MEA materials properties due to degradation. 3. Catalyst performance a. Relationships between catalyst structural changes and performance. b. Stability of the three-phase boundary and its effect on performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release Stage 2 - Beta Release o The model code repository is opened to the general public on a beta release c

Wessel, Silvia [Ballard Materials Products] [Ballard Materials Products; Harvey, David [Ballard Materials Products] [Ballard Materials Products

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

202

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

203

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi The Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combine Cycle Project (Project) (DOE/EIS-0409) in May 2010 and a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 2010 (75 FR 51248). The ROD identified commitments to mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the project. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes the monitoring and mitigation actions the recipient must implement during the design, construction, and demonstration of the Project. Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Iintegrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi, DOE/EIS-0409 (September 2010)

205

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Project - ODFW, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Core activities of the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Supplementation Program (GRESCSP) are funded through the authority of the Lower Snake River Fish and Wildlife Compensation Plan (LSRCP). The LSRCP program was approved by the Water Resources Development Act of 1976, PL 94-587, Section 102, 94th Congress substantially in accordance with the Special Report, LSRCP, June 1975 on file with the Chief of Engineers. The LSRCP was prepared and submitted in compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1958, PL 85-624, 85th Congress, August 12, 1958 to mitigate for the losses of fish and wildlife caused by the construction of dams on lower Snake River. The GRESCSP is an artificial propagation program that was initiated by Bonneville Power Administrations Fish and Wildlife program in the mid 1990's. The intent of this program was to change the mitigation aspect of the LSRCP program (harvest mitigation) to an integrated supplementation program; inasmuch as, hatchery produced fish could be experimentally used as a recovery tool and fish surplus to mitigation would be available for in-place and in-kind harvest. Fish production is still authorized by the LSRCP with the original mitigation return goal of 5,860 adult spring Chinook to the project area. The GRESCSP was developed with two primary components: (1) conventional broodstock (projects 199800702; 199800703; 199800704) and (2) captive brood (projects 199801001; 199801006). The GRESCSP relies on cooperative M&E efforts from the LSRCP including setting aside the Wenaha and Minam tributaries as natural production reserves components used for reference streams. The GRESCSP, coordinated with federal and tribal partners, identifies production levels for both propagation components and weir management strategies for each of the three supplemented tributary areas within the Grande Ronde Sub-basin. The three supplemented areas are Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and upper Grande Ronde River. Lookingglass Creek, an extirpated area, will be stocked (smolts and adults) with Catherine Creek origin salmon to initiate natural production in unseeded habitat, and to initiate future harvest opportunities. The current production levels have been incorporated into the U.S. v. Oregon Interim Management Agreement. The purpose of this contract is to integrate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) efforts with the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) program utilizing Lookingglass Hatchery as the primary rearing facility. BPA constructed an adult holding and spawning structure on the hatchery grounds; however, maintenance of this infrastructure was discontinued due to funding limitation and transferred to the LSRCP program in 2007. These integrated efforts focus on holding and spawning adults, rearing juveniles, fish health, and monitoring natural production (Redd counts) for Catherine Creek, Lostine River, and Upper Grande Ronde stocks.

Patterson, Scott

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

508: Mitigation Action Plan 508: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado This is the mitigation action plan (MAP) for use during construction of the Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie transmission line upgrades, including right-of ways (ROWS), hydrology, vegetation, construction debris and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado November 2005 More Documents & Publications EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan

207

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Summary of Slagging and Fouling Mitigation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a report on novel slagging and fouling mitigation methods in the coal-fired power generation industry. The project was identified by EPRI in response to member needs to compile a snapshot of approaches to mitigating slagging and fouling of coal-fired boilers as the industry migrates to burning off design coal.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

650 October 7, 1961 650 October 7, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO Few people realize that there is enough native wildlife worth mentioning in roaring, jam-packed Chicago, nor that very much of it is left in its fringe of adjoining suburbs. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Just as rural people become accustomed to urban life, some wild birds and mammals have adjusted to city life and are holding their own. A few kinds seem to be more numerous in parts of metropolitan Chicago than they were in those same areas a hundred years ago. The white-tailed deer, long extinct in this part of Illinois, is on the increase in the Chicago region. In recent winters two of them, perhaps chased by dogs, were rescued from the ice on the lake front -- one at Jackson Park and the other in the Calumet region.

210

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

BWRVIP-255: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Mitigation of IGSCC in the Lower Plenum of the BWR with HWC and Noble Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the effectiveness of innovative water chemistry technologies such as moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M) and HWC plus noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and on-line noble chemistry (OLNC) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the lower plenum region of BWRs.

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Volume 3: Sample Implementation Actions, Research Monitoring and Evaluation, and Policy and Planning Volume 3/ 1 VOLUME 3 SAMPLE IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS, RESEARCH MONITORING AND EVALUATION, AND POLICY AND PLANNING One of the major challenges within the Region has been understanding the interrelationships among the numerous proposed fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery actions. One reason for this difficulty is that these actions are derived from many different regional proposals, each of which has been designed to meet a specific goal. In addition, the lack of an effective tool to illustrate these interrelationships has hampered understanding.

214

Wildlife in Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

386-A September 12, 1970 386-A September 12, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE IN CHICAGO In August of 1803, when a detachment of soldiers came here from Detroit to build Fort Dearborn, they found only four crude cabins, situated on the north bank of the Chicago River. Three were occupied by French fur traders -- LeMaie, Ouilmette and Pettle -- and one was vacant. In 1833, when Chicago was incorporated as a village, there were only 200 people here. Wolves were still a problem, especially in winter. On October 6, 1834, a black bear -- the last wild one seen in Chicago was killed near the intersection of LaSalle and Adams Streets. Game was so plentiful that the region was a hunter's paradise .

215

2006 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. One of the objectives of restoration is the revegetation of remediated waste sites to stabilize the soil and restore the land to native vegetation. The report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2006 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 2 bat habitat mitigation projects.

A. L. Johnson; K. A. Gano

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project March 1, 2011 EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission...

217

EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project The Department of Energy has prepared a final environmental...

218

EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Based on the...

219

Record of Decision for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0312) (10/31/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FISH AND WILDLIFE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT ADMINISTRATOR'S RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt the Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) Policy Direction in its Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Environmental Impact Statement (FWIP EIS, DOE/EIS-0312, April 2003) as a comprehensive and consistent policy to guide the implementation and funding of the agency's fish and wildlife mitigation and recovery efforts. PA 2002 focuses on enhancing fish and wildlife habitat, modifying hydro operations and structures, and reforming hatcheries to both increase populations of listed fish stocks and provide long-term harvest opportunities. PA 2002 reflects regional fish and wildlife policy guidance and

220

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parks and Wildlife Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Name Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address 4200 Smith School Rd Place...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Libby Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement, 1992 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a project that was initiated in September, 1984 to mitigate for the loss of big game winter and spring range by the Libby Dam hydroelectric facility.

Holifield, Jennifer; Komac, Ron (Kootenai National Forest, Fisher River Ranger District, Libby MT)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wildlife -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New Wildlife Some of the links on this page lead to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT HUNTING ON THE OAK RIDGE RESERVATION OTHER WILDLIFE INFORMATION WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT Top of Page ORR Wildlife Management Update (Presentation - February 5, 2010) Goose Control. (Video - December 2009) Giffen, Neil R., James W. Evans, and Patricia D. Parr. 2007. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. ORNL/TM-2006/155. August. Giffen, Neil R. 2007. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL/TM-2006/154. March. Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR (Presentation - November 2006) Wildlife Management Activities on the ORR (Presentation - September 2006)

223

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix B  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7B 7B Appendix B-3: Terrestrial Wildlife Plan Terrestrial Wildlife Plan Searchlight Wind Project Clark County, Nevada Prepared For: Searchlight Wind Farm, LLC Prepared By: Tetra Tech EC, Inc. 1750 SW Harbor Way, Suite 400 Portland, OR 97201 January 2012 Terrestrial Wildlife Plan December 2011 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 1

225

EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91: Mitigation Action Plan 91: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Mitigation Action Plan Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves reconstruction of the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kV transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Mitigation Action Plan for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project More Documents & Publications EA-1591: Final Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact, and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1591: Finding of No Significant Impact

226

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mitigation of Animal-Caused Outages For Distribution Lines and Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant number of electric outages throughout North America are caused by animals -- mammals, birds, snakes, etc. These animal-caused outages are increasingly common in both urban and residential areas. By taking a pro-active approach to mitigating outages, utilities will spare the lives of wildlife and address the increasing pressures from environmental groups and concerned utility customers. This document describes a study designed to mitigate animal-caused outages for distribution lines and subs...

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Tucson aqueduct phase A, a feature of central Arizona project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction and operation of 40 miles of aqueduct from the terminus of the Salt-Gila Aqueduct in southcentral Pinal County to the vicinity of Rillito in northern Pima County, Arizona are proposed. The project, which would constitute Phase A of the Tuscon Aqueduct Project would involve three pumping plants; 40 miles of open, concrete-lined canal; two miles of discharge pipeline; and 29 miles of 115-kilovolt overhead transmission line. Approximately 185,000 acres of farmland in Pinal and Pima counties could receive water via Phase A of the Tuscon Aqueduct. As a result, the amount of water pumped from the groundwater aquifer in this area would decrease. Lowering of the aquifer level that results in increased pumping costs and damaging land subsidence would be mitigated by importation of water via the aqueduct.Rights-of-way requirements would displace pecan orchards, desert grazing land, and wildlife habitat, and the canal would obstruct wildlife movements and would constitute a drowning hazard for wildlife. Structures and rock cuts would mar visual aesthetics. Historic and prehistoric archaeological sites would be affected. The aqueduct would interfere with some small surfacewater drainages and water would be lost due to evaporation. Recreational access to the west side of the Picacho Mountains would be hampered somewhat.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Spring Break March 1-9, 2014 Understand Ecology and Conservation. Explain Concepts and Terms. Compare and Contrast Wildlife Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation & Life Sciences Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Courses are taught by UF faculty WIS4905

Watson, Craig A.

230

Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and wildlife agencies are facing the challenge of balancing the known and potential impacts to wildlife from lead in spent ammunition and sport fishing tackle with the public perception of the lead issue. Reports about the effect of lead on wildlife, the environment, and/or human health whether real or perceived create social, political and legal pressure to act. Fish and

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Agency/Company /Organization: Ecofys Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecofys.com/com/publications/brochures_newsletters/documents/Report National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development Screenshot References: National Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from Example Development[1] "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report summarizes the

232

EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment prepared for the proposal by the GSA and NNSA, neither the construction nor operation of the selected alternative wouldhave significant environmental impact. This MAP contains mitigation and monitoring commitments for the project, including commitments set in permits for the new facility. Mitigation Action Plan for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications EA-1592: Finding of No Significant Impact

233

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely

236

EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

340: Oregon Hatchery Project 340: Oregon Hatchery Project EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project Summary This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 23, 2006 EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

237

System verification and validation plan for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document outlines the system verification and validation plan for the SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS), covering the operation and maintenance phase of the project life cycle

Ermi, A.M.; Gauck, G.J.; Smith, S.O.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 223 / Friday, November 20, 2009 / Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-

239

Wildlife Trade: Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Project Summary Scenario Student Pages Internet Links Index Subject/Content Area: Physical Science, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Learning Strategies Target Audience: Thornridge is a comprehensive high school serving approximately 2,000 ninth through twelfth grade students living southeast of the Chicago city limits. Student backgrounds vary greatly socio-economically (below the poverty line to approximately six figures), ethnically (7% Caucasian, 87% African-American, 6% Hispanic) and culturally. Mobility and unemployment are high. Steel mills, the auto industry, steel processing plants and the construction trades have been the major employers; however, many no longer exist. Student test scores in all areas are below the state mean. Eighty freshmen, identified as performing

240

EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kVtransmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. Mitigation Action Plan for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project More Documents & Publications EA-1636: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC) has been developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) as an online tool to compare greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation proposals by various countries for the year 2020. In this paper, ... Keywords: Business intelligence, Cost curves, Decision model, Interactive system, Optimisation

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Lena Hoeglund-Isaksson; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mitigation Action Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 1, 2010 December 1, 2010 EA-1782: Mitigation Action Plan University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project September 1, 2010 EIS-0409: Mitigation Action Plan Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kemper County, Mississippi August 24, 2010 EA-1736: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility and Environmental Restoration of Reach S-2 of Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, Los Alamos, New Mexico July 10, 2010 EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi January 1, 2010 EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan

245

EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Mitigation Action Plan 1: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1901: Mitigation Action Plan Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is referenced in the Finding of No Significant Impact for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project (Department of Energy Environmental Assessment-1901). This MAP includes all of the mitigation measures recommended in the Final Environmental Assessment to mitigate adverse environmental impacts. It includes some measures that are essential to render the impacts of the Proposed Action not significant and other measures that will decrease impacts that did not reach a level to be considered significant. EA-1901-MAP-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications

246

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Mitigation Action Plan : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

247

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Mitigation Action Plan 28: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 Revision 2: This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Electric, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE-0128-MAP-02, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for Los Banos - Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project, Revision 2 (December 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan

248

EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0350-S1: Mitigation Action Plan Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) describes mitigation and monitoring commitments for constructing and operating the Modified CMRR-NF. The commitments made in this MAP are designed to mitigate potentially adverse environmental consequences associated with the CMRR-NF Project as the CMRR-NF is constructed and operated, and as direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts from these actions occur over time. EIS-0350-S1-MAP-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0350-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0350-S1: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

249

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents i TEXAS WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGMENT.............................................................................................................................. 2 #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page 1 TEXAS WILDLIFE-651-2880 karen.s.dulaney@usda.gov #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page

Wilkins, Neal

250

Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overarching goals of the 'Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation' Project (BPA Project No.2002-011-00) are to: (1) assess abiotic and biotic factors (i.e., geomorphologic, hydrological, aquatic and riparian/floodplain communities) in determining a definitive composition of ecological integrity, (2) develop strategies to assess and mitigate losses of ecosystem functions, and (3) produce a regional operational loss assessment framework. To produce a scientifically defensible, repeatable, and complete assessment tool, KTOI assembled a team of top scientists in the fields of hydrology, hydraulics, ornithology, entomology, statistics, and river ecology, among other expertise. This advisory team is known as the Research Design and Review Team (RDRT). The RDRT scientists drive the review, selection, and adaptive management of the research designs to evaluate the ecologic functions lost due to the operation of federal hydropower facilities. The unique nature of this project (scientific team, newest/best science, adaptive management, assessment of ecological functions, etc.) has been to work in a dynamic RDRT process. In addition to being multidisciplinary, this model KTOI project provides a stark contrast to the sometimes inflexible process (review, re-review, budgets, etc.) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project RDRT is assembled annually, with subgroups meeting as needed throughout the year to address project issues, analyses, review, and interpretation. Activities of RDRT coordinated and directed the selection of research and assessment methodologies appropriate for the Kootenai River Watershed and potential for regional application in the Columbia River Basin. The entire RDRT continues to meet annually to update and discuss project progress. RDRT Subcontractors work in smaller groups throughout the year to meet project objectives. Determining the extent to which ecological systems are experiencing anthropogenic disturbance and change in structure and function is critical for long term conservation of biotic diversity in the face of changing landscapes and land use. KTOI and the RDRT propose a concept based on incorporating hydrologic, aquatic, and terrestrial components into an operations-based assessment framework to assess ecological losses as shown in Figure E-1.

Merz, Norm [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

McCarl, Bruce A.

254

Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Notices My stuff Energy blogs Login | Sign Up Search Facebook icon Twitter icon Fish and Wildlife Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(150) Contributor 4 September,...

255

Wildlife Management Plan for the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at maintaining public safety (e.g., reduction in deervehicle collisions, reduction in Canada goosehuman interactions), while also maximizing wildlife health and diversity. *...

256

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 06/30/2004. The major accomplishment was the modification of the header and harvesting work, with a system designed to distribute algae at startup, sustain operations and harvest in one unit.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Name International Partnership on Mitigation and Measuring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) Agency/Company /Organization German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservancy and Nuclear Safety (BMU), German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector Climate Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations

258

Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Name Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Potential in Agriculture (MAGHG) Agency/Company /Organization Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture, Greenhouse Gas Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Dataset, Technical report Website http://www.fao.org/climatechan References MICCA Website[1] The overall objective of the MAGHG project is to support developing countries assess and report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

259

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation Ohio State University Nitin Padture Project Dates: 1012008 - 9302011 Area of Research: Materials...

260

Section 3.4 of the In Search of Truth Project Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

outlines the biological resources setting of the proposed project area in Canby, California. The vegetation and wildlife of the regional and local project area are described....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Argentina-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

262

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

263

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Brazil-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Brazil South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

264

EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Project Office focused on tracking and managing mitigation action commitments and reporting. Highlights for FY 2012 include the following: completion and distribution of the FY 2011 SWEIS Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (DOE 2012), which included a section for the Las Conchas Fire, completion and distribution of the calendar year (CY) 2010 SWEIS Yearbook in April 2012 (LANL 2012a), construction and operation of SERF-E, construction of an institutional

265

EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan specifies the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental impacts identified in DOE/EA-1923 and by the USFWS Biological Opinion issued to DOE on February 1, 2012, in accordance with the Endangered Species Act (ESA) (16 U.S.C.1531 et seq.). The development of these measures and an implementation plan, are a necessary condition for the DOE FONSI, as described by 40 CFR 1021.331(b) Mitigation action plans. EA-1923-MAP-2013 More Documents & Publications EA-1923: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact

266

Microsoft Word - Final Mitigated Action Plan - CNMI.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S....

267

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WAVE ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 | P a g e MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WAVE ENERGY TEST PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AUGUST 15, 2012 PREPARED TO ACCOMPANY DOEEA 1917 U.S....

268

2012 WILDLIFE CAPTURE, IMMOBILIZATION, AND HANDLING COURSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blow pipes Darts Dart guns 5. The Drugging Event: putting it all together (i.e. drugs and equipment. Drugging, reversal (i.v. and i.m.), and antibiotics: syringes, pole syringes, blow-pipes, darts, dart.M. Arnemo. 2007. Handbook of Wildlife Immobilization: International Edition. Wildlife Pharmaceutical, Inc

Weiblen, George D

269

EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

128: Mitigation Action Plan 128: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project This MAP addresses the construction, operation, and maintenance of the new 84-mile long 500-kV transmission line. Necessary work conducted by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) at their substations will occur within the previously disturbed area inside the substation boundaries. Western or Trans Elect, Inc. will also not have a role in upgrading the various existing PG&E 230-kV system components. DOE/EIS-0128, Western Area Power Administration, Mitigation Action Plan for the Los Banos-Gates (Path 15) Transmission Project (January 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0128: Mitigation Action Plan FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Mechanical Systems

270

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

271

DOE/EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan for the Lyle Falls Fish...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MITIGATION ACTION PLAN Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Bonneville Power Administration Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Washington Department of Fish and...

272

From sawdust to nuclear fuel: mitigating the removal of Humboldt Bay Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This projects purpose is to discuss the process for mitigating the removal of historic structures or buildings found eligible for listing in the National Register (more)

Root, Garret Samuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

SO3 Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of current utility operating experience in control of gas phase sulfuric acid emissions. It provides guidance for those contemplating the installation of an SO3 mitigation technology based on experience and lessons learned from utilities that have retrofitted different technologies.

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Report--2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) Biodiversity Conservation areas Reserve selection Stochastic programming

McGuire, A. David

276

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 11:13am Addthis After all cost-effective energy efficiency projects have been explored as part of a Federal agency's planning efforts for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings, renewable energy may be considered as an option for meeting the agency's GHG reduction goals. Renewable energy can reduce emissions in all three GHG emission scopes by displacing conventional fossil fuel use. The focus of this guidance is prioritizing on-site renewable energy projects that will best support GHG reduction goals. It is intended to provide a high-level screening approach for on-site renewable energy projects to support agency- or program-level portfolio planning. General

277

EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

706: Mitigation Action Plan 706: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - allowing the State of Tennessee to use some of its State Energy Program funds appropriated in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to construct and operate the West Tennessee Solar Farm Project - would not result in any significant environmental impacts. Mitigation Action Plan for the West Tennessee Solar farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee, DOE/EA-1706 More Documents & Publications EA-1706: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1706: Final Environmental Assessment 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology

278

EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: Mitigation Acton Plan 1: Mitigation Acton Plan EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project (Proposed Action). The Proposed Action involves rebuilding the 47-mile-long 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line from the existing Walla Walla Substation, located in the city of Walla Walla, Washington, to the existing Tucannon River Substation, located near the town of Dayton, Washington. Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project, DOE/EA-1731, (May 2011) More Documents & Publications EA-1731: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1731: Final Environmental Assessment

279

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

280

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida) Florida) Wildlife Management Areas (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and

283

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

284

About this Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toolkit Materials Toolkit Materials Video Federal Adaptation Planning Resources About this Project Print E-mail The new Climate Change, Wildlife and Wildlands Toolkit for Formal and Informal Educators is an updated and expanded version of the award-winning and very popular Climate Change, Wildlife and Wildlands Toolkit for Teachers and Interpreters which was first published in 2001. The new kit is designed for classroom teachers and informal educators in parks, refuges, forest lands, nature centers, zoos, aquariums, science centers, etc., and is aimed at the middle school grade level. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in partnership with six other federal agencies (National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USDA/Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management), developed the kit to aid educators in teaching how climate change is affecting our nation's wildlife and public lands, and how everyone can become climate stewards.

285

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below Libby Dam. The reservoir operation in spring largely works toward project refill while otherwise operations in the mid-Columbia River to support fall Chinook spawning and rearing in the Hanford Reach to fish. Action item F&W-2 (see the Action Plan) calls for the Council to work with fish and wildlife

286

Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Department of Wildlife Name Nevada Department of Wildlife Address 1100 Valley Rd. Place Reno, Nevada Zip 89512 Website http://www.ndow.org/ Coordinates 39.5394967°, -119.807584° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5394967,"lon":-119.807584,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Fund Wildlife Fund Jump to: navigation, search Logo: World Wildlife Fund Name World Wildlife Fund Address 1250 Twenty-Fourth Street, N.W. Place Washington, DC Zip 20090-7180 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website http://www.worldwildlife.org Coordinates 38.92°, -76.99° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.92,"lon":-76.99,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

288

Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80203 Phone number (303) 866-3437 Website http://wildlife.state.co.us/Pa Coordinates 39.7370973°, -104.9851154° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7370973,"lon":-104.9851154,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNADO826.pdf Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Screenshot References: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries[1] Summary "In order to determine how USAID assistance may help overcome barriers to financing these types of projects, this report addresses the following

290

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Mitigation Action Plan 6: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado Western proposes to upgrade the existing 146 miles of CH-MM 115kB transmission line which crosses Carbon, Albany and Larmie Counties in Wyoming and 35 miles of the AU-CH transmission line which corsses portions of Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado. The upgrade would remove the existing 115-kV H-frame structures and replace them with new 230-Kv H-frame structures and single pole steel structures. Western also proposes to widen the existing right-of-way (ROW), where necessary to allow adequate electrical clearances. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation Requirements for

291

EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan Reconstruction of the South Access Road (CR 802) in Support of the Department of Energy, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, New Mexico EA prepared for the proposed reconstruction of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (County Road 802) located in Eddy County, New Mexico. Through the environmental review process, the Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office (BLM CFO) determined that there would be potential environmental impacts from the proposed project that would require mitigation to assure that the impacts would not become significant. Therefore, the Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) prepared this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to establish conditions for issuing its

292

Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, South Africa South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Southern Africa References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1]

293

EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of Decision (ROD) for an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Order further requires that an annual report be prepared to demonstrate the progress made in implementing the commitments and effectiveness of any mitigation activity until the activity has been completed. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) MAP was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for the WIPP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), and the WIPP Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. This 2011 Annual Mitigation Report (2011 AMR) addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994

294

EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440-S1: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado ThIs Mitigation Action Plan implements the mitigation measures associated with the potential environmental impact of a DOE proposal that consists of three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site at Golden, Colorado: Construction of the Research Support Facilities (RSF), a new office building or multi-building office complex; Installation of Phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant

295

Mitigation Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

212 212 Mitigation Action Plan for the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory Departme~t of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Los Alamos Area Office Los Alamos, New Mexico MITIGATION ACTION PLAN for the LEASE OF LAND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A RESEARCH PARK AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Background on the Lease of Land at Los Alamos National Laboratory: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has approved an Environmental Assessment (EA) on the Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)(DOE/EA-1212), Los Alamos, New Mexico. The DOE released a Predecisional Draft of this EA for State and Tribal review and made the draft document available to the public on July 24, 1997 for

296

San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Risk Mitigation Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update builds upon the development of attack/failure and cyber-physical attack scenarios focused on combined cyber-physical attacks. These scenarios include threats and vulnerabilities that may be exploited by well-financed and motivated entities. It also leverages risk assessment processes developed to address combined cyber-physical attack scenarios. The framework in this update supports the further development of risk mitigation strategies focused on combined cyber-physical ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/2/2003 through 4/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are progressing with long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are completing final preparations for pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 are included.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the ending 12/31/2004. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include review of pilot scale testing and design of a new bioreactor. Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

302

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Burundia

303

69www.wildlife.org The Wildlife Society lake Grisham crawled from under the Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

69www.wildlife.org© The Wildlife Society B lake Grisham crawled from under the Texas Tech field to get water to the dilapidated structure. Towns are few and far between on the Texas Southern High Resources Management at Texas Tech University. Credit: Clint Boal After rising early at the texas tech field

304

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- refuge showcases wetland areas and forests that are home to a myriad of migra- tory birds and other wildlife. The design team's vision became a reality when the new visitor's center opened its doors in 2010. The 5,879-square foot building provides a starting point for visi- tors to to learn about the wildlife on the refuge. The facility also houses hands-on exhibits, office and classroom space, and a nature-themed store. "The design of this visitor center exemplifies the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's commitment to lowering our carbon footprint," said Libby Herland, Project Leader, Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge Complex. "We want this center to help promote the importance of environmental stewardship and connect the public with the beauty

305

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan master.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project DOE/EA-1591 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves reconstruction of the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kV transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. No impacts reached the level to be considered significant even without these mitigation measures.

306

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractors revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contracts revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

DOE/EIS-0332: Mitigation Action Plan for th eMcNary-John Day...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is for the McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, which involves construction and operation of a new...

310

Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.  

SciTech Connect

In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

Tillman, Jack B.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration at Industrial Customer Sites: Industrial and Utility Harmonic Mitigation Guideline s and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However the restructuring of the electric power industry shakes out, the commercial/industrial customer's need for quality power will increase; and customer service will remain a key to retaining current accounts and attracting new customers. The need for demonstrating new harmonics mitigation technologies will thus be an important factor for the wire side of the business as well as for energy service companies. This report provides guidelines for implementing harmonics mitigation demonstration projects ...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Utility stresses environmental programs, research projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B.C. Hydro, the provincial electric utility of British Columbia, views environmental programs and research projects as an important part of its business. Many of these activities stem from some aspect of hydroelectric generation as the utility relies on 39 reservoirs and 30 hydro stations for the bulk of its electricity production. These programs and research projects are featured in B.C. Hydro's first annual Report on the Environment, which summarizes the utility's work to minimize the effects of operations on the natural and social environment. Some programs and research projects were initiated some years ago, while others are new. B.C.'s environmental programs include environmental audits and fish and wildlife compensation (mitigation) programs. In 1988, the utility and the province's Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks began developing compensation programs to address water license requirements for B.C. Hydro's hydroelectric developments. Today, compensation programs for the Peace and Columbia river area serve as models for future programs. The utility also reports it is reviewing all operating orders for its water system to identify opportunities to make operations more sensitive to environmental concerns. Additionally, work is under way on a preliminary strategy for addressing fish and water quality issues and setting minimum flow requirements. And in an effort to control dust storms, B.C. Hydro reports it is studying native perennial plants that can endure the flooding/drawdown cycle typical of a water storage reservoir.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pesticides and their effects on wildlife  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

Driver, C.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

Spitler, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofreplacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for households and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge Photo of the Week: Rocky Flats Wildlife Refuge December 21, 2012 - 11:27am Addthis The Rocky Flats Plant was first established in 1951 as a nuclear...

319

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota) Minnesota) Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wildlife Refuges (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refuges (Iowa) Refuges (Iowa) Wildlife Refuges (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This document contains a list of wildlife refuges and sanctuaries in the state

322

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

324

Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Chile South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru

325

EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

440: Mitigation Action Plan 440: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex The Department of Energy has issued a Supplemental Environmental Assessment and has prepared a Finding of No Significant Impact for three site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain site at Golden, Colorado. 1) Construction of the Research Support Facilities, a new office building or multi-building office complex; 2) Installation of phase 1 of planned Site Infrastructure Improvements (Phase 1 of Full Site Development); and 3) Upgrades to the Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF), TCUF High Bay area, and addition of the Thermochemical Biorefinery Pilot Plant. Mitigation Action Plan for the Supplement to the Final Site-Wide

326

EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70: Mitigation Action Plan 70: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1870: Mitigation Action Plan Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, UT The Department of Energy (DOE) issues this Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) in conjunction with its Finding of No Significant Impact as to the department's proposed action of providing costshared funding for the Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant Project. Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1870), DOE determined that its proposed action allowing Viresco Energy, LLC (Viresco) to use federal funding to design, construct and operate a coal and biomass gasification pilot plant (pilot plant) - would not result in any significant environmental impacts. The pilot plant would evaluate the technical feasibility of using steam hydrogasification to convert coal and biomass (such as agricultural

327

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

328

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 BYLAWS OF DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (Ratified February 2010) Preamble The shared goals of the faculty and administration of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation are to attain excellence

Watson, Craig A.

329

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Oil Development & the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refuge (ANWR) is a wildlife refuge in Alaska Created 1956 during Eisenhower administration 1980 doubled. 9 #12;The coastal plain as depicted by oil lobbyists Source: ANWR.org 10 #12;The coastal plain can be a dreary place 11 #12;Even a harsh place 12 #12;But it also is very beautiful 13 #12;President Bush on ANWR

Kalinowski, Steven T

331

Determining the potential mitigation effects of wildlife passageways on black bears  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Transportation, Environmental Management Office,of Transportation, Environmental Management Office,

van Manen,, Frank T.; Jones, Mark D.; Kindall, Jason L.; Thompson, Laura M.; Scheick, Brian K.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section of the FEMP website is designed to provide Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG...

333

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Planning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program:...

334

Ultrasonic mitigation investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The suggestion was made that the introduction of ultrasound into Tank 101-SY might serve to release the hydrogen bubbles trapped in the slurry. This would cause a continuous release of bubbles and thereby prevent the turnover phenomenon. Two major considerations were (1) the method for delivering the energy into the slurry and (2) the effective volume of action. In this study, we attached the former by designing and testing a liquid-filled waveguide and radiator, and the latter by making ultrasonic property measurements on synthetic waste. Our conclusion is that ultrasonic mitigation may not be feasible, primarily because of the very high attenuation (1000 to 50000 dB/m) factor to 10 to 30 kHz. Such a high attenuation would restrict the action volume to such a low value as to make the method impractical. Further investigations are recommended to identify the cause of this effect and determine if this same effect will be seen in real 101-SY waste.

Hildebrand, B.P.; Shepard, C.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mitigation analysis for Estonia  

SciTech Connect

The present report provides data on the mitigation analysis of Estonia. The results for energy, forest and agricultural sectors and macro-economic analysis are given. The Government of Estonia has identified the development of energy production as the main strategical means in the movement towards market economy. Now 99% of electricity generation and about 25% of heat production in Estonia is based on oil shale combustion. To increase the efficiency of oil shale-fired power plants and decrease CO{sub 2} emissions, the State Enterprise (SE) Eesti Energia (Estonian Energy) is planning to reconstruct these power plants and introduce the Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) combustion technology for oil shale burning to replace the Pulverized Combustion (PC). According to the Estonian Forest Policy, two general objectives are of importance: sustainability in forestry and efficiency in forest management. For the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions from agriculture, it is necessary to increase the efficiency of production resource usage. The growth of the GDP in 1995 was 2.9% as a result of large-scale privatization activities in Estonia and re-introduction of the available, but unused production capacities with the help of foreign and domestic investments. It is assumed that the medium growth rate of GDP reaches 6% in 1998.

Martins, A.; Roos, J.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

186: Mitigation Action Plan 186: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority Healy Clean Coal Project In response to a Program Opportunity Notice issued in May 1989 by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the third solicitation of the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) conceived, designed, and proposed the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP). The HCCP, a coal-fired power generating facility, would provide the necessary data for evaluating the commercial readiness of two promising technologies for decreasing emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and particulate matter (PM). The two technologies to be demonstrated are the TRW Applied Technologies Division entrained

337

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in

338

Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA Website http://www.tdm-beijing.org/ Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References Transport Management in Beijing[1] Program Overview The project aims to improve transport demand management (TDM) in Beijing in order to manage the steadily increasing traffic density. The project provides capacity building for decision-makers and transport planners in Beijing to enable them to calculate baselines and assess reduction

339

EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Mitigation Action Plan 6: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority Healy Clean Coal Project In response to a Program Opportunity Notice issued in May 1989 by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the third solicitation of the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) conceived, designed, and proposed the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP). The HCCP, a coal-fired power generating facility, would provide the necessary data for evaluating the commercial readiness of two promising technologies for decreasing emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and particulate matter (PM). The two technologies to be demonstrated are the TRW Applied Technologies Division entrained

340

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis After determining the best greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies using renewable energy, a Federal agency should estimate the cost of implementing them in a building or buildings. There are several cost factors that need to be considered when developing a renewable energy project. Capital costs, fixed and variable operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and in the case of biomass and waste-to-energy projects, fuel costs all contribute to the total cost of operating a renewable energy system. The levelized system cost takes into account these

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

342

Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitigation Projects in the Electric Power Sector, OECD andfor the California Electric Power Sector. Berkeley, CA:Energy Efficiency and Electric Power Projects. LBNL-48242.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

Coeur d'Alene Tribe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:09am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 When estimating the cost of implementing the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, Federal agencies should consider the life-cycle costs and savings of the efforts. The major cost elements associated with developing and implementing a project are identified in Table 1. Table 1. Major Costs for Project Development and Implementation Cost Element Description Variables Project planning costs Preparatory work by building owners and design team. Benchmarking activities. Building audits. Developing statements of work for subcontractors. Selecting contractors. Integrated design process (for major renovations). Type of project; previous team experience; local markets; number of stakeholders

345

Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name Fish and Wildlife Service Place Washington, DC Year founded 1940 Phone number (303) 275-2370 Website http://www.fws.gov/ Coordinates 38.8951118°, -77.0363658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8951118,"lon":-77.0363658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Microsoft Word - Mitigation Action Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

782 782 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT DECEMBER 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 1.0 INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to aid its decision whether to provide funding for the University of Delaware's construction and operation of a 2-megawatt wind turbine adjacent to the University's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment Campus in Lewes, Delaware. The EA (DOE/EA-1782) for the University's Wind Energy Project was completed in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and implementing regulations issued by the Council on Environmental Quality and

347

Fish and Wildlife Response Letter for Clipper Windpower Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

includes one 262-foot tall wind turbine and associatedfacilities including a 240-foot tall meteorological tower (lattice- guyed type), 400 square foot building, and underground...

348

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Kate Marks (NASEO), Michael McAteer (National Grid), Bridget McLaughlin (Xcel Energy), Vivek Mohta

349

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Name Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Agency/Company /Organization The Children's Investment Fund Foundation, SouthSouthNorth, University of Cape Town-Energy Research Centre, Danish Government Sector Climate, Energy Topics Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Pathways analysis Website http://www.mapsprogramme.org Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Peru South America References Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 MAPS Processes and Outcomes 2.1 Chile 2.2 Colombia 2.3 Peru 2.4 Brazil 2.5 Resources 2.5.1 Mitigation Action Country Studies

350

Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

Makundi, Willy R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: 2: Appendices DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Appendix A Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles for Bonneville Power Administration Rates and Contracts Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Appendix A: Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles Appendix A/ 1 Appendix A FISH AND WILDLIFE FUNDING PRINCIPLES FOR BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION RATES AND CONTRACTS September 16, 1998 Preamble The purpose of these principles is to conclude the fish and wildlife funding process in which Bonneville has been engaged with various interests in the Region, and provide a set of guidelines for structuring Bonneville's subscription and power rate processes. The principles are intended to "keep the options open" for future fish and wildlife decisions that are anticipated to be made in late 1999 on reconfiguration of the hydrosystem and in

352

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wildlife Interactions and Wildlife Interactions Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind and Wildlife Interactions November 23, 2011 - 2:08pm Addthis This webinar is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America 2011 webinar series. This webinar will provide an overview of wind turbine and wildlife issues, including a summary of research plans by the American Wind and Wildlife Institute. Other topics will include an update of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wind regulations and bat/wind turbine interactions. The webinar is free; no registration is required. More Addthis Related Articles Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends DOE Announces Webinar on Tying Energy Efficiency to Compensation and Performance Reviews, and More

353

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mitigating New York City's Heat Island: Integrating Stakeholder Perspectives and Scientific Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study of New York City, New York's, heat island and its potential mitigation was structured around research questions developed by project stakeholders working with a multidisciplinary team of researchers. Meteorological, remotely-sensed, ...

Cynthia Rosenzweig; William D. Solecki; Jennifer Cox; Sara Hodges; Lily Parshall; Barry Lynn; Richard Goldberg; Stuart Gaffin; Ronald B. Slosberg; Peter Savio; Mark Watson; Frank Dunstan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Pantex wildlife program featured on Amarillo's NewsChannel 10...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and study the wildlife living on the Pantex site. Pantex is currently studying how wind energy can impact the surrounding ecosystems and has studied rattlesnakes and horned...

357

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

...31 APPENDIX A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

358

National Wildlife Chemical Effects Database | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Wildlife Chemical Effects Database Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities ...

359

Integrated training course for engineers and wildlife biologists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technical expertise and training on wildlife and highwaycomprehensive (yet concise) training course on the basics ofinterdisciplinary two-day training session that walks

Jacobson, Sandra L.; Brennan, Terry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) contains citations to more than 1,000 journal articles, government publications, conference proceedings, and other reports.

Sinclair, K.; Sandberg, T.; Cohn, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Jump to: navigation, search Name Bringing a Range of Supported Mitigation Activities in Selected Countries to the Next Level Agency/Company /Organization Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Ecofys Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, People and Policy Topics Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ecn.nl/docs/library Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Chile, Indonesia, Kenya, Peru, Tunisia South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa, South America, Northern Africa References ECN[1] Ecofys[2] Program Overview This project runs from March 2012 to December 2014, and is a collaboration

363

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda

364

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Prioritize Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis At this point in the analysis for using renewable energy in buildings, after estimating costs to implement strategies, there should be a list of sites and promising renewable energy technologies. The next step in the analysis is to prioritize those sites and technologies to achieve cost-effective reductions in greenhouse (GHG) emissions. In prioritizing the locations for cost-effective renewable energy project development, start with the sites that have the: Best resources Best financial incentives Highest energy rates. These factors are the most important for determining the economic viability

365

NETL: Gasification Systems - Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling Project No.: DE-FE0007952 Reaction Engineering International (REI) is working to develop practical solutions to mitigate the plugging and fouling of syngas coolers (SC) - fire tube heat exchangers located between the coal gasifier and the combustion turbine. Syngas coolers used in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants offer high efficiency, but their reliability is generally lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The principle downtime events associated with syngas coolers are typically a result of ash deposits that: form on (wall) surfaces upstream of the syngas cooler, break loose, and then lodge in the tubes; or form on the fireside surface of the syngas cooler tubes that lead to fouling and reduced heat transfer. Both ash deposit mechanisms result in reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs.

366

Cape Wind Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

G G Biological Assessment U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix G Biological Assessment Cape Wind Energy Project Nantucket Sound Biological Assessment Minerals Management Service for Consultation with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries May 2008 Appendix G Biological Assessment Cape Wind Energy Project i May 2008 U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................ 1-1 1.1 Project History .............................................................................................................

367

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Mitigation Planning Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning October 7, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Mitigation Planning section provides Federal agency personnel with guidance to achieve agency GHG reduction goals in the most cost-effective way. Using a portfolio-based management approach for GHG mitigation planning, agencies will be able to prioritize strategies for GHG mitigation. Agencies can also use this guidance to set appropriate GHG reduction targets for different programs and sites within an agency. Learn more about the benefits of portfolio-based planning for GHG mitigation. Also see information about greenhouse gas mitigation planning data and tools. Step-by-Step The GHG mitigation planning process follows six key steps. Click on a step

368

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Validating alternative methods of modeling wildlife corridors using relocation data from migrating elk and dispersing wolverines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Habitat loss and fragmentation increasingly impede wildlife movements that are essential for the long-term persistence of populations. Wildlife corridors facilitating movement have become a (more)

Rainey, Meredith McClure

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Validating alternative methods of modeling wildlife corridors using relocation data from migrating elk and dispersing wolverines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Habitat loss and fragmentation increasingly impede wildlife movements that are essential for the long-term persistence of populations. Wildlife corridors facilitating movement have become a key (more)

Rainey, Meredith McClure.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

Conley, Will

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy-ef?ciency and electric power projects, Berkeley, CA,for evaluation of electric power projects, Energy PolicyCentral America, electric power, mitigation projects,

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation is the second in a series of training modules addressing leakage in nuclear power plants. The first planned modules in the leakage reduction series include leakage reduction program management, bolted joints with flat gaskets, valve packing, threaded joints, compression fittings, mechanical seals, and miscellaneous bolting issues.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks 490 North Meridian Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and Wildlife Office, Boise, Idaho, Pacific Region, Portland, Oregon. USWS.. 1999. Status review Department of the Interior IDAHO FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICE 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Room 368 Boise, Idaho 83709 Inspector General Report disclosing irregularities in development of its 2005 bull trout final critical

376

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

377

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and...

378

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Name Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Address 1594 W North Temple, Suite 2110, Box 146301 Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6301 Phone number 801-538-4745 Website http://wildlife.utah.gov/dwr/a References Webpage[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is an organization based in Salt Lake City, Utah. References ↑ "Webpage" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utah_Division_of_Wildlife_Resources&oldid=536488" Categories: Government Agencies Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

379

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado Name Aspen & Pitkin County - Renewable Energy Mitigation Program Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Residential Eligible Technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife mitigation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Program on Technology Innovation: An Evaluation of Surface Stress Improvement Technologies for PWSCC Mitigation of Alloy 600 Nuclear Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the progress for 2005 on a new project to evaluate surface stress improvement methods to mitigate the initiation of PWSCC in Alloy 600 nuclear plant components. The first potential application for these various surface stress improvement technologies for SCC mitigation in PWR Alloy 600 components was identified as the bottom mounted nozzle (BMN). Mitigation will be demonstrated by creating both sufficient compressive surface stress and depth of the compressive stress on the ID and O...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes an estimated 2.9 Quads per year. To predict and control fouling, three OIP projects are currently exploring heat exchanger fouling in specific industrial applications. A fouling probe has been developed to determine empirically the fouling potential of an industrial gas stream and to derive the fouling thermal resistance. The probe is a hollow metal cylinder capable of measuring the average heat flux along the length of the tube. The local heat flux is also measured by a heat flux meter embedded in the probe wall. The fouling probe has been successfully tested in the laboratory at flue gas temperatures up to 2200F and a local heat flux up to 41,000 BTU/hr-ft2. The probe has been field tested at a coal-fired boiler plant. Future tests at a municipal waste incinerator are planned. Two other projects study enhanced heat exchanger tubes, specifically the effect of enhanced surface geometries on tube bundle performance. Both projects include fouling in a liquid heat transfer fluid. Identifying and quantifying the factors affecting fouling in these enhanced heat transfer tubes will lead to techniques to mitigate fouling.

Peterson, G. R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

WIPPAnnualMitigationActionReport2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-3322 2-3322 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT JULY 10, 2012 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 4 THE 2012 ANNUAL MITIGATION REPORT ......................................................................... 5 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 14 DOE/CBFO-12-3322 3 ACRONYMS AMR Annual Mitigation Report ASER Annual Site Environmental Report

385

Wildlife Vehicle Collision be Decreased by Increasing the Number of Wildlife Passages in Korea?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

living in the rural area of Korea. Journal of Ecology andUsing Snow Tracking in Korea. Korean Journal of EnvironmentGwanakgu, Seoul 151-742 Korea Abstract: The mitigation of

Choi, Tae-Young; Park, Chong-Hwa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

EIS-0425: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan 5: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0425: Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan Bonneville Power Administration Record of Decision and Mitigation Action Plan for the Mid-Columbia Restoration Project BPA decided to implement the Proposed Action of the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program as described in the Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0425, March 2012). BPA will fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho slamon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action will involve building a new, small, in-basin adult

387

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

389

EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOEs Bonneville Power Administrations operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies.

390

Annual Adaptive Management Report for Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon: Mitigation of Pier B Development at the Bremerton Naval Facilities - Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon - Naval Underwater Warfare Center Division - Keyport, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Unites States Navy capital improvement projects are designed to modernize and improve mission capacity. Such capital improvement projects often result in unavoidable environmental impacts by increasing over-water structures, which results in a loss of subtidal habitat within industrial areas of Navy bases. In the Pacific Northwest, compensatory mitigation often targets alleviating impacts to Endangered Species Act-listed salmon species. The complexity of restoring large systems requires limited resources to target successful and more coordinated mitigation efforts to address habitat loss and improvements in water quality that will clearly contribute to an improvement at the site scale and can then be linked to a cumulative net ecosystem improvement.

Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Environmental Impact Research Program and Defense Natural Resources Program: Section 7. 5. 7, US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources Management manual. Final report. [ELAEAGNUS UMBELLATA  

SciTech Connect

A plant materials report on autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is provided as Section 7.5.7 of the US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources management Manual. The report was prepared as a guide to assist project/installation natural resources personnel with the selection, establishment, and management of appropriate plant materials for wildlife and habitat development programs. Major topics covered are description, distribution, habitat requirements, wildlife and land management value, establishment, maintenance, and cautions and limitations. Autumn olive is a hardy shrub or small tree introduced into the United States from Asia. It is widely used in the East in habitat improvement projects designed to attract wildlife, provide barriers, beautify existing landscapes, and reclaim disturbed sites. Autumn olive is tolerant of a wide range of soils and climatic conditions. Plants grow best on well-drained soils that are deep, sandy, loamy, or moderately fine-textured. Establishment of autumn olive is often recommended for borders, hedgerows, windbreaks, and disturbed sites. Planting stock of autumn olive is readily available, and some commercial nurseries produce propagules in quantity. Four cultivars (Cardinal, Ellagood, Elsberry, and Redwing) have been developed and are adapted to geographically specific regions. This report provides information on management objectives, site selection and preparation, propagule selection, planting methods, and maintenance requirements for autumn olive throughout its area of potential use. Management cautions and limitations are discussed, and guidelines are provided on the appropriate use of autumn olive in wildlife and habitat management programs.

Dittberner, P.L.; Dietz, D.R.; Wasser, C.H.; Martin, C.O.; Mitchell, W.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials Website: unfccc.int/resource/cd_roms/na1/mitigation/index.htm UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments Screenshot References: UNFCCC-Mitigation Assessments[1] "This training package (containing PowerPoint presentations and notes, a handbook and reference materials) is designed to facilitate the preparation of the mitigation component of the national communications by non-Annex I teams based on UNFCCC guidelines contained in the annex to decision 17/CP.8." References

393

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No.199202601). Work undertaken during 2007 included: (1) Starting 1 new fencing project in the NFJD subbasin that will protect an additional 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat; (2) Constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa River to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) Planting 22,100 plants along 3 streams totaling 3.6 stream miles; (4) Establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; (7) Initiated writing of a comprehensive project summary report that will present a summary of conclusions of the benefits to focal species and management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 56 individual projects have been implemented, monitored and maintained along 84.8 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams that protect and enhance 3,501 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Northern California Power Agency Geothermal Project No. 2: draft joint environmental study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: project description, environmental setting, environmental impacts and mitigation measures, project alternatives and a summary of environmental consequences. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

Wente, William Baker

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Republic of Congo-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013

397

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iisd.org/climate/de Program Start 2012

398

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

Garcia, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish, Wildlife & Parks Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0701 Phone number 406-444-2535 Website http://fwp.mt.gov/doingBusines Coordinates 46.586864°, -112.01525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.586864,"lon":-112.01525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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401

India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Agency/Company /Organization Government of India Sector Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.envfor.nic.in/legis Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife[1] Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers Eco-marks Scheme Eco-sensitive Zone Environmental Clearance - General Environmental Labs Environmental Standards Hazardous Substances Management Loss Of Ecology Noise Pollution Ozone Layer Depletion Water Pollution 2-T Oil Public Liability Insurance

402

California high speed rail proposal: High speed rail and wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife and High Speed Rail C ALIFORNIA H IGH S PEED R AILLeavitt, California High Speed Rail Authority) Abstract TheCalifornia High Speed Rail (HSR) Proposal is in the initial

Wilkerson, Cynthia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE, FISHERIES, AND PARKS Sam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

321-1132. Sincerely, Kathy W. Lunceford Fish and Wildlife Biologist Cc: FWS, Atlanta, GA Attn: Jerry Ziewitz P.O. BOX 3658, TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI 38803-3658 WWW.WILDLIFETECHNICAL...

404

ORR Wildlife Management Update (2/5/2010)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Wildlife Services: * Recorded goose distress calls. * Laser light. * Radio-controlled boat. 35 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL Goose Chaser - The...

405

Schedule for 2013 Oak Ridge Wildlife Management Area (ORWMA)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schedule for 2013 Oak Ridge Wildlife Management Area (ORWMA) Spring Turkey Hunts Scouting day - April 6th Hunt Weekend - April 13th-14th Hunt Weekend - April 20th -21st These...

406

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring and financially viable Bonneville Power Administration is essential to carrying out those purposes. The Council

407

Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook - Appendix: Literature Review Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II United States Office of Research EPA/600/R-93/187 Environmental Protection and Development December 1993 Agency (8603) Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook Appendix: Literature Review Database Volume II of II EPA/600/R-93/187 December 1993 WILDLIFE EXPOSURE FACTORS HANDBOOK APPENDIX: LITERATURE REVIEW DATABASE Volume II of II Office of Health and Environmental Assessment Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 Additional major funding for this Handbook was provided by the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and by the Office of Science and Technology, Office of Water U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

408

Active Project Justification Statements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Justification Statements Project Justification Statements Date Received PJS Number Title Owner / Author Status ORG Due Date 10/26/2012 PJS-2012-007 Cost Benefit Analysis for Nuclear Facility Accident Prevention or Mitigation Design Options, Project Justification 1/9/2013 PJS-2013-01 DOE HDBK of Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 6/24/2013 PJS-2013-03 Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility

409

MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conference *3102012 Determine pilot plant and 100 MW plant parameters with Lockheed Martin Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return...

410

MHK Projects/NPI 021 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

? Main Overseeing Organization Northland Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13989 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

411

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has bee