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Sample records for wildlife mitigation program

  1. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  2. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  6. Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not...

  7. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  8. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  9. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are

  10. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2001-03-01

    This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  11. Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2000-04-01

    This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  12. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  13. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  14. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming Abstract Covers the basics of mitigation...

  16. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  17. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  18. Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Primer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Market-based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming: A Primer Abstract Covers the basics of...

  19. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

  20. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    This preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities are analyzed: Habitat protection; Habitat enhancement; Operation and maintenance; and Monitoring and evaluation. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  1. Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

  2. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  3. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  4. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  5. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  6. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  7. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  8. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  9. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  10. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack

    1984-11-01

    This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

  11. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  12. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  13. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  14. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  15. OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAR 635-415 - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 635-415 -...

  16. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  17. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  18. EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

  19. Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

  20. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in

  1. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  2. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  3. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  4. Plans for Implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program in Fiscal Year 1986.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1985-10-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program is an effort to enhance, protect, and mitigate losses of those fish and wildlife which have been affected by the development, operation, and management of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The implementation plan is organized to address the action items assigned to BPA in Section 1500 of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (1984). These action items generally relate to one or more specific measures in the Program. The following information is listed for each project: budget summary, projects, obligation plan, and work plan and milestones.

  5. Mitigation measures and programs in Hungary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molnar, S.

    1996-12-31

    In Hungary there are four main governmental programs, which may result in a decrease of emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs): (1) National program of energy efficiency improvement and energy conservation, (2) Afforestation program, (3) Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission reduction program, and (4) Program to reduce the use of ozone depleting substances. These ambitious programs were launched in the beginning of the 90`s, but they have been slowed down because of budgetary problems. The comprehensive action plan for mitigation of GHG emissions should be based on these ongoing programs. These programs should be expanded by further measures and programs in order to fulfill the requirements of the FCCC. In the next sections the results and prospects of the above mentioned programs will be summarized. Also the results of the mitigation study supported by the U.S. Country Studies Program are included.

  6. DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing ...

  7. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  8. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  9. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation

  10. DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report DOE Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report (447.33 KB) More Documents & Publications LM Annual NEPA Planning Summary 2014 EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment EA-1934: 2015 Annual Report for Mitigation Action

  11. Introduction to Administrative Programs that Mitigate the Insider Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Gretchen K.; Rogers, Erin; Landers, John; DeCastro, Kara

    2012-09-01

    This presentation begins with the reality of the insider threat, then elaborates on these tools to mitigate the insider threat: Human Reliability Program (HRP); Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Program; Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

  12. Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    divisionsfuture-perfect Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling1...

  13. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  14. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program : Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald L.; Woodward-Lilengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo J.

    1999-09-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and streams after eggs are laid in the gravel. Supplementation of

  15. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome

    1988-02-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-MARKET BARRIER MITIGATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Barrier Mitigation March 6-27, 2014 Wind Energy Technologies PR-5000-62152 2 Contents Market Barrier Mitigation Siting, Environmental and Permitting- Karin Sinclair, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Developing high-resolution spatial data of migration corridors for avian species of concern in regions of high potential wind development- Todd Katzner, West Virginia University Deepwater Offshore Bat Monitoring Program-Steven K Pelletier, Stantec Consulting Services, Inc. A Synchronized

  17. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  18. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    between Pantex, West Texas A&M University, and the U.S. Geological Survey's Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Texas Tech University.

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management

  20. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allee, Brian J.

    1997-06-26

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  1. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  2. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  3. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  4. Characterizing and Mitigating Work Time Inflation in Task Parallel Programs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olivier, Stephen L.; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Schulz, Martin; Prins, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Task parallelism raises the level of abstraction in shared memory parallel programming to simplify the development of complex applications. However, task parallel applications can exhibit poor performance due to thread idleness, scheduling overheads, and work time inflation – additional time spent by threads in a multithreaded computation beyond the time required to perform the same work in a sequential computation. We identify the contributions of each factor to lost efficiency in various task parallel OpenMP applications and diagnose the causes of work time inflation in those applications. Increased data access latency can cause significant work time inflation in NUMAmore » systems. Our locality framework for task parallel OpenMP programs mitigates this cause of work time inflation. Our extensions to the Qthreads library demonstrate that locality-aware scheduling can improve performance up to 3X compared to the Intel OpenMP task scheduler.« less

  5. Division of Fish and Wildlife Program Summary, 1985-1986 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiilsgaard, Chris

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the organization of the Division of Fish and Wildlife programs of Bonneville Power Administration, its budget, and research programs funded by it during FY 1986. (ACR)

  6. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-24

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  7. 1995 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-25

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys performed at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) from January through December of 1995 as compared with results from previous years. These surveys were performed as part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and describing fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in species using RFETS. The NRPCP provides support to the Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as Natural Resource Trustee, and provides data essential to accomplishing the goal of preserving the unique ecological values of RFETS in keeping with the Rocky Flats Vision presented in the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Public Comment Draft. Wildlife population densities vary due to natural pressures and human influences, and only long-term monitoring can verify which factors influencing wildlife populations are the consequence of natural fluctuations, and which are due to human influences. The wildlife monitoring described in this report provides qualitative data that give an indication of the ecological health of RFETS. Monitoring numbers, habitat affinities, and apparent health of the wildlife populations makes it possible to evaluate the overall ecological health of the site. Monitoring and surveys such as those carried out by the NRPCP can indicate trends of this sort, and act as an {open_quotes}early warning system{close_quotes} for impending ecological problems.

  8. Mitigation options for fish and wildlife resources affected by port and other water-dependent developments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dial, R.S.; Deis, D.R.

    1986-06-01

    Ten past restoration projects in Tampa Bay were evaluated. Habitats included Spartina marsh, mangrove forests, Juncus marsh, and subtidal habitat. Success was difficult to determine because goals for each project had not been defined. In-kind losses of habitat occurred in all but one project. Permanent losses occurred in at least three projects. Restoration of Spartina and Juncus marshes was recommended. Mangroves will recruit into Spartina marshes, provided a seed source is available; planting of mangroves alone is not recommended. Seagrass restoration is not recommended at this time. Twelve sites, most less than 50 ha, were identified as potential restoration sites to give 344 ha of subtidal habitat to be made shallower and 176 ha of uplands to be scraped down. The current management program's legal and policy needs for improving environmental management, the role of mitigation, and the information needed to develop mitigation plans are discussed. This report will be useful to decisionmakers concerned with wetland habitat loss and restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida, and other areas with similar habitats.

  9. Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    A Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, required by the California Environmental Quality Act, was developed by UC as part of the Final EIS/EIR process. This document describing the program is a companion to the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). The Final EIS/EIR analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, which for the purposes of NEPA is: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 1 0 years) proposed projects, of LLNL and SNL, Livermore. The proposed action for the EIR is the renewal of the contract between DOE and UC for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is for implementing and monitoring progress of measures taken to mitigate the significant impacts of the proposed action. A complete description of the impacts and proposed mitigations is in Section 5 of Volume I of the Final EIS/EIR. This report summarizes the mitigation measures, identifies the responsible party at the Laboratory for implementing the mitigation measure, states when monitoring will be implemented, when the mitigation measure will be in place and monitoring completed, and who will verify that the mitigation measure was implemented.

  10. Fiscal Year 2013 Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report, October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pava, Daniel S.

    2015-03-25

    This Trails Management Program Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (Trails MAPAR) has been prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) as part of implementing the 2003 Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Trails Management Program (DOE 2003). The Trails Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is now a part of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/EIS 0380) Mitigation Action Plan (2008 SWEIS MAP) (DOE 2008). The MAP provides guidance for the continued implementation of the Trails Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and integration of future mitigation actions into the 2008 SWEIS MAP to decrease impacts associated with recreational trails use at LANL. This eighth MAPAR includes a summary of Trails Management Program activities and actions during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, from October 2012 through September 2013.

  11. Mitigation Monitoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY00 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguff, R R

    2003-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed eight years of implementing the mitigation measures from the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of LLNL and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. This eighth annual report documents LLNL's implementation of the mitigation measures during the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000 (FY00). It provides background information on the mitigation measures, describes activities undertaken during FY00, and documents changes in the monitoring program. Table 1 on page 12, provides a numerical listing of each mitigation measure, the department responsible for implementing it, and the location within this report where the status is discussed. The discussion of the mitigation measures is organized by the University of California (UC)'s three categories of approaches to implementation: project-specific, service-level and administrative. Table 2 on page 19, Table 6 on page 55, and Table 7 on page 63 provide a detailed discussion of each mitigation measure, including LLNL's implementation strategy and the status as of the end of the fiscal year. Table 3 on page 37, Table 4 on page 46, and Table 5 on page 47 list each construction project undertaken in FY00 and the mitigation measures implemented.

  12. U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

  13. US country studies program: Results from mitigation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Country Studies Program which was implemented to support the principles and objectives of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). There were three principle objectives in this program: to enhance capabilities to conduct climate change assessments, prepare action plans, and implement technology projects; to help establish a process for developing and implementing national policies and measures; to support principles and objective of the FCCC. As a result, 55 countries are completing studies, more than 2000 analysts engaged in the studies have been trained, and there is a much broader understanding and support for climate change concerns. The article describes experiences of some countries, and general observations and conclusions which are broadly seperated into developed countries and those with economies in transition.

  14. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  15. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year

  16. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the

  18. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Combs, Mitch

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee

  19. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James

    2002-09-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

  20. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  3. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  4. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

  5. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01

    Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have

  6. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  7. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Wildlife Protecting Wildlife We monitor and protect the wildlife and their habitats on Laboratory property. February 2, 2015 Mule deer on LANL property LANL has been home to mule deer since its creation in 1942 and has seasonally been home to elk since their reintroduction to New Mexico in the 1960s. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Protecting our wildlife Since the early 1940s, LANL's

  8. Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 25, 2014 EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...

  9. The potential for biomass to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in the Northeastern US. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernow, S.S.; Gurney, K.; Prince, G.; Cyr, M.

    1992-04-01

    This study, for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) of the Coalition of Northeast Governors (CONEG), evaluates the potential for local, state and regional biomass policies to contribute to an overall energy/biomass strategy for the reduction of greenhouse gas releases in the Northeastern United States. Biomass is a conditionally renewable resource that can play a dual role: by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in meeting our energy needs; and by removing carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering it in standing biomass stocks and long-lived products. In this study we examine the contribution of biomass to the energy system in the Northeast and to the region`s net releases of carbon dioxide and methane, and project these releases over three decades, given a continuation of current trends and policies. We then compare this Reference Case with three alternative scenarios, assuming successively more aggressive efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through strategic implementation of energy efficiency and biomass resources. Finally, we identify and examine policy options for expanding the role of biomass in the region`s energy and greenhouse gas mitigation strategies.

  10. Mitigation of magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) effects from commerical electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Tesche, F.M.; Vance, E.F.

    1992-03-01

    A large nuclear detonation at altitudes of several hundred kilometers above the earth distorts the earth`s magnetic field and produces a strong magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). This can adversely affect electrical power systems. In this report, the effects of this nuclear environment on critical facilities connected to the commercial power system are considered. Methods of mitigating the MHD-EMP impacts are investigated, and recommended protection schemes are presented. Guidelines for testing facilities to determine the effects of MHD-EMP and to validate the mitigation methods also are discussed.

  11. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Studies Studying Our Environment A rich diversity of plants and animals call this area home. Through their studies, biologists help the Lab understand and protect the diversity of the land. Elk on Laboratory Land Taking Care of the Land The Lab's scientific work is balanced with our responsibility to take care of the land we're on. READ MORE Lab Biologist, Chuck Hathcock Studying the Land and Wildlife Biologists conduct annual and multi-year studies of animals and plants on Lab land.

  12. The role of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Program in implementing the objectives of the joint Canada-U.S. acid rain mitigation initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, A.L.; Smith, D.N.; Mann, A.W.; McIlvried, H.G.; Russell, D.L. Sr.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in part as a response to the 1986 Joint Report of the US and Canadian Special Envoys on Acid Rain, with a particular focus on coal-burning electric power plants. The fist three solicitations of the CCT Program were aimed primarily at mitigating the potential impacts of acid rain. Subsequently, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established emission reduction targets for SO{sub 2} and No{sub x}, which influenced the goals of the last two CCT Program. This paper provides an overview of the CCT Program and reports the significant results, with emphasis on emissions reduction as well as their impact on ozone formation.

  13. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  14. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime ...

  15. Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L.; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    2003-04-01

    In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and

  16. EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0472: Mitigation Action Plan Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE LM issued the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0472) in March 2014 and issued the associated Record of Decision (ROD) on May 6, 2014; the ROD was published in the Federal Register on May 12, 2014. This Mitigation Action Plan addresses the mitigation commitments

  17. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2005-06-01

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring

  18. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry

    2004-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  19. Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  20. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  2. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries

  3. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Measures for Distributed Interconnection" Michael Coddington with National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Robert Broderick with Sandia National Laboratories July 9, 2014 2 Speakers Michael Coddington Principal Investigator Distributed Grid Integration NREL Robert Broderick Technical Lead Distributed Grid Integration Programs Sandia National Laboratories Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL 3 INTERCONNECTION, SCREENING & MITIGATION PRACTICES OF 21 UTILITIES

  4. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildlife Encounters Report Wildlife Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email If you find an injured bird, contact the Santa Fe Raptor Center. Have a close encounter? Report the following Any wildlife incidents or encounters Migratory bird injury or

  5. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Planning and Policy organization (EWP) in the Division of Environment, Fish & Wildlife, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and reports to the EWP manager....

  6. Mitigating the Impacts of Glint and Glare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillesheim, Michael; Kandt, Alicen; Phillips, Steven

    2015-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, supporting the Department of the Navy Renewable Energy Program Office, has developed an innovative glint/glare analysis and visualization methodology to understand and mitigate the possible impacts of light reflecting off solar photovoltaic arrays.

  7. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigating Wildland Fires Mitigating Wildland Fires Our interactive wildland fire map displays the locations of wildland fire mitigation activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email View in Google Maps What we are doing to mitigate wildland fires Recent large wildfires in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire (2000), and the Las

  8. Neutralize & Mitigate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities » Neutralize & Mitigate Neutralize & Mitigate Scientists are developing technologies designed to mitigate the effects of IEDs, protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects of these and other types of explosives. v Protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects At Los Alamos, scientists are developing technologies designed to mitigate the effects of IEDs, protecting personnel and equipment from the detonation effects of these and other types

  9. Mitigation Action Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  10. Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan FutureGen 2.0 Project DOE/EIS-0460 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK DOE/EIS-0460 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROJECT MITIGATION ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose

  11. Bonneville’s “Balanced Scorecard” Approach to Mitigation, Monitoring, and Adaptive Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), DOE’s power marketing organization in the Pacific Northwest, will spend more than $300 million on mitigation projects to meet its mandate under the 1980 Northwest Power Act to “protect, mitigate and enhance” fish and wildlife affected by construction and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. How is BPA meeting its responsibility to ratepayers to ensure that these mitigation funds are spent effectively?

  12. Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

  13. EA-1160: Northeast Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to enter into an agreement with the Nez Perce Tribe to acquire and manage...

  14. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  15. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2010 Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation Report Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Guidance for the development of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is contained in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1B, National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program, and 10 CFR 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures. These documents specify that a MAP be prepared to mitigate environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commitments made in the Record of

  16. Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory Wildfire Mitigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory The Laboratory's Fire Mitigation program is closely integrated with Los Alamos County, the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service to fight any wildfire in the region. The Laboratory's Fire Management posts daily Fire Danger Ratings on their website. Wildfire-Mitigation-at-Los-Alamos-National-Laboratory.pdf (2.69 MB) More Documents & Publications Remediated Nitrate

  17. Uranium Leasing Program Environmental Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Documents Uranium Leasing Program Environmental Documents Uranium Leasing Program 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary Report (March 2016) The DOE Uranium Leasing Program's 2015 Mitigation Action Plan Activity Summary fulfills the mitigation plan's requirement to annually notify the public of mitigation activities completed by Uranium Leasing Program lessees. Uranium Leasing Program Mitigation Action Plan for the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental

  18. Report Wildlife Encounters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encounters Report any encounters with wildlife in the Los Alamos area. April 12, 2012 A mama black bear and her cub A mama black bear and her cub in Los Alamos. Contact...

  19. Breaking Barriers Wildlife Refreshment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barriers Wildlife Refreshment Walker becomes first black battalion commander. NSTec Aviation Safety Officer, RSL team honored by DOE. NNSS helping wildlife with new watering holes. See pages 8. See page 4. NSTec and UNLV Bring Technology Community Together at PDV Workshop In June 2014, National Security Technologies (NSTec) and University Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) co- hosted a Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) Workshop at the UNLV Science and Engineering Building (SEB). More than 125 attendees

  20. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address: 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place:...

  1. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name: Fish and Wildlife Service Place: Washington, DC Year Founded: 1940 Phone Number: (303) 275-2370...

  2. WREP Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Interconnection of the Whistling Ridge Energy Project 1 Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 Mitigation Action Plan for the Whistling Ridge Energy Project Measure Implementation Timeline Implementation Responsibility Earth (geology, soils, topography, and geologic hazards) Prior to Project construction, confirm subsurface soil and rock types and strength properties through a detailed geotechnical investigation of the specific locations of all wind Project elements, including wind

  3. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  5. On the road to HF mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanZele, R.L.; Diener, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The hazards of hydrogen fluoride (HF) have long been recognized and industry performance reflects sound operating practices. However, full-scale industry-sponsored HF release test conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test site in 1986 caused concern in view of HF's toxicity. Ambient impacts were greater than anticipated. And diking, a primary mitigation technique, proved ineffective for releases of pressurized superheated HF. In partial response to these new technical data, an ad-hoc three-component Industry Cooperative Hydrogen Fluoride Mitigation Assessment Program (ICHMAP) was begun in late 1987 to study and test techniques for mitigating accidental releases of HF and alkylation unit acid (AUA) and to enhance capabilities to estimate ambient impacts from such releases. AUA is a mixture of HF and hydrocarbons. The program's mitigation components have recently been completed while work on the impact assessment component is nearing completion. This article describes the program and summarizes the objective, scope of work, structure, and conclusions from the program's two mitigation components. In addition, the objectives and scope of work of the impact assessment components are described.

  6. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration Energy Technologies Program | Department of Energy Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2003_deer_gore.pdf (759.73 KB) More Documents & Publications The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 Reduction of Emissions

  7. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim

    2008-11-03

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler

  9. Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Estimator Worksheet Excel tool helps agencies estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings. For example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office

  10. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential | Department of Energy PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential February 24, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Adding offshore wind to the U.S. renewable energy portfolio promises access to a

  11. Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting 1996

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents information on voluntary actions to reduce greenhouse gases or remove such gases from the atmosphere in 1995. It provides an overview of participation in the Voluntary Reporting Program, a perspective on the composition of activities reported, and a review of some key issues in interpreting and evaluating achievements associated with reported emissions mitigation initiatives.

  12. EA-2006: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-2006: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Bonneville Power Administration issued a FONSI and a floodplain and wetland statement of findings for a proposed program of actions to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. The mitigation measures listed in the Mitigation Action Plan and

  13. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on Class I areas: part I. impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-07-01

    Published in two parts, this article describes a new emissions cap-and-trade program to reduce acid deposition and visibility impacts in four Class I areas (e.g. wildernesses and national parks) from the proposed Longview Power coal-fired power plant to be located in Maidsville, WV. Part I discusses the air quality impacts of the proposed project. 5 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  15. EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, on the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington

  16. EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington

  17. wildlife | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    wildlife NNSA's Pantex Plant recognized for bird conservation The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds named NNSA's Pantex Plant one of five finalists for the 2016 Presidential Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award for its excellence in conservation of migratory birds through research collaboration. The... A look at wildlife around the Pantex Plant Approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, sits the United States Department of

  18. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildlifeResources&oldid612286" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  19. Making the Most of Mitigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Los Alamos Field Office uses a comprehensive Mitigation Action Plan to monitor and manage commitments to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with the 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and multiple project-specific EISs and environmental assessments (EAs). The DOE NEPA Order requires a publicly available annual report on progress made in implementing mitigation commitments and the effectiveness of the mitigation.

  20. Nevada Department of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife (NDOW) is the state agency responsible for the restoration and management of fish and wildlife resources, and the promotion of boating safety on Nevada's waters. NDOW is...

  1. Colorado Division of Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Colorado Parks and Wildlife Address: 1313 Sherman Street, Suite 618 Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80203 Phone Number: (303) 866-3437...

  2. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River

  3. EIS-0295: Platte River Recovery Implementation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PEIS evaluates impacts of alternative Recovery Implementation Programs to: (1) Secure defined benefits for the target species and their associated habitats to assist in their conservation and recovery through a basin-wide cooperative approach that can be agreed to by the three states and the Department of the Interior; (2) serve as the reasonable and prudent alternative to offset the effects of existing and new water related activities in the Platte River Basin that, in the absence of such a Program, would be found by the U.S. Department of Interior Fish and Wildlife Service to be likely to jeopardize the continued existence of the target species or adversely modify designated critical habitat; (3) help prevent the need to list more basin associated species pursuant to the Endangered Species Act; and (4) mitigate new water related activities in a state in a manner that will not increase the mitigation responsibilities of other signatory states.

  4. BIAS MITIGATION | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diversity and Inclusion » BIAS MITIGATION BIAS MITIGATION BIAS MITIGATION The DOE has focused its efforts on eliminating implicit bias at the individual and institutional levels. At the individual level, the DOE's efforts to eliminate implicit bias include: conflict prevention and resolution; Ombudsman - which promotes the early identification and resolution of issues in order to promote morale and productivity through an informal process; workplace improvement forums; and an anti-harassment

  5. NEPA mitigation and monitoring activities on Army installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinke, D.C.; Robitaille, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Army National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation regulation AR 200-2 (Army Regulation) requires only mitigation measures that can reasonably be accompanied as part of a proposed alternative be identified in the NEPA document. Failure of the identified mitigation actions to be executed or to perform as expected leads to a required reevaluation of the project and the significance of its impacts. The USAEC has undertaken a study of mitigation and monitoring actions listed in Army NEPA documents. As part of the USAEC NEPA program the study has outlined three major tasks (1) collection of a significant sample of Army NEPA documents, (2) review environmental documentation management and retention, and (3) review in detail a subsample of documents and follow-up with site visits. Some 242 Army NEPA documents, Environmental Assessments (EA) and Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) were collected and evaluated for mitigation requirements. Ninety seven of the 242 NEPA documents committed to one or more mitigation actions. While a wide array of mitigating activities have been identified in these documents, the four most common are (1) management plans and practices, (2) training actions, (3) revegetation actions, and (4) construction practices. Site visits to selected Army installations showed that mitigation practices were for the most part being done, but were poorly documented. No installation visited had a mitigation monitoring plan in place as required by AR 200-2.

  6. Mitigation technologies and measures in energy sector of Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilifosova, O.; Danchuk, D.; Temertekov, T.

    1996-12-31

    An important commitment in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change is to conduct mitigation analysis and to communicate climate change measures and policies. In major part reducing CO{sub 2} as well as the other greenhouse gas emissions in Kazakstan, can be a side-product of measures addressed to increasing energy efficiency. Since such measures are very important for the national economy, mitigation strategies in the energy sector of Kazakstan are directly connected with the general national strategy of the energy sector development. This paper outlines the main measures and technologies in energy sector of Kazakstan which can lead to GHG emissions reduction and presents the results of current mitigation assessment. The mitigation analysis is addressed to energy production sector. A baseline and six mitigation scenarios were developed to evaluate the most attractive mitigation options, focusing on specific technologies which have been already included in sustainable energy programs. According to the baseline projection, Kazakstan`s CO{sub 2} emissions will not exceed their 1990 level until 2005. The potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction is estimated to be about 11 % of the base line emission level by the end of considered period (in 2020). The main mitigation options in the energy production sector in terms of mitigation potential and technical and economical feasibility include rehabilitation of thermal power plants aimed to increasing efficiency, use of nuclear energy and further expansion in the use of hydro energy based on small hydroelectric power plants.

  7. Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference April 1, 2013 - 12:54pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and federal agency partners recently completed the final operational field test in a 2-year initiative to accelerate the deployment of the most promising new technologies for mitigating radar interference caused by the physical and electromagnetic effects of wind

  8. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area will be assigned a retreatment cycle and will be incorporated into the LANL Wildland fire maintenance program. Environmental Protection What We Monitor & Why Cultural...

  9. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Abbreviation: WDFW...

  10. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  11. California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

  12. Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

  13. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Georgia MITEC Small Business Boot Camp In Georgia October 4, 2016 9:00AM to 3:00PM EDT Atlanta, GA DOE's Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI) is hosting a MITEC Boot Camp in Atlanta, Georgia coordinated through the Manufacturing Impacts Through Energy and Commerce (MITEC) program. This boot camp is designed to help small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in advanced energy sectors access DOE national lab capabilities and assets; learn about DOE programs targeting SMEs including the

  14. Virginia coastal resources management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Approval of a coastal management plan for coastal land and water use activities on the coast of Virginia is proposed. The coastal management area would embrace all of Tidewater Virginia, approximately 5000 miles long, and would extend to the three-mile outer limit of the United States territorial sea. The core regulatory program would include fisheries management, subaqueous lands management, wetland management, dunes management, nonpoint source pollution control, point source pollution control, shoreline sanitation, and air pollution control. Geographic areas of particular concern would be designated as worthy of special consideration in any planning or management process. These areas would include natural resource areas, such as wetlands, spawning areas, coastal sand dunes, barrier islands, and special wildlife management areas. Natural hazard areas would include areas vulnerable to erosion and areas subject to damage from wind, tides, and storm-related events. Geographic areas of special concern would include those with particular conservation, recreational, ecological, and aesthetic values. Waterfront development areas would include ports, commercial fishing piers, and community waterfronts. Shorefront access planning would provide access to the shoreline and water for recreational activities. Each year, two additional boat ramps would be planned for construction. Energy facility planning would focus on facilities involved in the production of electricity and petroleum, and in the export of coal. Shoreline erosion mitigation planning would identify, control, and mitigate erosion.

  15. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy Cover of the Federal Interagency ...

  16. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  17. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

    1994-06-01

    In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

  18. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data | Department of Energy Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish

  19. Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Recruiting a Local and Diverse Workforce and Mitigating Barriers to Entry, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, August 25, 2011. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (879.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Workforce Peer Exchange Call:

  20. Enhanced Separation and Mitigated Plasticization in Membranes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced Separation and Mitigated Plasticization in Membranes using Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles

  1. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta

    2009-10-15

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Project Title: Tin Whisker Mitigation (4532) Program or Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exercises and simulation OBI.3 - Routine maintenance and custodial services DB 1.4 - Air conditioning installation for existing equipment DB 1.5 Cooling water system...

  3. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and

  4. Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions By John Greenwald July 15, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion Energy Sciences. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Princeton Office of Communications ) Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion

  5. Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Experts assemble at PPPL to discuss mitigation of tokamak disruptions By John Greenwald July 15, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion Energy Sciences. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Princeton Office of Communications ) Amitava Bhattacharjee, left, and John Mandrekas, a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy's office of Fusion

  6. EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County This review is to ensure that project activities continue to be consistent with the Wildlife...

  7. International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

    2010-11-01

    The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief

  8. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  9. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More » Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable. Read More » Process Limits The hard and soft process limits are listed. Read More » Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:11

  10. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming The genepool system has a diverse set of software development tools and a rich environment for delivering their functionality to users. Genepool has adopted a modular system which has been adapted from the Programming Environments similar to those provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu/4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the GNU environment, principally GCC,

  11. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Read More Programming Tuning Options Tips for tuning performance on the Hopper system ... The ACML library is also supported on Hopper and Franklin. Read More PGAS Language ...

  12. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage & File Systems Application Performance Data & Analytics Job Logs & Statistics ... Each programming environment contains the full set of compatible compilers and libraries. ...

  13. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  14. Priority mitigation measures in non-energy sector in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizina, S.V.; Pilifosova, O.V.; Gossen, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Fulfilling the Commitments on UN FCCC through the U.S. Country Studies Program, Kazakstan has developed the national GHG Inventory, vulnerability and adaptation assessment and estimated the possibility of mitigation measures in certain sectors. Next step is developing National Climate Change Action Plan. That process includes such major steps as setting priorities in mitigation measures and technologies, their comprehensive evaluation, preparation implementation strategies, developing the procedure of incorporation of the National Action Plan into other development plans and programs. This paper presents programs and measures that can reduce GHG emissions in non-energy sector. Measures in land-use change and forestry, agriculture and coal mining are considered. Current situation in non-energy sector of Kazakstan is discussed. The amount of GHG emissions reduction and cost analysis presented in this paper was developed with the use of IPCC recommendations.

  15. OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Wildlife Diversity Plans used to guide the State of Oregon's Department of Fish and Wildlife when managing non-game wildlife. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  16. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents Mitigation Action Plans (MAP) and Related Documents Mitigation Action Plans are documents DOE prepares in accordance with DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR 1021.331) that describes the plan for implementing commitments made in a DOE environmental impact statement and its associated record of decision, or, when appropriate, an EA or FONSI, to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with an action. If you have any trouble finding a specific

  17. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Fiscal Year 2012 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report

  18. Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive...

  19. Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory...

  20. Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and Clarifying the Appropriate Use of Mitigated Findings of No Significant Impact Appropriate Use of Mitigation and Monitoring and ...

  1. EIS-0422: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mitigation measures and estimated time of implementation within the Mitigation Action Plan for the Central Ferry-Lower Monumental 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Project. Mitigation...

  2. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Mitigation Action Plan was prepared to address commitments made in the RODs for...

  3. EIS-0026: 2009 Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Annual Mitigation Report (AMR) addresses those WIPP-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  4. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  5. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Annual Mitigation Report (2007 AMR) addresses those WIPP- related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994...

  6. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 Annual Mitigation Report (AMR) addresses those WIPP-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through...

  7. EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project This Mitigation Action Plan identifies measures that are intended to avoid, reduce, or...

  8. MITIGATION ACTION PLAN FOR THE PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE TRANSMISSIO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... or updated as required, issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service pursuant to Section 7 ... Recreation; Special Status Wildlife, Fish, Aquatic Invertebrate, and Amphibian ...

  9. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Parks and Wildlife Department Name: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Address: 4200 Smith School Rd Place: Austin, TX Zip: 78744 Phone Number: (512) 389-4800 Website:...

  10. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: National Wildlife Refuge System...

  11. Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans...

  12. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Provides guidance on conservation oriented development. Authors State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Organizations State of Montana Fish and Wildlife & Parks Published...

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife ...

  14. New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos The Bradbury Science Museum unveils a new interactive ...

  15. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural ...

  16. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, ...

  17. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  18. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using MPI and OpenMP on NERSC systems, the same does not always exist for other supported parallel programming models such as UPC or Chapel. At the same time, we know that these...

  19. Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, Norm

    2009-02-18

    The overarching goals of the 'Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation' Project (BPA Project No.2002-011-00) are to: (1) assess abiotic and biotic factors (i.e., geomorphologic, hydrological, aquatic and riparian/floodplain communities) in determining a definitive composition of ecological integrity, (2) develop strategies to assess and mitigate losses of ecosystem functions, and (3) produce a regional operational loss assessment framework. To produce a scientifically defensible, repeatable, and complete assessment tool, KTOI assembled a team of top scientists in the fields of hydrology, hydraulics, ornithology, entomology, statistics, and river ecology, among other expertise. This advisory team is known as the Research Design and Review Team (RDRT). The RDRT scientists drive the review, selection, and adaptive management of the research designs to evaluate the ecologic functions lost due to the operation of federal hydropower facilities. The unique nature of this project (scientific team, newest/best science, adaptive management, assessment of ecological functions, etc.) has been to work in a dynamic RDRT process. In addition to being multidisciplinary, this model KTOI project provides a stark contrast to the sometimes inflexible process (review, re-review, budgets, etc.) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project RDRT is assembled annually, with subgroups meeting as needed throughout the year to address project issues, analyses, review, and interpretation. Activities of RDRT coordinated and directed the selection of research and assessment methodologies appropriate for the Kootenai River Watershed and potential for regional application in the Columbia River Basin. The entire RDRT continues to meet annually to update and discuss project progress. RDRT Subcontractors work in smaller groups throughout the year to meet project objectives. Determining the extent to which

  20. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  1. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better

  2. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  3. EA-1628: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa This Mitigation Action Plan specifieis the methods for implementing mitigation measures that address the potential environmental...

  4. EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and dewatering, landscape engineering, borrow pits and recommended procedures for Raptors and powerline construction. Mitigation Action Plan to Implement Mitigation...

  5. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken from the time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2014. EIS-0026-MAP-2014.pdf (1.05 MB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan

  6. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken since time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2016. Download Document EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report - 2016 (139.49 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: 2010

  7. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Annual Mitigation Report addresses those WIPP Project-related mitigation activities undertaken since time of submittal of the 1994 Annual Mitigation Report in July 1994 through June 2015. EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report - 2015 (133.54 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026: Annual Mitigation Report EIS-0026:

  8. Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H; Roche, Charles T

    2011-01-01

    The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with

  9. The Wildlife Society 22nd Annual Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wildlife Society’s 22nd Annual Conference will be held Oct. 17–21, 2015, in Winnipeg, Canada. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Sustainability Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking on how partnerships with key stakeholders lead to the research, development, and demonstration of technologies that produce advanced bioenergy and bioproducts from lignocellulosic and algal biomass. Several activities supported by BETO provide insights into how habitat and wildlife can be considered when designing bioenergy systems. Strong public and private collaboration can help meet simultaneous goals of expanding the bioeconomy while also incorporating the needs of wildlife, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and providing other environmental and socio-economic benefits.

  10. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2003-03-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington

  11. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  12. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  13. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the wind industry receives a lot of attention for avian impacts, research shows that nuclear and fossil-fueled plants have a greater impact. The Avian and Wildlife Costs of...

  14. OpenEI Community - Fish and Wildlife

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  15. Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental ...

  16. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy January 2016 This report ... First, the authors would like to thank the entire Wind Turbine Radar Interference Working ...

  17. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells 2012 ...

  18. Federal Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Mitigation Strategy January 2016 This report ... from the advice and comments of two wind industry and trade association ...

  19. Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation (ATDM) subprogram includes laboratory code and computer engineering and science projects that pursue long-term simulation and ...

  20. Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and Low-Carbon Development (LCD) strategies in developing countries through regionally based dialogues, web-based...

  1. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

  2. A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ronald J.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

  3. Core Program | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The SLD Core program is also involved in maintaining radiation detection equipment throughout the world to help mitigate the risk of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The SLD ...

  4. Mitigation assessment results and priorities in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Zongxin; Wei Zhihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper energy related CO2 emission projections of China by 2030 are given. CO2 mitigation potential and technology options in main fields of energy conservation and energy substitution are analyzed. CO2 reduction costs of main mitigation technologies are estimated and the AHP approach is used for helping assessment of priority technologies.

  5. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  6. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  7. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  8. 2009 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano; R. D. Teel

    2009-09-30

    This document details the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2009, including 25 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and three bat mitigation projects.

  9. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  10. Wind Program Announces $2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat Impact Minimization Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE's Wind Program announced $2 million in funding to advance technologies that address wind development’s potential impacts on wildlife.

  11. EIS-0419: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0419: Mitigation Action Plan Whistling Ridge Energy Project; Skamania County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) adopted all the mitigation measures described in the Whistling Ridge Energy Project EIS and prepared a mitigation action plan. The applicant will be responsible for executing the mitigation measures for the wind project, and BPA will be responsible for executing the mitigation measures for the BPA interconnection facilities. For more

  12. EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project DOE issued a Mitigation Action Plan that explains how mitigation measures, which have been designed to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with the course of action directed by the Record of Decision, will be planned and implemented. For more information visit the project page: http://energy.gov/node/583039. Download Document EIS-0486: Mitigation Action Plan (12.85 MB) More

  13. TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife Code Endangered Species Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: TPWC 68 - Parks and Wildlife...

  14. US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower Licensing webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: US Fish and Wildlife Service Hydropower...

  15. 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife Properties | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 2 CCR 406-9 - Wildlife PropertiesLegal Abstract Regulations governing all wildlife...

  16. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference October 13, 2015 8:00AM MDT to October 15,...

  17. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  18. Comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) - Description and instruction manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy; Sathaye, Jayant

    2001-11-09

    In order to prepare policies and plans to reduce GHG emissions, national policy-makers need information on the costs and benefits of different mitigation options in addition to their carbon implications. Policy-makers must weigh the costs, benefits, and impacts of climate change mitigation and adaptation options, in the face of competition for limited resources. The policy goal for mitigation options in the land use sector is to identify which mix of options is likely to best achieve the desired forestry service and production objectives at the least cost, while attempting to maximize economic and social benefits, and minimize negative environmental and social impacts. Improved national-level cost estimates of response options in the land use sector can be generated by estimating the costs and benefits of different forest management practices appropriate for specific country conditions which can be undertaken within the constraint of land availability and its opportunity cost. These co st and land use estimates can be combined to develop cost curves, which would assist policy-makers in constructing policies and programs to implement forest responses.

  19. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  20. Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory (CEQ, 1980) Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the ...

  1. Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the solar abundance problem Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring changes in solar model physics to mitigate the ...

  2. National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A...

  3. EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project Western Area Power Administration proposes to reconductor ...

  4. EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1923: Mitigation Action Plan Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands This Mitgation Action Plan ...

  5. EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1923: Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact Green Energy School Wind Turbine Project on Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern ...

  6. EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigation Action Plan EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE...

  7. Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoparticles to Mitigate Biofilm Growth. Abstract not provided. Authors: Altman, Susan Jeanne ...

  8. EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0380: Mitigation Action Plan Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico PDF icon Site-Wide Environmental Impact ...

  9. EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR Through the environmental review process, DOE determined, via consultations ...

  10. Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) (Redirected from CIFF-Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS)) Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:...