Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

5

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

Holland, R.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office carries out technology research, development, and deployment through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This Web page includes links to documents that support and document the program management process, and the results and public benefits that derive from it.

9

Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Implementing Motor Decision Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Motor Decision Plans R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E., Senior Associate American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Washington, DC Abstract The first step to reducing energy costs and increasing reliability in motors... when a motor fails and must either be replaced or repaired. This is represented visually in Figure 1. When purchasing a motor for a new application, time is usually available to consider various options. However, once a motor has failed...

Elliott, R. N.

11

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is a dynamic long-range environmental-protection plan for SRS. The EIP communicates the current and future (five year) environmental plans from individual organizations and divisions as well as site environmental initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed compliance with changing environmental/ regulatory requirements. Communication with all site organizations is essential for making the site environmental planning process work. Demonstrating environmental excellence is a high priority embodied in DOE and WSRC policy. Because of your support and participation in the three EIP initiatives; Reflections, Sectional Revision, and Integrated Planning, improvements are being made to the EIP and SRS environmental protection programs. I appreciate the ``Partnership in Environmental Excellence`` formed by the environmental coordinators and professionals who work daily toward our goal of compliance and environmental excellence. I look forward to seeing continued success and improvement in our environmental protection programs through combined efforts of all site organizations to protect our employees, the public health, and the environment. Together, we will achieve our site vision for SRS to be the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

TRUPACT-1 implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TRUPACT-1, the TRansUranic PACkage Transporter is a packaging designed to transport defense contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste from generating and interim TRU waste storage facilities to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to fabrication and procurement of a full fleet, an initial design (TRUPACT-1) will be introduced to the defense TRU waste complex through use in an operational prototype fleet which will consist of Units 1, 2, and 3. In an effort to provide a relatively smooth introduction of the TRUPACT-1, the TRUPACT Technical Team (TTT) has developed the following implementation plan. The plan provides detailed information on user handling opportunities, schedules, equipment, responsibilities, reporting and data collection activities to be performed. The intent of this document is to provide users of the TRUPACT-1 with a guidance document, complete with references, that will allow the smooth introduction of this new transportation system by providing the information necessary for collecting operational, performance and cost data. These data will be used in modeling and full fleet design and procurement activities. In addition, these data will help fine tune procedures in the inspection and maintenance document and the operational document. Additional objectives of this plan are to aid in the establishment of site operational, inspection and maintenance procedures as well as training of site operators and briefing state and local officials.

Hurley, J.D.; Tappen, J.J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Joint Integration Office); Christensen, D.S. (USDOE Joint Integration Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States)) (eds.)

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Conduct of operations implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This implementation plan describes the process and provides information and schedules that are necessary to implement and comply with the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, {open_quotes}Conduct of Operations{close_quotes} (CoOp). This plan applies to all Pinellas Plant operations and personnel. Generally, this Plan discusses how DOE Order 5480.19 will be implemented at the Pinellas Plant.

Anderson, C.K.; Hall, R.L.

1991-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Strategic Plan: Implementation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Findings From: Planning Interviews Stakeholder Survey Environmental Assessment Refine Mission and Vision Define Goals with Measurable Outcomes Develop Specific Strategies & Tactics Finalize;Improving lives and transforming healthcare.* Mission Statement ­ "Core Purpose" Vision Statement

Nguyen, Danh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Environmental implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document, the Savannah River site environmental programs and plans from DOE contractors and Westinghouse Savannah River Company divisions/departments are presented along with the environmental coordinator for each program. The objectives are to enhase communication of existing or planned programs to do the following: identify activities required for meeting environmental needs; identify needing resources and a schedule to accomplish those activities; promote share-savings and consistency in those activities.

Peterson, G.L.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

EIS-0312: Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, BPA has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially...

23

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Planning and Implementation Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation Federal renewable energy projects can be large or small and managed by a third-party or the agency....

25

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Schedule optimization study implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Implementation Plan is intended to provide a basis for improvements in the conduct of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Hanford. The Plan is based on the findings of the Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) team which was convened for two weeks in September 1992 at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL). The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit (OU) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan. The SOS team was comprised of independent professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration within the federal system. The objective of the team was to examine reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process and recommend ways to expedite it. The SOS team issued their Final Report in December 1992. The report found the most serious impediments to cleanup relate to a series of management and policy issues which are within the control of the three parties managing and monitoring Hanford -- the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology). The SOS Report identified the following eight cross-cutting issues as the root of major impediments to the Hanford Site cleanup. Each of these eight issues is quoted from the SOS Report followed by a brief, general description of the proposed approach being developed.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL 1 Subbasin Assessment Template for the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife progress. Subbasin assessments provide technical information upon which subbasin plans and other planning but are separate and distinct technical exercises. Assessments help to estimate the resource potential of each

32

SEPARATIONS AND WASTE FORMS CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Separations and Waste Forms Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Campaign will achieve the objectives set-forth by the Fuel Cycle Reasearch and Development (FCRD) Program. This implementation plan will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to changes or progress in separations and waste forms research and the FCRD Program priorities.

Vienna, John D.; Todd, Terry A.; Peterson, Mary E.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Implement an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from...

34

Oracle accrual plans from requirements to implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementing any new business software can be an intimidating prospect and this paper is intended to offer some insight in to how to approach this challenge with some fundamental rules for success. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had undergone an original ERP implementation of HRMS, Oracle Advanced Benefits, Worker Self Service, Manager Self Service, Project Accounting, Financials and PO, and recently completed a project to implement Oracle Payroll, Time and Labor and Accrual Plans. This paper will describe some of the important lessons that can be applied to any implementation as a whole, and then specifically how this knowledge was applied to the design and deployment of Oracle Accrual Plans for LANL. Finally, detail on the functionality available in Oracle Accrual Plans will be described, as well as the detailed setups.that were utilized at LANL.

Rivera, Christine K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION Waste Management Quality Assurance ImplementingI I IMPLEMENTING MANAGEMENT QUALITY PLAN ASSURANCE I lilillI WM-QAIMP Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing

Albert editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NERSC Strategic Implementation Plan 2002-2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This strategic proposal presents NERSC's vision for its activities and new directions over the next five years. NERSC's continuing commitment to providing high-end systems and comprehensive scientific support for its users will be enhanced, and these activities will be augmented by two new strategic thrusts: support for Scientific Challenge Teams and deployment of a Unified Science Environment. The proposal is in two volumes, the Strategic Plan and the Implementation Plan.

Kramer, William; Bethel, Wes; Craw, James; Draney, Brent; Fortney, William; Gorda, Brend; Harris, William; Meyer, Nancy; Ng, Esmond; Verdier, Francesca; Walter, Howard; Welcome, Tammy

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

MIDDLE SNAKE SUBBASINS MANAGEMENT PLAN SUPPLEMENT PRIORITIZED IMPLEMENTATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIDDLE SNAKE SUBBASINS MANAGEMENT PLAN SUPPLEMENT ­ PRIORITIZED IMPLEMENTATION NOVEMBER 24, 2004/Browsing..........................................................................................9 Key Limiting Factor #5: Water Quality............................................................................................................................11 Management Plan Considerations

38

Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and the Department of Energy. Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response - July 2011 More Documents & Publications National Action Plan on Demand...

39

Best Practices in Non-Motorized Transport Planning, Implementation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motorized Transport Planning, Implementation and Maintenance Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Best Practices in Non-Motorized Transport Planning,...

40

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Maintenance Implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Maintenance Implementation plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nuclear Facilities: 306W, 324, 325, 327 and 329NMF. It is based on a graded approach, self-assessment of the existing maintenance program(s) per the requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter II, Change {number_sign}3. The results of this assessment were evaluated to determine needed improvements in PNL Craft Services` current maintenance program. The objective of this implementation plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE 4330.4A, and for needed improvements. The prime consideration in applying a graded approach to the Order has been to maintain safe and reliable operations, environmental compliance, safeguards and security, programmatic mission, facility preservation, and/or other facility-specific requirements. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected nine of the 18 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are Training and Qualification of Maintenance Personnel; Maintenance Procedures; Planning, Scheduling, and Coordination of Maintenance; Control of Maintenance Activities; Post-Maintenance Testing; Facility Condition Inspection; Management Involvement; Maintenance History; and Additional Maintenance Requirements. Based upon graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

Bright, J.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Maintenance Implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Maintenance Implementation plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nuclear Facilities: 306W, 324, 325, 327 and 329NMF. It is based on a graded approach, self-assessment of the existing maintenance program(s) per the requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter II, Change {number sign}3. The results of this assessment were evaluated to determine needed improvements in PNL Craft Services' current maintenance program. The objective of this implementation plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE 4330.4A, and for needed improvements. The prime consideration in applying a graded approach to the Order has been to maintain safe and reliable operations, environmental compliance, safeguards and security, programmatic mission, facility preservation, and/or other facility-specific requirements. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected nine of the 18 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are Training and Qualification of Maintenance Personnel; Maintenance Procedures; Planning, Scheduling, and Coordination of Maintenance; Control of Maintenance Activities; Post-Maintenance Testing; Facility Condition Inspection; Management Involvement; Maintenance History; and Additional Maintenance Requirements. Based upon graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

Bright, J.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

FY95 capital asset implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Division (WID) is committed to providing good stewardship for the capital assets under its operational and physical control. To achieve this goal, the WID has developed the Capital Asset Implementation Plan (CAIP) to continue to implement for FY95 Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.2A, Capital Asset Management Process (CAMP). The Order provides policy and elements needed to establish a credible, consistent, auditable, and technically sound process for the DOE to forecast, plan, and budget for capital assets on a functional unit level. The objective of the WIPP CAMP program is to meet the goals of DOE Order 4320.2A in the most effective and efficient manner possible in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mission. As a result, this CAIP provides a way to implement the CAMP Program using a graded approach. Continued implementation will be accomplished by improving the existing process, and establishing future goals to promote growth for the CAMP Program. The CAIP is issued annually by the WID with quarterly progress reports submitted to the DOE. This document describes the current-year program staffing, roles, responsibilities, funding, and near-term milestones. In addition, the results of past goals are discussed.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

327 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 327 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-E) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in five areas and provided nine recommendations (11 items) to bring the 327 Building into compliance. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 327 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A and IUD 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

Implementation Plan for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains details regarding the planned implementation of the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory at the INL.

Not Listed

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Implementation Plan Template | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department-2023 Idaho4FuelImplementation Plan Template

47

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

324 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 324 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWHC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in six areas and provided 20 recommendations to bring the 324 Building into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A. Additionally, one observation was provided. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. The actions for recommendations associated with the safety related part of the 324 Building and operation of the cells and support areas were evaluated using the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 324 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A and RLID 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1994--November 9, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environment, safety, and health regulatory implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify, document, and maintain the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s environment, safety, and health (ES&H) regulatory requirements, the US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office tasked the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to develop a regulatory operating envelope for the UMTRA Project. The system selected for managing the UMTRA regulatory operating envelope data bass is based on the Integrated Project Control/Regulatory Compliance System (IPC/RCS) developed by WASTREN, Inc. (WASTREN, 1993). The IPC/RCS is a tool used for identifying regulatory and institutional requirements and indexing them to hardware, personnel, and program systems on a project. The IPC/RCS will be customized for the UMTRA Project surface remedial action and groundwater restoration programs. The purpose of this plan is to establish the process for implementing and maintaining the UMTRA Project`s regulatory operating envelope, which involves identifying all applicable regulatory and institutional requirements and determining compliance status. The plan describes how the Project will identify ES&H regulatory requirements, analyze applicability to the UMTRA Project, and evaluate UMTRA Project compliance status.

Not Available

1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Re: Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy Re: Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications...

52

State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Efficiency...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

More Documents & Publications State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study;...

53

Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Privacy Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy The United States Telecom Association...

54

Maintenance Implementation Plan for B Plant. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is to describe how the B Plant will implement the requirements established by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, ``Nuclear Facilities`` (DOE 1990). The plan provides a blueprint for a disciplined approach to implementation and compliance. Each element of the order is prioritized, categorized, and then placed into one of three phases for implementation.

Tritt, S.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Westinghouse Hanford Company Pollution Prevention Program Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan documents Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) Pollution Prevention (P2) (formerly Waste Minimization) program. The program includes WHC; BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR); and ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). The plan specifies P2 program activities and schedules for implementing the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness (WMin/P2) Program Plan requirements (DOE 1994a). It is intended to satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other legal requirements that are discussed in both the Hanford Site WMin/P2 plan and paragraph C of this plan. As such, the Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988) is included in the WHC P2 program. WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH are committed to implementing an effective P2 program as identified in the Hanford Site WMin/P2 Plan. This plan provides specific information on how the WHC P2 program will develop and implement the goals, activities, and budget needed to accomplish this. The emphasis has been to provide detailed planning of the WHC P2 program activities over the next 3 years. The plan will guide the development and implementation of the program. The plan also provides background information on past program activities. Because the plan contains greater detail than in the past, activity scope and implementation schedules may change as new priorities are identified and new approaches are developed and realized. Some activities will be accelerated, others may be delayed; however, all of the general program elements identified in this plan and contractor requirements identified in the Site WMin/P2 plan will be developed and implemented during the next 3 years. This plan applies to all WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH organizations and subcontractors. It will be distributed to those with defined responsibilities in this plan; and the policy, goals, objectives, and strategy of the program will be communicated to all WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH employees.

Floyd, B.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SB 375 IMPLEMENTATION: FROM PLAN TO REALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Cross-Agency Facilitation and Coordination Funding and Support for Sustainable Communities sustainable communities in a post-SB 375 world. · Urban Greening: $41.5 million in capital projects and plans Planning - Guidance documents - Metrics and indicators - Connecting dots across state agencies - Building

California at Davis, University of

58

Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF). Maintenance Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Maintenance Implementation Plan has been developed for maintenance functions associated with the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF). This plan is developed from the guidelines presented by Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program (DOE 1990), Chapter II. The objective of this plan is to provide baseline information for establishing and identifying WHC conformance programs and policies applicable to implementation of DOE order 4330.4A guidelines. In addition, this maintenance plan identifies the actions necessary to develop a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program at WSCF.

Bozich, J.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Designing and Implementing Effective Performance Assurance Plans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentationgiven at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting covers performance assurance planning and process, including performance-based contracts, and measurement and verification protocols.

60

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WV DoE-NRCCE-APERC DRAFT February 16, 2009 1 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Customer Complaints to WV PSC about Electric Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

State Waste Discharge Permit ST-4502 Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plan has been developed to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements set forth in Permit ST-3502 and as a line management tool for use in maintaining configuration control of permit as well as documentation used to implement permit requirements.

BROWN, M.J.; LECLAIR, M.D.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1991--November 9, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program,'' established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter 3 of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Field Office, Nevada (DOE/NV) has prepared this second annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Operations (AMO), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions. 7 figs.

Latham, A.R.; Evans, R.B.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Strategic Planning and Implementation National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategic Planning and Implementation James Ohi National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd producers, regional and state agencies, research institutes, and federal agencies provided information about scenario planning was presented at the World Hydrogen Energy Conference (WHEC) in June. The scenario

64

CDKN-CARICOM-Trinidad and Tobago-A Regional Implementation Plan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Regional Implementation Plan for...

65

Plans, Implementation, and Results | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and ModelingPinkand Results Plans,

66

Implementing Strategic Environmental Assessment of spatial planning tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After more than a decade from the publication of the European Directive 2001/42/CE (Directive) on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), the design and construction of the interested spatial planning instruments has gone through a variety of changes and integrations in European and in world states. This inhomogeneous panorama can be explained with a pattern of institutional structures that have so far affected the implementation of the Directive. The aim of this paper is to investigate the level of implementation of the Directive in Italy by developing a comparative analysis of the quality of integration of SEA within the design of the spatial coordination plan of a set of Italian provinces. Italian practice is analyzed in the framework of a comparative study of worldwide SEA implementation within spatial and land use planning. The results reveal strengths and weaknesses in SEA implementation at the provincial level and, in particular, the emergence of critical areas of research concerning institutional context, public participation, monitoring, and observatory of the spatial transformations. -- Highlights: This is a comparative analysis of SEA in strategic spatial planning in Italy. The adhesion of Provinces to the study is remarkable. SEA implementation and integration into spatial planning is still moderate. Participation via consultations should be more widespread. Monitoring and institution of observatories are still in an infancy stage.

De Montis, Andrea, E-mail: andreadm@uniss.it

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) supports achievement of the overarching mission and objectives of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Technologies Program The implementation plan begins with the assumption of target dates that are set out in the January 2013 DOE Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (http://energy.gov/downloads/strategy-management-and-disposal-used-nuclear-fuel-and-high-level-radioactive-waste). These target dates and goals are summarized in section III. This implementation plan will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to progress in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign and the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program.

Jens Birkholzer; Robert MacKinnon; Kevin McMahon; Sylvia Saltzstein; Ken Sorenson; Peter Swift

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High performance computing and communications: FY 1996 implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. Twelve federal agencies, in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and research laboratories, have developed the Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1995 and FY 1996. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

NONE

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

School Open Access Implementation Plan with Risk Register  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a draft School Implementation Plan for Open Access in the post-2014 REF. This draft is tailored for a School in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and is reproduced here as an example only, as part of the Jisc-funded LOCH...

McMahon, Jacqueline

2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

3 April 2002 1 GPM Draft Science Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 April 2002 1 GPM Draft Science Implementation Plan Ground Validation Chapter S. Yuter, R. Houze ratio qa ­ aggregate mixing ratio qg ­ graupel mixing ratio qh ­ hail mixing ratio #12;3 April 2002 2 1...................................................................................... 16 3.2 Focused Measurement Programs

Yuter, Sandra

72

High performance computing and communications: FY 1995 implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally established following passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991 signed on December 9, 1991. Ten federal agencies in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and laboratories have developed the HPCC Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1994 and FY 1995. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency. Although the Department of Education is an official HPCC agency, its current funding and reporting of crosscut activities goes through the Committee on Education and Health Resources, not the HPCC Program. For this reason the Implementation Plan covers nine HPCC agencies.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

How does the public process impact the selection of a nuisance wildlife management plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the 1950s the human relationship with wildlife in the United States shifted dramatically; from primarily consumptive to primarily recreational. Over the same time period a trend of humans moving into suburban communities ...

Siegel, Julianne (Julianne Susan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Oil program implementation plan FY 1996--2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reaffirms the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy commitment to implement the National Oil Research Program in a way to maximize assurance of energy security, economic growth, environmental protection, jobs, improved economic competitiveness, and improved US balance of trade. There are two sections and an appendix in this document. Section 1 is background information that guided its formulation and a summary of the Oil Program Implementation Plan. This summary includes mission statements, major program drivers, oil issues and trends, budget issues, customers/stakeholders, technology transfer, measures of program effectiveness, and benefits. Section 2 contains more detailed program descriptions for the eight technical areas and the NIPER infrastructure. The eight technical areas are reservoir characterization; extraction research; exploration, drilling, and risk-based decision management; analysis and planning; technology transfer; field demonstration projects; oil downstream operations; and environmental research. Each description contains an overview of the program, descriptions on main areas, a discussion of stakeholders, impacts, planned budget projections, projected schedules with Gantt charts, and measures of effectiveness. The appendix is a summary of comments from industry on an earlier draft of the plan. Although changes were made in response to the comments, many of the suggestions will be used as guidance for the FY 1997--2001 plan.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Westinghouse Hanford Company quality assurance program and implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first revision of the Quality AssurancePlan/Implementation Plan (QAP/IP) for nuclear facilities managedand operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC).Development of the initial IP required review of the WHC qualityassurance program to the requirements of the 10 CFR 830.120, andcompletion of initial baseline assessments against the QAP toverify implementation of the program. Each WHC-managed nuclearfacility provided a stand-alone section to the QAP/IP, describingits mission and life-cycle status. WHC support organizationsalso performed assessments for their lead areas, and providedinputs to a separate stand-alone section with the initialbaseline assessment results. In this first revision, the initialbaseline matrixes for those facilities found to be in compliancewith the QAP have been removed. Tank Waste Remediation System(TWRS) and K Basins have modified their baseline matrixes to showcompletion of action items to date. With the followingexceptions, the WHC-managed nuclear facilities and their supportorganizations were found to have implemented QA programs thatsatisfy the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120. TWRS identifiedImplementation Plan Action Items having to do with: generationand revision of as-built drawings; updating TWRS organizationaland program documents; tracking the condition/age ofmaterials/equipment; and reconstitution of design bases forexisting, active facilities. No incremental funding needs wereidentified for FY95. For FY97, TWRS identified incrementalfunding in the amount of $65,000 for as-built drawings, and$100,000 for tracking the age/condition of materials/equipment.The K Basin Fuel Storage Facility identified Implementation PlanAction Items having to do with: training; updating procedures;establishing configuration management; reconstituting designbases; and providing darwings; and developing integrated,resource-loaded schedules. Incremental funding needs in theamount of $1.7 million were identified, over a time periodthrough March 1996, to implement the actions. The costs were allassociated with the actions on training ($300K) and configurationmanagement, design bases, and drawings ($1.4M). Schedulardetails and compensatory measures for the action items areprovided in Appendices A and D to this document.

Moss, S.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

78

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

Vollmer, A.T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

In situ vitrification model development and implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Analysis Package being developed at the INEL to provide analytical support for (ISV) safety analysis and treatment performance predictions. Mathematical models and features which comprise this analysis package are presented and the proposed approach to model development and implementation is outlined. The objective of this document is two fold: to define preliminary design information and modeling objectives so that ISV modeling personnel can effectively modify existing models and formulate new models which are consistent with the objectives of the ISV treatability study and to provide sufficient technical information for internal and external reviewers to detect any shortcomings in model development and implementation plans. 27 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.; Hagrman, D.L.; Slater, C.E.; Marwil, E.S.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Chapter 3, paragraph 2). The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1992, through November 8, 1993. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Implementation Plan, 29 Recommendations of the Protective Force Career  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department-2023 Idaho4FuelImplementation PlanOptions

83

Idaho National Laboratory Site Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has established long-term stewardship programs to protect human health and the environment at sites where residual contamination remains after site cleanup. At the Idaho National Laboratory Site, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERLA) long-term stewardship activities performed under the aegis of regulatory agreements, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for the Idaho National Laboratory, and state and federal requirements are administered primarily under the direction of the Idaho Cleanup Project. It represents a subset of all on-going environmental activity at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. This plan provides a listing of applicable CERCLA long-term stewardship requirements and their planned and completed implementation goals. It proffers the Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Data Warehouse for Sitewide management of environmental data. This plan will be updated as needed over time, based on input from the U.S. Department of Energy, its cognizant subcontractors, and other local and regional stakeholders.

B. E. Olaveson

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) (DOE, 1993a), which was developed using US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C quality assurance (QA) criteria. The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. All QA issues in the QAIP shall comply with requirements contained in the TAC QAPP (DOE, 1933a). Because industry standards for data acquisition and data control are not addressed in DOE Order 5700.6C, the QAIP has been formatted to the 14 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) QA requirements. DOE Order 5700.6C criteria that are not contained in the CERCLA requirements are added to the QAIP as additional requirements in Sections 15.0 through 18.0. Project documents that contain CERCLA requirements and 5700.6 criteria shall be referenced in this document to avoid duplication. Referenced documents are not included in this QAIP but are available through the UMTRA Project Document Control Center.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Y-12 Site environmental protection program implementation plan (EPPIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Environmental Protection Program is conducted to: (1) protect public health and the environment from chemical and radiological releases occurring from current plant operations and past waste management and operational practices; (2) ensure compliance with federal, state, and local environmental regulations and DOE directives; (3) identify potential environmental problems; (4) evaluate existing environmental contamination and determine the need for remedial actions and mitigative measures; (5) monitor the progress of ongoing remedial actions and cleanup measures; and (6) inform the public of environmental issues relating to DOE operations. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, defines the general requirements for environmental protection programs at DOE facilities. This Environmental Protection Program Implementation Plan (EPPIP) defines the methods by which the Y-12 Plant staff will comply with the order by: (1) referencing environmental protection goals and objectives and identifying strategies and timetables for attaining them; (2) providing the overall framework for the design and implementation of the Y-12 Environmental Protection Program; and (3) assigning responsibilities for complying with the requirements of the order. The EPPIP is revised and updated annually.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Status Update on Action 2a: Implementation Handbook for Activity-level Work Planning and Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by James Winter, NA-00-10. DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-Level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities. Project Justification Statement submitted 1-29-13, with focus upon improved implementation of WP&C and activity-level work. Provides the background, project plan, and key elements of a new DOE handbook on implementing activity-level work planning and control at DOE nuclear facilities.

87

Question & Answer with Heather Harward: H2O4Texas Coalition promotes state water plan implementations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are conducting a statewide public education and awareness campaign hoping to invigorate Question & Answer with Heather Harward H#31;O#30;TEXAS Coalition promotes state water plan implementation 2 Texans at the grassroots and get them energized about... implementation of the plan, we need to get Texans energized about the state water plan and calling for implementation. Having the backing of Texans is important to a Legislature that will ultimately make the decision. Q: How many partners are currently...

Kalisek, Danielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

TxDOT Best Practices Model and Implementation Guide for Advance Planning Risk Analysis for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0-5478-P2 TxDOT Best Practices Model and Implementation Guide for Advance Planning Risk Analysis?....................................................................................................1 1.2 Advance Planning Risk Analysis...........................................................................................................11 3.4 Philosophy of Use

Texas at Austin, University of

89

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Wildlife Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Services, part of Texas Cooperative Extension, is an agency created to assist the public in managing the problems sometimes caused by wildlife. Its objectives are to protect wildlife, crops, livestock, property and human health...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Re: NBP RFI-Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy Re: NBP RFI-Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the...

92

Implementation Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan- February 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities for implementing energy efficiency measures and practices in homes, as identified by the Building America Implementation Standing Technical Committee.

93

Maintenance implementation plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located at the Hanford site at Richland, Washington. This MIP describes the PFP maintenance program relative to DOE order 4330.4B. The MIP defines the key actions needed to meet the guidelines of the Order to produce a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program. A previous report identified the presence of significant quantities of Pu-bearing materials within PFP that pose risks to workers. PFP`s current mission is to develop, install and operate processes which will mitigate these risks. The PFP Maintenance strategy is to equip the facility with systems and equipment able to sustain scheduled PFP operations. The current operating run is scheduled to last seven years. Activities following the stabilization operation will involve an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine future plant activities. This strategy includes long-term maintenance of the facility for safe occupancy and material storage. The PFP maintenance staff used the graded approach to dictate the priorities of the improvement and upgrade actions identified in Chapter 2 of this document. The MIP documents PFP compliance to the DOE 4330.4B Order. Chapter 2 of the MIP follows the format of the Order in addressing the eighteen elements. As this revision is a total rewrite, no sidebars are included to highlight changes.

Meldrom, C.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Implementation plan for WRAP Module 1 operational readiness review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP 1) will be used to receive, sample, treat, and ship contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW) to storage and disposal sites both on the Hanford site and off-site. The primary mission of WRAP 1 is to characterize and certify CH waste in 55-gallon and 85-gallon drums; and its secondary function is to certify CH waste standard waste boxes (SWB) and boxes of similar size for disposal. The WRAP 1 will provide the capability for examination (including x-ray, visual, and contents sampling), limited treatment, repackaging, and certification of CH suspect-TRU waste in 55-gallon drums retrieved from storage, as well as newly generated CH LLW and CH TRU waste drums. The WRAP 1 will also provide examination (X-ray and visual only) and certification of CH LLW and CH TRU waste in small boxes. The decision to perform an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was made in accordance with WHC-CM-5-34, Solid Waste Disposal Operations Administration, Section 1.4, Operational Readiness Activities. The ORR will ensure plant and equipment readiness, management and personnel readiness, and management programs readiness for the initial startup of the facility. This implementation plan is provided for defining the conduct of the WHC ORR.

Irons, L.G.

1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

95

Plan for the Future How Local Governments Can Help Implement California's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plan for the Future How Local Governments Can Help Implement California's New Land Use and Climate, and Janill Richards of the California Attorney General's Of- fice for helping to edit this report@law.berkeley.edu or (510) 643- 3701. Plan for the Future: How Local Governments Can Help Implement California's New Land

Kammen, Daniel M.

96

Technical Implementation Plan for the ShakeAlert Production System--An Earthquake Early Warning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Implementation Plan for the ShakeAlert Production System--An Earthquake Early Warning.scec.org/terashake). #12;Technical Implementation Plan for the ShakeAlert Production System--An Earthquake Early Warning for the ShakeAlert production system--An Earthquake Early Warning system for the West Coast of the United States

Allen, Richard M.

97

Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan 1 Table.......................................................................................Page 8 #12;Bishop's University "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Implementation Plan 2 Introduction: The "Think Global, Drink Local" Bottled Water Free Campaign, a student run initiative, has been

98

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QA Program, the applicable QA requirements, and the responsibility for the implementationQA capability as determined by evaluation of the facilities and implementation of the QA program.QA personnel and having line authority for the implementation of the QA program.

Albert editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

High performance computing and communications: FY 1997 implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage, with bipartisan support, of the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. The original Program, in which eight Federal agencies participated, has now grown to twelve agencies. This Plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` FY 1996 HPCC accomplishments and FY 1997 HPCC plans. Section 3 of this Plan provides an overview of the HPCC Program. Section 4 contains more detailed definitions of the Program Component Areas, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each PCA. Appendix A provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Used fuel disposition campaign international activities implementation plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT), is responsible for conducting research and development pertaining to the management of these materials in the U.S. Cooperation and collaboration with other countries would be beneficial to both the U.S. and other countries through information exchange and a broader participation of experts in the field. U.S. participation in international UNF and HLW exchanges leads to safe management of nuclear materials, increased security through global oversight, and protection of the environment worldwide. Such interactions offer the opportunity to develop consensus on policy, scientific, and technical approaches. Dialogue to address common technical issues helps develop an internationally recognized foundation of sound science, benefiting the U.S. and participating countries. The UNF and HLW management programs in nuclear countries are at different levels of maturity. All countries utilizing nuclear power must store UNF, mostly in wet storage, and HLW for those countries that reprocess UNF. Several countries either utilize or plan to utilize dry storage systems for UNF, perhaps for long periods of time (several decades). Geologic disposal programs are at various different states, ranging from essentially 'no progress' to selected sites and pending license applications to regulators. The table below summarizes the status of UNF and HLW management programs in several countriesa. Thus, the opportunity exists to collaborate at different levels ranging from providing expertise to those countries 'behind' the U.S. to obtaining access to information and expertise from those countries with more mature programs. The U.S. fuel cycle is a once through fuel cycle involving the direct disposal of UNF, as spent nuclear fuel, in a geologic repository (previously identified at Yucca Mountain, Nevada), following at most a few decades of storage (wet and dry). The geology at Yucca Mountain, unsaturated tuff, is unique among all countries investigating the disposal of UNF and HLW. The decision by the U.S. Department of Energy to no longer pursue the disposal of UNF at Yucca Mountain and possibly utilize very long term storage (approaching 100 years or more) while evaluating future fuel cycle alternatives for managing UNF, presents a different UNF and HLW management R&D portfolio that has been pursued in the U.S. In addition, the research and development activities managed by OCRWM have been transferred to DOE-NE. This requires a reconsideration of how the UFDC will engage in cooperative and collaborative activities with other countries. This report presents the UFDC implementation plan for international activities. The DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has cooperated and collaborated with other countries in many different 'arenas' including the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and through bilateral agreements with other countries. These international activities benefited OCRWM through the acquisition and exchange of information, database development, and peer reviews by experts from other countries. DOE-NE cooperates and collaborates with other countries in similar 'arenas' with similar objectives and realizing similar benefits. However the DOE-NE focus has not typically been in the area of UNF and HLW management. This report will first summarize these recent cooperative and collaborative activities. The manner that the UFDC will cooperate and collaborate in the future is expected to change as R&D is conducted regarding long-term storage and the potential disposal of UNF and HLW in different geolo

Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

that Govern Activity-level Work Developing Good Practices and Lessons Learned Linking Safety Culture and the Effectiveness of WP&C Practices DOE Handbook: Implementing...

103

Teachers' conceptions of the nature of science: their impact on the planned implementation of mandated curriculum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study explores the effect of teachers' conceptions of the nature of science on the planned implementation of a mandated curriculum. I used naturalistic and qualitative methods to address three research questions: To what extent do teachers...

Travis, Moreen K.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

PROCEDURES FOR ESTABLISHING OR CHANGING IMPLEMENTATION PLANS FOR THE CULTURAL DIVERSITY REQUIREMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEDURES FOR ESTABLISHING OR CHANGING IMPLEMENTATION PLANS FOR THE CULTURAL DIVERSITY REQUIREMENT with a post baccalaureate program is encouraged, using its own procedures, to evaluate the adequacy of those

Arnold, Jonathan

105

Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control are applicable to any stationary source that has the potential to emit any federally regulated air pollutant. The...

106

DOE Nevada Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1993--November 9, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this fourth annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Security, & Health (AMESSH), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

Elle, D.R. [USDOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Proposed Specifications for Implementation of Fifth Power Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial Buildings October 13, 2006 #12;Overview The Northwest Power and Conservation Council seeks comment commercial buildings adopted in the Fifth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Plan. Description in commercial buildings was the most important factor for inclusion. Both efficiency level and breadth of scope

109

Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and LaunchesRelated FinancialUtility DistrictAssistancePlanning

110

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation- Project Final Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1980 a s outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994.Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOEEA-1023)...

111

Federal Renewable Energy Project Planning and Implementation | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrialEnergy FederalFLASHof Energy Planning and

112

Program Plans, Implementation, and Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment of Energy 2:52pm Addthis InAbout » Program Plans,

113

Re: Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergy 0611__Joint_DOE_GoJ_AMS_Data_v3.pptx More Documents &DOE.FTrans-AtlanticPlan

114

Re: Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergy 0611__Joint_DOE_GoJ_AMS_Data_v3.pptx More Documents &DOE.FTrans-AtlanticPlanRequirements

115

Performance improvement plan use in implementing conduct of operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Processing and Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Divisions (NMPD/WMER) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) operate nineteen individual facilities at Savannah River Site (SRS). These facilities produce the fuel and target assemblies for the SRS Reactors: extract Tritium, Plutonium, Uranium and other isotopes from the irradiated fuel and targets; safely store the radioactive waste from ongoing operations; and encapsulate the waste in a final waste form for long term disposal. Continuous improvement in the operation of all facilities and in the conduct of business at SRS is the goal embodied in the NMPD/WMER Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) discussed in this document. The NMPD/WMER PIP is the mechanism used to establish a basis for operations that will lead to achievement of a performance level that will meet or exceed the standards developed and used in the commercial nuclear power industry.

Baumhardt, R.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Performance improvement plan use in implementing conduct of operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Processing and Waste Management and Environmental Restoration Divisions (NMPD/WMER) of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) operate nineteen individual facilities at Savannah River Site (SRS). These facilities produce the fuel and target assemblies for the SRS Reactors: extract Tritium, Plutonium, Uranium and other isotopes from the irradiated fuel and targets; safely store the radioactive waste from ongoing operations; and encapsulate the waste in a final waste form for long term disposal. Continuous improvement in the operation of all facilities and in the conduct of business at SRS is the goal embodied in the NMPD/WMER Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) discussed in this document. The NMPD/WMER PIP is the mechanism used to establish a basis for operations that will lead to achievement of a performance level that will meet or exceed the standards developed and used in the commercial nuclear power industry.

Baumhardt, R.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Staff summary of Issues and Recommendations Priorities, Funding allocation, In-lieu and other Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(but not limited to) toxic contaminants, operational and secondary losses for wildlife, transmission in regional recovery plans or develop implementation plans that are integrated with recovery plans. 2 providing adequate funding for the area above Wells Dam in order to close the largest ESA gap for recovery

118

Implementation Plan: Jasper Management Prestart Review (Surrogate Material Experiments)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Able Site is located 24 km northwest of Mercury on the Nevada Test Site. The Nevada Test Site is approximately 105 km northwest of Las Vegas, NV. Major facilities at Able Site include Buildings 5100,5180, and 5191. Significant external interfaces for the JASPER site include the electrical system, wastewater system, communications systems, and water supply system, which provides both potable and fire-protection water. Support services, which are provided on the Nevada Test Site, include medical, emergency response (NTS Fire Department), radiation protection, industrial hygiene, and waste management. Although JASPER will ultimately be used for actinide research, the start-up process requires system demonstration using surrogates in place of the actinide targets. LLNL Nevada Experiments and Operations (N) Program has established a Management Prestart Review (MPR) team to determine the readiness of the JASPER personnel and facilities to initiate surrogate-material experiments. A second MPR will be conducted before actinide experiments are executed. This document addresses implementation requirements for only the first MPR. This first review coincides with the completion of authorization-basis documents and physical subsystems, which have undergone appropriate formal engineering design reviews. This MPR will affirm the quality of those reviews, their findings/resolutions, and will look most closely at systems integration requirements and demonstrations that will have undergone technical acceptance reviews before this formal MPR action. Closure of MPR findings will finalize requirements for a DOE/NV Real Estate/Operations Permit (REOP) for surrogate-material experiments. Upon completion of that experiment series and the establishment of capabilities for incorporating special nuclear material (SNM) into future experiments, the team will convene again as part of the process of authorizing those activities. A summary of the review schedule is provided.

Cooper, W.E.

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Lessons Learned at the Nevada National Security Site Implementing the EFCOG Activity-level Work Planning and Control Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Steele Coddington, Work Planning Manager, National Security Technologies, Nevada National Security Site. Lessons Learned Implementing Work Planning & Control. 6 Step Process for improving WP&C.

120

Design and implementation of a financial planning and tracking system for the Nova Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nova project is a 185 million dollar DOE funded project to build an experimental facility to demonstrate the thermonuclear ignition of laser fusion targets. This paper describes the design and implementation considerations for the project's computerized performance measurement financial planning and tracking system and critiques its actual operation.

Holcomb, F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The International Plan of Action for Sharks: How does national implementation measure up?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the original FAO guidelines. For comprehensiveness, additional management and conservation measures for sharksThe International Plan of Action for Sharks: How does national implementation measure up? Brendal a greater need for effective conservation measures. In 1999 the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO

Myers, Ransom A.

122

Bicycle Urbanism Symposium -Program at a glance -Updated June 12, 2013 Advocacy, Planning and Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bicycle Urbanism Symposium - Program at a glance - Updated June 12, 2013 General Theme Advocacy, Planning and Implementation in the Puget Sound The Global Experience + Bicycle Cities of the Future Promoting Bicycling Rider Education / Crunching Numbers: Analyzing and Applying Cycling Data | Panels

Hochberg, Michael

123

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP`s disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) experienced a devastating accident. This accident left much of the plant and its safety systems destroyed with widespread radioactive waste contamination from the damaged nuclear fuel. In the 6 months following the accident, heroic measures were taken to stabilize the situation and erect a temporary confinement shelter over the damaged unit 4. Since that time the shelter and the contained radioactive materials and debris have begun to deteriorate. Lack of funding and staff has allowed only minor improvements to occur on-site, resulting in an existing shelter that is unstable and deteriorating. International aid has been provided to develop a comprehensive plan for the safe and environmentally sound conversion of the damaged Chernobyl reactor. These efforts are being performed in conjunction with US experts, European experts, and local Chernobyl NPP personnel. This plan is discussed here.

Johnson, W. [Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, Richland, WA (United States); Kreid, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); DeFranco, W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Implementation Plan for the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Long-Range Deep Vadose Zone Program Plan was published in October 2010. It summarized the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) state-of-knowledge about the contaminant remediation challenges facing the deep vadose zone (DVZ) beneath the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site and their approach to solving those challenges. Developing an implementation plan is the next step to address the knowledge and capabilities required to solve DVZ challenges when needed. This multi-year plan (FY-11 through FY-20) identifies the short to long-term research, management, and execution plans required to solve those problems facing the DVZ-Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The schedule supporting implementation overlies existing activities and milestones from Hanfords DOE-Environmental Management (EM) end-user projects. Success relies upon multi-project teams focused on coordinated subsurface projects undertaken across the DOE Complex combined with facilitated, problem-focused, research investments implemented through the DVZ-AFRC.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gephart, Roy E.; Triplett, Mark B.; Johnson, Timothy C.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 5, Chemical management, pollution prevention and other compliance programs. Draft revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance with environmental regulations and US Department of Energy Orders (DOE) relating to environmental protection is an important part of SRS`s program. Over the past few years, the number of environmental regulations has increased. The strategy to comply with new and existing environmental regulations and DOE orders is described in chapter two. In this chapter, the following environmental programs are described: Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA); and SPCC/BMP/Pollution Prevention Plans;The implementation section identifies issues and those responsible to achieve defined objectives.

Peterson, G.L. [comp.

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

The case for using weight-of-evidence demonstrations in state implementation planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to move beyond the current approach of relying heavily on modeling for air quality analyses, the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee's Air Quality Management Workgroup recently recommended that 'weight-of-evidence' demonstrations be used for state implementation planning purposes. This article discusses the workgroup's recommendation and illustrates how such demonstrations can be used to provide comprehensive air quality assessments. 11 refs., 1 tab.

Michael Koerber; Donna Kenski [Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium in Des Plaines, IL (US)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

Bibb, E.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Quality assurance of HDR prostate plans: Program implementation at a community hospital  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is currently the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the United States, and the second leading cause of cancer mortality. The utilization of radiation therapy is regarded as the definitive local therapy of choice for intermediate- and high-risk disease, in which there is increased risk for extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or regional node involvement. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a logical treatment modality to deliver the boost dose to an external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) treatment to increase local control rates. From a treatment perspective, the utilization of a complicated treatment delivery system, the compressed time frame in which the procedure is performed, and the small number of large dose fractions make the implementation of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program imperative. One aspect of this program is the QA of the HDR treatment plan. Review of regulatory and medical physics professional publications shows that substantial general guidance is available. We provide some insight to the implementation of an HDR prostate plan program at a community hospital. One aspect addressed is the utilization of the low-dose-rate (LDR) planning system and the use of existing ultrasound image sets to familiarize the radiation therapy team with respect to acceptable HDR implant geometries. Additionally, the use of the LDR treatment planning system provided a means to prospectively determine the relationship between the treated isodose volume and the product of activity and time for the department's planning protocol prior to the first HDR implant. For the first 12 HDR prostate implants, the root-mean-square (RMS) deviation was 3.05% between the predicted product of activity and time vs. the actual plan values. Retrospective re-evaluation of the actual implant data reduced the RMS deviation to 2.36%.

Rush, Jennifer B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, High Point Regional Hospital, High Point, NC (United States); Thomas, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, High Point Regional Hospital, High Point, NC (United States)]. E-mail: mthomas@hprhs.com

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Implementation Plan for the Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Knowledge Management (KM) Program is to capture, share, disseminate, and ensure the ability to apply the knowledge created by the major nuclear energy Research and Development (R&D) programs. In support of the KM program, the Implementation Plan for the Office of NE KM Program outlines the knowledge management and distributed data environment that is required for its success. In addition to enumerating some strategic goals and objectives, this document characterizes the initial program and identifies computer-based areas of investment required for increased knowledge sharing and collaboration. It identifies and addresses investments already in existence and describes how these investments can be further enhanced and implemented to support a distributed KM program. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is leading the effort to identify and address these investments through the implementation of a distributed KM program that includes participants from ten of the major DOE national laboratories.

Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Maintenance implementation plan for the B Plant/WESF. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) has been developed for maintenance functions associated with the B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility) complex. The objective of this plan is to provide baseline information for establishing and identifying WHC conformance programs and policies applicable to implementation of DOE order 4330.4B guidelines. In addition, this maintenance plan identifies the actions necessary to develop a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program at B Plant/WESF. The B Plant WESF facility complex consists of three main facilities and several support structures located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford site. B Plant is a transition facility that is required to ensure safe storage and management of WESF (operating facility) cesium and strontium capsules. B Plant/WESF also contains substantial radiological inventory from previous campaigns. There are no production activities at B Plant, but several of its operating systems are required to accomplish the current B Plant/WESF mission. B Plant/WESF are each considered a nuclear facility due to the storage of cesium and strontium capsules at WESF and the large radiological inventory from past processing.

Tritt, S.E.; Lueck, B.H.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Walleye Smallmouth bass Northern pike Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12; At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control Implement

134

DOE and FERC Jointly Submit Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response to Congress  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) jointly submitted to Congress a required Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response.

135

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

136

UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

FY2010 2018 Fish and Wildlife Program Project Solicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idaho Wildlife Mitigation-Middle Snake #12;2 A. Abstract The Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation project (SIWM) of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) proposes implementation of wildlife mitigation and/or scientific background In both the Mid and Upper Snake Provinces, human development

138

UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

SRS ES and H Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. The purpose of this Implementation Plan is to define the single program for all sitewide and facility 90-2 ES and H Standards Compliance efforts, which will satisfy the HQ Implementation Plan, avoid duplicate efforts, be as simple and achievable as possible, include cost-saving innovations, use a graded approach based on facility hazards and future needs of facilities, and support configuration control for facility requirements. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designated a pilot facility for the 90-2 program and has progressed with their facility program ahead of the site-level program. The DWPF, and other Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facilities that progress on an enhanced schedule, will serve as pilot facilities for the site-level program. The lessons learned with their requirement identifications, and their assessments of the adequacy of and their compliance with these requirements will be used to improve the efficiency of the site-level and subsequent programs.

Hearn, W.H.

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

Ian Mckirdy

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fish and Wildlife Administrator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

142

Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Implementation of UMTRA Project Environmental Audit Action Plan status report for period ending September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the status of implementation of corrective actions for findings made in an Environmental Audit conducted by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environmental Audit, in June 1991. An Action Plan, dated December 1991, was developed to address the findings. The Action Plan was approved by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, in July 1992. This report provides status for each activity listed in the approved Action Plan. Of 48 findings identified in the August 1991 Environmental Audit Report, 4 required no action, 5 were combined with others and actions to correct 19 are complete. Although it appears no progress has been made since the last status report was issued, UMTRA has completed 89% of the findings identified, compared to 72% identified in the last status report. The table below lists the 20 findings where actions are still underway, the current projected completion date, the organization(s) responsible for taking action on the finding, and the UMTRA Project Off ice staff member assigned responsibility for the finding.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Wildlife Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP SignInWho do IWhyWhy:Wildlife

145

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wildlife Biology Graduate Schools University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program: Wildlife Biology http://www.bw.uaf.edu/ University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Wildlife://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ProspectiveStudents/degrees.htm Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Programs: Wildlife Fisheries Biology http

147

Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore Environmental Protection Implementation Plan for the period November 9, 1991--November 9, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, as part of the DOE complex, is committed to full compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations. This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL, Livermore. The EPIP will serve as an aid to management and staff to implement these new programs in a timely manner. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A study to determine if in-depth professional development provided to extension educators on program development has an effect on planning, implementing, and evaluating extension educational programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academy,� was designed and implemented from May 2006 to November 2006 to provide early to mid-career Extension educators with comprehensive instruction related to program planning, program implementation and evaluation and interpretation. A Pre...

Dromgoole, Darrell Allen

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

NSF final project report planning and implementation of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conducted planning and implementation of ocean carbon dioxide hydrographic surveys ocean process studies, time-series studies of Bermuda and Hawaii, and sponsored scientific workshops for those activities.

Livingston, Hugh D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes_020312  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRO: Professional Record Online G:\\IR\\PRO\\Implementation Plan\\SC\\PRO Steering Committee Minutes in their work. The data entry team searched for photos/videos of music faculty online and found a few about PRO and will use the PRO website user guide and FAQs to respond to questions. Returning

151

A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented through Water Quality Management Plans (WQMPs; Best management practices Software availability Name of the software: Soil and Water Assessment Tool. doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.05.013 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft Environmental Modelling & Software

152

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

153

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

154

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

155

Tank waste remediation system privatization phase I infrastructure and project W-519 and QA implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to identify the quality requirements for all products/activities developed by or for Project W-519. This plan is responsive to the Numatec Hanford Corporation, Quality Assurance Program Plan, NHC-MP-001.

HUSTON, J.J.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan: November 9, 1993, to November 9, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hub of today`s programs at the Hanford Site are activities dedicated to managing stored and new wastes and cleanup of waste sites. To ensure focused planning and implementing efforts for these programs, management of the site is assigned to DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This report describes policies and procedures in the following areas: Compliance activities; Environmental restoration; Waste management; and Technology development. Procedures for notification of environmental occurrences, long-range environmental protection planning and reporting, waste management programs; environmental monitoring programs, and quality assurance and data verification are also described and discussed.

NONE

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Greening the Department of Energy through waste prevention, recycling, and Federal acquisition. Strategic plan to implement Executive Order 13101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Plan provides strategies and milestones to implement Executive Order 13101, Greening the Government Through Waste Prevention, Recycling, and Federal Acquisition, and to achieve the new Secretarial goals for 2005 and 2010. It serves as the principal Secretarial guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Field Offices, and laboratory and contractor staff to improve sanitary waste prevention, recycling, and the purchase and use of recycled content and environmentally preferable products and services in the DOE.

None

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - abu wildlife sanctuary Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FORESTRY SECTOR IN GHANA Ben N. Donkor Summary: wildlife sanctuaries and one strict nature reserve (Figure 1.7). Management plans based on biological... and sociological surveys...

159

Implementation Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 1 The SLP System: An Implementation.09.2002 The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 4 SLP Interpreter (1) Negation Semantics Brass Dagstuhl, 16.09.2002 #12; The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 5 SLP

Brass, Stefan

160

Implementation Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 1 The SLP System: An Implementation: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 2 Super Logic Programs (1) #15; Arbitrarily nested propositional: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 3 Super Logic Programs (2) #15; Default negation can be used only

Brass, Stefan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improving supply chain performance by implementing weekly demand planning processes in the consumer packaged goods industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines how simple weekly demand planning process can improve inventory levels and customers service levels at the Gillette Company. The processes designed by the project team has been tested and executed in ...

Rah, Myung-Hyun Elisa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Design for implementation : redesigning a planning process in a multinational company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a consumer-packaged-goods company dealing with multiple suppliers, "Company X" (the company's real name has been disguised) has a clear need for an accurate raw material forecast. The current planning process has not ...

Azrielant, Liron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Implementation of the Integrated Planning Concept to Strengthen Indonesian Radiation Emergency Response Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear power has been included in Indonesian national plan as an alternative solution for electricity production. However, Indonesia lies within the Pacific Ring of Fire with around 129 active volcanoes along its region. In addition, the Indonesian...

Volia, Merinda Fitri

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through a Heliborne Electromagnetic (EM) Survey: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing the Pecos River WPP through a Heliborne Electromagnetic (EM) Survey Final Report Lucas Gregory, Zhuping Sheng, Almoutaz El Hassan, Alyson K. McDonald, Amy Porter Texas Water Resources Institute TR-470 March 2014 Implementing....S. Environmental Protection Agency Authors Lucas Gregory1, Zhuping Sheng2, Almoutaz El Hassan2, Alyson K. McDonald3, & Amy Porter4 1Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas Water Resources Institute 2Texas A&M AgriLife Research, El Paso Research...

Gregory, L.; Sheng, Z.; Hassan, A.; McDonald, A.; Porter, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

167

Provides overall leadership for and management of the University's human resources strategy. Responsible for planning, organizing, directing, implementing, and administering human resources strategy, policies and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides overall leadership for and management of the University's human resources strategy. Responsible for planning, organizing, directing, implementing, and administering human resources strategy resource matters; collaborates with senior leaders to build a performance based culture that emphasizes

Dasgupta, Dipankar

168

Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O'Hara

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 IMPLEMENTATION 8-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................8-11 8.4.5 Economic and Cost Considerations-12 8.5 ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT PROCESS & SCHEDULE ......................................................8 implementation of programs and actions with the monitoring and evaluation process. It describes the mechanism

170

Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

171

Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

172

the future of gw's mount vernon campus implementing the 2010 mount vernon campus plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and academic space to enhance the living and learning community; Sustainable practices such as green building campus development and reallocation of currently proposed building uses; Balance of residential. The first Campus Plan for GW's Mount Vernon Campus was developed in 1967 when it operated as Mount Vernon

Vertes, Akos

173

Implementation Plan for Tank Farm Transition Projects Suspect and Counterfeit Items  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan is designed to provide an appropriate level of confidence that Tank Farm Transition Projects (TFTP) facilities will be evaluated to assess the presence of suspect/counterfeit items. It is intended to identify suspect/counterfeit items that are presently in inventory and provide for the reporting and disposition of those items. Items which have been installed will also receive appropriate evaluation using a graded approach to achieve optimum results balanced against safety considerations and cost effectiveness.

TRUE, R.R.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the fourth annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in 1992 as ES/ER-17&D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, this document lists FFA activities planned for FY 1997. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans - Implementing Sustainability: The Institutional-Behavioral Dimension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is part of a larger, programmatic effort to assist federal agencies in taking action and changing their institutions to achieve and maintain federal sustainability goals, while meeting their mission goals. FEMP is developing guidance for federal agency efforts to enable institutional behavior change for sustainability, and for making sustainability business as usual. The driving requirement for this change is Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. FEMP emphasizes strategies for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy utilization as critical components of attaining sustainability, and promotes additional non-energy action pathways contained in EO 13514. This report contributes to the larger goal by laying out the conceptual and evidentiary underpinnings of guidance to federal agencies. Conceptual frameworks focus and organize the development of guidance. We outline a series of progressively refined conceptual frameworks, including a multi-layer approach, key steps in sustainability implementation, a process view of specific approaches to institutional change, the agency Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans (SSPPs), and concepts related to context-specific rules, roles and tools for sustainability. Additionally, we tap pertinent bodies of literature in drawing eight evidence-based principles for behavior change. These principles are important foundations upon which to build in selecting strategies to effect change in organizations. Taken together, this report presents a suite of components that inform the training materials, presentations, web site, and other products that provide guidance to federal agencies.

Malone, Elizabeth L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Sanquist, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wolfe, Amy K. [ORNL; Diamond, Rick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Payne, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Dion, Jerry [ORNL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multi-GPU implementation of a VMAT treatment plan optimization algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VMAT optimization is a computationally challenging problem due to its large data size, high degrees of freedom, and many hardware constraints. High-performance graphics processing units have been used to speed up the computations. However, its small memory size cannot handle cases with a large dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix. This paper is to report an implementation of our column-generation based VMAT algorithm on a multi-GPU platform to solve the memory limitation problem. The column-generation approach generates apertures sequentially by solving a pricing problem (PP) and a master problem (MP) iteratively. The DDC matrix is split into four sub-matrices according to beam angles, stored on four GPUs in compressed sparse row format. Computation of beamlet price is accomplished using multi-GPU. While the remaining steps of PP and MP problems are implemented on a single GPU due to their modest computational loads. A H&N patient case was used to validate our method. We compare our multi-GPU implemen...

Tian, Zhen; Folkerts, Michael; Tan, Jun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Recommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to operate the FCRPS to maximize energy revenue so Bonneville can pay its nuclear power plant gambling debtsRecommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power to the Northwest Power Planning Council's March 14, 2001 request for recommended amendments to the mainstem

179

Wildlife Photography Market Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs to reach existing groups such as photography clubs. Joining tourism organizations is also likely to be helpful. Private Landowners? Responses The data gathered from the landowners? survey responses illustrates the limited nature of wildlife... wildlife photography, most have not yet reached the levels desired by operators. This is partly due to a lack of development as a tourism enterprise, which includes marketing and well-defined operational limits.It does seem that satisfaction is very...

Phillips, Miles

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

Implementation plan for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary technical objective for the WERF Restart Project is to assess, upgrade where necessary, and implement management, documentation, safety, and operation control systems that enable the resumption and continued operation of waste treatment and storage operations in a manner that is compliant with all environment, safety, and quality requirements of the US Department of Energy and Federal and State regulatory agencies. Specific processes that will be resumed at WERF include compaction of low-level compatible waste; size reduction of LLW, metallic and wood waste; incineration of combustible LLW and MLLW; and solidification of low-level and mixed low-level incinerator bottom ash, baghouse fly ash, and compatible sludges and debris. WERF will also provide for the operation of the WWSB which includes storage of MLLW in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Planning and Implementation of an Alkali-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) Field Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Warden ASP project has progressed from the initial planning stage to construction of an injection plant. An ASP chemical system was designed based on laboratory evaluations that included interfacial tension, mobility requirements, rock-alkali interaction, fluid capabilities, and core tests. Field cores were obtained from the Permian No. 5 and No. 6 sands on the Warden lease in Sho-Vel-Tum oil field. A separate tank battery for the pilot pattern area was installed, and a field tracer test is currently being evaluated. Tracer test results to date indicate that there is no major fracturing in the No. 5 sand. There is indication, however, of some channeling through high permeability sand. The field injection plant was designed, and construction is in progress. Several variations of injection plant design have been evaluated. Some plant design details, such as alkali storage, were found to be dependent on the availability of use equipment and project budget. The surfactant storage facility design was shown to be dependent on surfactant rheology.

French, T.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

Implementation of 10 CFR 20.1406 Through Life Cycle Planning for Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a regulatory guide that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is currently developing for use in implementing Title 10, Section 20.1406, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 20.1406), 'Minimization of Contamination'. The intent of the regulation is to diminish the occurrence and severity of 'legacy sites' by taking measures to reduce and control contamination and facilitate eventual decommissioning. The thrust of the regulatory guide is to encourage applicants to use technically sound engineering judgment and a practical risk-informed approach to achieve the objectives of 10 CFR 20.1406. In particular, such an approach should consider the materials and processes involved (e.g., solids, liquids, gases), and focus on (1) the relative significance of potential contamination, (2) areas that are most susceptible to leaks, and (3) the appropriate level of consideration that should be incorporated in facility design and operational procedures to prevent and control contamination. (authors)

O'Donnell, E.; Ott, W.R. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Prioritization and Implementation Plan for Collaborative Case Study on RPV Steels During Extended Service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power currently provides a significant fraction of the United States non-carbon emitting power generation. In future years, nuclear power must continue to generate a significant portion of the nation's electricity to meet the growing electricity demand, clean energy goals, and ensure energy independence. New reactors will be an essential part of the expansion of nuclear power. However, given limits on new builds imposed by economics and industrial capacity, the extended service of the existing fleet will also be required. Ensuring public safety and environmental protection is a prerequisite to all nuclear power plant operating and licensing decisions at all stages of reactor life. This includes the original license period of 40 years, the first license extension to 60 years, and certainly for any consideration of life beyond 60 years. For extended operating periods, it must be shown that adequate aging management programs are present or planned and that appropriate safety margins exist throughout the subsequent license renewal periods. Materials degradation can impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Components within a reactor must tolerate the harsh environment of high temperature water, stress, vibration, and/or an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. Clearly, understanding materials degradation and accounting for the effects of a reactor environment in operating and regulatory limits is essential. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is designed to support the long-term operation (LTO) of existing domestic nuclear power generation with targeted collaborative research programs into areas beyond current short-term optimization opportunities. Within the LWRS program, two pathways have been initiated to perform research essential to informing relicensing decisions. The Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is designed to help develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained operation. The Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization Pathway (RISMC) seeks to merge fundamental scientific understanding of critical phenomenological conditions and deterministic predictions of nuclear power plant performance with risk-informed characterization tools. This will provide an integrated characterization of public safety margins in an optimization of nuclear safety, plant performance, and long-term asset management. Clearly, these two pathways have many synergies in goals and outcomes. The data and mechanisms generated in the Materials Pathway may feed into and mold efforts within the RISMC Pathway. In addition, insights from the characterization tools developed in RISMC tasks may inform materials testing needs and experiments. To demonstrate this potentially powerful interaction, a joint case study has been proposed and initiated. This document describes the initial planning for a coordinated study between the Materials and the RISMC Pathways. A brief description of each Pathway is presented along with a more detailed description of the needs and requirements of this collaborative task. A list of criteria for any case-study candidate are then listed, along with the rationale for choosing pressurized thermal shock as the prime candidate an inter-pathway collaboration. A proposed timeline and organization of future interactions on this subject area is also presented.

Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

186

Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Implementation Plan, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 - Robust Tools. Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 - Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 - Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

McCoy, M; Phillips, J; Hpson, J; Meisner, R

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced Simulation & Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2--Prediction through Simulation. Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear-weapons performances in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3--Balanced Operational Infrastructure. Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Perry, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1 Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2 Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3 Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Carnes, B

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: Objective 1. Robust Tools--Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements. Objective 2. Prediction through Simulation--Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile. Objective 3. Balanced Operational Infrastructure--Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that was very successful in delivering an initial capability to one that is integrated and focused on requirements-driven products that address long-standing technical questions related to enhanced predictive capability in the simulation tools. ASC must continue to meet three objectives: (1) Robust Tools - Develop robust models, codes, and computational techniques to support stockpile needs such as refurbishments, SFIs, LEPs, annual assessments, and evolving future requirements; (2) Prediction through Simulation - Deliver validated physics and engineering tools to enable simulations of nuclear weapons performance in a variety of operational environments and physical regimes and to enable risk-informed decisions about the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile; and (3) Balanced Operational Infrastructure - Implement a balanced computing platform acquisition strategy and operational infrastructure to meet Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and SSP needs for capacity and high-end simulation capabilities.

Kissel, L

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Objective 1: Extend Life, Improve Performance, and Maintain Safety of the Current Fleet Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60 year operating licenses. Figure E 1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to declineeven with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap has organized its activities in accordance with four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administrations energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document describes how Objective 1 and the LWRS Program will be implemented. The existing U.S. nuclear fleet has a remarkable safety and performance record and today accounts for 70% of the low greenhouse gas emitting domestic electricity production. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants beyond 60 years and, where possible, making further improvements in their productivity will generate early benefits from research, development, and demonstration investments in nuclear power. DOEs role in Objective 1 is to partner with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in appropriate ways to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The DOE research, development, and demonstration role will focus on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and are generic to reactor type. Cost-shared demonstration activities will be conducted when appropriate.

Robert Youngblood

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

195

Implementation Plan 20112014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information 17 ­developinganinformedmarketplace 4. Legacy and longer term 18 involvement in the bioenergy. Woodfuel markets are already contributing to the green economy by creating jobs, tackling climate change and providing local communities and businesses with secure, renewable, low carbon energy. These markets

196

PICs Implementation Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical:Rocky MountainFebruary 6, 2013DOE/WIPP

197

Permanent Markers Implementation Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven AshbyDepartment ofGE'sOptimizationUSING C RAY'SDOE/WIPP

198

Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

N /A

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

202

Invited Paper Wildlife Conservation Planning Under the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the need for additional listings under the Endangered Species Act and facilitate delisting. Although

Nie, Martin

203

Implementation Plan for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date in implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These commitments were initially submitted in ES/ER-17&Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service. ORNL has a comprehensive program underway to upgrade the LLLW system as necessary to meet the FFA requirements. The tank systems that are removed from service are being investigated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Waste and risk characterizations have been submitted. Additional data will be prepared and submitted to EPA/TDEC as tanks are taken out of service and as required by the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. The plans and schedules for implementing the FFA compliance program that were submitted in ES/ER-17&Dl, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste tanks Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are updated in this document. Chapter 1 provides general background information and philosophies that lead to the plans and schedules that appear in Chaps. 2 through 5.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

205

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

206

The U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) jointly submitted to Congress a required Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) jointly submitted to Congress a required Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response.

207

Five-Year Implementation Plan For Advanced Separations and Waste Forms Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (FY 2011 to FY 2015)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE-NE separations research is focused today on developing a science-based understanding that builds on historical research and focuses on combining a fundamental understanding of separations and waste forms processes with small-scale experimentation coupled with modeling and simulation. The result of this approach is the development of a predictive capability that supports evaluation of separations and waste forms technologies. The specific suite of technologies explored will depend on and must be integrated with the fuel development effort, as well as an understanding of potential waste form requirements. This five-year implementation plan lays out the specific near-term tactical investments in people, equipment and facilities, and customer capture efforts that will be required over the next five years to quickly and safely bring on line the capabilities needed to support the science-based goals and objectives of INLs Advanced Separations and Waste Forms RD&D Capabilities Strategic Plan.

Not Listed

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Department of Wildlife Ecology, University Fisheries and Wildlife United States Geological Survey United States Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife of this report in any way is withheld pending specific authorization from the Leader, Maine Cooperative Fish

Thomas, Andrew

209

PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PDX\\APP L_STATE FED INVENTORY.DOC 1 APPENDIX L Inventory of State and Federal Fish and Wildlife Plans and Programs This inventory was conducted in the spring of 2003 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under contract to WRI. The following pages are printed from the spreadsheet used in the inventory

210

Implementing 10 CFR 830 at the FEMP Silos: Nuclear Health and Safety Plans as Documented Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Silos Project at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) is to safely remediate high-grade uranium ore residues (Silos 1 and 2) and metal oxide residues (Silo 3). The evolution of Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) for these facilities has reflected the changes in remediation processes. The final stage in silos DSAs is an interpretation of 10 CFR 830 Safe Harbor Requirements that combines a Health and Safety Plan with nuclear safety requirements. This paper will address the development of a Nuclear Health and Safety Plan, or N-HASP.

Fisk, Patricia; Rutherford, Lavon

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at 14 of 27 Major Hydroelectric Projects in Idaho, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act and wildlife and their habitats in the Columbia River Basin and to compliance with the Program, the wildlife mitigation status reports coordination with resource agencies and Indian Tribes. developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program development, operation, and maintenance of hydroelectric projects on existing agreements; and past, current, and proposed wildlife factual review and documentation of existing information on wildlife meet the requirements of Measure 1004(b)(l) of the Program. The mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. In mitigate for the losses to those resources resulting from the purpose of these wildlife mitigation status reports is to provide a resources at some of the Columbia River Basin hydroelectric projects the river and its tributaries. To accomplish this goal, the Council were written with the cooperation of project operators, and in within Idaho.

Martin, Robert C.; Mehrhoff, L.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Implementation of UMTRA Project Environmental Audit Action Plan status report for period ending September 30, 1992. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the status of implementation of corrective actions for findings made in an Environmental Audit conducted by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environmental Audit, in June 1991. An Action Plan, dated December 1991, was developed to address the findings. The Action Plan was approved by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, in July 1992. This report provides status for each activity listed in the approved Action Plan. Of 48 findings identified in the August 1991 Environmental Audit Report, 4 required no action, 5 were combined with others and actions to correct 19 are complete. Although it appears no progress has been made since the last status report was issued, UMTRA has completed 89% of the findings identified, compared to 72% identified in the last status report. The table below lists the 20 findings where actions are still underway, the current projected completion date, the organization(s) responsible for taking action on the finding, and the UMTRA Project Off ice staff member assigned responsibility for the finding.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Worth It? Weighing the costs of implementing the state water plan and the consequences of doing nothing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of science-based contributions from the state?s #28;#24; regional water planning groups. Created a#23;er the #28;#27;#26;#25;s drought, TWDB is equipped by the state to provide loans to local governments for needed water supply projects identi#30;ed... tolerate the large #30;nancial undertaking. On January #28;#25;, state Rep. Allan Ri#20;er #30;led two bills: HB #19;, proposing ?the creation and funding of the state water implemen- tation fund for Texas to assist the Texas Water Development Board...

Lee, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Predator Control as a Tool in Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the individual predator profiles beginning on page 11). For example, coyote scat is generally cigar shaped and smaller than that of a domestic dog. Game monitoring systems can be useful in studying game and predator species. Managers can view wildlife via video... containing chicken eggs) to measure depredation. Then a strategic predator management plan can be developed to address specific problems (for example, only raccoons) or areas (for example, around deer feeders). Camera systems range in price from about $200...

Rollins, Dale

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Monitoring and Evaluation Plan For The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,617 acres of wetland habitat and the inundation of 8,900 acres of deep-water marsh. Estimated wildlifeDRAFT Monitoring and Evaluation Plan For The Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project (BPA Project on vegetation monitoring. Their contributions to this project are greatly appreciated. #12;1 Introduction

217

Willamette Wildlife Mitigation Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 264 miles · 30% decline in small floodplains along tributaries-70% decline of islands in tributaries developments and habitat loss Land matrix: small parcels with high value #12;Willamette Subbasin Plan." Willamette Basin Hydro-Facilities Willamette Valley Cascade Mtns Big Cliff Detroit Foster Green Peter Hills

218

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Towards sustainable settlement growth: A new multi-criteria assessment for implementing environmental targets into strategic urban planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nearly one decade, the German political and research-agenda has been to a large extent determined by the ongoing question of how to limit the expansion of settlement areas around cities in order to preserve natural resources, make settlement growth more sustainable and to strengthen the re-use of existing inner-urban areas (see a.o. Koetter et al. 2009a, 2010; Schetke et al. 2009, 2010b). What is already under discussion within the international literature are the recommendations of the German Council for Sustainability to quantitatively reduce the daily greenfield consumption from the current rate of over 100 ha per day to a rate of 30 ha per day in 2020 and to bring urban infill development up to a ratio of 3:1 with greenfield development (German Council for Sustainability, 2004).). This paper addresses the added value beyond those abstract political targets and presents an innovative, multi-criteria assessment (MCA) of greenfield and infill sites to evaluate their sustainability and resource efficiency. MCA development and its incorporation into a Decision Support System (DSS) were accomplished by utilising a stakeholder-driven approach. The resulting tool can be applied in preparing and revising land-use plans. The paper presents the concept and the development process of the MCA-DSS. Test runs with planners prove that the evaluation of potential housing sites using individually weighted environmental indicators helps to identify those strategies of housing development that accord most closely with sustainability goals. The tests further show that the development of greenfield sites generally exhibits less sustainability than that of infill sites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper presents an innovative, multi-criteria assessment (MCA) of greenfield and infill sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MCA evaluates sustainability and resource efficiency of potential housing sites in a stakeholder-driven approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test runs with planners identified prominent environmental indicators and assigned individual weights. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resulting tool can be applied in preparing and revising land-use plans according to sustainable housing development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Test runs also show that greenfield development generally exhibits less sustainability than infill development.

Schetke, Sophie, E-mail: schetke@uni-bonn.de [Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Dept. of Urban Planning and Real Estate Management, University of Bonn, Nussallee 1, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Haase, Dagmar, E-mail: dagmar.haase@ufz.de [Humboldt University of Berlin, Department of Geography, Rudower Chaussee 16, 10099 Berlin, Germany, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Computational Landscape Ecology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Koetter, Theo, E-mail: koetter@uni-bonn.de [Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformation, Dept. of Urban Planning and Real Estate Management, University of Bonn, Nussallee 1, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Management Plan for Experimental Reintroduction of Sockeye into Skaha Lake; Proposed Implementation, Monitoring, and Evaluation, 2004 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Okanagan River sockeye salmon, which spawn near the town of Oliver, B.C., have their farther upstream migration limited by several water control and diversion dams. Stock numbers have been declining for many years and the Okanagan Native Alliance Fisheries Department (ONAFD) has been the principal advocate of a program to restore their numbers and range by reintroducing them into upstream waters where they may once have occurred in substantial numbers Some investigators have warned that without effective intervention Okanagan sockeye are at considerable risk of extinction. Among a host of threats, the quality of water in the single nursery areas in Osoyoos Lake. is deteriorating and a sanctuary such as that afforded in larger lakes higher in the system could be essential. Because the proposed reintroduction upstream has implications for other fish species, (particularly kokanee, the so-called ''landlocked sockeye'' which reside in many Okanagan lakes), the proponents undertook a three-year investigation, with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, to identify possible problem areas, and they committed to an interim experimental reintroduction to Skaha Lake where any problems could be worked out before a more ambitious reintroduction, (e.g. to Okanagan Lake) could be formally considered. The three-year investigation was completed in the spring of 2003. It included an assessment of risks from disease or the possible introduction of unwanted exotic species. It also considered the present quality and quantity of sockeye habitat, and opportunities for expanding or improving it. Finally ecological complexity encouraged the development of a life history model to examine interactions of sockeye with other fishes and their food organisms. While some problem areas were exposed in the course of these studies, they appeared to be manageable and the concept of an experimental reintroduction was largely supported but with the proviso that there should be a thorough evaluation and reporting of progress and results. A 2004 start on implementation and monitoring has now been proposed.

Wright, Howie; Smith, Howard (Okanagan Nation Alliance, Fisheries Department, Westbank, BC, Canada)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the U.S. Department of Energy that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one and wildlife mitigation. Also, direct-funding payments to the other federal agencies for theERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act

223

Dr. Brian White is the Superintendent of Schools for the Chartiers Valley School District. Shortly after beginning at Chartiers Valley in August 2010, Dr. White implemented a strategic planning process that engaged the members of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dr. Brian White is the Superintendent of Schools for the Chartiers Valley School District. Shortly after beginning at Chartiers Valley in August 2010, Dr. White implemented a strategic planning process, Dr. White held several positions at the Beaver Area School District. He began as an assistant

Sibille, Etienne

224

WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and implementing prescribed burns and fuel reduction projects in the Upton Reserve. Prescribed fire and fuel reduction in locations outside the Upton Reserve will be coordinated through the Natural Resource Management Program at BNL, and done in consultation with FWS. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by FWS, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix L Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities (http://clientzone.golder.com/YSBI) The Inventory element in the Yakima Subbasin plan is intended to summarize fish and wildlife protection. The Inventory will be updated as the Yakima Subbasin Plan gets updated. This iterative process will allow us

226

elcome to Council Quarterly, the newsletter of the Northwest Power Planning Council. Council Quarterly replaces NWPPC News and is part of our ongoing effort to inform you about Northwest energy and sh & wildlife issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

burning diesel, helped boost the energy supply, but proved to be expensive as wholesale power prices dropped. These diesel generators also pollute the air more than other types of power plants. · Reducedelcome to Council Quarterly, the newsletter of the Northwest Power Planning Council. Council

227

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

HUD Choice Neighborhoods Implementation Grants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is accepting applications to support communities that have undergone a comprehensive local planning process and are ready to implement their "Transformation Plan" to redevelop the neighborhood.

229

Wildlife Photography for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. *Extension Ecotourism Program Specialist, The Texas A&M University System WILDLIFE Photography Miles Phillips* for Fun and Profit: Constructing and Installing Wildlife Photography Blinds B-6187 3/06 Types of Blinds Surface blinds Most photographers...

Phillips, Miles

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

Summary of CHSD Implementation Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avoiding or Delaying Care Due to Scheduling/Access Primary Care Needed Interest in Health Education Classes Avoiding or Delaying Care Due to Cost Specialists, Services Needed Top Health Concerns Commonly Prioritized Needs #12;91% 74% 74% 17% 17% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Alcohol/Substance Abuse Cancer Obesity Heart

Dyer, Bill

231

IMPLEMENTING Partnerships, Plans and Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Participation Individual participation vs Community-based participation Political and Jurisdictional Hierarchy with elected officials Manage our own lake or stream-front property Talk with our neighbors Community Participation As A Group, We Can: Communicate with elected officials Manage our own lake or stream

232

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

233

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

235

A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

Murphy, Michaela Rene

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we meeting biological and programmatic performance objectives established within the Columbia Basin Fish implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

237

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

White Salmon Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Northwest Power and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i White Salmon Subbasin Plan 5/28/2004 Prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Rawding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Wildlife Heather Simmons-Rigdon, Yakama Nation White Nation, Steve VanderPloeg, WDFW, Lee VanTussenbrook, WDFW, and Joe Zendt, Yakama Nation White Salmon

239

White Salmon Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Northwest Power and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;White Salmon Subbasin Plan 5/28/2004 Prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Rawding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Wildlife Heather Simmons-Rigdon, Yakama Nation White Nation, Steve VanderPloeg, WDFW, Lee VanTussenbrook, WDFW, and Joe Zendt, Yakama Nation White Salmon

240

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

242

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown,...

243

The Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001, WARS 2000 Wildlife Accident Reporting System (2000related motor vehicle accident claim data and funding toTHE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) IN BRITISH

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation For students entering fall 2010 graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. 1 - Earth Science elective ­ GEO-SCI 100 (f more of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Schweik, Charles M.

245

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester interested in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

246

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Fall Semester Spring Semester in pursuing graduate studies in Wildlife Ecology/Conservation Biology. a Intro. Bio. elective options - BIOL of the following: NRC 597F ­ Conservation Genetics (s) BIOL 521 ­ Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (f,s) BIOL 540

Schweik, Charles M.

247

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

248

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

TIES -Towards an Internationalisation of Higher Education Network for MEDA Region. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN TEMPUS 159218 -TEMPUS -1 -2009 -1 -ES -TEMPUS -JPGR Calendar Year 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and opportunities UA 2.7. WS: Fundraising and project management USGM 2.8. WS: ICTs for IROs 3. Capacity Building plans 4. Networking and sustainability (network) MEDA C 4.1. Internationalisation network set up MEDA C 4.2. Sustainability: Creating network's Business plan MEDA C 4.3. Internationalisation roundtable

250

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LocalEnergyPlanningforCityQuartersorNeighbourhoodsandImplementation CaseStudiesII:IntegratedEnergyPlanningforCommunitiesandImplementationStrategies

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

253

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Review of the Department of Energys Implementation of Executive Order 12898 and Recommendations for a Second Five-Year Strategic Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the request of the U.S Department of Energys Office of Legacy Management, the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) performed a historical review of the Offices implementation of...

255

Lessons Learned at the Nevada National Security Site Implementing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Lessons Learned Implementing Work Planning & Control Integration of Safety Culture Attributes into EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guidance Document EFCOG...

256

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

Calkins, Brian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

258

Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section IX and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review of approval. The issue of ES/ER-17&D1 Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. This document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA as presented in ES/ER-17&D I and summarizes the progress that has been made to date. This document supersedes all updates of ES/ER- 17&D 1. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System and the objectives of the FFA. Chapters 2 through 5 contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/convective heat loss. Eastern red bats roosting in fragmented habitats, such as urban areas and farmland, may to population declines, which, when coupled with their slow reproductive rate, could lead to a slow population two at the New Boston Air Force Base in New Boston (Hillsborough County). Based on echolocation calls

New Hampshire, University of

260

OAR - Division 100-Wildlife Diversity Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)ReferencesNuiqsut, Alaska:Nutley, NewEnergyO2Diesel Corporation-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

OAR 635-100 - Wildlife Diversity Plans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)ReferencesNuiqsut, Alaska:Nutley, NewEnergyO2DieselOAR 635-100 -

262

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq.NorthUniopolis,ParcelDefenseOpen Energythe

263

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-632  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which prevents the killing of most non- game birds

New Hampshire, University of

264

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migratory Bird Treaty Act 1.4 Population and Habitat Distribution Population sizes are unknown at state

New Hampshire, University of

265

SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-602  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which prevents the killing of most non- game birds and collection of their nests

New Hampshire, University of

266

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

267

Transition Implementation Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide was prepared to aid in the development, planning, and implementation of requirements and activities during the transition phase at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities that have been declared or are forecast to become excess to any future mission requirements.

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and slopes found on Gus Engeling Wildlife Management Area (GEWMA) and Richland Creek Wildlife Management Area (RCWMA). The resulting model output was displayed as a map, depicting the spatial distribution of habitat suitability for each of the 3 species...

Daugherty, Brad Ellis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Position: Forestry Intern Location: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Application Process: Student Conservation Association (SCA) Forestry and biological Wildlife Refuge. This forestry position will be mostly field work within the Lower

Mazzotti, Frank

270

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

271

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

Howerton, Jack

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

277

Emergency Readiness Assurance Plans (ERAPs)  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume describes the assessments and documentation that would ensure that stated response capabilities are sufficient to implement emergency plans. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

278

WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

279

Operating plan FY 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Wildlife Exclusion Fencing Temporary Hourly Technicians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technical support, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities and mammals that present a threat to aircraft operations. In order to prevent wildlife from burrowing under sponsorship for this position. Candidates must be physical able to conduct repetitive actions; eye, hand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

282

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking: Design Tradeoffs and Early Experiences with ZebraNet Philo Juang Hidekazu Oki Yong Wang Margaret Martonosi Li-Shiuan Peh Dan Rubenstein Dept. of Electrical Princeton University ZebraNet Project VET TES EN NOV TAM TVM Current Tracking Technology Most common: VHF

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

283

Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel. The BNL Fire Department is the lead on wildfire suppression. However, the BNL Natural Resource Manager will be assigned to all wildland fires as technical resource advisor.

Green,T.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Planning for an energy-efficient future: The experience with implementing energy conservation programs for new residential and commercial buildings: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of program experience reports that seek to synthesize current information from both published and unpublished sources to help utilities, state regulatory commissions, and others to identify, design, and manage demand-side programs. This report evaluates the experience with implementing programs promoting energy efficiency in new residential and commercial construction. This investigation was guided by our perspective on how programs address the barriers to widespread adoption of energy-efficient design and better end-use technologies in new buildings. We considered four types of barriers: lack of information, high initial costs, degree of technological development, and perceived risk. We developed a typology that reflects different approaches to overcome these barriers to energy-efficient construction. 234 refs., 5 tabs.

Vine, E.; Harris, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

287

8 Management Plan 8.1.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management and use of natural resources including reliable water supplies, fish and wildlife populations145 8 Management Plan 8.1.1 Introduction The information below will be used by subbasin planners that will aid in the recovery of focal species. The management plan is made up of five components: the vision

288

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

289

CRAD, Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan CRAD, Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is to verify programmatic implementation of...

290

The wildlife orientation of selected student populations in Victoria, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE WILDLIFE ORIENTATIONS OF SELECTED STUDENT POPULATIONS IN VICTORIA, TEXAS A Thesis by PHYLLIS ANN BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK Approved as to style and content by...

Kirkpatrick, Phyllis Ann Bradley

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

Nickels, J.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division.

Parr, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Evans, J.W. (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

294

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

295

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

296

EA-0928: Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project, Multnomah County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington...

297

Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

Not Available

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

NONE

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Configuration Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314 [CANCELLED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-314 configuration management (CM) plan describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementing CM.

MCGREW, D.L.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Local Energy Plans in Practice: Case Studies of Austin and Denver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examines the successes and difficulties that Denver, CO, and Austin, TX , experienced implementing citywide energy plans.

Petersen, D.; Matthews, E.; Weingarden, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Microsoft Word - SIWMROD09232014(final).docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT ANALYSIS ... 25 A. BPA's Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS and ROD ... 26 B....

303

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 40(3), 2004, pp. 493500 Wildlife Disease Association 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pepper,1 Thomas R. Rainwater,1 Steven G. Platt,2 Jennifer A. Dever,3 Todd A. Anderson,1 and Scott T. Mc and cost associated with CAM collection and the specific life history traits of the wildlife species. Key often involves killing animals for collection and analysis of various biologic samples (e.g., internal

Dever, Jennifer A.

304

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(2), 2005, pp. 291297 Wildlife Disease Association 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of northern California and southern Oregon (USA), the Texas Panhandle, and the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska Department, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California 95521, USA 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Current address: U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 204 Russell Lab

Mladenoff, David

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - atoll national wildlife Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Changed Pupping and Hauling Summary: . Atoll Research Bulletin 103. 3 pp. US.Fish and Wildlife Service. 1986. Hawaiian IslandsNational Wildlife... Islands National...

306

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Trains, Grains, and Grizzly Bears: Reducing Wildlife Mortality on Railway Tracks in Banff National Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the causes and solutions to train-wildlife collisions. Whilepopulations, relatively few trains strike wildlife on thegrizzlies were struck by CPR trains, and none of the five

Pissot, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWoodWildlife Fund Jump to:

310

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a system of economic incentives and develop cost effective solutions to agricultural and wildlife issues#12;ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the Potential for Use of Economic and Associated Floodplains prepared by Richard M. Porter for Socio-Economic Section Sustainability Division

312

Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

Gray, Matthew

313

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

314

Community Health Needs Assessment Report & Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCESS TO CARE.................................................................................................................11 SUBSTANCE ABUSE ................................................................................................................18 CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT

Michigan, University of

315

Designing and Implementing Effective Performance Assurance Plans  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

view all areas of the room 4 Daylighting Controls Functional Test No. 4: a) During daylight hours, observe lights. b) Simulate reduction in day light, observe lights. c) During...

316

Maintenance implementation plan for B Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B Plant facility, is located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It consists of two major operating areas: the B Plant Canyon Building, and the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The B Plant was originally designed to chemically process spent nuclear fuels. After this initial mission was completed, the plant was modified to provide for the separation of strontium and cesium, individually, from the fission productwaste stream following plutonium and uranium recovery from irradiated reactor fuels in the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX). The recovered, purified, and concentrated strontium and cesium solutions were then transferred to the WESF for conversion to solid compounds, encapsulation, and interim storage. After strontium and cesium removal, the remaining waste was transferred from B Plant to tank farms. B Plantis an operating facility that is required to ensure safe storage And management of the WESF cesium and strontium capsules, as well as a substantial radiological inventory remaining in the plant from previous campaigns. There are currently no production activities at B Plant, but several operating systems are required to accomplish the current B Plant mission.B Plant receives and stores various chemicals from commercial suppliers for treatment of low-level waste generated at WESF and B Plant, generation of demineralized water, and conditioning of water used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units. This report describes the maintenance of B Plant, including personnel training and schedules.

Tritt, S.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obligations on climate change the United Kingdom Government has sought to ensure that universities play equates to reducing energy consumption. This report considers the phasing of work on the basis://www.diag.org.uk/ 5 The Energy Consortium is projecting a 15% rise in electricity costs and a 50% rise in gas costs

Chittka, Lars

318

IMPLEMENTING THE NOAA NEXT GENERATION STRATEGIC PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate modeling using NOAA's high performance computing abilities; · Expand the Climate Portal through

319

Plans, Implementation, and Results | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

agencies to meet energy-related goals and provide energy leadership to the country. This Web page includes links to documents that support the office management process and the...

320

Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-Induced NanoscaleValidatingValidation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruary 4, 2014 BioenergyDepartment ofPyrolysisAbout the

322

Plans, Implementation, and Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined HeatInformationDepartmentManagementPersonalAbout the Geothermal

323

Plans, Implementation, and Results | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined HeatInformationDepartmentManagementPersonalAbout the

324

Plain Writing Implementation Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and ModelingPink Skies ComingPlain

325

Prepare comprehensive implementation plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde IncStarAreas-

326

Audit Implementation Design Plan | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis Aerosol STATEMENTAttention

327

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject isNovember 07, 2007What Isand Supply ChainWindWind

328

Yellow: Pre-DOE Implementation Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, part 2 ContinuingYan Mei Wang Yan MeiYejun

329

2030 Transportation and Mobility Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sections are as follows: 1. Introduction 2. Bi-State MPO Area Description 3. Planning Horizon Description and Data Projections 4. Long Range Plan Presentation 5. Plan Implementation and Monitoring Procedures 6. Bi-State MPO 2030 Transportation..., improved access at the Leigh Avenue/I-540 interchange, and the deployment of appropriate Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) projects. The Airport Master Plan Update has estimated a total airport improvement cost of $ 74,170,000 over a Three (3...

Bi-State Metropolitan Planning Organization

2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Plan and Energy Options Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy planning document to assist the Karuk Tribe in making educated decisions about future energy priorities and implementation.

Ramona Taylor, Karuk Tribe; David Carter, Winzler and Kelly

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Response and Rescue Plans for Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles Impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response and Rescue Plans for Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles Impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico The Wildlife Branch of the Unified Command has organized trained wildlife that will be impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The marine mammal and sea turtle response teams include

332

Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

New Hampshire, University of

333

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Resources on Implementing Energy Savings Performance Contracts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an ESPC Detailed Energy Survey Planning and Reporting for O&M in Federal ESPCs FEMP O&M Best Practices Guide Life Cycle Costing Tools Helps Federal agencies implement energy- and...

336

IMPLEMENTATION OF ONCE-THROUGH COOLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPLEMENTATION OF ONCE-THROUGH COOLING MITIGATION THROUGH ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING AND PROCUREMENT Michael R. Jaske Electricity Supply Analysis Division California Energy Commission Dennis C ...........................................................................................................................................1 Energy Agencies' Presumptions About Once-through Cooling Mitigation

337

Storm Water Management Plan Program (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation implements the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Requirements, and encourages cities and counties to create stormwater management plans in order to receive grant...

338

Developing an Evaluation Measurement, and Verification Plan:...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement successful and sustainable clean energy programs. DOE TAP EMV Planning Webinar - Res Retrofits 3-29-11...

339

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

340

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(1):136138, Spring 2008 Book Reviews Urban Wildlife Management by Clark-reviewed and popular articles to support the subject mat- ter. Enter wildlife professors Clark Adams, Sara Ash, and Kieran Lindsey. Together, they have brought to us the first comprehensive book on urban wildlife

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):250259, Fall 2013 Winter habitat use by juvenile greater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 S. W. Williston Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA The historic range

342

Research Object and Plan Center for Renewable Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/29/2010 1 Research Object and Plan Center for Renewable Carbon Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries industrial l tirevolution. *Natural factors *Human activities *Industrial pollutions Background Atmospheric Oceanic and Atmospheric administration #12;9/29/2010 2 Background CO2 is essential to photosynthesis

Gray, Matthew

343

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

Costello, Ronald J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion: Project management/evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Management/Evaluation Plan are: (1) clarify management structure, task responsibilities and schedules, and (2) to be used as a basis for judging the Project Evaluation Report submitted as a part of the continuation application. The components addressed in the report are: management structure; project staff organization; management procedure; quality assurance plan; ES and H plan and environmental compliance reporting; task WBS and logic flow diagram; list and schedule of planned deliverables; diagram of existing facilities; industry interaction; and evaluation of technical and economic feasibility.

Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Transportation Institutional Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainablys...

348

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

350

EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

351

Technical Report TR-011 March 2000 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-011 Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary

352

A national assessment of wildlife information transfer to the public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT A National Assessment of Wildlife Information Transfer to the Public. (August 2003) Kieran Jane Lindsey, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clark E. Adams A self-administered questionnaire was developed using... A NATIONAL ASSESSMENT OF WILDLIFE INFORMATION TRANSFER TO THE PUBLIC A Thesis by KIERAN JANE LINDSEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Lindsey, Kieran Jane

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2009-2035  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Metropolitan? Transportation?Plan? 2009?2035? ? This?document?is?the?long?range?transportation?plan?for?the?Houma?Thibodaux? Metropolitan?Planning?Organization.??It?represents?the?staged?implementation?of? the?transportation...?needs?in?the?Houma?Thibodaux?urbanized?area,?extending?from? 2009?to?2035.? ? Adopted?on?May?14,?2009? Prepared?by?the?South?Central?Planning?and?Development?Commission? ? Adopted My 14, 2009 [METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN] 2 Contents Chapters Page 1 Introduction 5 2 Existing...

South Central Planning and Development Commission

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

Smith, Brent

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PLANNING Guiding Principles Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is conducted in a timely manner, in accordance with statutory, regulatory,...

356

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

N /A

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

358

Institutional plan. Fiscal year, 1997--2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institutional Plan is the culmination of Argonne`s annual planning cycle. The document outlines what Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) regards as the optimal development of programs and resources in the context of national research and development needs, the missions of the Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory, and pertinent resource constraints. It is the product of ANL`s internal planning process and extensive discussions with DOE managers. Strategic planning is important for all of Argonne`s programs, and coordination of planning for the entire institution is crucial. This Institutional Plan will increasingly reflect the planning initiatives that have recently been implemented.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Benchmarking & Energy Master Planning in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We change the way people use energy Benchmarking & Energy Master Planning in Schools ESL-KT-14-11-03 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Project implementation barriers ? Obtaining management commitment... ? Access to comprehensive measurement tools & methodologies ? Short-term planning horizons ? Available budget to fund projects ? Personnel time to design and plan project because of competing priorities ? Internal expertise to implement projects...

Bronk, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Collaboratives for Wildlife-Wind Turbine Interaction Research: Fostering Multistakeholder Involvement (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster highlights the various wildlife-wind collaboratives (specific to wildlife-wind turbine interaction research) that currently exist. Examples of collaboratives are included along with contact information, objectives, benefits, and ways to advance the knowledge base.

Sinclair, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS SUMMARY

362

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

363

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

364

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

365

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

366

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

367

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

368

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

369

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

370

Performance Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Performance Management Plan describes the approach for accelerating cleanup activities of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Environmental Management (EM) Program. This approach accelerates the reduction of risk at NNSA/NV sites while performing the work responsibly, effectively, and more efficiently. In May 2002, NNSA/NV EM and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection signed a Letter of Intent formalizing an agreement to pursue accelerated risk reduction and cleanup for activities within the State of Nevada. This Performance Management Plan provides the strategic direction for implementing the Letter of Intent.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

371

Guam Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes various energy strategies available to Guam to meet the territory's goal of diversifying fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020.The information presented in this strategic energy plan will be used by the Guam Energy Task Force to develop an energy action plan. Available energy strategies include policy changes, education and outreach, reducing energy consumption at federal facilities, and expanding the use of a range of energy technologies, including buildings energy efficiency and conservation, renewable electricity production, and alternative transportation. The strategies are categorized based on the time required to implement them.

Conrad, M. D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy`s response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department`s Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron Fish and Wildlife Service -760/431-9440 ext. 205  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEWS RELEASE Contact: Jane Hendron ­ Fish and Wildlife Service - 760/431-9440 ext. 205 Jan Bedrosian ­ Bureau of Land Management ­ 916/978-4614 Timothy J. DiCintio ­ National Fish and Wildlife. The REAT is comprised of representatives of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management

374

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE PROJECTS (FW 370) Fall Semester, 2010 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Will Clements in fish, wildlife and conservation biology. The course format will include lectures, group discussion Assignments and Homework......................................... 15% #12;FW 370- DESIGN OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

375

TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOURISM PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF WILDLIFE VIEWING IN THE SQUAMISH VALLEY by Kim Cherie: Tourism Product Development: A Case Study of Wildlife Viewing In the Squamish Valley PROJECT: 284 #12;iii ABSTRACT Wildlife viewing is an increasingly important form of tourism in British Columbia

376

Implementation impacts of PRL methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department`s previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

FY 2007/2008 Contractor Performance Plan, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Contractor Performance Plan is a detailed execution plan covering fiscal years 2007 and 2008 that implements the Integration Project Baseline in a more aggressive cost and schedule approach.

Project Integration

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

The early planning and development of Oklahoma City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of the planning, development, and implementation of Oklahoma City's Grand Boulevard. In the early days of 1909, a plan emerged to build an expansive parks and boulevard system to encircle Oklahoma City. Such ...

Humphreys, Blair D. (Blair David)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

FY 2007/2008 Contractor Performance Plan, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Contractor Performance Plan is a detailed execution plan covering fiscal years 2007 and 2008 that implements the Integration Project Baseline in a more aggressive cost and schedule approach.

Project Integration

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness, treaty rights, public involvement in forest policy, or international trade issues? Contact Information · Silviculture · Consulting Company · Urban Forestry · Tourism · GIS · Computer Modeling · Professional Biologist

Northern British Columbia, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/17/2011 1 ACOUSTIC POLLUTION HOW HUMAN ACTIVITIES DISRUPT WILDLIFE COMMUNICATION Emily Hockman M of acoustic pollution in the oceans and effects on marine mammals Where do we go from here? #12;4/17/2011 2 ON ACOUSTIC POLLUTION Anthropogenic sound generation Transportation Army/Navy Research Commercial Birds

Gray, Matthew

382

EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

Gray, Matthew

383

Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Michael Murray, Ph.D. National Wildlife Federation Great Lakes Natural Resource Center Ann Arbor context #12;2 Source: Cassedy and Grossman, Introduction to Energy, 1998 #12;3 Coal Ranks · Anthracite ­ highest rank, high energy content · Bituminous ­ second highest rank, high energy content; typically

O'Donnell, Tom

384

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service- Shepherdstown, West Virginia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation Training Center (NCTC). The 500-acre site includes 16 buildings that accommodate education and training facilities for the USFWS. The center was designed to use passive solar and low-energy technologies that are readily available, easily maintained and cost effective.

385

Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics Marc Choisy1,* and Pejman Rohani1 extinction. Surprisingly, infectious diseases have not been accounted for in harvest models, which is a major and harvesting can substantially increase both disease prevalence and the absolute number of infectious

386

Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Volunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hampshire Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer University of New Hampshire, UVolunteer Service Position Description Title: Speaking for Wildlife Presenter Term: One Year Duties; (2) Actively publicize the availability of SFW presentations in your community; (3) For field walks

New Hampshire, University of

388

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

389

Civil Works Planning Overview Civil Works (CW) Planning offers a structured, rational approach to solving water resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the current design and construction program is largely a result of project authorizations. Planning); and several implementing policies. CW Planning is the start of the "pipeline" for addressing water resources

US Army Corps of Engineers

390

Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

Casey, Daniel

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Walla Walla Subbasin Plan May 2004 Version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Tim Bailey, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kevin Blakely Department of Fish and Wildlife Del Groat, United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service Gary James

393

Sample 8 Semester Plan for NRES Students need 130 hours to graduate.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resource systems with emphasis on the ecology, biology, conservation, and management of fish and wildlifeSample 8 Semester Plan for NRES Students need 130 hours to graduate. Year 11 Fall Semester ACES 101 Public Speaking2 IB 103 Intro to Plant Biology Statistics3 or Cultural Studies4 Total Hours Hrs 3 1 3-4 4

Kent, Angela

394

May 2005 O-1 The Interaction between Power Planning and Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2005 O-1 The Interaction between Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development to decide how to equitably allocate this resource. In particular, measures developed to aid fish, "optimizing1 " the operation of the system to enhance power production has detrimental effects on fish

395

Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan Guidance Under the Endangered Species Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan Guidance Under the Endangered Species Act U.S. Fish and Wildlife............................................................................................1-5 1.3 Role of the states, other Service programs, and other partners in Post-delisting Monitoring.4 Post-delisting Monitoring for species in foreign countries....................................1-7 2

396

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year ten in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trapnets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report under Section I, Implementation. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Section II of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed under Section II.

Porter, Russell G.; Glaser, Bryce G.; Amren, Jennifer

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

THE SEQUOIA 2000 ARCHITECTURE AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE SEQUOIA 2000 ARCHITECTURE AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Michael Stonebraker and James Frew Center for Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics and Department of Geography University of California;#12;Sequoia Architecture and Plan i Abstract This paper describes the Sequoia 2000 software architecture

California at Irvine, University of

398

Last Planner System Areas of Application and Implementation Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surveyed to assess the implementation challenges that they encountered. The main findings of this analysis are; (1) that practitioners have used LPS for the purpose of making plans more reliable, (2) get smooth work flow (3) improve productivity. The survey...

Porwal, Vishal

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Analytical Methods for Implementing Industrial Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many utilities have completed long-term planning studies and have shown that a load management program is cost effective. They are now actively implementing large-scale, system-wide programs such as demand subscription, interruptable rates, and time...

Hassig, N.; Chan, M.; Carlson, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Strategic Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a single BPA data repository * Data quality improvements * Improve model alignment with WECC planning data * Improve WECC base case coordination * Align the BPA data model with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Methow Subbasin Plan November 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Fish and Wildlife Colville Tribes Coordinators Keith Wolf, KWA Ecological Sciences, Inc. Julie Dagnon, Okanogan County Joe Foster, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Contributors Carmen Andonaegui--Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Paul R. Ashley--Washington Department of Fish

402

TEXAS WATERSHED PLANNING Short Course What's a Watershed Protection Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for achieving water resource goals that provides assessment & management information for a geographically: 5. Plans only succeed if implemented. 6. Partnerships equal power. 7. Good tools are available. 8 B. Estimate of load reductions needed C. Description of mgt measures needed D. Technical & financial

403

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

Calkins, Brian

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergyProgram Lawswith Wildlife

405

Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Rulison Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Fi h d Wildlif PFish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Burbot) Kootenai River Operation Mitigation & Evaluation Building on Success · All Tribal projects objectives, and to guide and refine future project design and implementation Monitoring Corrective Evaluation Meets objectives Does not meet objectives Corrective action #12;4/11/2013 5 Integrated Ecosystem Based

408

PURDUE EXTENSION Open Space Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of runoff from their fields by implementing best manage- ment practices. There is more work to do of direct runoff. Contami- nated storm water can even be filtered through planned open space in the agricultural area with respect to soil erosion and some nutrients, but reduced tillage practices, filter strips

409

Campus Planning Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F I N A L Campus Planning Environmental Impact Report UCSF Mount Zion Garage State Clearinghouse No ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT Under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the University of California procedures for implementing CEQA, following completion of a Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR

Mullins, Dyche

410

Better Buildings Alliance, adidas Case Study: adidas Saves Energy and Costs with Planned RTU Replacement Program (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Case study describing how adidas implemented a best practice of a planned replacement program for its RTUs.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

FTCP Corrective Action Plan- Revision 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

January 2007 FTCP Corrective Action Plan, Revision 1, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004- 1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations

412

SNF project engineering process improvement plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819. All new procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999.

DESAI, S.P.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fiscal Year (FY) 2003-2007 Institutional Plan describes the strategic directions and key issues that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory management must address with the Department of Energy (DOE) in charting its future as a multiprogram national laboratory. The Plan provides an overview of the Laboratory's mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Plan facilitates the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to strengthen the Integrated Laboratory System. Preparation and review of the Institutional Plan is one element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, implemented through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the President's Management Agenda and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Plan complements the current performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California, and summarizes Best Management Practices for a potential future results-based contract as a basis for achieving DOE goals and the Laboratory's scientific and operations objectives. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Planning and Strategic Development Office from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions and DOE comments on prior years' plans. The Laboratory Mission section identifies the specific strengths of Berkeley Lab that contribute to the mission in general and the Integrated Laboratory System in particular. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies the existing activities in support of DOE Office of Science and other sponsors; support for DOE goals; and the Laboratory Scientific Vision and operations goals. The Initiatives section describes some of the specific new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Department of Energy and Berkeley Lab. The Operations Strategic Planning section describes our strategic thinking in the areas of human resources; site and cyber security; workforce diversity; communications and trust; integrated safety management; and technology transfer activities. The Infrastructure Strategic Planning section describes Berkeley Lab's facilities planning process and our site and facility needs. The Summary of Major Issues section provides context for discussions at the Institutional Planning On-Site Review. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for Berkeley Lab's research programs.

Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environmental Planning and Ecology Program Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Planning and Ecology Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Planning and Ecology Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Tiger and the Sun: Solar Power Plants and Wildlife Sanctuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss separate and integrated approaches to building scalable solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries. Both solar power plants and wildlife sanctuaries need a lot of land. We quantify some of the requirements using various estimates of the rate of solar power production as well as the rate of adding wildlife to a sanctuary over the time range 2010-2050. We use population dynamics equations to study the evolution of solar energy and tiger populations up to and beyond 2050.

McGuigan, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

INL-Site Idaho Completion Project Long Term Stewardship Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Strategic Plan provides a brief historical overview of ICP long-term stewardship at the INL Site and the major goals and strategies that will drive the continued implementation of long-term stewardship in the future. The specific activities and processes that will be required to implement these goals should be outlined within an implementation plan and within implementing procedures and work plans.

Olaveson, B.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DOE plan for UMTRA Project water protection standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was developed to define DOE`s implementation of water protection standards for the UMTRA Project, on an interim basis, until the EPA promulgates revised standards in response to the September, 1985, decision by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. This plan presents the historical background of the development of the Title I standards and the rationale for the DOE implementation approach.

Not Available

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

DOE plan for UMTRA Project water protection standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was developed to define DOE's implementation of water protection standards for the UMTRA Project, on an interim basis, until the EPA promulgates revised standards in response to the September, 1985, decision by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. This plan presents the historical background of the development of the Title I standards and the rationale for the DOE implementation approach.

Not Available

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

ORISE: Policy Implementation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Policy Implementation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science in the implementation of its program...

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration wildlife mitigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IntroductionI. Introduction The Northwest Power Act of Summary: , mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, on the Columbia... to...

424

Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

425

Division of Fish and Wildlife Programs, 1984-1985 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the organization and functions of the Division of Fish and Wildlife, and lists the projects conducted during FY 1985. (ACR)

Kiilsgaard, Chris

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hunting, Habitat, and Indigenous Settlement Patterns: A Geographic Analysis of Bugl Wildlife Use in Western Panama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation analyzes indigenous wildlife use from a geographic perspective, focusing on the relationships between hunting, habitat, and settlement patterns. Fieldwork took place among five neighboring communities in ...

Smith, Derek Anthony

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Implementing AccountableCare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing AccountableCare Organizations POLICYBRIEF MAY2010 ADVANCING NATIONAL HEALTH REFORMPolicyandClinicalPractice #12;i Berkeley Center on Health, Economic & Family Security|Implementing Accountable Care to implement the newly-minted comprehensive healthcare reform law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care

Kammen, Daniel M.

428

Guam Energy Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

CIPS Validation Data Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

Nam Dinh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Technical Report TR-012 March 2001 Research Section, Vancouver Forest Region, BCMOF Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife TR-012: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife #12;Technical Report TR ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Page Summary 2 Keywords 2

432

Mitigation Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition...

434

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

GREEN,T.ET AL.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), Bureau

436

Proactive Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, rainwater harvesting, stream bank stabilization, and educational programs to prevent urban and agricultural nonpoint source pollution. Project leaders plan to have the Cedar Creek Watershed Protection Plan finalized by the summer of 2008. ?We... on watershed management, stream restoration practices, agricultural best man- agement practices, rainwater harvesting, non- point source pollution control, on-site septic system maintenance, and other water quality issues facing urban and rural...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

CORPORATE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Faculty planning workbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................33 Staffing & workforce planningCORPORATE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Faculty planning workbook Humanities, Law & Social Studies Outcomes from 2008/09 Confirmation of progress during 2009/10 Faculty planning for 2010/11 ­ 2012/13 #12

438

Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and Management Plan For Fish and Wildlife Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.H. Stute. 2001. Evaluation of Idaho Power hatchery mitigation program. In: Technical appendices for Hells Canyon Complex Hydroelectric project. Idaho Power, Boise, ID. Technical Report E.3.1-4. Agee, J. K. 1981. Armour, C. 1990. Options for reintroducing salmon and steelhead above mid-Snake River dams. U.S. Fish

439

Coal-Mac, Inc. Phoenix No. 1 mine provides wildlife haven. 2007 Wildlife West Virginia Award  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Mac, Inc.'s Harless Wood Industrial Park off Holden 22 Mines Road in Logan Country, West Virginia is an award-winning reclamation site in the mountains frequented by geese, wild turkey, deer and black bears. Orchard grass and rye is a temporary cover for the timothy, clover and other seedlings. The area was mined several years ago. Some 40,000-50,000 tons of coal per month are surfaced mined with the current permit that takes in 1,500-2,000 acres. After removing the coal, valleys are backfilled as part of the mining and reclamation plan. 10 photos.

Skinner, A.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After establishing a goal and assessing the rules, roles, and tools, Federal agencies can develop an action plan (select the strategies that will be implemented over time to achieve and maintain energy and sustainability goals). This action plan should target specific audiences with tailored strategies and take into account the need to review and revise strategies in the long-term. The action plan must include appropriate metrics and regular measurement. Remember that planning useful efficiency and sustainability evaluation is necessary before an organization begins to implement an action plan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) is to provide specific guidance to all LBL employees and contractors who use hazardous chemicals. This Plan, when implemented, fulfills the requirements of both the Federal OSHA Laboratory Standard (29 CFR 1910.1450) for laboratory workers, and the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) for non-laboratory operations (e.g., shops). It sets forth safety procedures and describes how LBL employees are informed about the potential chemical hazards in their work areas so they can avoid harmful exposures and safeguard their health. Generally, communication of this Plan will occur through training and the Plan will serve as a the framework and reference guide for that training.

Berkner, K.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Information Resources Security Planning and Policy Committee -UTDPP1003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Resources Security Planning and Policy Committee - UTDPP1003 Policy Charge IR Security it is confidential, sensitive, both or neither. 2. Prepare a security plan to protect information identified as confidential, sensitive or both. 3. Assign management responsibility for implementing the security plan. 4

O'Toole, Alice J.

443

Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMont Vista Capital LLCFish, Wildlife

445

Professional internship with the Houston Lighting and Power Company Radiological Services: wildlife collection manual report and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

game wardens, wildlife refuge managers in Texas, and who to contact about specific animal species or trapping techniques. An Equipment Sources Appendix and Literature Cited and Available in Wildlife Documents File were also included. This file...

Graves, Tina Borghild

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

447

Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Underground storage tank management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Wildlife across our borders: a review of the illegal trade in Australia Erika Alacs* and Arthur Georges Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia Australian flora and fauna are highly sought for the international black market in wildlife. Within Australia

Canberra, University of

450

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

451

SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM · determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

452

wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wilDliFe Biology AnD conservAtion College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Biology Biology and several local offices of the federal and state conservation agencies. These agencies often--Wildlife Diseases................................................................3 WLF F433--Conservation

Hartman, Chris

453

FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics The Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville invites applications have at least one degree in Forestry from an SAF-accredited program. Demonstrated experience in field

Tennessee, University of

454

Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Declines in large wildlife increase landscape-level prevalence of rodent-borne disease in Africa) Populations of large wildlife are declining on local and global scales. The impacts of this pulse of size by directly or indirectly releasing controls on rodent density. We tested this hypothesis by experi- mentally

Hutchens, John

455

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

Bedrossian, Karen L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Visitors to Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia--their characteristics, attitudes, satisfactions and preferences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's influence. (7) Wildlife and wild-lands oriented recreation: Activities which permit people to enjoy wildlife and wild-lands. This recre- ation, whether on-site or off-site, is derived or generated on or from the refuge and its resources. (81 W'1dl...

Fowler, Ronald Lynn

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

Firestone, Jeremy

458

Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman, and Joshua D. Stafford Abstract Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

459

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

460

Water Budget Managers Report to Northwest Power Planning Council, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1985 was the third year of operation of the Water Budget Center under the guidance and supervision of the fishery agencies and tribal Water Budget Managers, and the second year of formal water budget implementation. The Water Budget Managers also directed the Smolt Monitoring and Water Budget Evaluation Programs of Section 304(d) of the Fish and wildlife Program. The Water Budget Managers work to implement policies and priorities of the state and federal fishery agencies and Indian tribes in carrying out applicable measures of the Fish and Wildlife Program. This report summarizes Water Budget Manager activities in implementing program measures, including 1985 flow conditions, water budget usage and spill management and problems encountered, and the 1985 Smolt Monitoring Program and preliminary results. Recommendations are included.

Karr, Malcolm H., Maher, Mark (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Material Stabilization Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides.

SPEER, D.R.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Medical Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey MathematicaMeasuringMedical Plans Medical Plans

463

Strategic Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutronStrategic Plan The strategic planning process1/7/2010

464

A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system for use in wildlife capture are described, including the standard 3-rocket system, are presented. Keywords: Rocket net, wildlife capture, trapping, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Arizona

465

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):100­105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for cavity-nesting birds WILLIAM C. PITT, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center elevation areas of the Alakai Plateau. Puaiohi nest primarily on steep streamside cliffs

466

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):58, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(1):5­8, Spring 2011 Use of illegal methods in Kenya's rural.O. Box 5496-30100, Eldoret, Kenya nsifuna@ yahoo.com Key words: human­wildlife conflicts, Kenya Wildlife depredation in Laikipia, Kenya Kenya's Laikipia District is located on the equator in the central part

467

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

Calkins, Brian

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

Graphical visualization of implemented storage databases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PC-program LANUC, developed from Admintec, supports a decentralized or centralized storage management of radioactive waste. It gives the storekeeper a graphical view of a storage area and its contents which are otherwise only represented in lists and databases. The storekeeper can plan any movements within the storage area and once they are confirmed, the data in the database are automatically altered. Any implemented database can be represented by simulating a human operator with a program.

Fischer, C.; Hamp, H.P. [Admintec GmbH, Pforzheim (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Quality Assurance (QA) Program Plan Conceptual Design Phase of Project W-521 Waste Feed Delivery Systems [SUPERSEDED BY RPP-6649 Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance implementation strategy for Project W-521 during conceptual design.

WHITE, K.A.

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Pollution prevention program plan 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan serves as the principal crosscutting guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Operations Office, laboratory, and contractor management to fully implement pollution prevention programs within the DOE complex between now and 2000. To firmly demonstrate DOE`s commitment to pollution prevention, the Secretary of Energy has established goals, to be achieved by December 31, 1999, that will aggressively reduce DOE`s routine generation of radioactive, mixed, and hazardous wastes, and total releases and offsite transfers of toxic chemicals. The Secretary also has established sanitary waste reduction, recycling, and affirmative procurement goals. Site progress in meeting these goals will be reported annually to the Secretary in the Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, using 1993 as the baseline year. Implementation of this plan will represent a major step toward reducing the environmental risks and costs associated with DOE operations.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Plan Your School Visit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit...

474

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the...

475

Energy planning and management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

EMERGENCY READINESS ASSURANCE PLAN (ERAP) FOR FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, Comprehensive Emergency Management System. The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for FY-15. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN-114, INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.

Shane Bush

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

River Protection Project (RPP) Environmental Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Program Plan was developed in support of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System Plan (ISMS) (RPP-MP-003), which establishes a single, defined environmental, safety, and health management system that integrates requirements into the work planning and execution processes to protect workers, the public, and the environment. The ISMS also provides mechanisms for increasing worker involvement in work planning, including hazard and environmental impact identification, analysis, and control; work execution; and feedback/improvement processes. The ISMS plan consists of six core functions. Each section of this plan describes the activities of the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly known as the Tank Waste Remediation System) Environmental organization according to the following core functions: Establish Environmental Policy; Define the Scope of Work; Identify Hazards, Environmental Impacts, and Requirements; Analyze Hazards and Environmental Impacts and Implement Controls; Perform Work within Controls; and Provide Feedback and Continuous Improvement.

POWELL, P.A.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page INTRODUCTION. Interpretation Defined Project Description. 2 3 THE AGENCY PLAN Mission Statement Park Operations Statement Past, Present, and Future Interpretation. RESOURCE INVENTORY 4 5 5 Flora and Fauna Cultural Resources. Park... Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program t for Lea Plan gl Plan g2 Plan g 3 Plan 44 Plan $5 Plan g6 Plan g7 Plan g8 Plan g9 Plan N10 Plan /11...

Herrick, Tommie L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wildlife implementation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Performance Demonstration Program Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To demonstrate compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization program, each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP serves as a quality control check against expected results and provides information about the quality of data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed by an independent organization to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. There are three elements within the PDP: analysis of simulated headspace gases, analysis of solids for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and analysis for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Because the analysis for TRU radionuclides using NDA techniques involves both the counting of drums and standard waste boxes, four PDP plans are required to describe the activities of the three PDP elements. In accordance with these PDP plans, the reviewing and approving authority for PDP results and for the overall program is the CBFO PDP Appointee. The CBFO PDP Appointee is responsible for ensuring the implementation of each of these plans by concurring with the designation of the Program Coordinator and by providing technical oversight and coordination for the program. The Program Coordinator will designate the PDP Manager, who will coordinate the three elements of the PDP. The purpose of this management plan is to identify how the requirements applicable to the PDP are implemented during the management and coordination of PDP activities. The other participants in the program (organizations that perform site implementation and activities under CBFO contracts or interoffice work orders) are not covered under this management plan. Those activities are governed by the organizations quality assurance (QA) program and procedures or as otherwise directed by CBFO.

Carlsbad Field Office

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Planning: The Key to Surviving Drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication outlines the steps that ranchers should take to survive a drought. Those steps include developing a plan for each enterprise of the operation, ranking strategic ranch goals, planning for resource flow, implementing and monitoring...

Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

High-Level Architectures for Contingency Planning in Air Traffic Management Chris. W. Johnson, DPhil;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was conducted to identify current and best practice in contingency planning. This paper provides a brief and implement drills/tabletop exercises to assess adequacy of plans for different scenarios. Fail to safe Phase

Johnson, Chris

484

DIGITAL ARCHITECTURE PROJECT PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an industry consensus document on how to scope and implement the underlying information technology infrastructure that is needed to support a vast array of real-time digital technologies to improve NPP work efficiency, to reduce human error, to increase production reliability and to enhance nuclear safety. A consensus approach is needed because: There is currently a wide disparity in nuclear utility perspectives and positions on what is prudent and regulatory-compliant for introducing certain digital technologies into the plant environment. For example, there is a variety of implementation policies throughout the industry concerning electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), cyber security, wireless communication coverage, mobile devices for workers, mobile technology in the control room, and so forth. There is a need to effectively share among the nuclear operating companies the early experience with these technologies and other forms of lessons-learned. There is also the opportunity to take advantage of international experience with these technologies. There is a need to provide the industry with a sense of what other companies are implementing, so that each respective company can factor this into their own development plans and position themselves to take advantage of new work methods as they are validated by the initial implementing companies. In the nuclear power industry, once a better work practice has been proven, there is a general expectation that the rest of the industry will adopt it. However, the long-lead time of information technology infrastructure could prove to be a delaying factor. A secondary objective of this effort is to provide a general understanding of the incremental investment that would be required to support the targeted digital technologies, in terms of an incremental investment over current infrastructure. This will be required for business cases to support the adoption of these new technologies.

Thomas, Ken

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Dioxin hazards to fish, wildlife, and invertebrates: a synoptic review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs) are present as trace impurities in various manufactured chemicals and in combustion products. The chemical and environmental stability of PCDDs and their tendency to accumulate in fatty tissues have resulted in their widespread detection throughout the global ecosystem. The most toxic and extensively studied PCDD isomer is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Accidental contamination of the environment by 2,3,7,8-TCDD has resulted in deaths in many species of birds, wildlife, and domestic animals, and in the closing of rivers to fishing due to high residues in fish, i.e., >50 parts per trillion (ppt) wet weight. Laboratory studies with birds, mammals, aquatic organisms, and other species have conclusively demonstrated that exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD can be associated with acute and delayed mortality, carcinogenic, teratogenic, reproductive, mutagenic, histopathologic, and immunotoxic effects.

Eisler, R.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization 2030 Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

And Development Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization 2030 Transportation Plan DRAFT FINAL REPORT Prepared by Neel-Schaffer, Inc... ? 2020 DEFICIENCIES ........................................................................................... 51 FIGURE 11 ? 2030 DEFICIENCIES ........................................................................................... 52 FIGURE 12...

Lafayette Metropolitan Planning Organization

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

Ramsey, G.F.

1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - awareness program plan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 5 Texas Transportation Institute, Agency 727 Energy Management and Conservation Plan (RP-49) Summary: and implements. TTI Employee Awareness...

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive management plan Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: adaptive management plan Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Summary: & Implement Management Options Monitor &...

490

11.701 Introduction to Planning and Institutional Processes in Developing Countries, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The planning process in developing countries. Interaction between planners and institutions at both national and local levels. Overview of theories of state, organizational arrangements, implementation mechanisms, and ...

Sanyal, Bishwapriya

491

Maps and Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shrouded door to box seats. Rose / Maps and Plans Re-Placing Places 20.1 Rose / Maps and Plans Re-Placing PlacesMaps and Plans Thomas Rose Architectural plans create the

Rose, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and other entities 1 to empower consumers (and perhaps others) through access to detailed energy information in electronic form-including real-time information from smart meters,...

493

2009 RARE PLANT CONSERVATION INITIATIVE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (May 4, 2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section 6 fund for listed species-late summer RFP GOCO NFWF-acres for America Economic stimulus

494

Microsoft Word - EXEC-2010-008725_2- Implementation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

potential impact on current and future DOE requirements for armed guards. Preliminary review indicates that, to the extent that the Interagency Security Committee standards may...

495

Scoping Plan Measures Implementation Timeline May 5, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARB 2010 2015 2.5 Regulation Tao Huai 24 Refinery Flare Recovery System Improvement I-4 C-155 ARB Refinery Regulations I-5 C-156 ARB, Local Air Districts Dec-10 2012