National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wildlife exposure factors

  1. Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  2. Wildlife Diseases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    with rodents and rodent- infested areas, by controlling rodent populations, and by proper sanitation. For additional information contact the nearest office of Texas Cooperative Extension?Wildlife Services.. TCE?Wildlife Services P.O. Box 100410 ? San Antonio...

  3. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Dosimetric measurements were performed to determine the exposure-to-dose conversion factors (Cx) for simple extremity phantoms suitable for extremity dosimeter performance testing. The phantoms studied represented the forearm or lower leg and the finger. Measurements were performed for solid plastic phantoms and for phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the simulated bone to the phantom surface. Photon beam energies used for the measurements ranged from 16 keV to 1.25 MeV (average). The Cx factors for the finger phantoms did not vary significantly with phantom composition. The Cx factors in the arm/leg phantoms with the bone simulant material differed significantly from those for the solid plastic phantom over the energy range of 40-100 keV. This effect was attributed to the preferential absorption of the lower energy backscattered photons by the higher atomic number material that was contained in the bone-simulant insert. The position of the bone-simulating material below the surface of the phantom was more important than its size or level of bone equivalency. For calibrations and dosimeter testing, Al was found adequate as a bone-simulating material.

  4. Wildlife Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23

    in large numbers may damage property and cause human health problems. ? Protecting crops, timber, rangeland and other natural resources from the damage caused by gophers, prairie dogs, feral hogs, raccoons, rabbits, coyotes, grackles, beavers and other... wildlife. When building dams, beavers may cause flooding of timber and pastureland and the loss of trees and field crops. Feral hogs damage field crops, pastures and riparian habitat by their feeding, trampling and rooting activities. ? Protecting livestock...

  5. Harvesting Rainwater for Wildlife 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Persyn, Russell A.; Porter, Dana; Dozier, Monty; Mecke, Michael; Kniffen, Billy

    2008-08-11

    Landowners can attract wildlife to their properties by installing rainwater catchment devices. This publication explains wildlife water sources, management considerations, rainfall catchment areas and wildlife tax valuation. It also illustrates...

  6. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Fish & Wildlife Program, which implements and provides policy and planning support for actions to meet BPAs fish and wildlife mitigation responsibilities under...

  7. Wildlife Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubicthe FOIA? TheWildlife Studies Studying Our

  8. Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ; methods used to assess hazards contaminants pose to fish and wildlife; sublethal and indirect effects" Session 2: Laboratory Toxicity Tests/ "Anatomy of an Oil Spill" Session 3: Factors Governing Test Results

  9. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

  10. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  11. Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pete Schmidt Wildlife Biologist March 2009 #12;OverviewOverview Location Importance to Fish system Anadromous fish remain Abundant wildlife remain Others working to improve habitat Connectivity & anadromous fish Local support MBCC support #12;HabitatHabitat TypesTypes Seasonal, forested, & scrub shrub

  12. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  13. Wildlife management assistance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with 1773 people participating. Biological data was collected on 76 deer, eight wild turkeys, 33 feral hogs, 58 ducks of two species, 75 gray squirrels, 4 raccoons, 9 bobwhites, and 484 fish of 9 species. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRS Site Use Committee entailed evaluating 81 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. The antlerless deer quota program continued in the district with 129 landowners in Aiken, Barnwell, and Orangeburg Counties being approved for antlerless harvest which required field investigations, acreage verification at tax offices, and personal correspondence. Bait sites for turkey trapping were maintained on the SRS for two months. Wildlife census work was conducted on wild turkey, bobwhite, mourning dove, furbearers, fox squirrels, and bald eagles on the SRS and in Aiken and Barnwell Counties. Three wetlands in Aiken County were evaluated for suitability with regard to wood duck boxes. Two wetland environmental review notices for the SRS were evaluated. Additional work on Wildlife Management Area land included reposting 50 miles of boundary in Aiken and Lexington County and removing signs form several tracts lost from the program. Future recommendations for the turkey and regulations brochures were submitted and WMA maps covering Aiken and Lexington Counties were updated.

  14. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  15. WILDLIFE MITIGATION RULE AND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to wildlife by 13 Columbia Basin hydropower dams for which habitat loss statements have been submitted to be general consensus that 35 percent was well . within the losses that could be attributed to hydropower of the habitat losses allocated to hydropower. During the 10- year period, the Council will focus on wildlife

  16. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):205­213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to corn at reducing wildlife damage to row crops rely on information concerning the spatial nature of wildlife damage at local and landscape scales. In this study we explored spatial patterns of wildlife damage within

  17. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  18. EIS-0246: Wildlife Mitigation Program, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Washington, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA has decided to adopt the set of prescriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) identified in the final EIS as “Alternative 6, Balanced Action (BPA’s Preferred Alternative).” This decision will standardize the planning and implementation process, while achieving balance among all decision factors: (1) meeting the biological objectives of wildlife mitigation projects, (2) achievement of cost and administrative efficiency, (3) compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, and (4) protection and improvement of other environmental resources when such actions would support wildlife mitigation.

  19. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Dimensions of Wildlife Research Norman Dandy Social & Economic Research Group #12;Wildlife) · Human-dimensions of species management (HDSM) Research Projects #12;Collaborative Frameworks for Land of woodland landscapes ­ discussion groups, · Choice experiments, · Fellowships / Placements, · Newsletters

  20. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  1. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impacts of hydropower dams on fish and wildlife. It also helps direct more than $250 million each year habitats in tributaries that have been damaged by development. A broad range of entities propose projects issues, as well as an independent panel of economists to provide guidance on questions of cost

  2. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  3. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  4. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  5. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  6. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  7. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

  8. Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Wildlife / dangerous Tree assessor's Course Workbook Wildland fire safeTy Course Module Revised from the "Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course ­ Forest Harvesting and Silviculture." Jeff Mc contributions to this current course workbook. #12;Danger Tree Assessor's Course July 2010 ii Library

  9. Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook Forest Harvesting and Silviculture: Ministry of Forests and Range Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook: Forest Harvesting and Silviculture Module May 2008 iii DANGEROUS TREE ASSESSMENT IN BRITISH

  10. Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University

  11. Wildlife Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelper JumpWild HorseWildlife

  12. Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers: Survey of Rehabilitators' Attitudes, Motivations, and Knowledge and Study of Animal Admittance to the South Plains Wildlife Rehabilitation Center by E. Kathleen Wildlife Rehabilitation Center for allowing me access to the wildlife admittance records and providing

  13. Reviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to wildlife management? Who opposes wildlife management and why? Change in the human dimensions of wildlifeReviewing the human dimensions of wildlife management and recreation Mariella Marzano Norman Dandy Centre for Human & Ecological Sciences Forest Research #12;Human Dimensions of Species Management http

  14. WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH WOODLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH WOODLANDS by Robert A. Hodorff A thesis submitted Sciences, South Dakota State University. 1985 #12;WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Date #12;WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO STAND STRUCTURE OF GREEN ASH

  15. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):182194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 7(2):182­194, Fall 2013 Vitals rates and seasonal movements of two the factors affecting the vital rates in these isolated populations. Livestock grazing by domestic cattle higher for both populations in 2005 than 2006. We attributed these annual differences in vital rates

  16. wildlife

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers andMEDA Station3/%2A| National48/%2A en

  17. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 Seotember 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas increases. Programs to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should

  18. Operational/Secondary Losses and Wildlife Monitoring Issues Wildlife Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to costs and manpower, likely cannot be applied at the scale needed to fully mitigate operational impacts with dual benefits and strive to mesh both fish and wildlife resources in the development of these ecosystem for the development of ecosystem approaches to mitigation that benefit both fish and wildlife resources, while keeping

  19. 46 The Wildlife Professional, Winter 2012 The Wildlife Society A New Forest Fire Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSante, David F.

    46 The Wildlife Professional, Winter 2012 © The Wildlife Society A New Forest Fire Paradigm paradigm--which holds that severe forest fires are always harmful--to a new one that embraces among forest types and regions, and fire severity differs with vegetation type, geographical location

  20. Track 3: Exposure Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

  1. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

    2010-09-01

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  2. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W.

    2010-08-04

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  3. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Evans, James W.; Parr, Patricia Dreyer

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  4. ITEP Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) webinar and learn the climate change challenges for fish and wildlife and what can be done to help safeguard fish, wildlife, and plants and the communities and economies that depend on them.

  5. The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP) Originally Written By: Edward L. Neilson, Jr. and Delwin E. Benson, Ph.D. Adapted From the 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program National..........................................................................................................................3 A Real Life Project

  6. Riparian Buffers for Wildlife Benefits of Riparian Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    , develop- ment, and recreation. Losing these buffers has negatively affected wildlife habitat and water the information you will need to create an effective riparian buffer for wildlife while pro- tecting water quality for wildlife; but they also improve water quality for humans. In general, the wider and more diversely planted

  7. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE The Power Act requires that the Council's power plan and Bonneville's resource acquisition program and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  8. Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Demand for Wildlife Hunting in the Southeastern United States Presented by: Neelam C. Poudyal... Number of studies scrutinized demand for wildlife hunting (Ziemer et al. 1980; Miller and Hay,1981). Essential to understand what influences hunting demand. Projecting how the future of wildlife hunting

  9. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    for Wind Farm Sitings #12;Ohio Map of Survey Effort #12;Wind Energy & Nebraska's Wildlife Map #12Wind Energy Development & Wildlife ­ Striving for Co-existence Caroline Jezierski Nebraska Wind Energy & Wildlife Project Coordinator ISU ­ October 26, 2012 #12;#12;Installed Wind Power Capacity http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/wind

  10. WILDLIFE SECTION 11 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 11-1 December 14, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of other activities associated with hydroelectric development have altered land and stream areas to protect, mitigate and enhance wildlife affected by hydroelectric development should consider the net

  11. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 39(3), 2003, pp. 712717 Wildlife Disease Association 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gompper, Matthew E.

    37996, USA; 3 New York State Museum, CEC 3140, Albany, New York 12230, USA; 4 Wildlife Conservation is important for understanding coyote pop- ulation limitation and understanding po- tential risks that coyote

  12. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. WFS 350 -WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGEMENT SPRING 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Lisa

    . Omaha, Nebraska, USA. Available on-line at: www.ianr.unl.edu/wildlife/solutions/handbook the lecture material, field trips, and assigned readings. General Reports: You must locate one current (no.). The written report will be graded as follows: 1. Report format, article selection, etc. 20 pts. 2. Writing

  14. WILDLIFE HABITAT RELATIONS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in California's Hardwood Rangelands1 Barrett A. Garrison2 Frank W. Davis3 The nine papers in the following. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Garrison and Davis Brief Overview of the Session on Wildlife Habitat and described a coordinated regional planning effort to conserve remaining habitats. Garrison and Standiford

  15. Role of domestic dogs in diseases of significance to humans and wildlife health in central Chile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The higher proximity among humans, domestic animals and wildlife favours disease spill-over both from wildlife to domestic animals and vice versa, which is a potential risk for the extinction of wildlife populations and ...

  16. California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Hydroelectric Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson...

  18. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California...

  19. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  20. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  1. BPA celebrates protection of Lemhi River fish and wildlife habitat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates-protection-of-Lemhi-River-fish-and-wildlife-habitat Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  2. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Nevada Department of...

  3. The Wildlife Society (TWS) GIS Annual Remote Sensing Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Chris

    1996-01-01

    Secretary/Treasurer, TWS GIS & Remote Sensing Working Group.The Wildlife Society (TWS) GIS Annual Remote Sensing Meetinghosted a special meeting of GIS and remote sensing interests

  4. Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03

    The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

  5. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

    1992-05-05

    An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

  6. EIS(DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOEEIS-0246SA-20) Allyn Meuleman, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch...

  7. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's net-zero energy visitor's center at the Assabet River National Wildlife.

  8. 2011Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report AnnuAl RePoRt to the noRthWest Gove | Northwest Power & Conservation Council Document 2012-11 | September 2012 #12;FIsh & WIlDlIFe Costs ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthWESt GOvERNORS costs 08

  9. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring that have significant capital and/or operating costs that would be borne, at least in part, by the power that the Council would develop the fish and wildlife program immediately after passage of the Act.5 In contrast

  10. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    PotentialWind Energy Resource Potential New U.S. Generating CapacityNew U.S. Generating Capacity Wind energy1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions

  11. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  12. Wildlife and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop's blog HomeWildlife and Wind Energy

  13. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoTherm GmbH JumpFishWildlife

  14. World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: navigation, searchWorld FuelWildlife Fund Jump

  15. Maternal exposure to metals—Concentrations and predictors of exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, A.C., E-mail: a.callan@ecu.edu.au [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Hinwood, A.L.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia)] [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Heyworth, J. [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McCafferty, P. [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia)] [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia); Odland, J.Ř. [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsř, N-9037 Tromsř (Norway)] [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsř, N-9037 Tromsř (Norway)

    2013-10-15

    A variety of metals are important for biological function but have also been shown to impact health at elevated concentrations, whereas others have no known biological function. Pregnant women are a vulnerable population and measures to reduce exposure in this group are important. We undertook a study of maternal exposure to the metals, aluminium, arsenic, copper, cobalt, chromium, lithium, manganese, nickel, selenium, tin, uranium and zinc in 173 participants across Western Australia. Each participant provided a whole blood and urine sample, as well as drinking water, residential soil and dust samples and completed a questionnaire. In general the concentrations of metals in all samples were low with the notable exception of uranium (blood U mean 0.07 µg/L, range <0.01–0.25 µg/L; urinary U mean 0.018 µg/g creatinine, range <0.01–0.199 µg/g creatinine). Factors that influenced biological concentrations were consumption of fish which increased urinary arsenic concentrations, hobbies (including mechanics and welding) which increased blood manganese concentrations and iron/folic acid supplement use which was associated with decreased concentrations of aluminium and nickel in urine and manganese in blood. Environmental concentrations of aluminium, copper and lithium were found to influence biological concentrations, but this was not the case for other environmental metals concentrations. Further work is underway to explore the influence of diet on biological metals concentrations in more detail. The high concentrations of uranium require further investigation. -- Highlights: • High concentrations of uranium with respect to international literature. • Environmental concentrations of Al, Cu and Li influenced urinary concentrations. • Exposure to mechanics/welding hobbies increased blood Mn concentrations. • Iron/Folic acid supplements reduced biological concentrations of Al, Ni and Mn.

  16. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-04-01

    Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  17. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

  18. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  19. iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK 98501-1091 Prepared by Pat E. Fowler, District Wildlife Biologist January 2001 Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Date #12;iiJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife TABLE OF CONTENTS

  20. DDA, A Water-Soluble DDT Metabolite, for Human Biomonitoring and Wildlife Exposure Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhenshan

    2011-01-01

    bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) to 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)2, 2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane] by the white rot fungus2, 2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane and 1, 1-dichloro-2, 2-

  1. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Bingham, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Goggin, Rita (Englewood, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Netter, Judy C. (Westminster, CO)

    2000-06-13

    Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

  3. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  5. TUBERCULOSIS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Biosafety Committee, the Infection Policy and Education Committee or the Environmental Health and Safety and Education Committee and Environmental Health and Safety. June 2013: Summary of Document Changes The major Provided by: Environmental Health &Safety Department June 2013 #12;TB Exposure Control Plan Environmental

  6. California high speed rail proposal: “High speed rail and wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Chapter Wildlife and High Speed Rail C ALIFORNIA H IGH SDan Leavitt, California High Speed Rail Authority) AbstractThe California High Speed Rail (HSR) Proposal is in the

  7. Tribal Wildlife Grant (FWS)- Grant Writing Strategy Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 23, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the FWS Tribal Wildlife Grant funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper Sustainably’s...

  8. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  9. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  10. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  11. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  12. Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Department of Wildlife Application for Energy Projects "Fund for the Recovery of Costs" Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  13. EA-0939: Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to secure land and conduct wildlife habitat enhancement and long term...

  14. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing roost sites, each within rock crevices in outcrops near the base of the Surry Mountain Lake dam

  15. Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, L.M.; Hicks, A.M.; Peters, J.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature in order to summarize the present knowledge on the association between parental occupational exposures to chemicals and the risk of childhood malignancy. The 32 studies pertaining to this topic were evaluated by considering various study qualities such as sample size, specificity of outcome, confounding, exposure specificity, and control selection. When evaluating the findings from any epidemiologic study, the potential sources of bias have to be considered. The selection of subjects, misclassification of exposure or outcome, and confounding from extraneous factors can contribute to a biased estimate of effect. Studies done to minimize these potential biases will be more valid, and these studies should be given the most weight when parental occupational exposures are evaluated as risk factors for childhood malignancy. We conclude that the preponderance of evidence supports the hypothesis that occupational exposure of parents to chemicals increases the risk of childhood malignancy. The parental occupational exposures implicated in childhood malignancy risk are exposure to chemicals including paints, petroleum products, solvents (especially chlorinated hydrocarbons) and pesticides, and exposure to metals. The available data do not allow the identification of specific etiologic agents within these categories of compounds. Future epidemiologic and toxicologic studies should be designed to pursue these leads. 49 references.

  16. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  17. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    and perinatal risk factors for autism. Journal of PerinatalB. (1979). Viral exposure and autism. American Journal ofage and the risk of autism spectrum disorder. American

  18. Segmenting participants on nonconsumptive wildlife-related recreation: a comparison of casual wildlife watchers and serious birders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, James Stuart

    1998-01-01

    birders. For this study, casual wildlife watchers were represented by holders of Texas Conservation Passports and serious birders were represented by member of the American Birding Association. These two subgroups were surveyed using a mail...

  19. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  20. Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, John Mapes

    2006-01-01

    A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

  1. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

  2. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) is the database of occupational radiation exposures for all monitored DOE employees, contractors,...

  3. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  4. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soults, Scott

    2009-08-05

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) was actively involved in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in late 2007, but due to internal conflicts, the AFIWG members has fractionated into a smaller group. Implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. As of 2008, The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (Work Group) is a coalition comprised of wildlife managers from three tribal entities (Kalispel Tribe, Kootenai Tribe, Coeur d Alene Tribe) and the US Army Corps of Engineers. The Work Group directs where wildlife mitigation implementation occurs in the Kootenai, Pend Oreille and Coeur d Alene subbasins. The Work Group is unique in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) wildlife managers in 1995, approved what was one of the first two project proposals to implement mitigation on a programmatic basis. The maintenance of this kind of approach through time has allowed the Work Group to implement an effective and responsive habitat protection program by reducing administrative costs associated with site-specific project proposals. The core mitigation entities maintain approximately 9,335 acres of wetland/riparian habitats in 2008.

  5. Bonneville Power Administration Wildlife Mitigation Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is responsible for mitigating the loss of wildlife habitat caused by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System. BPA accomplishes this mitigation by funding projects consistent with those recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The projects are submitted to the Council from Indian Tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, and other Federal agencies. Future wildlife mitigation actions with potential environmental impacts are expected to include land acquisition and management, water rights acquisition and management, habitat restoration and enhancement, installation of watering devices, riparian fencing, and similar wildlife conservation actions. BPA needs to ensure that individual wildlife mitigation projects are planned and managed with appropriate consistency across projects, jurisdictions, and ecosystems, as well as across time. BPA proposes to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects funded by BPA. Alternative 1 is the No Action alternative. Five standardizing alternatives are identified to represent the range of possible strategies, goals, and procedural requirements reasonably applicable to BPA-funded projects under a standardized approach to project planning and implementation. All action alternatives are based on a single project planning process designed to resolve site-specific issues in an ecosystem context and to adapt to changing conditions and information.

  6. Oriel UV Exposure Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumption (Million CubicLSDOriel UV Exposure Station

  7. Exposure Evaluation Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8)highlightsNew PhaseExposure Evaluation Process

  8. Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 2 Wildlife Biologist, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF), Sacramento; Senior Wildlife Biologist, Jones and Stokes Associates, Inc. Sacramento, California; Operations Research and GIS Specialist, CDF, Sacramento; and GIS Manager, Teale Data Center, Sacramento. Nancy D. Tosta2

  9. Privatization and regulatory oversight of commercial wildlife control activities in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Kieran J.

    2009-05-15

    Urbanization decreases the amount of natural habitat available to wildlife but some species are able to adapt to and even thrive in human-dominated landscapes. When humans and wildlife live in close proximity the number ...

  10. Nuisance Wildlife Education and Prevention Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of nuisance wildlife at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Nuisance wildlife management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; and law enforcement. This plan covers the following subjects: (1) roles and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and agencies; (2) the general protocol for reducing nuisance wildlife problems; and (3) species-specific methodologies for resolving nuisance wildlife management issues for mammals, birds, snakes, and insects. Achievement of the objectives of this plan will be a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA); U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-Wildlife Services (WS); and ORNL through agreements between TWRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC; and UT-Battelle, LLC; and USDA, APHIS-WS.

  11. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data The Wind Program hosted a...

  12. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  14. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  15. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  16. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  17. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  18. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  19. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  20. JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995 blank page #12;SECTION 5 JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION September 13, 1995 5-16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM temperature MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-17 September 13, 1995 program. If there are conflicting

  1. SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools #12;SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT A-1 Interactive and Washington during the Wildlife-Habitat Types in Oregon and Washington project. IBIS data is currently being

  2. New Hampshire Coverts Project Volunteers Working for Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    New Hampshire Coverts Project Volunteers Working for Wildlife 2014 Annual Report Written by: Haley) 862-5327 October 31, 2014 The New Hampshire Coverts Project is sponsored by UNH Cooperative Extension and New Hampshire Fish & Game. The program also receives support from the New Hampshire Division

  3. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Silver-haired bats do not remain in New Hampshire during the winter (see Izor 1979 for discussion to their summer habitat in New Hampshire (or, more gener- ally, to northern states; Cryan and Veilleux in press

  4. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Special Concern Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1 was listed as Threatened in New Hampshire between 1980 and 1986, was on the American Birds Blue List through

  5. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  6. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G4 State Rank: S2 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Breeding habitat for the rusty blackbird in New Hampshire

  7. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209 Associated Species: spruce grouse: Carol R. Foss Affiliation: New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat on mineral soils. In northern New Hampshire, these range from well or moderately well drained upland forests

  8. HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanB-10 Associated Species: Timber rattlesnake. Foss, Audubon Society of New Hampshire Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Appalachian oak pine forest systems are found mostly below 900 ft elevation in southern New Hampshire south

  9. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  10. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing found in similar shallow-water habitats in southernNewHampshire(JenkinsandBabbitt2003). The spotted, and a Species of Special concern in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Because their habitat overlaps

  11. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Jillian R. Kelly, New Hampshire Fish and Game Element 1). In the winter, spruce grouse feed entirely on short conifer needles (Nature- Serve 2005). New Hampshire natural

  12. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing, and Wisconsin (NatureServe 2004). New Hampshire and Maine represent the northernmost extent of the known to New Jersey are vulnerable to development. In New Hampshire, ringed boghaunter populations are limited

  13. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Eastern red bats inhabit New Hampshire during the summer. Individuals migrate to southern states in the fall and return to New Hampshire and other northern states in the spring (Cryan and Veilleux in press

  14. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing included peer-re- viewed literature, Breeding Bird Survey Database, New Hampshire's Breeding Bird Atlas, and expert consultation. 1.8 Extent and Quality of Data The annual breeding bird survey, New Hampshire

  15. O&M strategic plan Fish and Wildlife Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Update on O&M strategic plan Fish and Wildlife Committee February 10, 2015 #12;Background Over, but will continue to help BPA meet its mitigation requirements. 2 #12;O&M Strategic planning Initial steps #C) Next steps in developing a Strategic Plan for Public Review Proposed Categories Screens

  16. Wildlife damage management professionals deal with very few

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , environmental degradation, or disease transmission, feral hogs play a substantial role. Earlier this year damage caused by feral hogs, a growing threat is transmission of diseases, primarily pseudorabies, Washington, DC 20250-3402, USA William H. Clay #12;138 Human­Wildlife C

  17. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind by recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  18. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Kalama Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind by recovery and subbasin planning Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  19. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Gorge Framework Potential costs and economic considerations for recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. E Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Serv

  20. Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbasin II.G. Lewis Subbasin II.H. Lower Columbia Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin by recovery and subbasin planning. Appdx. D Economic Framework Potential costs and economic considerations;Lower Columbia Recovery Plan Steering Committee Mark Bagdovitz, US Fish and Wildlife Service John

  1. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  2. 8 Connecticut Wildlife March/April 2012 "How suddenly they

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelly, David Kiernan

    8 Connecticut Wildlife March/April 2012 "How suddenly they awake! Yesterday, as it were, asleep ­ Connecticut Science Center ; photos by Jonathan Richardson Filling occurs once leaves have fallen from in southern Connecticut to breed in March. Two images from the same vernal pond in central Connecticut

  3. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE AND WILDLIFE A Background Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instruments for the Conservation and Preservation of Wildlife Habitat in the Lower Fraser River Estuary), Brian Fairley (B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food), Kelly Fink (Canadian Forest Service, Fisheries and Food), and Bill Wareham (Ducks' Unlimited). The Forest Economics and Policy Analysis Research

  4. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):129131, Fall 2007 This issue of Human-Wildlife Conflicts focuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the management of feral hogs (Sus scrofa). As this exotic species has become more numerous apparent and alarming. How best to manage feral hogs has become one of the most vexing questions for wildlife agencies today, owing to society's mixed attitudes towards feral hogs (Rollins et al. 2007

  5. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):251260, Fall 2014 Wildlife strikes with U.S. military rotary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during deployments in the Middle East (e.g., Iraq), whereas, strikes to U.S. Air Force aircraft occurred, Iraq, military, rotary-wing aircraft, wildlife strikes During the last 2 decades, a great deal of armed conflict, and political upheaval has occurredintheMiddleEast(e.g.,Iraq)andsouth- central Asia (e

  6. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

  7. Student Stress Exposure: A Daily Path Perspective on the Connections among Cognition, Place, and the Socioenvironment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Nikki

    2012-10-19

    with physiological measurement are combined with individual narratives on stress, place, and social situations to examine socio-environmental factors that influence stress exposures. Mobile measurement tools include wristwatch Global Positioning System (GPS) units...

  8. Receptor modeling assessment of particle total exposure assessment methodology data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovleva, E.; Hopke, P.K.; Wallace, L.

    1999-10-15

    Data from the 1991 Particle Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (PTEAM) study in Riverside, CA, were analyzed using a new receptor modeling method. In this study, ambient (outdoor), indoor, and personal particulate matter (PM) concentrations and elemental concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} were measured for a number of participants. These measurements made is possible to relate the pollution to which people were exposed throughout their daily activities with the outdoor air conditions. Personal daytime concentrations of the PM{sub 10} and majority of elements were significantly higher than outdoor or indoor concentrations, suggesting that a significant part of personal aerosol exposure is the result of personal daily activities. Possible sources of additional particulate mass include resuspension of particles that penetrate from the outdoors and formation of new particles during cooking, smoking, etc. Positive matrix factorization analysis was performed to describe the sources of personal exposure. To identify relative contribution of different sources, regression of the particulate matter mass against the factor contributions was performed. Major sources of PM{sub 2.5} were oil combustion, nonferrous metal operations, and motor vehicles. The mass contributions of particles from these sources were similar for outdoor air and personal exposure. Personal exposure to particles from these sources can be controlled by changing outdoor sources. The primary source of PM{sub 10} was soil.

  9. RADON DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero, J.V.EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero, J.V.EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero, J.V.

  10. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  11. Cardiovascular effects of lead exposure.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, N D; Gonick, H C

    2008-01-01

    air quality standards for lead exposure, 2006. ReferencesM, Wen SW. Environmental lead level and pregnancy-inducedDong W, Poulter N. Blood lead and blood pressure: evidence

  12. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  13. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  15. Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naihua Duan

    2011-01-01

    human exposure to air pollution." SIMS Technical Report No.human exposure to air pollution." Environment International.Annual Meeting of the A i r Pollution Control Association,

  16. Montana Building with Wildlife Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004)Michigan:Montana Building with Wildlife

  17. Market-Based Wildlife Mitigation in Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois: Energy Resources JumpMarion,Market-Based Wildlife

  18. Wildlife Monitoring and Wind Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar: Demonstration of NREL's BioEnergyWildlife Monitoring and

  19. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  20. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  1. Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Tommie L.

    1994-01-01

    Sharing Texas Resources: Interpretation Handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tommie L. Herrick Nay 1994 Record of Study SHARZNG TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK POR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT A... Department Natural Resources Development SHARING TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK FOR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTNENT A Professional Paper by Tommie L. Herrick Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Edward H. Heath (Chairman...

  2. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  3. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  4. COLLISIONS BETWEEN LARGE WILDLIFE AND MOTOR VEHICLE IN MAINE: 1998 - 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van-Riper, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Source: As part of Maine Department of TransportationWILDLIFE AND MOTOR VEHICLE IN MAINE: 1998 - 2001 Robert Van-Environmental Office, Maine Department of Transportation,

  5. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Renewable Energy Programs Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Scott Johnston U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Brian Kinlan NCCOS-CMA-Biogeography Branch National Oceanographic...

  6. A GIS-based identification of potentially significant wildlife habitats associated with roads in Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Viani, Kevin; Hammond, Forrest; Slesar, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Capen. 1997. A report on the biophysical regions in Vermont.report prepared for the Vermont Ecomapping Roundtable.scientist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and

  7. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A: Workshop Agenda July 2013 Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication Dates: July...

  8. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

  9. A national comparison of structural factors affecting participation in selected wildlife-related activities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, William Roy

    1989-01-01

    . 92 15. 94 15. 56 15. 49 14. 80 14. 78 14. 68 14. 66 14. 36 14. 01 13. 80 13. 03 12. 89 12. 64 12. 20 12. 19 SD OR CO ME IA FL NE PA MN Ml VT AZ OK WA MO NH NM NV ND OH MA VA CA IL MD 40. 65 32. 19 29. 66 29... Angling State Hunting State Nonconsumptive VA NH NM 25. 51 25. 20 25. 13 23. 71 22. 94 AZ 10. 60 NC 10. 09 NH 9. 50 WA 9. 32 IN 9. 16 N AR 14. 36 14. 27 14. 18 13. 29 1 2. 73 DE 22. 59 NY 8. 69 12. 65 NV MD 21. 34 21. 18 20. 30...

  10. HumanWildlife Interactions 7(2):313324, Fall 2013 Factors influencing survival and productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pronghorn in a semiarid grass-woodland in east-central New Mexico louiS C. BeNdeR, Department of Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88001, USA JoN C. BoReN, Associate Dean and Director, Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University

  11. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2003-08-12

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS to deliver a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in chamber means that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  12. Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO)

    2004-11-23

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  13. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  14. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    of time outdoors and light levels as risk factors for myopiaH. C. (1995). Constant light produces severe cornealNg, H. , & Phillips, J. (2011) Light exposure patterns in

  15. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-03

    First they had a vision: welcome people into a building embracing environmental stewardship on land that is steeped in history. The designers of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took this vision and designed a new energy-efficient and environmentally friendly visitor center for the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge located in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

  16. Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Participatory wildlife surveys in communal lands: a case study from Simanjiro, Tanzania Fortunata U and Sustainability, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JN, U.K.; 3 Tanzania National Parks, PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania; 4 Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania; 5 Center for Collaborative

  17. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  18. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):240247, Fall 2008 Mammalian hazards at small airports in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fence maintenance is vital for effective wildlife- strike management at small airports. Key words,000 hours of aircraft downtime each year and cost the civil aviation industry >$556 million annually (Cleary the inception of aviation 100 years ago (Sodhi 2002). Unfortunately, the probability of wildlife strikes

  19. INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (ISAB) REVIEW OF THE 2009 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM Kate of ocean conditions on fish and wildlife populations." #12;Relationship between CRB and Ocean Ecosystems Columbia R Basin Ecosystem Ocean Ecosystem Anadromous fish Viability Abundance, productivity, spatial

  20. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs are reaching out to these varied interests to form a coalition to secure the necessary funding appreciation of the natural world and how they might act to insure that wildlife remains a part of it

  1. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  2. New Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    preservation and other activities associated with traditional game management. Fortunately, much of the knowledge and techniques developed for game #12;management can be transferred to considerations of wildlifeNew Dimensions of Visual Landscape Assessment Wildlands Management for Wildlife Viewing1 Tamsie

  3. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  4. National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:Information Wildlife Refuge System Administration

  5. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSetIdaho: EnergyNatural Resources Code JumpWildlife

  6. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColorado Parks and Wildlife Rules and Regulations

  7. Review and validation of exposure assessment methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research is twofold, to standardize and to validate exposure assessment methods. First, the attempt is made to standardize the manner in which exposure assessment methods are developed. Literature on the subject is reviewed...

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  13. Biomarkers of exposure to complex environmental mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naufal, Ziad Sami

    2009-05-15

    Maternal exposure to genotoxic chemicals may produce a variety of adverse birth outcomes. Depending on the dose and duration of exposure, adverse birth outcomes can range from premature or low-birth weight, to congenital ...

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  15. RADON DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    heat exchanger. Both the radon-2? 2 concentration (a) andMeeting on the Assessrm of Radon and Daughter Exposure andItaly, March 3-7, 1980 RADON-DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-

  16. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  2. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  3. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BULLETIN 101 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Doualas McKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

  4. Lead Exposure Alters the Development of Agonistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delville, Yvon

    Lead Exposure Alters the Development of Agonistic Behavior in Golden Hamsters M. Catalina Cervantes@mail.utexas.edu ABSTRACT: We tested the effects of exposure to different doses of lead acetate (either 0, 25, 100, or 400-specific effect of lead exposure on the development of aggression during puberty at doses resulting in blood

  5. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  6. An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-15

    The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

  7. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkins, Brian

    2007-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

  8. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  9. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  10. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  11. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  12. INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -site measures and programs -- respond to the impacts on fish and wildlife caused by the region's hydroelectric and management of hydroelectric facilities located on the Columbia River and its tributaries, while assuring

  13. The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Fish and Wildlife Service Manual, Part 340 FW 3: Rights-of-Way and Road Closings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  14. SampleSize 1.1 Sample Size Calculations for Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box 3621 Portland, OR 97208-3621 Project of design variables. This project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, US Department of Energy

  15. Assessing Attitudes Toward Wildlife Ownership in United StatesMexico Borderlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Park & Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA ANGELA G. MERTIG Department or access to it on game ranches) made some wildlife species a potentially valuable asset for landowners

  16. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  17. Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

  18. The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Etienne Samuel

    2006-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

  19. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01

    The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the wave conditions in the channel in order to evaluate the respective energies...

  20. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):296297, Fall 2009 Richard A. Dolbeer: scientist, innovator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and produced advances in how airport habitats should be managedtoreduceusebywildlife,inthedesign of turbine-powered engines and airframes to withstand bird strikes, and in how wildlife strike data are reported

  1. Cadmium, lead and mercury exposure in non smoking pregnant women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinwood, A.L., E-mail: a.hinwood@ecu.edu.au [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Callan, A.C.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia)] [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Heyworth, J. [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McCafferty, P. [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia)] [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia); Odland, J.Ř. [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsř, N-9037 Tromsř (Norway)] [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsř, N-9037 Tromsř (Norway)

    2013-10-15

    Recent literature suggests that exposure to low concentrations of heavy metals may affect both maternal and child health. This study aimed to determine the biological heavy metals concentrations of pregnant women as well as environmental and dietary factors that may influence exposure concentrations. One hundred and seventy three pregnant women were recruited from Western Australia, each providing a sample of blood, first morning void urine, residential soil, dust and drinking water samples. Participants also completed a questionnaire which included a food frequency component. All biological and environmental samples were analysed for heavy metals using ICP-MS. Biological and environmental concentrations of lead and mercury were generally low (Median Pb Drinking Water (DW) 0.04 µg/L; Pb soil <3.0 µg/g; Pb dust 16.5 µg/g; Pb blood 3.67 µg/L; Pb urine 0.55; µg/L Hg DW <0.03; Hg soil <1.0 µg/g; Hg dust <1.0 µg/g; Hg blood 0.46 µg/L; Hg urine <0.40 µg/L). Cadmium concentrations were low in environmental samples (Median CdDW 0.02 µg/L; Cdsoil <0.30 ug/g; Cddust <0.30) but elevated in urine samples (Median 0.55 µg/L, creatinine corrected 0.70 µg/g (range <0.2–7.06 µg/g creatinine) compared with other studies of pregnant women. Predictors of increased biological metals concentrations in regression models for blood cadmium were residing in the Great Southern region of Western Australia and not using iron/folic acid supplements and for urinary cadmium was having lower household annual income. However, these factors explained little of the variation in respective biological metals concentrations. The importance of establishing factors that influence low human exposure concentrations is becoming critical in efforts to reduce exposures and hence the potential for adverse health effects. -- Highlights: • Biological heavy metals concentrations in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. • Exposure assessment including environmental, lifestyle and activity data. • Urinary cadmium concentrations were elevated in this group of pregnant women. • Blood lead and mercury concentrations were below recommended biological guideline values.

  2. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  3. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  4. Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naihua Duan

    2011-01-01

    in air pollution risk assessment and management. With thepollution." In: Total Exposure Assessment Methodology: A New Horizon, 166-195, Air and Waste Management

  5. 2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU

    2012-12-12

    This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

  6. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  7. Effect of co-exposure and cadmium in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, S.K.; Tewari, P.C.

    1987-10-01

    Metabolism and toxicity of heavy metals may be influenced by certain factors such as protein malnutrition, essential element deficiency or alcoholism. Ethanol has been found to enhance the absorption of lead in body and alcoholics have been reported to be more susceptible to lead intoxication. As alcoholism may be common among industry workers and a significant section of population, who may be exposed to cadmium, it was considered of interest to investigate the influence of ethanol-cadmium co-exposure on cadmium sensitive hepatic, renal and serum enzymes, tissue accumulation of cadmium, essential trace element status and cadmium induced hepatic metallothione in synthesis in rats.

  8. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  9. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Fish and Wildlife Projects in Montana, November 28-29, 1984.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drais, Gregory

    1985-01-01

    Brief summaries of projects investigating the impacts of hydroelectric power projects in Montana on fish and wildlife values are presented. (ACR)

  10. Strategies for restoring ecological connectivity and establishing wildlife passage for the upgrade of Route 78 in Swanton, Vermont: an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, John M.; Ferguson, Mark; Gingras, Glenn; Bakos, Greg

    2003-01-01

    on Black bears in Vermont. Stratton Mountain Black BearStudy. Final Report. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources,biologist with the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

  11. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  12. Formaldehyde Exposure Control Plan Procedure: 6. 09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Formaldehyde Exposure Control Plan Procedure: 6. 09 Version: 2.0 Effective 8.2.2013 1 A. PURPOSE To maintain formaldehyde exposure below the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Formaldehyde Standard 29 CFR 1910.1048 established action level (AL) 0.5 ppm, permissible

  13. Environmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes: A Reference for State Officials to Use in Decision-making Background The issue of formaldehyde exposure in homes is long-standing and has been studied over time. Formaldehyde is frequently used in plywood, fiberboard, resins, glues, and several

  14. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Tony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Vu, Toni [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hicks, Deanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pritchard, Kathleen [Department of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  15. UNBC Continuing Studies -WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9 TEL: 250-960-5980 FAX: 250-960-5984 TOLL FREE: 1-866-843-8061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    UNBC Continuing Studies - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE REGISTRATION FORM UNBC CONTINUING STUDIES 3333 form. Name Telephone Number Email Address COURSE INFORMATION - WILDLIFE DANGER TREE ASSESSOR

  16. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  17. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  18. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):199204, Fall 2007 A landscape-level survey of feral hog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):199­204, Fall 2007 A landscape-level survey of feral hog impacts of feral hog (Sus scrofa) on the natural resources of the Big Thicket National Preserve (BTNP), a unit years. Key words: Big Thicket National Preserve, exotic species, feral hog, human­wildlife conflicts

  19. GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GAL.BLAYDES-FIRESTONE.DOC 11/19/2008 2:01 PM [1167] WIND POWER, WILDLIFE, AND THE MIGRATORY BIRD by discussing the rapid domestic growth of wind power and the implications for turbine-related avian and bat Fish and Wildlife Service-- all in an effort to ensure that wind power, which provides a cost

  20. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(1):100105, Spring 2011 A rat-resistant artificial nest box for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The sole population of about 500 birds is currently restricted to remote, higher, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880, Hilo, HI 96721, USA will.pitt@aphis.usda.gov LAURA C. DRISCOLL, USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services' National Wildlife Research Center, Hawaii Field Station, P.O. Box 10880

  1. Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, USA Tel.: (Office) +1 864.656.6190, (Home) +1 864.653.3872 Email: pjodice-June 2004), U.S. Geological Survey, South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson

  2. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-02

    BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  4. Human Factors @ UB Fall 2010 Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . Outsourcing aviation maintenance: Hu- man factors implications, specifically for communications. C. Drury, K. Guy, C. Wenner. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 2010, 20, 124 ­ 143. #12;2 Human Factors

  5. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 2012 Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 12TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 12th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH AvEnuE, Su

  6. FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs < PAGE 1 Draft 2013 Columbia River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH AnnuAL REPORT TO THE nORTHWEST GOvERnORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13th ANNUAL REPORt tO thE NORthwEst GOvERNORs > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIxTH Av

  7. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  8. The role of the duty factor in ultrasound-mediated cardiac stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    @illinois.edu, wdo@illinois.edu Abstract: The role of the duty factor (DF) in ultrasound-mediated car- diac- controlled platform in dorsal recumbency for ultrasonic cardiac exposure. Respiratory rate, heart rate

  9. Assessment of Technologies Used to Characterize Wildlife Populations in the Offshore Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-12-09

    Wind energy development in the offshore environment can have both direct and indirect effects on wildlife, yet little is known about most species that use near-shore and offshore waters due in part to the difficulty involved in studying animals in remote, challenging environments. Traditional methods to characterize offshore wildlife populations include shipboard observations. Technological advances have provided researches with an array of technologies to gather information about fauna from afar. This report describes the use and application of radar, thermal and optical imagery, and acoustic detection technologies for monitoring birds, bats, and marine mammals in offshore environments.

  10. Woody Plants for Wildlife: Brush Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.; Taylor, Richard B.

    1999-10-01

    &M University System; Wildlife Biologist, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. L-5332 9-99 Loc. Food Co ver W ater S E Species T P Forage M ast Fruit Protection Nesting Roosting P Agarito, desert holly, Mahonia trifoliolata 44 b i o i o B F o B F o B F Allthorn... Sculpting in South Texas and the Edwards Plateau Robert K. Lyons, Tim F. Ginnett and Richard B. Taylor* O ur perspective is changing on the value of brush or woody plants. When Texas rangeland was used primarily for livestock, managing brush meant...

  11. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine

    2009-04-03

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  12. DOE 2014 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report REMS RF RL SLAC SNL SPEAR3 SPRU SRNS SRR SRS Sv TED TEqD TJNAF U-234 UMTRA USEC WIPP WVDP Y-12 Radiological Control Standard Roentgen equivalent in man Radiation Exposure...

  13. Industrial Hygiene Exposure Predictor Model | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Track 3-2 Topics Covered: Aspects of an Industrial Hygiene Exposure Agreement Risk Assessment Considerations When is sampling appropriate and pertinent to the exposure...

  14. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thrall, Karla D. (3804 Alder Lake Ct., West Richland, WA 99353); Kenny, Donald V. (6947 Sparrow La., Worthington, OH 43235); Endres, George W. R. (2112 Briarwood Ct., Richland, WA 99352); Sisk, Daniel R. (1211 Marshall Ave., Richland, WA 99352)

    1997-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

  15. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  16. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  17. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  18. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Approaches to a Statewide Pedestrian Exposure Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

    2007-01-01

    Pedestrian Exposure Database, March 23, 2007 Federal TransitNational Transit Database. http://www.ntdprogram.gov/Implementation of a National Database of Air Passenger

  19. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Approaches to a Statewide Pedestrian Exposure Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

    2007-01-01

    C.Radisch. Travel Choices in Pedestrian Versus Automobile-141. City of Berkeley. Pedestrian Master Plan. Draft FinalApproaches to a Statewide Pedestrian Exposure Database,

  20. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Transcription Factor Encyclopedia. Genome Biology 2012 13:Factor Encyclopedia. Gen- ome Biology 2012, 13:000. where ‘Biology 2012, 13:R24 http://genomebiology.com/2012/13/3/R24 SOFTWARE Open Access The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

  1. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Findings) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council oversees the development, amendment by the development and operation of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, known

  2. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Findings) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council oversees the development, amendment by the development and operation of the hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries, known

  3. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(2):257265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 4(2):257­265, Fall 2010 Bullet fragmentation and lead deposition to North Dakota's program. Therefore, we analyzed fragmentation patterns and lead deposition in carcasses fragments and lead deposits throughout the entire abdominal cavity of carcasses. We also used 2 types

  4. 136 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    136 Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems BRUCE D. LEOPOLD that is growing in importance throughout the southeastern United States: feral hogs. Being in Mississippi, I am in crops to corn for biofuels will greatly enhance our feral hog populations. In Mississippi alone

  5. Wildlife management assistance report. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with 1773 people participating. Biological data was collected on 76 deer, eight wild turkeys, 33 feral hogs, 58 ducks of two species, 75 gray squirrels, 4 raccoons, 9 bobwhites, and 484 fish of 9 species. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRS Site Use Committee entailed evaluating 81 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. The antlerless deer quota program continued in the district with 129 landowners in Aiken, Barnwell, and Orangeburg Counties being approved for antlerless harvest which required field investigations, acreage verification at tax offices, and personal correspondence. Bait sites for turkey trapping were maintained on the SRS for two months. Wildlife census work was conducted on wild turkey, bobwhite, mourning dove, furbearers, fox squirrels, and bald eagles on the SRS and in Aiken and Barnwell Counties. Three wetlands in Aiken County were evaluated for suitability with regard to wood duck boxes. Two wetland environmental review notices for the SRS were evaluated. Additional work on Wildlife Management Area land included reposting 50 miles of boundary in Aiken and Lexington County and removing signs form several tracts lost from the program. Future recommendations for the turkey and regulations brochures were submitted and WMA maps covering Aiken and Lexington Counties were updated.

  6. Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -hydro agency responsibilities. #12;2 Strategic Category: Hydro RM&E The following are the primary management1 Fish and Wildlife Management Questions and RM&E Strategies Key Management Questions 1. Are we implemented and accomplished as proposed? Strategic Category: Fish Population Status Monitoring The following

  7. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 Section 12 FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT Much of this program has focused on mitigating damage done for additional federal hydroelectric projects and to plan for new development in the basin. The Federal Energy

  8. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. 16 SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS The Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system is a limited resource and reliable energy supply. This is so even though the hydroelectric operations specified for fish and wildlife peaking needs. On average, hydroelectric generation is reduced by about 1,200 average megawatts, relative

  9. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  10. Notes From the Chair 2 Revised Fish and Wildlife Program 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adds to its cost, is a major question for the Council as it develops its Sixth Power Plan. On the fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams. The power plan's goal is to ensure the region of an adequate, efficient, econom- ical, and reliable power system. In 2009, the Council will develop and complete its Sixth

  11. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project would be located. Within the tidal marsh there were also tidal creeks and guts. The following list

  12. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):235244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animalvehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):235­244, Fall 2014 Examining patterns of animal­vehicle collisions, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People's Re- public of China, 100083 Abstract: Animal­vehicle collisions (AVCs) cause animal death, human injury, and vehicle damage. Uncovering the general patterns

  13. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):194199, Fall 2008 How people should respond when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a black bear, mountain lion, or wolf, most respondents said to fight back. Opinion was divided over, carnivores, grizzly bear, human­wildlife conflicts, mountain lion, predator attacks, wolf Attacks by large). Black bears (Ursus americana), grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), mountain lions (Puma concolor), and gray

  14. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  15. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  16. SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

  17. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  18. UNITED STATES DEPARTMEl\\1T OF THE I NTERI OR FI SH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMEl\\1T OF THE I NTERI OR FI SH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Washington} D. C. } 20240. A simple penetrometer for the measurement of texture ch::mges in canned salmon. Gulf States shrimp cinnin on spoil age characteri stics. Equi pment Kote #8 - New hydraulically driven block speeds hauling crab -pot

  19. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  20. COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Wildlife Major: Natural Resources Conservation Option: Natural Resources Science Education For Students Graduating Elective 3 13 15 SENIOR YEAR FOR CSES 4334 3444 Prin. of Agroforestry (fall) OR World Crops & Crop Systems

  1. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(1):130144, Spring 2010 Evaluation of damage by vertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    survey, distress call, grapes, human­wildlife conflicts, Meleagris gallopavo, vineyards, wild turkey range have resulted in conflict with human interests. Complaints include turkeys causing a nuisance in the Napa Valley and Sierra Foothills American Viticultural Areas of California. We conducted damage surveys

  2. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  3. Evaluation of dietary factors associated with spontaneous pancreatitis in dogs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lem, Kristina Yvonne

    2009-05-15

    ). Based on information extracted from the medical records, ingesting unusual food (OR=4.3; CI=1.7 to 10.7), ingesting table food (OR=1.5; CI=1.0 to 2.2), or exposure to both of these dietary factors (OR=2.1; CI=1.3 to 3.2) increased the odds...

  4. Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy CSUF has developed the Lead Exposure Management Plan to reduce occupational and environmental exposure to lead, a potent neurotoxin and carcinogen that causes considers the nature of the task involved, confirmed and presumed exposures, and the lead content

  5. RPR 1B. REQUEST FOR RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RPR 1B. REQUEST FOR RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY (Please type or print legibly) Organization: Address:...

  6. Policy on Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogens (BBP) and other Occupational Exposures or Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    clinical site to provide evaluation and treatment of health care workers who have sustained a BBP exposure for initial evaluations. Effective management of HIV exposure may require the administration of antiviral at DMS during day hours or the Dean on Call at other times (numbers and schedule in the student handbook

  7. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  8. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  9. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  10. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  11. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-06-15

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research.

  12. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1998 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health with support from Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  13. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  14. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  15. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  16. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2002 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  17. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

    1997-07-08

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

  18. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

    2011-01-07

    Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

  19. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  20. COORDINATED IMPLEMENTATION, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION SECTION 3 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 3-2 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-2 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 3 COORDINATED IMPLEMENTATION, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION September 13, 1995 3-2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM address progress, problems and issues regarding program

  1. Is the 10-Year Wildlife Cycle Induced by a Lunar Cycle? Author(s): Herbert L. Archibald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    work(s): Source: Wildlife Society Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 3 (Autumn, 1977), pp. 126-129 Published by.22 represents the vernal equinox (21 March) in 1950. At this time, the moon's declination attained a maximum

  2. United states Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secret ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United states Department of the Interior, Oscar L. Chapman, Secret ary Fish and Wildlife Service in the water by means of floats on the top line and held downward by weights on the bottom line to act

  3. VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION WILDLIFE CROSSING TEAM; BUILDING AN INTER-AGENCY PLANNING TOOL TO ADDRESS ECOLOGICAL CONNECTIVITY IN VERMONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slesar, Chris; Morse, Susan C.; Austin, John M.

    2003-01-01

    He serves as chair of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibianis coordinator of the Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas.biologist with the Vermont Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. John

  4. HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    HEALTH PROFESSIONS RECRUITMENT & EXPOSURE PROGRAM 2015 (HPREP) Northwestern University's Feinberg in pursuing a career in the health professions, e.g. physician, nurse, physical therapist, or pharmacist students Information on different health professions and fields of medicine This program is looking

  5. Stimulus exposure effects in human associative learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gluck, Mark

    Stimulus exposure effects in human associative learning Catherine E. Myers Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, U.S.A. Lindsay M. Oliver Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, U.K. Stacey G. Warren should be sent to Catherine E. Myers, Department of Psychology, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 07102, U

  6. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  7. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  8. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  9. Effect of environmental factors on film badge dosimetry readings of dental office personnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, W.K.; Kaugars, G.E.; Broga, D.W. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Inadvertent exposure of film badges to environmental factors may produce fogging of the film and yield higher radiation exposure readings. Common environmental factors in everyday living were studied to assess their effect on film badge readings. Only heat appeared to have any significant effect, because moisture, chemicals, pressure, cold temperature, and non-work-related electromagnetic radiation did not substantially alter film badge readings. Therefore not all unexplained high readings on personnel film badge reports may be due to heat or other common environmental factors evaluated in this study.

  10. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  11. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Economic Decisions with Wildlife in Mind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Warminski , Patrick; Jones, DeDe

    2009-04-07

    and includes drilling, casing, capping, gravel, packing, and slush pit digging. Windmill expenses include mill, tower, sucker rod, pipe removal and replacement, and cylinder pump. Storage facilities are not included in the estimate. In some areas 4 gallons... with conventional agricultural operations. Using partial budget analysis for planning will help de- termine if a landowner?s return on investment is greater than the proposed expenditures. Implementing a sound wildlife management plan that fits landowner...

  12. Resistance to Antibiotics of Clinical Relevance in the Fecal Microbiota of Mexican Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristóbal-Azkarate, Jurgi; Dunn, Jacob C.; Day, Jennifer M. W.; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.

    2014-09-18

    further confirmed this by aligning the sequences with in-house control sequences using the MEGA5 software [34]. For further corroboration of felid species identification, we used a second molecular marker, a species- specific fragment polymorphism of a... role in determining ATBR in wildlife, as some species come in to more frequent contact with humans, human landscapes, or domestic animals than others [19–21]. However, very few studies have traced resistance genes found in antibiotic-free environments...

  13. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  14. Growth Kinetics of Wildlife E. coli Isolates in Soil and Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Meghan

    2012-07-16

    water microcosm were spread plated onto MacConkey agar (Difco?) plate at different sampling times. The E. coli concentrations (CFU/mL) were recorded at each sampling time. The kinetic characteristics of E. coli strains in water at different... KINETICS OF WILDLIFE E. COLI ISOLATES IN SOIL AND WATER A Thesis by MEGHAN ANNE GALLAGHER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  15. An Evaluation of the Importance of Hand Exposures Using Rubber Latex Gloves as Sampling Dosimeters for Assessing Pesticide Exposures in Strawberry Harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaran, Gayatri

    2012-01-01

    Fungicide Exposures of Strawberry Harvesters Using THPI as apesticide residues in strawberries, particularly preformedof pesticide residues for strawberry harvester exposure

  16. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  17. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  18. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise This study...

  20. Changes in gene expression following EMF exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Loberg, L.; Gauger, J.; McCormick, D.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on specific gene expression, an effect that can be deleterious, beneficial, or neutral, depending on the long-term consequences; however, the proof of a reproducible, quantitative biological effect (such as change in gene expression) will lead to latter experiments aimed at determining the relative contribution of these changes to cellular consequences. Past work by ourselves and by others has shown that measures of gene expression are extremely sensitive indicators of the cellular and biological effects of ionizing radiation, with transcriptional changes being detected by exposure of cells to doses of {gamma}-rays as low as 0.01 cGy that have no pronounced cellular consequences. On the basis of this work, the authors hypothesized that measures of gene expression will be equally sensitive to EMF effects on cells.

  1. Exposure of Santa Cruz Wharf Anglers to Domoic Acid Toxins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Silver, Mary W

    2009-01-01

    pier anglers’ consumption of self-caught seafood containingand exposure through consumption of self-caught seafood have

  2. Chapter 2. Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 2. Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure Prepared by Thomas D. Matte, MD of Residential Lead Exposure Table 2.1. Summary of Recommendations for Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure Make prompt and effective environmental management for children with EBLLs the highest

  3. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  4. Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janeen Denise Robertson

    1999-02-01

    In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

  5. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  6. Microsoft Word - exposure_request_form.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 Assessment ofLana CoxWhat?Copper23 atEXPOSURE REQUEST

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-09-13

    BPA proposes to partially fund the acquisition of 7,630 acres of shrub-steppe, riparian, and wetland habitat in northern Franklin County, Washington. Title to the land will be transferred initially to The Conservation Fund and ultimately for inclusion as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Passive management practices will take place on the land until an official management plan is developed and approved for the property. Some short-term control of invasive, exotic plant species may occur as necessary prior to the approval of a management plan. The compliance checklist for this project was completed by Randy Hill with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge and meets the standards and guidelines for the Wildlife Mitigation Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). A comprehensive management plan will be prepared for the property after it is acquired and will follow the guidelines and mitigation measures detailed in the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS and ROD. No plant or animal species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will be affected by the fee-title purchase of the subject property. Mark Miller with the Eastern Washington Ecological Services Office of USFWS concurred with this finding on August 3, 2001. Section 7 consultation will be conducted by BPA and USFWS, as necessary, prior to the implementation of any restoration or enhancement activities on the site. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) and USFWS policy, the addition of the Eagle Lakes property to the National Wildlife Refuge System does not constitute an undertaking as defined by the NHPA, or require compliance with Section 106 of the NHPA. Anan Raymond, Regional Archaeologist with USFWS Region 1 Cultural Resource Team, concurred with this finding on May 4, 2001. Compliance with NHPA, including cultural resources surveys, will be implemented, as necessary, once specific management activities are proposed for the property. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is encountered during developments that might occur prior to a cultural resource survey, an archeologist will immediately be notified and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. A Level I Contaminants Survey was completed on April 3, 2000 by Toni Davidson, Environmental Contaminants Specialist with the USFWS Upper Columbia River Basin Field Office. The survey found that overall the lakes, wetlands, and terrestrial habitats on the site appear to be in a healthy condition. The only concern expressed in the survey report was over the presence of two household/farm dumps. As a requirement of the Eagle Lakes sale, the landowner agreed to remove the dumps to the satisfaction of the USFWS contaminant specialist before the title to the land is transferred. A follow-up survey will be conducted to confirm compliance with this requirement of sale. Public involvement associated with this project has included written notification and solicitation of comments to interested parties, adjacent landowners, local tribes, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and sports clubs. Public response from the mail-out indicated general support for the project, although some questions were raised about the provision of seasonal hunting and fishing on the property. These types of questions will be addressed in the development of a management plan for the Eagle Lakes land. Because of initial favorable comments on this project, it was decided that subsequent public meetings and/or workshops were not warranted.

  8. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2015-03-18

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0 × 108 to 2.2 × 1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2 × 106 to 2 × 107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in themore »chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. In most cases, for a specific SOA type the most-oxidized chamber SOA and the least-oxidized flow reactor SOA have similar mass spectra, oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios, and carbon oxidation states at integrated OH exposures between approximately 1 × 1011 and 2 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, or about 1–2 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. This observation suggests that in the range of available OH exposure overlap for the flow reactor and chambers, SOA elemental composition as measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer is similar whether the precursor is exposed to low OH concentrations over long exposure times or high OH concentrations over short exposure times. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.« less

  9. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  10. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  11. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-18

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  12. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-40)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-07-16

    BPA proposes to fund the acquisition of two parcels in Benewah County, Idaho with the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These parcels encompass approximately 475 acres of riparian and potential riparian habitat along Hangman Creek on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The goal of this project is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

  13. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof Energy Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward

  14. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof Energy Fish and Wildlife Service Moves

  15. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  16. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yde, Chris A.

    1984-10-01

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

  17. The MX Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Factor Test films played a strategic-planning role in the debates of the late 1970s and early 1980s about where and how to deploy the MX intercontinental ballistic missile...

  18. Power Factor Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    and disadvantages of various locations in the electrical network are described including the cost of installation and network capacity improvement. Sizing of capacitors is also covered. Finally, some case studies involving power factor improvement are presented...

  19. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Before PF 100142 0.70 or 70% After PF 100105 0.95 or 95% PB References: B.C. Hydro. Power Factor. The GEM Series. October 1989. Commonwealth Sprague Capacitor, Inc....

  20. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  1. Optimizing Power Factor Correction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    FACTOR CORRECTION Robert K. Phillips and Louis C. Burmeister, Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers... consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 k\\~ and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results...

  2. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  3. Wildlife management assistance report: Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-four days were spent administering hunts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area with approximately 1100 people participating. Biological data was collected and evaluated on 50 deer, 3 wild turkeys, 16 feral hogs, 16 ducks of two species, 85 gray squirrels, and 105 fish of 4 species. Preparatory work prior to hunts included 4 miles of roadways being fertilized and 3 miles of roads brushed. Approximately 200 WMA and 20 US Government signs were posted on the area. Serving as a Coordinating Land User for the SRP site use Committee entailed evaluating 45 land use proposals with regard to effects on wildlife populations. Eight timber prescriptions proposed by the US Forest Service were the most time consuming involving records review, field investigations, meetings with the authoring agency, and a report to DOE detailing possible impacts. The Natural Resources Management draft plan required attendance at several meetings and an extensive written review of impacts. DOE was provided with information on how state game laws apply to research involving animal collection and SRP deer hunts. Trapping permits were issued to the beaver control contractor when required.

  4. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  5. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  6. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

  7. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  8. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED ELASTOMERS - RECENT INSIGHTS FROM EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING Citation Details In-Document Search Title: STRUCTURAL...

  9. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of 18 Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise James Bradbury, Melissa Allen, and Rebecca Dell Office of Energy Policy and...

  10. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program Policy for Submitting of PII information Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII information January 22, 2015 The REMS Program...

  11. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.),...

  12. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to...

  13. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia

    2013-11-13

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  14. Sidestream cigarette smoke toxicity increases with aging and exposure duration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Suzaynn; Glantz, Stanton A

    2006-01-01

    Not required. References Schick S, Glantz G. Phillip Morrisand Exposure Duration Suzaynn Schick. and Stanton A. GlantzCA 94143-1390 Suzaynn Schick Postdoctoral Fellow Center for

  15. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Automated Pedestrian Counting Devices Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

    2007-01-01

    pp. 283-291. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draftand J. Thiran. Counting Pedestrians in Video Sequences UsingPartnership (CLP) Automatic Pedestrian Counting Trial. Stage

  16. Potential hazards of compound 1080 to selected nontarget wildlife when used in the toxic collar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastland, Warren George

    1983-01-01

    1080 (Ruckelshaus 1972). Primary poisoning results from an animal's exposure to unassimilated Compound 1080 (Kun 1980). Examples of primary hazards would include: Compound 1080 spilled on soil or vegetation, an animal's ingestion of vomitus from a... coyote that has ingested Compound 1080, or an animal's scavenging a livestock carcass with Compound 1080 spilled on it. Secondary poisoning results from exposure to assimilated Compound 1080 (Kun 1980), which would occur when an animal comes...

  17. Welcome everyone, thank you for coming. My name is ___. I'm a volunteer with Speaking for Wildlife. Speaking for Wildlife is a program by the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension that brings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    . Speaking for Wildlife is a program by the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension that brings presentation is about three of the nonnative invasive insects that are a risk to New Hampshire's trees woolly adelgid (pictured in the middle), and one not yet known to be in New Hampshire but is certainly

  18. 4/18/2014 Human Competition Edging Out Those Lovable Icons of Wildlife -New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/06/world/human-competition-edging-out-those-lovable-icons-of-wildlife.html 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    there is human. And these humans' demands for fuel for heating and cooking mean prime panda forest habitat habitat areas in 1965, 1974, and 1997. (Source: Dr. Jianguo Liu, Marc Linderman, Michigan State University Science World Wildlife Fund) Archives HOME PAGE TODAY'S PAPER VIDEO MOST POPULAR EMAIL PRINT

  19. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P.

    2008-04-15

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  20. Chronic disease and early exposure to air-borne mixtures. 2. Exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Argo

    2007-10-15

    This work is part of a larger study of the impact of early exposure to releases from industry on the etiology of cancer. Releases from all kraft and sulfite mills, coke ovens, oil refineries, copper, nickel, and lead/zinc smelters operating in Canada during the exposure period of 1967-1970 have been determined. All plumes have been expressed in g BaP eq/d using the RASH methodology. The releases have been divided into process, boiler fuel, dioxin, and SO{sub 2} emissions. Combustion sources have been defined with FIREv6.23. Dioxin congenors are expected in all source types when the boiler fuel is heavy fuel oil, wood or wood bark, or coal. All about 90 communities examined have an inverted sex ratio. 53 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  2. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  3. Bivariate Left-Censored Bayesian Model for Predicting Exposure: Preliminary Analysis of Worker Exposure during the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Caroline; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2015-01-01

    M. , Reddy, K. (2014) Crude oil spill exposure and humanof the volatile components of crude oil that make upapproximately 20% of the crude oil released in the Deepwater

  4. Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring and Assessment of Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Robert C.

    Ecological & Environmental Acoustic Remote Sensor (EcoEARS) Application for Long-Term Monitoring and Assessment of Wildlife Gonzalo Sanchez; President, Sanchez Industrial Design, Inc., 3510 Beltline Hwy and installation of specialized electronic hardware used to collect both acoustic and environmental data. He holds

  5. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):261272, Fall 2012 A model to predict the likelihood of cliff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for construction and maintenance divisions of many departments of transportation. In planning future projects of cliff swallow nesting on a particular highway structure. We used logistic regression on data collected, highway structure, human­wildlife conflicts, logistic regression, nest, occupancy, Petrochelidon

  6. Wildlife, fish and environmental studies in Ume 1 PhD student in the research education subject: Animal Community Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildlife, fish and environmental studies in Umeĺ 1 PhD student in the research education subject is an Equal Opportunity Employer. A person has basic eligibility for third level education if he or she has taken a second level qualification or has completed course requirements of at least 240 higher education

  7. HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(1):4148, Spring 2009 House cats as predators in the Australian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @bio.usyd.edu.au Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the predatory activities of the house cat (Felis catus positive outcomes for both wildlife conservation and cat welfare. Key words: Australia, Felis catus, house in the introduced house cat (Felis catus) in Australia and, in particular, the impact of the cat on native

  8. Dose profiles through the dermis for on and off-skin hot particle exposures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Kimberly Rochelle

    1993-01-01

    reports measurements of depth-dose profiles for on- and off-skin hot particle exposures using radiochromic dye film. Dose profiles from both a "Co hot particle, and activated depleted uranium oxide microspheres were measured with the film. Exposures... 24 27 32 TABLE OF CONTENTS Icontinued) Page RESULTS 34 ' Co On-Contact Exposures 34 Co Exposures Through Protective Clothing ~Co Off-Skin Exposures Uranium Microsphere On-Contact Exposures 45 49 Uranium Microsphere Exposures Through...

  9. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Morphology and sexual dimorphism of the many-lined skink in north central New Mexico (Western North American Naturalist 75(2):232-235) Threatened and Endangered Species...

  10. Protecting Wildlife

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | CenterPressthis siteProspective UsersProtecting

  11. GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN;GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN and Disease Registry Christopher Portier, PhD Director Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning

  12. Environmental Health & Safety Department New Employee Exposure Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Environmental Health & Safety Department New Employee Exposure Assessment PURPOSE: The purpose of the assessment questions, Environmental Health & Safety will inform you and your supervisor of any additional of this assessment is to determine your required health & safety training by evaluating your use of and exposure

  13. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  14. LIGHTNING EXPOSURE OF WIND TURBINES University of Toronto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    LIGHTNING EXPOSURE OF WIND TURBINES Dale Dolan University of Toronto e-mail: dale@ecf.utoronto.ca Abstract This paper applies the electrogeometric model of lightning exposure to a wind turbine to compute. For a typical 45 m wind turbine, the probability of being struck by a downward negative flash, as predicted

  15. Modeling Contaminant Exposure in a Single-Family House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    occupational exposure to household contaminants in a single-family house under different ventilation, heating the performance of two heating systems, two cooling systems and three ventilation systems in summer and winter contaminant exposure in a generic, small single-family house with a floor area of 100 m2 and a height of 2.5 m

  16. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2009-12-11

    Samples of four formulations of ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomer were exposed to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for various times up to about 420 days in closed containers. Two formulations were carbon-black-filled commercial formulations, and two were the equivalent formulations without filler synthesized for this work. Tritium effects on the samples were characterized by measuring the sample volume, mass, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties and by noting changes in appearance. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature increased significantly with tritium exposure, and the unfilled formulations ceased to behave as elastomers after the longest tritium exposure. The filled formulations were more resistant to tritium exposure. Tritium exposure made all samples significantly stiffer and therefore much less able to form a reliable seal when employed as O-rings. No consistent change of volume or density was observed; there was a systematic lowering of sample mass with tritium exposure. In addition, the significant radiolytic production of gas, mainly protium (H{sub 2}) and HT, by the samples when exposed to tritium was characterized by measuring total pressure in the container at the end of each exposure and by mass spectroscopy of a gas sample at the end of each exposure. The total pressure in the containers more than doubled after {approx}420 days tritium exposure.

  17. Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures Sungkyoon) models to investigate nonlinear relationships between levels of benzene metabolites (E,E- muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid, phenol, hydroqui- none, and catechol) and benzene exposure among 386 exposed and control workers

  18. Fast Factoring of Integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-09-20

    An algorithm is given to factor an integer with $N$ digits in $\\ln^m N$ steps, with $m$ approximately 4 or 5. Textbook quadratic sieve methods are exponentially slower. An improvement with the aid of an a particular function would provide a further exponential speedup.

  19. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    PCA 3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization 3.15.2 Matrix concentration3.3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization . . . 3.4

  20. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

  1. Deuteron Form Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, G.R.; Huleihel, K.; Zhang, H. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States))

    1995-01-30

    We obtain the perturbative QCD (PQCD) prediction for the leading twist deuteron form factor, treated as a pair of nucleons in nonrelativistic bound state. It is [lt]10[sup [minus]3] times experiment at [ital Q][sup 2]=4 GeV[sup 2], suggesting that PQCD is not relevant to the deuteron form factor at present values of [ital Q][sup 2], or that non-nucleon (e.g., hidden color'') degrees of freedom must be included for a correct description of the deuteron. The tree-level amplitude [similar to][ital eg][sup 10] and is the sum of several 10[sup 6] Feynman diagrams, making it an interesting case study in the behavior of perturbation theory.

  2. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  3. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  4. DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU

    2012-08-08

    This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

  5. Mercury exposure from interior latex paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agocs, M.M.; Etzel, R.A.; Parrish, R.G.; Paschal, D.C.; Campagna, P.R.; Cohen, D.S.; Kilbourne, E.M.; Hesse, J.L. )

    1990-10-18

    Many paint companies have used phenylmercuric acetate as a preservative to prolong the shelf life of interior latex paint. In August 1989, acrodynia, a form of mercury poisoning, occurred in a child exposed to paint fumes in a home recently painted with a brand containing 4.7 mmol of mercury per liter (at that time the Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit was 1.5 mmol or less per liter). To determine whether the recent use of that brand of paint containing phenylmercuric acetate was associated with elevated indoor-air and urinary mercury concentrations, we studied 74 exposed persons living in 19 homes recently painted with the brand and 28 unexposed persons living in 10 homes not recently painted with paint containing mercury. The paint samples from the homes of exposed persons contained a median of 3.8 mmol of mercury per liter, and air samples from the homes had a median mercury content of 10.0 nmol per cubic meter (range, less than 0.5 to 49.9). No mercury was detected in paint or air samples from the homes of unexposed persons. The median urinary mercury concentration was higher in the exposed persons (4.7 nmol of mercury per millimole of creatinine; range, 1.4 to 66.5) than in the unexposed persons (1.1 nmol per millimole; range, 0.02 to 3.9; P less than 0.001). Urinary mercury concentrations within the range that we found in exposed persons have been associated with symptomatic mercury poisoning. We found that potentially hazardous exposure to mercury had occurred among persons whose homes were painted with a brand of paint containing mercury at concentrations approximately 2 1/2 times the Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit.

  6. Integrated modelling and Bayesian inference applied to population and disease dynamics in wildlife: M.Bovis in badgers in Woodchester Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zijerveld, Leonardus Jacobus Johannes

    2013-06-29

    Understanding demographic and disease processes in wildlife populations tends to be hampered by incomplete observations which can include significant errors. Models provide useful insights into the potential impacts of ...

  7. Perceptions of livestock producers, forage producers, wildlife managers, and forage-based service providers concerning extension and technology-transfer activities in south Texas and northeast Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folsom, Wendy Ann

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this bi-national study was to determine the type, nature, and extent of existing extension and technology-transfer activities provided to livestock producers, forage producers, and wildlife managers in south ...

  8. The Antarctic Wildlife Research Fund (AWR) c/o Schjdt AS Lawfirm, PO-BOX 2444 Solli, N-0201 Oslo, Norway AWR Funding Press Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mate, Bruce R.

    , Norway 1 AWR Funding Press Release September 15, 2015 Three Projects Named as Antarctic Wildlife Research (AWR) c/o Schjřdt AS Lawfirm, PO-BOX 2444 Solli, N-0201 Oslo, Norway 2 forms the base of Antarctic food

  9. Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Amber Marie

    2006-08-16

    The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

  10. Passive Exposure to Mobile Phones: Enhancement of Intensity by Reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuyoshi Hondou; Takenori Ueda; Yasuhiro Sakata; Nobuto Tanigawa; Tetsu Suzuki; Taizo Kobayashi; Kensuke Ikeda

    2007-03-12

    In a recent Letter [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 71, 432 (2002)], we reported a preliminary calculation and concluded that public exposure to mobile phones can be enhanced by microwave reflection in public spaces. In this paper, we confirm the significance of microwave reflection reported in our previous Letter by experimental and numerical studies. Furthermore, we show that "hot spots" often emerge in reflective areas, where the local exposure level is much higher than average. Such places include elevators, and we discuss other possible environments including trains, buses, cars, and airplanes. Our results indicate the risk of "passive exposure" to microwaves.

  11. Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

  12. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  13. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; McKay, M.D.; Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

  14. Multiplexed photography : single-exposure capture of multiple camera settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Paul Elijah

    2009-01-01

    The space of camera settings is large and individual settings can vary dramatically from scene to scene. This thesis explores methods for capturing and manipulating multiple camera settings in a single exposure. Multiplexing ...

  15. Effect of exposure environment on the interactions between acid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of exposure environment on the interactions between acid gas (H2S and CO2) and pozzolan-amended wellbore cement under acid gas co-sequestration conditions Citation Details...

  16. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    levels of risk similar to those for industrial activities (e.g., chemical, mining, transportation). The key U.S. limit for occupational exposure to radiation is 5 rems...

  17. An exposure assessment survey of the Mont Belvieu polyethylene plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Thomas Franklin

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of ever changing, complex workplaces can be accomplished with a sound, logical exposure assessment survey (EAS). An EAS was conducted at a polyethylene plant located in southeast Texas to determine the risk of adverse health effects...

  18. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

  19. Privacy-Preserving Methods for Sharing Financial Risk Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbe, Emmanuel A.

    The financial industry relies on trade secrecy to protect its business processes and methods, which can obscure critical financial risk exposures from regulators and the public. Using results from cryptography, we develop ...

  20. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    nickel and manganese in shipyard welding fumes.  Welding on weld fume exposures in a shipyard confined space welding 1: Manufacturing 2: Shipyard 3: Railroad 4: Automobile 0:

  1. Acute cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution: components, vascular mechanisms and protecting the public 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langrish, Jeremy Patrick

    2012-11-30

    Exposure to air pollution, particularly fine and ultrafine particulate matter derived from combustion sources, has been consistently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent controlled exposure ...

  2. Assessing Uncertainty in Spatial Exposure Models for Air Pollution Health Effects Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    assessing air pollution exposure within cities as a priorityof air pollution exposure within cities or the associ- atedpollution levels are spatially autocorrelated within cities, and

  3. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  4. Assessment of outdoor radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure through hotspot localization using kriging-based sequential sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aerts, Sam, E-mail: sam.aerts@intec.ugent.be; Deschrijver, Dirk; Verloock, Leen; Dhaene, Tom; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-10-15

    In this study, a novel methodology is proposed to create heat maps that accurately pinpoint the outdoor locations with elevated exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in an extensive urban region (or, hotspots), and that would allow local authorities and epidemiologists to efficiently assess the locations and spectral composition of these hotspots, while at the same time developing a global picture of the exposure in the area. Moreover, no prior knowledge about the presence of radiofrequency radiation sources (e.g., base station parameters) is required. After building a surrogate model from the available data using kriging, the proposed method makes use of an iterative sampling strategy that selects new measurement locations at spots which are deemed to contain the most valuable information—inside hotspots or in search of them—based on the prediction uncertainty of the model. The method was tested and validated in an urban subarea of Ghent, Belgium with a size of approximately 1 km{sup 2}. In total, 600 input and 50 validation measurements were performed using a broadband probe. Five hotspots were discovered and assessed, with maximum total electric-field strengths ranging from 1.3 to 3.1 V/m, satisfying the reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection for exposure of the general public to RF-EMF. Spectrum analyzer measurements in these hotspots revealed five radiofrequency signals with a relevant contribution to the exposure. The radiofrequency radiation emitted by 900 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) base stations was always dominant, with contributions ranging from 45% to 100%. Finally, validation of the subsequent surrogate models shows high prediction accuracy, with the final model featuring an average relative error of less than 2 dB (factor 1.26 in electric-field strength), a correlation coefficient of 0.7, and a specificity of 0.96. -- Highlights: • We present an iterative measurement and modeling method for outdoor RF-EMF exposure. • Hotspots are rapidly identified, and accurately characterized. • An accurate graphical representation, or heat map, is created, using kriging. • Random validation shows good correlation (0.7) and low relative errors (2 dB)

  5. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  6. Tiled QR factorization algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwmeester, Henricus; Langou, Julien; Robert, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This work revisits existing algorithms for the QR factorization of rectangular matrices composed of p-by-q tiles, where p >= q. Within this framework, we study the critical paths and performance of algorithms such as Sameh and Kuck, Modi and Clarke, Greedy, and those found within PLASMA. Although neither Modi and Clarke nor Greedy is optimal, both are shown to be asymptotically optimal for all matrices of size p = q^2 f(q), where f is any function such that \\lim_{+\\infty} f= 0. This novel and important complexity result applies to all matrices where p and q are proportional, p = \\lambda q, with \\lambda >= 1, thereby encompassing many important situations in practice (least squares). We provide an extensive set of experiments that show the superiority of the new algorithms for tall matrices.

  7. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors for each shift... The purpose of this paper is to analyze operating hours of small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in the United States and develop ranges of load factors for use as diagnostic tools for effective energy management. Load factor is defined...

  8. Health effects of Halon 1301 exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holness, D.L.; House, R.A. )

    1992-07-01

    An accidental discharge of a Halon 1301 system is reported. Thirty-one workers were assessed, 22 who were present at the time of the discharge, and 9 who worked the next shift. The incident was complicated by a small Freon-22 leak several hours later. Throat, eye, and nasal irritation and lightheadedness were reported by the majority of workers. Workers present during the halon discharge reported significantly more lightheadedness, headache, voice change, cough, and a fast heartbeat than did those who worked the later shift. These differences were significant even after correcting for confounding factors such as age, sex, and sense of anxiety at the time of the incident. The possible causes for the irritant symptoms include breakdown products of Halon 1301 and Freon-22 or contaminants from the halon discharge system. Although these irritant effects may not be an effect of Halon 1301 alone, they may occur in these discharge situations, and workers should be advised of this possibility. The possible cardiac and central nervous system effects also should be considered. The importance of a clear-cut protocol to deal with such incidents as well as worker education are discussed.

  9. EFFECTS OF ONE WEEK TRITIUM EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E

    2007-06-07

    This report documents test results for the exposure of four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer to tritium gas at one atmosphere for approximately one week and characterization of material property changes and changes to the exposure gas during exposure. All EPDM samples were provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Material properties that were characterized include mass, sample dimensions, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. No change of glass transition temperature due to the short tritium gas exposure was observed. Filled and unfilled formulations of Dupont{reg_sign} Nordel{trademark} 1440 had a slightly higher glass transition temperature than filled and unfilled formulations of Uniroyal{reg_sign} Royalene{reg_sign} 580H; filled formulations had the same glass transition as unfilled. The exposed samples appeared the same as before exposure--there was no evidence of discoloration, and no residue on stainless steel spacers contacting the samples during exposure was observed. The exposed samples remained flexible--all formulations passed a break test without failing. The unique properties of polymers make them ideal for certain components in gas handling systems. Specifically, the resiliency of elastomers is ideal for sealing surfaces, for example in valves. EPDM, initially developed in the 1960s, is a hydrocarbon polymer used extensively for sealing applications. EPDM is used for its excellent combination of properties including high/low-temperature resistance, radiation resistance, aging resistance, and good mechanical properties. This report summarizes initial work to characterize effects of tritium gas exposure on samples of four types of EPDM elastomer: graphite filled and unfilled formulations of Nordel{trademark} 1440 and Royalene{reg_sign} 580H.

  10. Overview of multivariate methods and their application to studies of wildlife habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques as methods of choice in analyzing habitat relations among animals have distinct advantages over competitive methodologies. These considerations, joined with a reduction in the cost of computer time, the increased availability of multivariate statistical packages, and an increased willingness on the part of ecologists to use mathematics and statistics as tools, have created an exponentially increasing interest in multivariate statistical methods over the past decade. It is important to note that the earliest multivariate statistical analyses in ecology did more than introduce a set of appropriate and needed methodologies to ecology. The studies emphasized different spatial and organizational scales from those typically emphasized in habitat studies. The new studies, that used multivariate methods, emphasized individual organisms' responses in a heterogeneous environment. This philosophical (and to some degree, methodological) emphasis on heterogeneity has led to a potential to predict the consequences of disturbances and management on wildlife habitat. One recent development in this regard has been the coupling of forest succession simulators with multivariate analysis of habitat to predict habitat availability under different timber management procedures.

  11. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application. It is possible to have confidence in the predictions of many of the existing models because of their fundamental physical and chemical mechanistic underpinnings and the extensive work already done to compare model predictions and empirical observations. The working group recommends that modeling tools be applied for benchmarking PBT/POPs according to exposure-to-emissions relationships, and that modeling tools be used to interpret emissions and monitoring data. The further development of models that couple fate, long-range transport, and bioaccumulation should be fostered, especially models that will allow time trends to be scientifically addressed in the risk profile.

  12. Cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages from Nordland, northern Norway: implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    269 Cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages from Nordland, northern Norway: implications.R., Mickelson, D.M., Raisbeck, G.M. & Yiou, F.: Cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure ages from Nord- land cosmogenic nuclides can be used as a measure (i.e. exposure dating) of the duration of subaerial exposure (e

  13. TESS-based dose-response using pediatric clonidine exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Blaine E. [New Mexico Poison and Drug Information Center and University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)]. E-mail: jebenson@salud.unm.edu; Spyker, Daniel A. [Alexza Pharmaceuticals, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States); Troutman, William G. [University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Watson, William A. [American Association of Poison Control Centers, Washington, DC 20016 (United States)]. E-mail: http://www.aapcc.org/

    2006-06-01

    Objective: The toxic and lethal doses of clonidine in children are unclear. This study was designed to determine whether data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) could be utilized to determine a dose-response relationship for pediatric clonidine exposure. Methods: 3458 single-substance clonidine exposures in children <6 years of age reported to TESS from January 2000 through December 2003 were examined. Dose ingested, age, and medical outcome were available for 1550 cases. Respiratory arrest cases (n = 8) were classified as the most severe of the medical outcome categories (Arrest, Major, Moderate, Mild, and No effect). Exposures reported as a 'taste or lick' (n = 51) were included as a dose of 1/10 of the dosage form involved. Dose ranged from 0.4 to 1980 (median 13) {mu}g/kg. Weight was imputed based on a quadratic estimate of weight for age. Dose certainty was coded as exact (26% of cases) or not exact (74%). Medical outcome (response) was examined via logistic regression using SAS JMP (release 5.1). Results: The logistic model describing medical outcome (P < 0.0001) included Log dose/kg (P 0.0000) and Certainty (P = 0.045). Conclusion: TESS data can provide the basis for a statistically sound description of dose-response for pediatric clonidine poisoning exposures.

  14. Small animal electric and magnetic field exposure systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, R.C.; Dietrich, F.M.

    1993-10-01

    Laboratory evaluation of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) and cancer in animals requires exposure of relatively large numbers of animals, usually rats or mice, to 60-Hz fields under very well controlled conditions for periods of up to two years. This report describes two exposure systems, the first of which is based on modifications of an existing electric field exposure system to include magnetic field exposure capability. In this system, each module houses 576--768 mice, which can be exposed to electric field levels of up to 100 kV/m and magnetic field levels of up to 10 Gauss. When a module was operated at 10 Gauss, measured levels of noise and vibration fell substantially below the detection threshold for humans. Moreover, temperature rise in the coils did not exceed 12{degrees}C at the 10 Gauss level. Specifications and test results for the second system, which provides magnetic field exposure capability only, are similar, except that each module houses 624--780 mice. After installation of the second system at the West Los Angeles Veterans Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, additional results were obtained. This report provides a complete description of the engineering design, specifications, and test results for the completed systems.

  15. Chronic exposure to environmental levels of tribromophenol impairs zebrafish reproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Jun [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Chunsheng; Yu Liqin [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhou Bingsheng, E-mail: bszhou@ihb.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP) is ubiquitously found in aquatic environments and biota. In this study, we exposed zebrafish embryos (F{sub 0}; 2'''' days post-fertilization, dpf) to environmental concentration (0.3 mug/L) and a higher concentration (3.0 mug/L) of TBP and assessed the impact of chronic exposure (120 dpf) on reproduction. TBP exposure did not cause a significant increase in the malformation and reduction in the survival in the F{sub 0}-generation fish. After TBP exposure, the plasma testosterone and estradiol levels significantly increased in males and decreased in females. The transcription of steroidogenic genes (3beta-HSD, 17beta-HSD, CYP17, CYP19A, CYP19B) was significantly upregulated in the brain and testes in males and downregulated in the brain and ovary in females. TBP exposure significantly downregulated and upregulated the expression of VTG in the liver of female and male fish, respectively. Meanwhile, TBP exposure altered the sex ratio toward a male-dominant state. The F{sub 1}-generation larvae exhibited increased malformation, reduced survival, and retarded growth, suggesting that TBP in the aquatic environment has significant adverse effects on fish population.

  16. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising the noise performance in the image regions with highest noise.

  17. Integrity evaluation of lower thermal shield under exposure to HFBR environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassir, M.; Weeks, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Shewmon, P.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exposure to the HFBR environment on the carbon steel in the HFBR lower thermal shield were evaluated. Corrosion was found to be a non-significant degradation process. Radiation embrittlement has occurred; portions of the plate closest to the reactor are currently operating in the lower-shelf region of the Charpy impact curve (i.e., below the fracture toughness transition temperature). In this region, the effects of radiation on the mechanical properties of carbon steel are believed to have been saturated, so that no further deterioration is anticipated. A fracture toughness analysis shows that a large factor of safety (> 1.5) exists against propagation of credible hypothetical flaws. Therefore, the existing lower thermal shield structure is suitable for continued operation of the HFBR.

  18. 25/08/2010 14:33In pictures: The week in wildlife | Environment | guardian.co.uk Page 2 of 3http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/aug/20/week-in-wildlife#/?picture=365949451&index=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    25/08/2010 14:33In pictures: The week in wildlife | Environment | guardian.co.uk Page 2 of 3http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/aug/20/week-in-wildlife#/?picture=365949451&index=1 A white-fronted bee-eater, a species with very crocodile 8 Apr 2009 UK butterfly numbers plunge after worst year Gallery (16 pictures): The week

  19. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping: Charcoal cryosorber tritium exposure results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments, have shown the practically of using activated charcoal (coconut charcoal) at 4{degrees}K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were shown to be satisfactory. The long term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL were not known and a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77{degrees}K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately half way through and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict charcoal's use as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high vacuum pumping applications. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  1. RADIATION EXPOSURE TO HUMAN SUBJECTS, COMMITTEE ON The responsibilities of the Committee on Radiation Exposure to Human Subjects, established in 1974, are: 1) review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    RADIATION EXPOSURE TO HUMAN SUBJECTS, COMMITTEE ON The responsibilities of the Committee on Radiation Exposure to Human Subjects, established in 1974, are: 1) review for authorization applications involving ionizing radiation exposure to human research subjects, insofar as the proposed study involves

  2. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1983-11-01

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure at regions of interest within the object.

  3. Further Analysis of Accelerated Exposure Testing of Thin-Glass Mirror Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C. E.; Terwilliger, K.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) companies have deployed thin-glass mirrors produced by wet-silver processes on {approx}1-mmthick, relatively lightweight glass. These mirrors are bonded to metal substrates in commercial installations and have the confidence of the CSP industry. Initial hemispherical reflectance is {approx}93%-96%, and the cost is {approx}$16.1/m{sup 2}-$43.0/m{sup 2}. However, corrosion was observed in mirror elements of operational solar systems deployed outdoors for 2 years. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Advanced Materials Team has been investigating this problem. First, it was noted that this corrosion is very similar to the corrosion bands and spots observed on small (45 mm x 67 mm) thin-glass mirrors laminated to metal substrates with several different types of adhesives and subjected to accelerated exposure testing (AET) at NREL. The corrosion appears as dark splotches in the center of the mirror, with a corresponding 5%-20% loss in reflectivity. Secondly, two significant changes in mirror manufacture have occurred in the wet-chemistry process because of environmental concerns. The first is the method of forming a copper-free reflective mirror, and the second is the use of lead-free paints. However, the copper-free process requires stringent quality control and the lead-free paints were developed for interior applications. A test matrix of 84 combinations of sample constructions (mirror type/backprotective paint/adhesive/substrate) was devised for AET as a designed experiment to identify the most-promising mirrors, paints, and adhesives for use with concentrator designs. Two types of accelerated exposure were used: an Atlas Ci5000 WeatherOmeter (CI5000) and a BlueM damp-heat chamber. Based on an analysis of variance (ANOVA), the various factors and interactions were modeled. These samples now have more than 36 months of accelerated exposure, and most samples have completed their test cycle. We will discuss the results of the final exposure testing of these mirror samples. Glass mirrors with copper back-layers and heavily leaded paints have been considered robust for outdoor use. However, the basic mirror composition of the new mirrors is radically different from that of historically durable solar mirrors, and the outdoor durability must be determined.

  4. TMD theory, factorization and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Collins

    2013-07-10

    The concepts and methods of factorization using transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) parton densities and/or fragmentation functions are summarized.

  5. Filling factors and Braid group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We extract the Braid group structure of a recently derived hierarchy scheme for the filling factors proposed by us which related the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, to statistics, $\

  6. This is an addendum to the draft Columbia Gorge Mainstem Subbasin Plan submitted by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, May 28,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Bonneville Power Administration (August 12) Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (August 12) Oregon by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, May 28, 2004 will affect the ability to adopt the plan under the Northwest Power Act and the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program

  7. Enlisting the support of the Texas birding community into the wildlife management process, with comparisons to Texas waterfowl hunters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifester, Jason Andrew

    1994-01-01

    23. 6 100. 0 11. 1 3. 3 6. 1 18. 9 19. 5 3. 7 5. 7 25. 8 100. 0 9. 1 9. 6 3. 2 7. 0 22. 5 25. 1 4. 8 3. 2 15. 5 100. 0 Mean length of time (in years) lived in Texas: birders = 35. 3, waterfowl hunters = 31. 9, non... linear models and Chi-square tests) showed that birders are highly committed to their pastime, spending more time in the field and much more money on their hobby than the waterfowl hunters. Birders tended to feel that the State concentrates wildlife...

  8. Updated Exposure Times for the COS SMS LSSFN2P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Updated Exposure Times for the COS SMS LSSFN2P (COS Short System Functional Nitrogen2 Purge) Date: April 25, 2006 Document Number: COS-11-0046 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: Prepared By: Dr. Steven Penton, COS Software Scientist, CU Date Reviewed By: Dr. Steven Osterman, COS

  9. Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

    2011-11-01

    This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

  10. Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure at Medical Institutions ALARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure at Medical Institutions ALARA ALARA Program as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). In accord with this commitment, we hereby describe, and instructions to foster the ALARA concept within our institution. The organization will include a Radiation

  11. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    -Medical Licensed Activities at the University of Florida, As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) I. Management radiation exposures (individual and collective) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In accordance the necessary written policies, procedures, and instructions to foster the ALARA concept within our institution

  12. Chromosomal "Fingerprints" of Prior Exposure to Densely Ionizing Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    be detected and measured long after radiation exposure. Specifically, they produce an anomalously low ratio (F doses of densely ionizing radiation, such as a particles or neutrons. Consequently, determina- tion ion- izing radiation doses is an important societal and legal issue. Thus there has been considerable

  13. Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted concentration of relevant Benefit Analysis The sanitary benefits brought about by air pollution improvement as a result of climate by a collateral reduction of air pollutant emissions, hence a lower cost of AQ legislation. Modelling Framework

  14. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  15. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  17. Brief Communications Nocturnal Light Exposure Impairs Affective Responses in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randy J.

    include television and computer screens, light pollution, shift work, compact fluorescent light (CFLBrief Communications Nocturnal Light Exposure Impairs Affective Responses in a Wavelength; light is the most potent entraining cue. In mammals, light is detected by (1) rods and cones, which

  18. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-06-01

    This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

  19. Chemical Profile Hepatic Transcriptional Networks Induced by Exposure to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    Chemical Profile Hepatic Transcriptional Networks Induced by Exposure to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) serves as a prototype for a range of environmental toxicants The compound 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) has long been a focus of public concern. Formed

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Perch exposure and predation risk: a comparative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    the greatest energy storage losses (Thomas et al. 2003), and comparative studies also show that speciesORIGINAL PAPER Perch exposure and predation risk: a comparative study in passerines Diana P. Campos predation risk (degree of concealment, height in tree or shrub, and distance to the forest edge) and time

  1. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 241 0.400 0.430 0.024 42 8.9 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  2. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  3. Wildlife and water: collective action and social capital of selected landowner associations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Matthew Wayne

    2007-04-25

    -making of landowners. Likewise, aquifer reserves are a trans-boundary resource subject to the "rule of capture." Numerous factors may affect the success of common-pool associations, including property ownership and habitat characteristics, landowner demographics...

  4. Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthma and Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, indoor materials or finishes such as carpet, flexible flooring, paint,

  5. An Investigation into Household and Occupational Pesticide Exposures with Genetic Variants as Risk Factors for Parkinson's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    subjects from Kern, Fresno, and Tulare counties in centralresidents of Fresno, Kern, or Tulare Counties, were not inprimarily in Fresno, Kern, or Tulare counties. Controls ages

  6. Prenatal Risk and Protective Factors for Childhood Cancer: Investigating the Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation, Pesticide Exposure, and Maternal Diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, Christina

    2013-01-01

    study based on solar radiation data from NASA relying onwith data from the National Solar Radiation Database. Ourusing data from the National Solar Radiation Database from

  7. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Baron, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

    1995-08-01

    Historically, ecological risk assessment at CERCLA sites [such as the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)], has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source operable unit. Consequently the species that are generally considered are those with home ranges small enough such that multiple individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the contaminated site. This approach is adequate for sites with single, discrete areas of contamination that only provide habitat for species with limited requirements. This approach is not adequate however for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. Because wide-ranging wildlife species may travel between and use multiple contaminated sites they may be exposed to and be at risk from contaminants from multiple locations. Use of a particular contaminated site by wide-ranging species will be dependent upon the amount of suitable habitat available at that site. Therefore to adequately evaluate risks to wide-ranging species at the ORR-wide scale, the use of multiple contaminated sites must be weighted by the amount of suitable habitat on OUs. This reservation-wide ecological risk assessment is intended to identify which endpoints are significantly at risk; which contaminants are responsible for this risk; and which OUs significantly contribute to risk.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

    1996-09-01

    More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

  9. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause the adaptive change of glucocorticoid-IGF1 axis.

  10. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

  11. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  12. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

  13. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

  14. Personal PM2.5 exposure among wildland firefighters working at prescribed forest burns in southeastern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Dunn, Kevin; Hall, Daniel, B.; Achtemeier, Gary; Stock, Allison; Naeher, Luke, P.

    2011-07-15

    This study investigated occupational exposure to wood and vegetative smoke in a group of 28 forest firefighters at prescribed forest burns in a southeastern U.S. forest during the winters of 2003-2005. During burn activities, 203 individual person-day PM{sub 2.5} and 149 individual person-day CO samples were collected; during non-burn activities, 37 person-day PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected as controls. Time-activity diaries and post-work shift questionnaires were administered to identify factors influencing smoke exposure and to determine how accurately the firefighters qualitative assessment estimated their personal level of smoke exposure with discrete responses: 'none' or 'very little,' 'low,' 'moderate,' 'high,' and 'very high.' An average of 6.7 firefighters were monitored per burn, with samples collected on 30 burn days and 7 non-burn days. Size of burn plots ranged from 1-2745 acres (avg = 687.8). Duration of work shift ranged from 6.8-19.4 hr (avg = 10.3 hr) on burn days. Concentration of PM{sub 2.5} ranged from 5.9-2673 {mu}g/m{sup 3} on burn days. Geometric mean PM{sub 2.5} exposure was 280 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (95% CL = 140, 557 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, n = 177) for burn day samples, and 16 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (95% CL = 10, 26 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, n = 35) on non-burn days. Average measured PM{sub 2.5} differed across levels of the firefighters categorical self-assessments of exposure (p < 0.0001): none to very little = 120 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (95% CL = 71, 203 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) and high to very high = 664 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (95% CL = 373, 1185 {mu}g/m{sup 3}); p < 0.0001 on burn days. Time-weighted average PM{sub 2.5} and personal CO averaged over the run times of PM{sub 2.5} pumps were correlated (correlation coefficient estimate, r = 0.79; CLs: 0.72, 0.85). Overall occupational exposures to particulate matter were low, but results indicate that exposure could exceed the ACGIH{reg_sign}-recommended threshold limit value of 3 mg/m{sup 3} for respirable particulate matter in a few extreme situations. Self-assessed exposure levels agreed with measured concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}. Correlation analysis shows that either PM{sub 2.5} or CO could be used as a surrogate measure of exposure to woodsmoke at prescribed burns.

  15. Limiting human exposures through the ``as low as reasonably achievable`` process at a Department of Energy mixed waste site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M.; Peterson, J.; Haroun, L.; Blunt, D.; Dunning, D.

    1994-09-01

    Applying a process to reduce human exposures to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is a cornerstone of the US Department of Energy`s radiation protection program, and this process is being used to develop cleanup levels for contaminated sites across the country. Under the ALARA process, exposures and risks are reduced as far below protective criteria as can reasonably be achieved--considering technical, economic, and social factors. Risk-based cleanup levels have been developed for radionuclides and chemicals in surface water and soil at the Weldon Spring site in Missouri, following explicit applications of the ALARA process. Among the lessons learned during these applications were the importance of three factors: (1) soliciting early input from the parties involved--because the ALARA process involves a range of technical and nontechnical issues; (2) maintaining site specificity for the ALARA analyses--because contaminant types and distributions will vary, as will local conditions and constraints; and (3) identifying cleanup levels in the planning phase that are distinct from those developed for the field phase--because remedies can be over-designed if the decision levels are the same as the ALARA goals for field work, such that little increased risk reduction is achieved for substantially higher costs.

  16. Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Maryla A.

    2000-12-21

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  17. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Tapajyoti

    2010-07-14

    Load factors are an important simplification of electrical energy use data and depend on the ratio of average demand to peak demand. Based on operating hours of a facility they serve as an important benchmarking tool for the industrial sector...

  18. Efficient Networks for Quantum Factoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Beckman; Amalavoyal N. Chari; Srikrishna Devabhaktuni; John Preskill

    1996-02-21

    We consider how to optimize memory use and computation time in operating a quantum computer. In particular, we estimate the number of memory qubits and the number of operations required to perform factorization, using the algorithm suggested by Shor. A $K$-bit number can be factored in time of order $K^3$ using a machine capable of storing $5K+1$ qubits. Evaluation of the modular exponential function (the bottleneck of Shor's algorithm) could be achieved with about $72 K^3$ elementary quantum gates; implementation using a linear ion trap would require about $396 K^3$ laser pulses. A proof-of-principle demonstration of quantum factoring (factorization of 15) could be performed with only 6 trapped ions and 38 laser pulses. Though the ion trap may never be a useful computer, it will be a powerful device for exploring experimentally the properties of entangled quantum states.

  19. Human Factors of Reporting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. P. Carayon (ed.), A Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare and Patient Safety, Lawrence Erlbaum, London, UK. pp 715-750 Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

  20. Estimating pollutant exposures from coal fired power plants in a rural region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batterman, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    A critical issue in epidemiological studies of ambient air pollution is the measurement of pollutant exposure in the study population. Accurate characterization of air quality is necessary in any study relating exposure ...

  1. Fluoxetine Exposure during Adolescence Alters Responses to Aversive Stimuli in Adulthood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iniguez, Sergio D.

    The mechanisms underlying the enduring neurobiological consequences of antidepressant exposure during adolescence are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the long-term effects of exposure to fluoxetine (FLX), a selective ...

  2. HUMAN DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: THE IMPACT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budnitz, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Buildings H M N DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: U A THE IMPACTVent 78-6 HUMAN DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: THE IMPACT OFof conservation measures on radon levels, and the disease

  3. HUMAN DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: THE IMPACT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION IN BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budnitz, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Snihs, "The Significance of Radon and Its Progeny as NaturalDivision Human Disease from Radon Exposures: The I P ImpactVent 78-5 HUMAN DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: THE IMPACT OF

  4. Human Exposure to Foodborne Toxins in Ghana: Intervention Strategy for Reduction of Aflatoxin and Fumonisin Bioavailability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Nicole Jean

    2013-08-30

    ......................................................................................18 1.1.8 Human exposure in Africa .............................................................................21 1.1.9 AFB1 metabolism ...........................................................................................25... of exposure .................................................................................48 1.2.7 Regulation ......................................................................................................49 1.3 AFB1/FB1 co...

  5. Author's personal copy Beryllium-10 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of Quaternary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankel, Kurt L.

    Author's personal copy Beryllium-10 terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides Optically stimulated luminescence Alluvial fans Shore lines Lake Manly nuclide (TCN) surface exposure methods in Death Valley. The 10 Be TCN ages show considerable variance

  6. Interchangeable whole-body and nose-only exposure system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cannon, W.C.; Allemann, R.T.; Moss, O.R.; Decker, J.R. Jr.

    1992-03-31

    An exposure system for experimental animals includes a container for a single animal which has a double wall. The animal is confined within the inner wall. Gaseous material enters a first end, flows over the entire animal, then back between the walls and out the first end. The system also includes an arrangement of valve-controlled manifolds for supplying gaseous material to, and exhausting it from, the containers. 6 figs.

  7. Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECH EUV Micro-Exposure Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuest, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of Optics and Mask Contamination in SEMATECHMioro^Exposure Tools IEUVI Optics Contamination/Lifetime TWG

  8. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  9. 332003 Mainstem Amendments to the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Analysis of the Adequacy, Efficiency, Economy and Reliability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development, operation, and management of [hydropower] facilities while assuring the Pacific Northwest an adequate 16,000 average megawatts. The average regional cost is less than $10 million per year, compared

  10. FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 The definitions in this list have no legal significance and are provided only for clarification of terms used

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOSSARY FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM G-1 December 14, 1994 GLOSSARY The definitions in this list have fish in the water of a particular stream before their release into that stream. Act -- See Northwest of different elements of the system are better understood. adult equivalent population The number of fish

  11. Texas Tech University Military & Veterans Programs My name is Josh Quigley. I'm originally from Lubbock, Texas and I'm a senior Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Texas Tech University Military & Veterans Programs My name is Josh Quigley. I'm originally from Lubbock, Texas and I'm a senior Wildlife Management major here at Texas Tech. My name is Todd Truesdell. I am classified as a senior and I'm from Carrollton, Texas. My name is Alex Robles. I'm a junior here

  12. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Patel, Kinal J., E-mail: kinalv5@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang, E-mail: jianliangs@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Reimer, David, E-mail: reimerd@las.rutgers.edu [Laboratory Animal Services, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gow, Andrew J., E-mail: gow@rci.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  13. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronco, Ana Maria, E-mail: amronco@inta.cl [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Saez, Daniel [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Sandra [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Zepeda, Ramiro [Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, Miguel N. [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-03-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  14. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  15. Doctoral Defense "Frost Deterioration in Concrete Due to Deicer Salt Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Doctoral Defense "Frost Deterioration in Concrete Due to Deicer Salt Exposure: Mechanism-freeze climate zone. During winter a deicer-salt application is needed to melt snow on highways. Freezing in the presence of a deicer salt solution is considered a severe concrete exposure condition. Prolonged exposure

  16. Gestational exposure of Ahr and Arnt hypomorphs to dioxin rescues vascular development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradfield, Christopher A.

    Gestational exposure of Ahr and Arnt hypomorphs to dioxin rescues vascular development Jacqueline A of xenobiotics and in the toxic events that follow exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-di- oxin (dioxin hypomorphs could be efficiently closed by dioxin exposure as early as embryonic day 12.5 and as late

  17. Comparison of personal radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure in different urban areas across Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Wout; University of Basel ; Thuroczy, Gyoergy; French National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks , Verneuil en Halatte ; Gajsek, Peter; Trcek, Tomaz; Bolte, John; Vermeeren, Guenter; University of Basel ; Juhasz, Peter; Finta, Viktoria

    2010-10-15

    Background: Only limited data are available on personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure in everyday life. Several European countries performed measurement studies in this area of research. However, a comparison between countries regarding typical exposure levels is lacking. Objectives: To compare for the first time mean exposure levels and contributions of different sources in specific environments between different European countries. Methods: In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), measurement studies were performed using the same personal exposure meters. The pooled data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method in order to allow for data below the detection limit. Mean exposure levels were compared between different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoor. Results: Exposure levels were of the same order of magnitude in all countries and well below the international exposure limits. In all countries except for the Netherlands, the highest total exposure was measured in transport vehicles (trains, car, and busses), mainly due to radiation from mobile phone handsets (up to 97%). Exposure levels were in general lower in private houses or flats than in offices and outdoors. At home, contributions from various sources were quite different between countries. Conclusions: Highest total personal RF-EMF exposure was measured inside transport vehicles and was well below international exposure limits. This is mainly due to mobile phone handsets. Mobile telecommunication can be considered to be the main contribution to total RF-EMF exposure in all microenvironments.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL BENZENE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR PARENT-CHILD PAIRS IN ROUEN, FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ENVIRONMENTAL BENZENE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR PARENT-CHILD PAIRS IN ROUEN, FRANCE Amin KOUNIALIa environmental benzene exposure. In this study we compared personal benzene exposure and inhalation uptake in a group of children to those of their parents. We also compared levels of urinary benzene metabolites

  19. Cigarette, cigar and pipe smoking, passive smoke exposure, and risk of pancreatic cancer: a population-based study in the San Francisco Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranah, Gregory J; Holly, Elizabeth A; Wang, Furong; Bracci, Paige M

    2011-01-01

    cigarette smoking, household passive smoke exposure, and theb 1.0 (Ref. ) Passive exposure to household and workplaceIn this study, passive exposure to household and workplace

  20. An Evaluation of the Importance of Hand Exposures Using Rubber Latex Gloves as Sampling Dosimeters for Assessing Pesticide Exposures in Strawberry Harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaran, Gayatri

    2012-01-01

    State. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, 60(exposures. American Industrial Hygiene Association journal,model. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal 61,

  1. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-? production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term detrimental effects on the immune system of the offspring and these effects are to some extent sex-specific. -- Highlights: ? Prenatal exposure to Cd causes no thymocyte phenotype changes in the offspring ? Analysis of the splenocyte phenotype demonstrates a macrophage-specific effect only in male offspring ? The cytokine profiles suggest an effect on peripheral Th1 cells in female and to a lesser degree in male offspring ? There was a marked increase in serum anti-streptococcal antibody levels after immunization in both sexes ? There was a marked decrease in the numbers of splenic CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} cells in both sexes.

  2. A quantitative approach to the characterization of cumulative and average solvent exposure in paint manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, D.P.; Schwartz, B.S.; Powell, S.; Nelson, T.; Keller, L.; Sides, S.; Agnew, J.; Bolla, K.; Bleecker, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous reports have attributed a range of neurobehavioral effects to low-level, occupational solvent exposure. These studies have generally been limited in their exposure assessments and have specifically lacked good estimates of exposure intensity. In the present study, the authors describe the development of two exposure variables that quantitatively integrate industrial hygiene sampling data with estimates of exposure duration--a cumulative exposure (CE) estimate and a lifetime weighted average exposure (LWAE) estimate. Detailed occupational histories were obtained from 187 workers at two paint manufacturing plants. Historic industrial hygiene sampling data for total hydrocarbons (a composite variable of the major neurotoxic solvents present) were grouped according to 20 uniform, temporally stable exposure zones, which had been defined during plant walk-through surveys. Sampling at the time of the study was used to characterize the few zones for which historic data were limited or unavailable. For each participant, the geometric mean total hydrocarbon level for each exposure zone worked in was multiplied by the duration of employment in that zone; the resulting products were summed over the working lifetime to create the CE variable. The CE variable was divided by the total duration of employment in solvent-exposed jobs to create the LWAE variable. The explanatory value of each participant's LWAE estimate in the regression of simple visual reaction time (a neurobehavioral test previously shown to be affected by chronic solvent exposure) on exposure was compared with that of several other exposure variables, including exposure duration and an exposure variable based on an ordinal ranking of the exposure zones.

  3. Modeling personal particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pb-pah) exposure in human subjects in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jun; Tjoa, Thomas; Li, Lianfa; Jaimes, Guillermo; Delfino, Ralph J

    2012-01-01

    PAH exposures of each subject across all the samplingroot of average PAH exposures of each subject across all thesampling sessions (six subjects with only one-day of

  4. Impact of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure on connexin gap junction proteins in cultured rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2014-01-15

    7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) destroys ovarian follicles in a concentration-dependent manner. The impact of DMBA on connexin (CX) proteins that mediate communication between follicular cell types along with pro-apoptotic factors p53 and Bax were investigated. Postnatal day (PND) 4 Fisher 344 rat ovaries were cultured for 4 days in vehicle medium (1% DMSO) followed by a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO) or DMBA (12.5 nM or 75 nM) and cultured for 4 or 8 days. RT-PCR was performed to quantify Cx37, Cx43, p53 and Bax mRNA level. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to determine CX37 or CX43 level and/or localization. Cx37 mRNA and protein increased (P < 0.05) at 4 days of 12.5 nM DMBA exposure. Relative to vehicle control-treated ovaries, mRNA encoding Cx43 decreased (P < 0.05) but CX43 protein increased (P < 0.05) at 4 days by both DMBA exposures. mRNA expression of pro-apoptotic p53 was decreased (P < 0.05) but no changes in Bax expression were observed after 4 days of DMBA exposures. In contrast, after 8 days, DMBA decreased Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA and protein but increased both p53 and Bax mRNA levels. CX43 protein was located between granulosa cells, while CX37 was located at the oocyte cell surface of all follicle stages. These findings support that DMBA exposure impacts ovarian Cx37 and Cx43 mRNA and protein prior to both observed changes in pro-apoptotic p53 and Bax and follicle loss. It is possible that such interference in follicular cell communication is detrimental to follicle viability, and may play a role in DMBA-induced follicular atresia. - Highlights: • DMBA increases Cx37 and Cx43 expression prior to follicle loss. • During follicle loss both Cx37 and Cx43 expressions are reduced. • CX43 protein is absent in follicle remnants lacking an oocyte.

  5. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  6. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  7. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  8. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A.

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  9. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  10. Human factors in software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an overview of ergonomics/human factors in software development, recent research, and classic papers. Articles are drawn from the following areas of psychological research on programming: cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, and psycholinguistics. Topics examined include: theoretical models of how programmers solve technical problems, the characteristics of programming languages, specification formats in behavioral research and psychological aspects of fault diagnosis.

  11. Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence Andrzej Cichocki a , Hyekyoung Lee b , Yong of Science and Technology San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784, Korea Abstract Nonnegative matrix reduction, the goal of which is to decompose nonnegative data matrix X into a product of basis matrix

  12. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of supply, upon written request as follows: Address: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission OfficeTransfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees Office of Nuclear Regulatory; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series

  13. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia)] [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia); Grigoryan, N. [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2013-07-01

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different radionuclides that have intake into the organism or absorbed into blood. Transport of different radionuclides between compartments is assumed to follow first order kinetics provided the concentration in red blood cells (RBCs) stays below a nonlinear threshold concentration. When the concentration in RBCs exceeds that threshold, the transfer rate from diffusible plasma to RBCs is assumed to decrease as the concentration in RBCs increases. For the calculations used capabilities AMBER by using the traces of radionuclides in the body. Model for the transfer of radionuclides in the body has been built on the basis of existing models at AMBER for lead. (authors)

  14. Post-accident inhalation exposure and experience with plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J

    1998-06-01

    This paper addresses the issue of inhalation exposure immediately afterward and for a long time following a nuclear accident. For the cases where either a nuclear weapon burns or explodes prior to nuclear fission, or at locations close to a nuclear reactor accident containing fission products, a major concern is the inhalation of aerosolized plutonium (Pu) particles producing alpha-radiation. We have conducted field studies of Pu- contaminated real and simulated accident sites at Bikini, Johnston Atoll, Tonopah (Nevada), Palomares (Spain), Chernobyl, and Maralinga (Australia).

  15. Optimization Online - Integer Factorization is in P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuly Shipilevsky

    2012-08-31

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Integer Factorization is in P. Yuly Shipilevsky (yulysh2000 ***at*** yahoo.ca). Abstract: A polynomial-time algorithm for integer factorization, ...

  16. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  17. Protocols of radiocontaminant air monitoring for inhalation exposure estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.

    1995-09-01

    Monitoring the plutonium and americium particle emissions from soils contaminated during atmospheric nuclear testing or due to accidental releases is important for several reasons. First, it is important to quantify the extent of potential human exposure from inhalation of alpha-emitting particles, which is the major exposure pathway from transuranic radionuclides. Second, the information provided by resuspension monitoring is the basis of criteria that determine the target soil concentrations for management and cleanup of contaminated soil sites. There are other radioactive aerosols, such as the fission products (cesium and strontium) and neutron-activation products (europium isotopes), which may be resuspended and therefore necessary to monitor as well. This Standard Protocol (SP) provides the method used for radiocontaminant air monitoring by the Health and Ecological Assessment Division (formerly Environmental Sciences Division), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as developed and tested at Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the Marshall Islands. The objective of this SP is to document the applications and methods of monitoring of all the relevant variables. This protocol deals only with measuring air concentrations of radionuclides and total suspended particulates (TSP, or {open_quotes}dust{close_quotes}). A separate protocol presents the more difficult measurements required to determine transuranic aerosol emission rates, or {open_quotes}resuspension rate{close_quotes}.

  18. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telisman, Spomenka Colak, Bozo; Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna; Cvitkovic, Petar

    2007-10-15

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  19. Multi-parametric approach towards the assessment of radon and thoron progeny exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Rosaline E-mail: rosaline.mishra@gmail.com; Sapra, B. K.; Mayya, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Conventionally, the dosimetry is carried out using radon and thoron gas concentration measurements and doses have been assigned using assumed equilibrium factors for the progeny species, which is inadequate pertaining to the variations in equilibrium factors and possibly due to significant thoron. In fact, since the true exposures depend upon the intricate mechanisms of progeny deposition in the lung, therefore an integrated approach for the assessment of progeny is essential. In this context, the recently developed deposition based progeny concentration measurement techniques (DTPS: Direct Thoron progeny sensors and DRPS: Direct Radon progeny sensors) appear to be best suited for radiological risk assessments both among occupational workers and general study populations. DTPS and DRPS consist of aluminized mylar mounted LR115 type passive detectors, which essentially detects the alpha particles emitted from the deposited progeny atoms on the detector surface. It gives direct measure of progeny activity concentrations in air. DTPS has a lower limit of detection limit of 0.1?Bq/m{sup 3} whereas that for DRPS is 1 Bq/m{sup 3}, hence are perfectly suitable for indoor environments. These DTPS and DRPS can be capped with 200-mesh type wire-screen to measure the coarse fraction of the progeny concentration and the corresponding coarse fraction deposition velocities as well as the time integrated fine fraction. DTPS and DRPS can also be lodged in an integrated sampler wherein the wire-mesh and filter-paper are arranged in an array in flow-mode, to measure the fine and coarse fraction concentration separately and simultaneously. The details are further discussed in the paper.

  20. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of chronic exposure results with the MACCS reactor accident consequence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; Rollstin, J.A.; Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the chronic exposure pathways associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 75 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: crop growing season dose, crop long-term dose, water ingestion dose, milk growing season dose, long-term groundshine dose, long-term inhalation dose, total food pathways dose, total ingestion pathways dose, total long-term pathways dose, total latent cancer fatalities, area-dependent cost, crop disposal cost, milk disposal cost, population-dependent cost, total economic cost, condemnation area, condemnation population, crop disposal area and milk disposal area. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: dry deposition velocity, transfer of cesium from animal feed to milk, transfer of cesium from animal feed to meat, ground concentration of Cs-134 at which the disposal of milk products will be initiated, transfer of Sr-90 from soil to legumes, maximum allowable ground concentration of Sr-90 for production of crops, fraction of cesium entering surface water that is consumed in drinking water, groundshine shielding factor, scale factor defining resuspension, dose reduction associated with decontamination, and ground concentration of 1-131 at which disposal of crops will be initiated due to accidents that occur during the growing season.