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1

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Estes Gulch Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Estes Gulch Disposal Cell (010) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

2

Tuana Gulch Wind Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tuana Gulch Wind Park Tuana Gulch Wind Park Jump to: navigation, search Name Tuana Gulch Wind Park Facility Tuana Gulch Wind Park Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exergy Developer Exergy Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location Twin Falls County ID Coordinates 42.89°, -114.98° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.89,"lon":-114.98,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

hare-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diurnal Variability of Turbulent Fluxes in the Equatorial Pacific J. E. Hare Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado...

4

Fossil Gulch Wind Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossil Gulch Wind Park Fossil Gulch Wind Park Jump to: navigation, search Name Fossil Gulch Wind Park Facility Fossil Gulch Wind Park Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exergy Development Group/United Materials Developer Exergy Development Group/United Materials Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location Northwest of Hagerman ID Coordinates 42.814261°, -114.996665° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.814261,"lon":-114.996665,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Rabbits and Hares  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rabbits and Hares Rabbits and Hares Nature Bulletin No. 473-A December 2, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RABBITS AND HARES The Cottontail Rabbit, with his long hind legs, big ears and a tuft of cottony white fuzz underneath his bobtail, is proverbial for his timidity, speed and dodging tactics; for his skill at concealment by camouflage: and for his prolific, rapidly growing families. He is our most common and best known mammal. American folklore and literature are filled with jingles, songs, cartoons, old sayings and children's stories about him. B'rer Rabbit in the Uncle Remus tales, Molly Cottontail, Bugs Bunny, the Easter rabbit, and the Hare and the Tortoise, are famous animal characters.

6

HARE: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of work done over a 6 year period under the FAST-OS programs. The first effort was called Right-Weight Kernels, (RWK) and was concerned with improving measurements of OS noise so it could be treated quantitatively; and evaluating the use of two operating systems, Linux and Plan 9, on HPC systems and determining how these operating systems needed to be extended or changed for HPC, while still retaining their general-purpose nature. The second program, HARE, explored the creation of alternative runtime models, building on RWK. All of the HARE work was done on Plan 9. The HARE researchers were mindful of the very good Linux and LWK work being done at other labs and saw no need to recreate it. Even given this limited funding, the two efforts had outsized impact: _ Helped Cray decide to use Linux, instead of a custom kernel, and provided the tools needed to make Linux perform well _ Created a successor operating system to Plan 9, NIX, which has been taken in by Bell Labs for further development _ Created a standard system measurement tool, Fixed Time Quantum or FTQ, which is widely used for measuring operating systems impact on applications _ Spurred the use of the 9p protocol in several organizations, including IBM _ Built software in use at many companies, including IBM, Cray, and Google _ Spurred the creation of alternative runtimes for use on HPC systems _ Demonstrated that, with proper modifications, a general purpose operating systems can provide communications up to 3 times as effective as user-level libraries Open source was a key part of this work. The code developed for this project is in wide use and available at many places. The core Blue Gene code is available at https://bitbucket.org/ericvh/hare. We describe details of these impacts in the following sections. The rest of this report is organized as follows: First, we describe commercial impact; next, we describe the FTQ benchmark and its impact in more detail; operating systems and runtime research follows; we discuss infrastructure software; and close with a description of the new NIX operating system, future work, and conclusions.

Mckie, Jim

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Clam Gulch, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clam Gulch, Alaska: Energy Resources Clam Gulch, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 60.2311111°, -151.393611° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.2311111,"lon":-151.393611,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Preliminary assessment report for Waiawa Gulch, Installation 15080, Pearl City, Oahu, Hawaii. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Hawaii Army National Guard (HIARNG) property near Pearl City, Oahu, Hawaii. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Waiawa Gulch property, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP).

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessing Satellite-Based Rainfall Estimates in Semiarid Watersheds Using the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Gauge Network and TRMM PR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rain gauge network associated with the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona provides a unique opportunity for direct comparisons of in situ measurements and satellite-based instantaneous rain rate estimates like ...

Eyal Amitai; Carl L. Unkrich; David C. Goodrich; Emad Habib; Bryson Thill

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Wild Rice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an Algonquin Indian name for Wild Rice, the most productive and valuable wild grain crop we have. Wild rice and acorns were two crops harvested in autumn by the Indians in...

11

Wild Cherries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cherries Cherries Nature Bulletin No. 201-A October 9, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILD CHERRIES This is a year of bountiful harvests, rewarding the labor of the farmer and the gardener, and also producing an abundance of wild fruits which may be had for the picking. In our forest preserves, all wild fruits have been unusually large, juicy and full of flavor -- strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, currants, gooseberries, elderberries, grapes, plums, haws, crabapples and cherries. To some of us, the last is the tastiest of them all and, a month ago, the outer twigs of the wild cherry trees were drooping with heavy clusters of this fruit. The familiar Wild Black Cherry is the only one of the four kinds of wild cherries found in this region which grows to be a large forest tree widespread throughout the eastern half of North America. Its reddish- brown close-grained wood, strong and rather hard, takes a satiny finish and compares favorably with mahogany. It is highly prized for fine cabinet work and some of our most beautiful pieces of antique furniture from colonial and pioneer times were made of wild cherry.

12

Wild Onions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Onions Onions Nature Bulletin No. 184 March 21, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILD ONIONS In 1673-74, when Father Marquette and his party journeyed from what is now Green Bay, Wisconsin, and returned by way of what is now Chicago. It is recorded that one of their chief foods was the "wild onion": probably the Wild Leek and the Meadow Garlic in the woods of Wisconsin, and the Nodding Onion so abundant in the wet prairies around Chicago. Two of the first plants to push through the ground in spring, along with the skunk cabbage, are the wild leek and the wild garlic. A woodsman will eat handfuls of their tender leaves, which is all right if he stays in the woods away from people. Believe it or not, leeks, garlics and onions are "outlaw" members of the lily family. Their flavor and odor are due to an oil-like vegetable compound of sulfur which is volatile and dissipated by heat, making them more palatable when cooked -- particularly if boiled In 3 different waters.

13

Wild Roses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roses Roses Nature Bulletin No. 382-A May 16, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILD ROSES The wild flowers of our forest preserves come into bloom, fade and go to seed, one after another, to present an almost year-long pageant of color. The most spectacular displays are in spring when the woodlands are carpeted with a multitude of delicate blossoms; in May when the landscape is dominated by the pink and white masses of crabapple and hawthorn; and in late summer when the prairies blaze with bands of rich golds, blues and purples. This parade begins quietly in February when the queer hooded bloom of the skunk cabbage pushes up through the crusted snow; and ends in autumn, after the snow has begun to fly again, with the uncoiling of the slender yellow petals of the witch hazel. But, for many of us, the stars of this production are the Wild Roses that show their faces during the long days of June and Midsummer.

14

Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whale Cr Tepee Cr Thoma Cr KintlaCr Logg ing Cr Anaconda Cr Bo wmanCr Kintla Cr Cam a s Cr A naco nda

15

Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kintla Cr Lo gging Cr Anaconda Cr B owmanCr Kintla Cr Ca mas Cr Ana conda Cr SFkShortyCrShorty Cr Mc

16

Wild Birds in Captivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wild Birds in Captivity Name: Suzanne Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Our cat has found a young cedar waxwing - which he left unharmed - on our lawn. We have taken...

17

Michael Wilde | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael Wilde Software Architect Michael Wilde is a software architect and a Fellow in the Computation Institute. Research Interests Parallel programming Parallel scripting...

18

solarFLAG hare and hounds: estimation of p-mode frequencies from Sun-as-star helioseismology data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the results of the latest solarFLAG hare-and-hounds exercise, which was concerned with testing methods for extraction of frequencies of low-degree solar p modes from data collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. We have used the new solarFLAG simulator, which includes the effects of correlated mode excitation and correlations with background noise, to make artificial timeseries data that mimic Doppler velocity observations of the Sun as a star. The correlations give rise to asymmetry of mode peaks in the frequency power spectrum. Ten members of the group (the hounds) applied their ``peak bagging'' codes to a 3456-day dataset, and the estimated mode frequencies were returned to the hare (who was WJC) for comparison. Analysis of the results reveals a systematic bias in the estimated frequencies of modes above approximately 1.8 mHz. The bias is negative, meaning the estimated frequencies systematically underestimate the input frequencies. We identify two sources that are the dominant contributions to the frequency bias. Both sources involve failure to model accurately subtle aspects of the observed power spectral density in the part (window) of the frequency power spectrum that is being fitted. One source of bias arises from a failure to account for the power spectral density coming from all those modes whose frequencies lie outside the fitting windows. The other source arises from a failure to account for the power spectral density of the weak l=4 and 5 modes, which are often ignored in Sun-as-a-star analysis. The Sun-as-a-star peak-bagging codes need to allow for both sources, otherwise the frequencies are likely to be biased.

S. J. Jimenez-Reyes; W. J. Chaplin; R. A. Garcia; T. Appourchaux; F. Baudin; P. Boumier; Y. Elsworth; S. T. Fletcher; M. Lazrek; J. W. Leibacher; J. Lochard; R. New; C. Regulo; D. Salabert; T. Toutain; G. A. Verner; R. Wachter

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

Domestic Animals that go Wild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and become tamer than their wild relatives. By the artificial selection of breeding stock, these domesticated animals have been greatly modified to fill man's needs for better...

20

solarFLAG hare and hounds: on the extraction of rotational p-mode splittings from seismic, Sun-as-a-star data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on results from the first solar Fitting at Low-Angular degree Group (solar FLAG) hare-and-hounds exercise. The group is concerned with the development of methods for extracting the parameters of low-l solar p mode data (`peak bagging'), collected by Sun-as-a-star observations. Accurate and precise estimation of the fundamental parameters of the p modes is a vital pre-requisite of all subsequent studies. Nine members of the FLAG (the `hounds') fitted an artificial 3456-d dataset. The dataset was made by the `hare' (WJC) to simulate full-disc Doppler velocity observations of the Sun. The rotational frequency splittings of the l=1, 2 and 3 modes were the first parameter estimates chosen for scrutiny. Significant differences were uncovered at l=2 and 3 between the fitted splittings of the hounds. Evidence is presented that suggests this unwanted bias had its origins in several effects. The most important came from the different way in which the hounds modeled the visibility ratio of the different rotationally split components. Our results suggest that accurate modelling of the ratios is vital to avoid the introduction of significant bias in the estimated splittings. This is of importance not only for studies of the Sun, but also of the solar analogues that will targets for asteroseismic campaigns.

W. J. Chaplin; T. Appourchaux; F. Baudin; P. Boumier; Y. Elsworth; S. T. Fletcher; E. Fossat; R. A. Garcia; G. R. Isaak; A. Jimenez; S. J. Jimenez-Reyes; M. Lazrek; J. W. Leibacher; J. Lochard; R. New; P. Palle; C. Regulo; D. Salabert; N. Seghouani; T. Toutain; R. Wachter

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wild Steelhead Studies, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was attained in implementing the complex and challenging studies of wild steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss production in Idaho. Study sites were selected and techniques were developed to collect the needed data in remote wilderness locations. Cursory examination of existing data provides indication that most wild steelhead stocks are under escaped, especially the Group B stocks. Abundance of wild steelhead is generally declining in recent years. The portable weir concept and electronic fish counting developed through this project have been well received by land owners and reviewing governmental agencies with less impact to the land, stream, and fishery resources than conventional permanent weirs.

Holubetz, Terry B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

23

York's Wild Kingdom : a development proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York's Wild Kingdom is a privately held zoo and amusement park in York, a Massachusetts based shopping center developer and investment compa Kingdom and the 150 acres that surround it. The community is culturaIl ( and York ...

Rae, Kimberley Whiting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

QuarterlyCouncil > In this issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

updates its long-term plan for meeting growth in demand.The power plant that became Langley Gulch has been of helping to tame the wild child of the energy world, wind power. The Langley Gulch Power Plant will help system.The plant is capable of producing enough power for about 208,000 homes. At a dedication ceremony

25

Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1982 State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Established by The Wild Resource Conservation Act of 1982, the Wild Resource Conservation Program is a part of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The program works closely with the Pennsylvania Game

26

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

27

Wild Brush Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brush Energy Brush Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Brush Energy Place Seattle, Washington Product Washington State-based clean energy company and publicly traded junior energy firm based in Seattle. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (11) Apply Africa filter Asia (12) Apply Asia filter Australia and Oceania (10) Apply Australia and Oceania filter Europe (219) Apply Europe filter Global (7) Apply Global filter North America (217) Apply North America filter Technology Land-Based Wind (280) Apply Land-Based Wind filter Marine Energy (58) Apply Marine Energy filter Offshore Wind (161) Apply Offshore Wind filter Power Lines (66) Apply Power Lines filter Towers (23) Apply Towers filter Animal Birds (334) Apply Birds filter Fish (71) Apply Fish filter Invertebrates (44) Apply Invertebrates filter Mammals (185) Apply Mammals filter Reptiles (10) Apply Reptiles filter Publication Year 2013 (92) Apply 2013 filter

29

Wild Horse and Burro Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wild Horse and Burro Management Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

30

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) contains citations to more than 1,000 journal articles, government publications, conference proceedings, and other reports.

Sinclair, K.; Sandberg, T.; Cohn, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

32

Wild Horse II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wild Horse II Wind Farm Wild Horse II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse II Wind Farm Facility Wild Horse II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Puget Sound Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location Kittitas County Coordinates 47.000782°, -120.190609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.000782,"lon":-120.190609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Myakka River Wild and Scenic Designation and Preservation Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Myakka was designated as the state's only "Florida Wild and Scenic River" by the Florida State Legislature in 1985. The act provides for preservation and management of the 34-mile portion of...

34

Crop to wild introgression in lettuce: following the fate of crop genome segments in backcross populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article as: Uwimana et al. : Crop to wild introgression infollowing the fate of crop genome segments in backcrossto the wild parent reduces the crop genome content in amount

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for maintaining a state water plan, intended to implement state policies for water management. A portion of the plan is reserved for rivers

36

Detecting Adversarial Advertisements in the Wild Google, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting Adversarial Advertisements in the Wild D. Sculley Google, Inc. dsculley@google.com Matthew Eric Otey Google, Inc. otey@google.com Michael Pohl Google, Inc. mpohl@google.com Bridget Spitznagel Google, Inc. drsprite@google.com John Hainsworth Google, Inc. hainsworth@google.com Yunkai Zhou

Cortes, Corinna

37

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Wild Horse Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse Wind Power Project Facility Wild Horse Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location Kittitas County Coordinates 47.000782°, -120.190609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.000782,"lon":-120.190609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present, wild hogs exist in Texas in free-ranging populations numbering in the millions. These populations continue to expand, and now are pervasive in almost all land resource areas of the state. Wild hogs have a noted presence in the ranching and farming industry. This presence is both biophysical and socioeconomic in nature. The hogs financially influence agriculture as both a valuable asset and expensive liability. The economic presence of this influence reflects opposing personal preferences which play an important part in opposing valuations. Biological information is available which concerns the hogs, but no research has centered specifically around the economic effects of the hog's presence upon agricultural producers. To properly perform any economic analysis of wild hog impacts on the state's agricultural producers, good data was needed and became a primary focus of this study. A second need and focus of the study was the employment of enterprise budgeting as an economic research method to discover values for the positive and negative financial effects of the hogs. These methods were used to yield sound values for the economic effects of the wild hogs on the Texas agriculture producers which were the focus of this study. This research effort demonstrates the economic effects of wild hogs on eight selected Texas agricultural producers. An intensive survey was conducted which involved gathering primary data which focused on the effects the hogs have on the respondent's operations. This data was used to construct both full and partial combination effect enterprise budgets for the respondent's agriculture enterprises. These budgets yield values for the benefits and damages that result from the hog's growing influence on landowners / managers. The values for the economic effects of the hogs are presented and discussed in an attempt to offer information and alternatives which may help efficiently manage populations of the hogs in Texas. This information can be used to evaluate biophysical and socioeconomic options for that management effort in several areas. These are the establishment of legal ownership of the hogs, legal liability, and creation of rules, regulations, and programs which increase the efficiency of management efforts.

Bach, Joel Paul

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock 1 cup wild rice, rinsed Sea ground pepper to taste 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons buttermilk or plain low-fat

Blanchette, Robert A.

42

Effects of hunting and season of fire on wild turkey populations in South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses impacts to wild turkey populations from hunting and prescribed fire. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To compare survival rates and causes of mortality of wild turkey gobblers between hunted and unhunted populations; (2) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on nesting success, survival and habitat use of wild turkey hens; (3) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on the availability of wild turkey plant foods.

Moore, William, F.; Kilgo, John, C.; Guynn, David, C.; Davis, James, R.

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Transgenic crops get a test in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

Cherfas, J.

1991-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Electric Coop, Inc Rice Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc Place Minnesota Utility Id 20639 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AUTOMATIC YARD LIGHT SERVICE Lighting FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 10 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 15 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 25 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 37.5 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 50 KVA transformer Residential

45

Wild Horse 69-kV transmission line environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc. (Hill County) proposes to construct and operate a 69-kV transmission line from its North Gildford Substation in Montana north to the Canadian border. A vicinity project area map is enclosed as a figure. TransCanada Power Corporation (TCP), a Canadian power-marketing company, will own and construct the connecting 69-kV line from the international border to Express Pipeline`s pump station at Wild Horse, Alberta. This Environmental Assessment is prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) as lead federal agency to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as part of DOE`s review and approval process of the applications filed by Hill County for a DOE Presidential Permit and License to Export Electricity to a foreign country. The purpose of the proposed line is to supply electric energy to a crude oil pump station in Canada, owned by Express Pipeline Ltd. (Express). The pipeline would transport Canadian-produced oil from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Caster, Wyoming. The Express Pipeline is scheduled to be constructed in 1996--97 and will supply crude oil to refineries in Wyoming and the midwest.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Wild Steelhead Studies, Salmon and Clearwater Rivers, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To enumerate chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss adult escapements, weirs were operated in Marsh, Chamberlain, West Fork Chamberlain, and Running creeks. Beginning in late July 1994, a juvenile trap was installed in Running Creek to estimate juvenile outmigrants. Plans have been completed to install a weir in Rush Creek to enumerate steelhead adult escapement beginning in spring 1995. Design and agreements are being developed for Johnson Creek and Captain John Creek. Data collected in 1993 and 1994 indicate that spring chinook salmon and group-B steelhead populations and truly nearing extinction levels. For example, no adult salmon or steelhead were passed above the West Fork Chamberlain Creek weir in 1984, and only 6 steelhead and 16 chinook salmon were passed into the important spawning area on upper Marsh Creek. Group-A steelhead are considerably below desirable production levels, but in much better status than group-B stocks. Production of both group-A and group-B steelhead is being limited by low spawning escapements. Studies have not been initiated on wild summer chinook salmon stocks.

Holubetz, Terry B; Leth, Brian D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) 17FDAWildScenicRiversSection7AProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies National Park Service Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service United States Forest Service Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations & Policies Wild and Scenic Rivers Act 36 CFR 297 Wild and Scenic Rivers Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17FDAWildScenicRiversSection7AProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

48

V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild 3: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild April 26, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A new Metasploit module for the Java 7u17 sandbox bypass emerged PLATFORM: All versions of Java SE-7 (including the recently released 1.7.0_21-b11) ABSTRACT: Java issues are being exploited in the wild by exploit kits, with Cool and Redkit specifically being known to use these bugs, and others likely to follow shortly. REFERENCE LINKS: SecList SE-2012-01 Security Explorations IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: It can be used to achieve a complete Java security sandbox bypass on a target system. IMPACT: Manipulation of data System access SOLUTION: Vendor recommends patch systems immediately Addthis Related Articles V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary

49

Ian Foster, Ti Leggett, Mike Papka, Mike Wilde Win the Analytics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ti Leggett, Mike Papka, and Mike Wilde were part of the team that won the Analytics Challenge at SC07 for presenting a new approach for protecting cyberinfrastructure. The...

50

Evaluation and Monitoring of Wild /Natural Steelhead Trout Production, 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to provide additional, and more definitive, information regarding wild steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations in Idaho. Important streams for wild steelhead production were identified and selected for monitoring. Monitoring activities employed among streams varied, but generally included: aerial redd counts, placement of adult weirs, enumeration of juveniles through mask and snorkel counts, and emigrant trapping. This report details activities during the 1996 field season.

Leth, Brian D.; Holubetz, Terry B.; Nemeth, Doug (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive The lower portion of the St. Croix River in Minnesota and Wisconsin is

52

Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1985-1988 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steelhead trout reared in Idaho hatcheries for release during the 1984--1988 outmigrations were adipose fin clipped to differentiate between wild/natural and hatchery-reared fish. From 1984--1988, 34 million hatchery-reared steelhead trout were clipped and 30.1 million were released; the difference being made up by hatchery mortality and the percent of acceptable clips. Since 1987, the adipose clip has given protection to all wild/natural steelhead and identified them from hatchery stocks. 135 refs.

Duke, Rodney C.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this study are to (1) characterize the outmigration timing of different wild stocks of spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers, (2) determine if consistent patterns are apparent, and (3) determine what environmental factors influence outmigration timing. The authors PIT tagged wild spring/summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1993, and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary Dams during spring, summer, and fall 1994. This report details their findings.

Achord, Stephen; Matthews, Gene M.; Kamikawa, Daniel J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A comparison of Texas and Iowa broodstocks for eastern wild turkey restoration in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Objectives of this study were to compare mortality, reproduction, and movements of eastern wild turkeys (Meleagis gallopavo silvestris) from Iowa and Texas which were relocated (more)

Gainey, Jeffery Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Abstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

52820). Sequence analysis of ScNLE protein A BLAST search of the GenBank protein database revealed transcription factors, we searched the ScNLE promoter for different sequence motifs recog- nizedAbstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum

56

Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis of feces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis 10016; and Departments of c Biology and e Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Board November 1, 2012 (received for review September 19, 2012) We use stable isotope ratios in feces

Rothman, Jessica M.

57

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We PIT tagged wild spring/summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1995 and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during spring and summer 1996.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced

59

Wild Pigs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlike other pigs its hind feet have only three toes instead of four; also there is a gland on its back that gives off a foul-smelling secretion. It is noted for devouring...

60

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology R&D Strategy for the Electric Power Industry: "Wild Cards"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address the many challenges facing the electric power industry during the next 20 years, an effective process of technology R&D planning is needed. To augment recently completed scenario-based planning, this report identifies the technology and R&D needs that result from 21 additional institutional, political, financial, technical, or social changes ("wild cards") not addressed in the prior scenarios project (see EPRI Report 1014385). This report also identifies key R&D priorities that occur in multip...

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

hare1MSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm does not work. If this is the case, simply add the semi-inner product to a standard ..... userinfo(2, 'LLLPoly', "Using Gram-Schmitd on row "||i||" of "||dim);.

62

hare2MSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is part of the MITACS Symbolic Analysis Project and is based ... in the event that the decimal expansion of a number is known to greater accuracy.

63

Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Knapp, Steve

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

The abundance of presolar grains in comet 81P/WILD 2  

SciTech Connect

We carried out hypervelocity impact experiments in order to test the possibility that presolar grains are preferentially destroyed during impact of the comet 81P/Wild 2 samples into the Stardust Al foil collectors. Powdered samples of the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 were shot at 6 km s{sup -1} into Stardust flight spare Al foil. Craters from the Acfer 094 test shots, as well as ones from the actual Stardust cometary foils, were analyzed by NanoSIMS ion imaging to search for presolar grains. We found two O-rich presolar grains and two presolar SiC grains in the Acfer 94 test shots, with measured abundances in the foils of 4 and 5 ppm, respectively, significantly lower than the amount of presolar grains actually present in this meteorite. Based on known abundances of these phases in Acfer 094, we estimate a loss of over 90% of the O-rich presolar grains; the fraction of SiC lost is lower, reflecting its higher resistance to destruction. In the Stardust cometary foils, we identified four O-rich presolar grains in 5000 {mu}m{sup 2} of crater residue. Including a presolar silicate grain found by Leitner et al., the overall measured abundance of O-rich presolar grains in Wild 2 is {approx}35 ppm. No presolar SiC has been found in the foil searches, although one was identified in the aerogel samples. Based on the known abundances of presolar silicates and oxides in Acfer 094, we can calculate the pre-impact abundances of these grains in the Stardust samples. Our calculations indicate initial abundances of 600-830 ppm for O-rich presolar grains. Assuming a typical diameter of {approx}300 nm for SiC suggests a presolar SiC abundance of {approx}45 ppm. Analyses of the Stardust samples indicated early on that recognizable presolar components were not particularly abundant, an observation that was contrary to expectations that the cometary material would, like interplanetary dust particles, be dominated by primitive materials from the early solar system (including abundant presolar grains), which had remained essentially unaltered over solar system history in the cold environment of the Kuiper Belt. Our work shows that comet Wild 2, in fact, does contain more presolar grains than measurements on the Stardust samples suggest, with abundances similar to those observed in primitive IDPs.

Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Ong, W. J. [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kearsley, Anton T. [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)] [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, Mark J., E-mail: floss@wustl.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE Joint Genome Institute: First Wild Grass Species and Model System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 10, 2010 February 10, 2010 First Wild Grass Species and Model System for Energy Crops Sequenced WALNUT CREEK, CA-As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works toward developing sustainable sources of clean renewable energy, perennial grasses have emerged as major candidates for the commercial production of cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks. However, little is known about the specific biological traits of the grasses that might contribute to their usefulness for energy production, in part because such grasses typically have long lifecycles and possess large, complex genomes, making them difficult to study. Representative genomes for two of the three major subfamilies of grasses-those that include rice, maize, sorghum and sugar cane-have already been sequenced. Now in the February 11 edition of the journal

66

A simulation model of Rio Grande wild turkey dynamics in the Edwards Plateau of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I investigated the effect of precipitation and predator abundance on Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo; RGWT) in Texas. My results suggested that RGWT production was strongly correlated with cumulative winter precipitation over the range of the RGWT in Texas. However, I found no evidence that predator abundance influenced RGWT production, although spatial-asynchrony of predator populations at multiple spatial scales might have masked broad-scale effects. Using the results of these analyses, as well as empirical data derived from the literature and from field studies in the southern Edwards Plateau, I developed a stochastic, density-dependent, sex- and agespecific simulation model of wild turkey population dynamics. I used the model to evaluate the effect of alternative harvest management strategies on turkey populations. Sensitivity analysis of the model suggested that shape of the density-dependence relationship, clutch size, hatchability, juvenile sex ratio, poult survival, juvenile survival, and nonbreeding hen mortality most strongly influenced model outcome. Of these, density-dependence, sex ratio, and juvenile survival were least understood and merit further research. My evaluation of fall hen harvest suggested that current rates do not pose a threat to turkey populations. Moreover, it appears that hen harvest can be extended to other portions of the RGWT range without reducing turkey abundance, assuming that population dynamics and harvest rates are similar to those in the current fall harvest zone. Finally, simulation of alternative hen harvest rates suggested that rates ?5% of the fall hen population resulted in significant declines in the simulated population after 25 years, and rates ?15% resulted in significant risk of extinction to the simulated population.

Schwertner, Thomas Wayne

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mineral and geothermal resource potential of Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake roadless areas Plumas, Shasta, and Tehama Counties, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical surveys in Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake Roadless Areas indicate no potential for metallic or non-metallic mineral resources in the areas and no potential for coal or petroleum energy resources. However, Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and part of Heart Lake Roadless Area lie in Lassen Known Geothermal Resources Area, and much of the rest of Heart Lake Roadless Area is subject to non-competitive geothermal lease applications. Both areas are adjacent to Lassen Volcanic National Park, which contains extensive areas of fumaroles, hot springs, and hydrothermally altered rock; voluminous silicic volcanism occurred here during late Pleistocene and Holocene time. Geochemical data and geological interpretation indicate that the thermal manifestations in the Park and at Morgan and Growler Hot Springs (immediately west of Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area) are part of the same large geothermal system. Consequently, substantial geothermal resources are likely to be discovered in Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and cannot be ruled out for Heart Lake Roadless Area.

Muffler, L.J.P.; Clynne, M.A.; Cook, A.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Dose-rate-effects in XRCC1 wild-type and mutant CHO cell lines using An ?AM source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on both the AA8 (wild-type CHO cells) and EM9 (XRCC1 null CHO mutants) cell lines. In particular, this study performed clonogenic survival and growth assays to ...

Chambers, Dwight McCoy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Genomic organization of chromosomal centromeres in the cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., and its wild progenitor, O. rufipogon Griff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centromeres are responsible for sister-chromatid cohesion, kinetochore formation, and accurate transmission of chromosomes. Rice provides an excellent model for organizational and functional studies of centromeres since several of its chromosomes contain limited amounts of satellite and other repetitive sequences in their centromeres. To facilitate molecular characterization of the centromeres, we screened several BIBAC and BAC libraries of japonica and indica rice, using several centromere-specific repeat elements as probes. The positive clones were identified, fingerprinted and integrated into our whole genome physical map databases of the two rice subspecies. BAC/BIBACbased physical maps were constructed for the centromeric regions of the subspecies. To determine whether the genomic organization of the centromeres has changed since the cultivated rice split from its progenitor and to identify the sequences potentially playing an important role in centromere functions, we constructed a large-insert BIBAC library for the wild progenitor of Asian cultivated rice, O. rufipogon. The library contains 24,192 clones, has an average insert size of 163 kb, and covers 5 x haploid genome of wild rice. We screened the wild rice library with two centromere 8-specific overgo probes designed from the sequences flanking centromere 8 of japonica rice. A BIBACbased map was constructed for wild rice centromere 8. Two of the clones, B43P04 and B15E04, were found to span the entire region of the wild rice centromere and thus selected for sequencing the centromere. By sequencing the B43P09 clone, a 95% genomic sequence of the long arm side of wild rice centromere 8 was obtained. Comparative analysis revealed that the centromeric regions of wild rice have a similar gene content to japonica rice, but the centromeric regions of japonica rice have undergone chromosomal rearrangements at both large scale and nucleotide levels. In addition, although the 155-bp satellite repeats showed dramatic changes at the middle region, they are conserved at the 5' and 3' ends of satellite monomers, suggesting that those regions might have important functional roles for centromeres. These results provide not only new insights into genomic organization and evolution, but also a platform for functional analysis of plant centromeres.

Uhm, Taesik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Digital Mapping and Environmental Characterization of National Wild and Scenic River Systems  

SciTech Connect

Spatially accurate geospatial information is required to support decision-making regarding sustainable future hydropower development. Under a memorandum of understanding among several federal agencies, a pilot study was conducted to map a subset of National Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs) at a higher resolution and provide a consistent methodology for mapping WSRs across the United States and across agency jurisdictions. A subset of rivers (segments falling under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service) were mapped at a high resolution using the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The spatial extent and representation of river segments mapped at NHD scale were compared with the prevailing geospatial coverage mapped at a coarser scale. Accurately digitized river segments were linked to environmental attribution datasets housed within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program database to characterize the environmental context of WSR segments. The results suggest that both the spatial scale of hydrography datasets and the adherence to written policy descriptions are critical to accurately mapping WSRs. The environmental characterization provided information to deduce generalized trends in either the uniqueness or the commonness of environmental variables associated with WSRs. Although WSRs occur in a wide range of human-modified landscapes, environmental data layers suggest that they provide habitats important to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and recreation important to humans. Ultimately, the research findings herein suggest that there is a need for accurate, consistent, mapping of the National WSRs across the agencies responsible for administering each river. Geospatial applications examining potential landscape and energy development require accurate sources of information, such as data layers that portray realistic spatial representations.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bosnall, Peter [National Park Service] [National Park Service; Hetrick, Shelaine L [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Refractory Inclusion Returned by Stardust from Comet 81P/Wild 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft is a suite of particles from one impact track (Track 25) that are Ca-, Al-rich and FeO-free. We studied three particles from this track that range in size from 5.3 x 3.2 {micro}m to 15 x 10 {micro}m. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show that they consist of very fine-grained (from {approx}0.5 to {approx}2 {micro}m) Al-rich, Ti-bearing and Ti-free clinopyroxene, Mg-Al spinel, anorthite, perovskite, and osbornite (TiN). In addition to these phases, the terminal particle, named 'Inti', also contains melilite. All of these phases, with the exception of osbornite, are common in refractory inclusions and are predicted to condense at high temperature from a gas of solar composition. Osbornite, though very rare, has also been found in meteoritic refractory inclusions, and could have formed in a region of the nebula where carbon became enriched relative to oxygen compared to solar composition. Compositions of Ti-pyroxene in Inti are similar, but not identical, to those of fassaite from Allende inclusions. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that Ti-rich pyroxene in Inti has Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} within the range of typical meteoritic fassaite, consistent with formation under reducing conditions comparable to those of a system of solar composition. Inti is {sup 16}O-rich, with {delta}{sup 18}O {approx} {delta}{sup 17}O {approx} 40{per_thousand}, like unaltered phases in refractory inclusions and refractory IDPs. With grain sizes, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and an oxygen isotopic composition like those of refractory inclusions, we conclude that Inti is a refractory inclusion that formed in the inner solar nebula. Identification of a particle that formed in the inner Solar System among the comet samples demonstrates that there was transport of materials from the inner to the outer nebula, probably either in a bipolar outflow or by turbulence.

Simon, S B; Joswiak, D J; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Chi, M; Grossman, L; Al?on, J; Brownlee, D E; Fallon, S; Hutcheon, I D; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K D

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of the Reproductive Success of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead in Hatchery and Natural and Hatchery Environments : Annual Report for 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the field, laboratory, and analytical work from December 2007 through November 2008 on a research project that investigates interactions and comparative reproductive success of wild and hatchery origin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout in Forks Creek, a tributary of the Willapa River in southwest Washington. First, we continued to successfully sample hatchery and wild (i.e., naturally spawned) adult and wild smolt steelhead at Forks Creek. Second, we revealed microsatellite genotype data for adults and smolts through brood year 2008. Finally, four formal scientific manuscripts were published in 2008 and two are in press, one is in revision and two are in preparations.

Quinn, Thomas P.; Seamons, todd; Hauser, Lorenz; Naish, Kerry

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m2) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree analysis, the relative total reproductive success (adult-to-adult production) of hatchery (H{sub old} or H{sub new}) and wild (W) fish for two populations, over multiple brood years. Our analyses of samples from fish that bred in the early to mid 1990's show that fish of 'old' hatchery stocks have much lower total fitness than wild fish (17% to 54% of wild fitness), but that 'new' stocks have fitness that is similar to that of wild fish (ranging from 85% to 108% of wild fitness, depending on parental gender and run year). Therefore, our results show that the decision to phase out the old, out-of-basin stocks and replace them with new, conservation hatchery stocks was well founded. We also conclude that the H{sub new} fish are leaving behind substantial numbers of wild-born offspring. The similar fitnesses of H{sub new} and W fish suggests that wild-born offspring of H{sub new} fish are unlikely to have negative genetic effects on the population when they in turn spawn in the wild. We will test this hypothesis once enough F2 offspring have returned. Another interesting result is that we were unable to match a large fraction of the unclipped, returning fish with parents from their brood year. Furthermore, we were missing more fathers than mothers. Because we sampled almost every possible anadromous parent, these results suggest that nonanadromous trout or precocious parr may be obtaining a substantial number of matings. Substantial reproduction by precocious parr could be one unintended consequence of the hatchery program.

Blouin, Michael

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of the 1994 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook in the Snake River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged under programs conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The detection of tagged individuals at Lower Granite Dam provides a measure, of the temporal and spatial distribution of the wild populations. PIT Forecaster was developed to take advantage of this historical data to predict the proportion of a particular population which had arrived at the index site in real-time and to forecast elapsed time to some future percentile in a migration. This report evaluates the performance of the Least Squares (LS) method and the Synchronized historical pattern matching (SYNC) method used in the PIT Forecaster and two other possible methods of prediction reminiscent of methods recommended by the Fish Passage Center (FPC). Alternative No. 1 bases predictions on the historical proportion of PIT-Tags recovered in a specific year and Alternative No. 2 uses the historical cumulative distribution of smolt predicted of a previous season. Over the entire 1994 season, the LS method had the best prediction performance for both aggregate and individual streams. However, for the first half of the season, Alternative No. 1 was clearly a better predictor. This performance deteriorated for the last half of the season, and the LS method improved prediction for aggregate streams and for the individual streams. The algorithms used by PIT Forecaster provide a better prediction as the season progresses. For the first half of the season, Alternative No. 1 did very well for both index years selected. For the 1995 season, Alternative No. 1 will be combined with the LS method to create an improved predictor.

Townsend, Richard L.; Westhagen, P.; Yasuda, D.; Skalski, J.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Contrasting colonization and plant growth promoting capacity between wild type and gfp-derative of the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 in hybrid poplar  

SciTech Connect

This study aims to investigate the colonization of poplar by the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 and its capacity to promote plant growth. Poplar cuttings were inoculated with P. putida W619 (wild-type or gfp-labelled). The colonization of both strains was investigated and morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to evaluate plant growth promotion. Inoculation with P. putida W619 (wild-type) resulted in remarkable growth promotion, decreased activities of antioxidative defence related enzymes, and reduced stomatal resistance, all indicative of improved plant health and growth in comparison with the non-inoculated cuttings. In contrast, inoculation with gfp-labelled P. putida W619 did not promote growth; it even had a negative effect on plant health and growth. Furthermore, compared to the wildtype strain, colonization by the gfp-labelled P. putida W619::gfp1 was much lower; it only colonized the rhizosphere and root cortex while the wild-type strain also colonized the root xylem vessels. Despite the strong plant growth promoting capacity of P. putida W619 (wild-type), after gfp labelling its growth promoting characteristics disappeared and its colonization capacity was strongly influenced; for these reasons gfp labelling should be applied with sufficient caution.

Weyens N.; van der Lelie D.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, D.; Timmermans, J.-P.; Prinsen, E.; Van Oevelen, S.; D"Haen, J.; Smeets, K.; Taghavi, S.; Vangronsveld, J.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wild Teas and Tonics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roots. Tonics brewed from wormwood seed, the leaves and twigs of spicebush or prickly ash, and yarrow leaves, tasted too much like bitter medicine. Basswood flowers, red clover...

82

Wild Cats and Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moving to a new location or going on vacation, will either walk off and leave a dog or cat to shift for itself, or dump it in the forest preserves. It would be far kinder to...

83

Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008 Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are listed below: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m{sup 2}) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transportation as a Means of Increasing Wild Juvenile Salmon Survival : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 4 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Smolt transportation on the Snake and Columbia Rivers has been under nearly continuous study for 25 years. Most controversy surrounds transport of spring/summer chinook, so most analyses and discussion are devoted to that species. Sockeye migrate at the same time as spring/summer chinook as do the earliest of the fall chinook. Therefore, action taken o spring/summer chinook will also affect sockeye and fall chinook. Many factors influenced transportation study results including population structure change -- the shift from nearly all wild fish to nearly all hatchery fish; new dams; the number of turbines at Snake River dams alone increased from 3 in 1968 to 24 by 1979; installation of juvenile fish pass facilities; and calamitous natural events such as the 1977 drought. All the above had negative effects on the survival of wild fish in general and on transport test results specifically, except that when smolts were transported from the upper dam their survival was not influenced by new or existing structures downstream from the transport site.

Park, Donn L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously shown that the ZN(II) coordination by gp32 employs a metal ligand donor set unrelated to any known zinc-finger motif thus far described and is derived from the His64-XI2-Cys77-Xg-Cys87-X2-CYS90 sequence in the ssDNA-binding core domain of the molecule. Crystallographic studies reveal that His64 and Cys77 are derived from two independent p-strands and are relatively more buried from solvent than are Cys87 and Cys9O, which combine to nucleate an (X-helix. In an effort to understand the origin of the stability of the metal complex, we have employed an anaerobic optical spectroscopic, competitive metal binding assay to determine the coordination geometry and association constants (Ka) for the binding of CO(II) to wild-type gp32 and a series of zinc ligand substitution mutants. We find that all non-native metal complexes retain tetrahedral coordination geometry but are greatly destabilized in a manner essentially independent of whether a new protein-derived coordination bond is forfned (e.g., in H64C gp32) or not. Quantitative Co(H) binding isotherms for the His64 mutants reveal that these gp32s form a dimeric CYS4 tetrathiolate intermediate complex of differing affinities at limiting [Co]f; each then rearranges at high [Co]f to form a monomolecular site of the expected geometry and Ka=IXIO4 M-1. C87S and C90A gp32s, in contrast, form a single complex at all [Co]f, consistent with CYS2-His-H20 tetrahedral geometry of Ka=1-2xlo5 M-1. The susceptibility of all mutant metal sites to oxidation by 02 is far greater than the wild-type protein; none appear to be functional ssDNA binding proteins. These studies reveal that the local protein structure greatly limits accommodation of an altered complex in a ligand-specific manner. The implications of this work for de novo design of zinc complexes in proteins will be discussed.

Guo, Juqian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

89

Wild Ennerdale The natural evolution of a wild valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

providers. · Set up and share results from long term monitoring of vegetation and habitat change and people Ennerdale, including limiting the number of cars accessing the site and ensuring that the building's carbon

90

Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynasty. (Davies 1943: pl. XXIX). Economy, Haring, UEE 2009J OHN B AINES Short Citation: Haring, 2009, Economy. UEE.Citation: Haring, Ben, 2009, Economy. In Elizabeth Frood and

Haring, Ben

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

About the 2004 Electronic Materials Conference: Travel Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The university is about 2 hours (by car) from O'Hare airport, less to Midway. From O'Hare Airport: Take Route 190 east out of O'Hare to Route 90 east (Kennedy...

93

Stefan Wild | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algorithms for Nonlinear Optimization SUPER: Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy and Resilience TAO: Toolkit for Advanced Optimization XTUNE: Autotuning for Exascale...

94

Passively Q-switched microchip laser R. Haring, R. Paschotta, R. Fluck,* E. Gini, H. Melchior, and U. Keller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and M. Birnbaum, ``Passive Q-switch at 1.53 m using divalent uranium ions in calcium fluoride,'' J. Appl of the parameters needed for a specific application. Design guidelines20 for Q-switched microchip lasers with SESAMs. Zhang, E. Gini, and U. Keller, ``Experimentally con- firmed design guidelines for passively Q

Keller, Ursula

95

Evaluation of the 2008 Predictions of Run-Timing and Survival of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Steelhead on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia Basin Research uses the COMPASS model on a daily basis during the outmigration of Snake River Chinook and steelhead smolts to predict downstream passage and survival. Fish arrival predictions and observations from program RealTime along with predicted and observed environmental conditions are used to make in-season predictions of arrival and survival to various dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. For 2008, calibrations of travel and survival parameters for two stocks of fish-Snake River yearling PIT-tagged wild chinook salmon (chin1pit) and Snake River PIT-tagged steelhead (lgrStlhd)-were used to model travel and survival of steelhead and chinook stocks from Lower Granite Dam (LWG) or McNary Dam (MCN) to Bonneville Dam (BON). This report summarizes the success of the COMPASS/RealTime process to model these migrations as they occur. We compared model results on timing and survival to data from two sources: stock specific counts at dams and end-of-season control survival estimates (Jim Faulkner, NOAA, pers. comm. Dec. 16, 2008). The difference between the predicted and observed day of median passage and the Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between predicted and observed arrival cumulative distributions are measures of timing accuracy. MAD is essentially the average percentage error over the season. The difference between the predicted and observed survivals is a measure of survival accuracy. Model results and timing data were in good agreement from LWG to John Day Dam (JDA). Predictions of median passage days for the chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were 0 and 2 days (respectively) later than observed. MAD for chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks at JDA were 2.3% and 5.9% (respectively). Between JDA and BON modeling and timing data were not as well matched. At BON, median passage predictions were 6 and 10 days later than observed and MAD values were 7.8% and 16.0% respectively. Model results and survival data were in good agreement from LWG to MCN. COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.77 and 0.69 for chin1pit and lgrStlhd, while the data control's survivals were 0.79 and 0.68. The differences are 0.02 and 0.01 (respectively), nearly identical. However, from MCN to BON, COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.74 and 0.69 while the data controls survivals were 0.47 and 0.53 respectively. Differences of 0.27 and 0.16. In summary: Travel and survival of chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were well modeled in the upper reaches. Fish in the lower reaches down through BON suffered unmodeled mortality, and/or passed BON undetected. A drop in bypass fraction and unmodeled mortality during the run could produce such patterns by shifting the observed median passage day to appear artificially early.

Beer, W. Nicholas; Iltis, Susannah; Anderson, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

98

A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

503 * July 2012 503 * July 2012 Hydrogen photoproduction by 500 mL of sulfur/phosphorus- deprived (-S -P) algal cultures placed in PhBRs with different headspace volumes (165-925 mL). The final percentages of H 2 gas in the gas phase of the PhBRs are indicated in the figure inset; the Y-axis reports actual amounts of H 2 produced. The yield of H 2 gas in the PhBR with a historically small gas phase volume is shown as a dotted line. A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume Project: Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction Team: Maria L. Ghirardi and Michael Seibert, NREL; Sergey N. Kosourov, Khorcheska A. Batyrova, Ekaterina P. Petushkova, and Anatoly A. Tsygankov, IBBP, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

99

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FC Master List.vp:CorelVentura 7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

495726 Mustang Draw TX80 317 Martin 1971 OA 013905 Mustang Gulch TX30 039 Brazoria 1990 N 495788 Mustang Island TX40 355 Nueces 1949 ONA

102

NREL SEA-II Chapters 4 through end  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulch stormwater flows, habitat losses from development of natural areas, demand for energy, and beneficial impacts from improved alternative energy sources. The Proposed Action...

103

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains Appendix F, bid schedule and specifications for remedial action on three sites: Old Rifle processing site; New Rifle processing site and Estes Gulch disposal site.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final design, specifications, and drawings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains Appendix F, bid schedule and specifications for remedial action on three sites: Old Rifle processing site; New Rifle processing site and Estes Gulch disposal site.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NICKEL FOAM HEAT EXCHANGERS Kristin Wild  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to design and troubleshooting suggestions, he saved me many hours of work and improved this project with his

Sun, Yu

106

Detecting adversarial advertisements in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a large online advertising system, adversaries may attempt to profit from the creation of low quality or harmful advertisements. In this paper, we present a large scale data mining effort that detects and blocks such adversarial advertisements for ... Keywords: adversarial learning, data mining, online advertisement

D. Sculley; Matthew Eric Otey; Michael Pohl; Bridget Spitznagel; John Hainsworth; Yunkai Zhou

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Diagnosing mobile applications in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a lot of applications that run on modern mobile operating systems. Inevitably, some of these applications fail in the hands of users. Diagnosing a failure to identify the culprit, or merely reproducing that failure in the lab is difficult. ... Keywords: diagnosis, mobile applications

Sharad Agarwal; Ratul Mahajan; Alice Zheng; Victor Bahl

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wild Geese and Ducks Fly North  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in 1940. Some have been killed in northern or western Canada; some as far south as Venezuela and Columbia in South America; some in California; and many on the Atlantic Coast....

109

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

110

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Identifying Active Manifolds in Regularization Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondary : 52A30,. 52A41, 90C53. W. L. Hare. Dept. of Math, Stats, & Physics, UBC O, Kelowna, BC, V1V 1V7, Canada e-mail: war- ren.hare@ubc.ca. 1...

112

The Role of Strategic Pricing by Retailers in the Success of Store Brands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We also thank the participants at the Albert Haring Doctoral Consortium at Indiana University and the Cornell

Sergio Meza; K. Sudhir

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Spatially Distributed Sensible Heat Flux over a Semiarid Watershed. Part II: Use of a Variable Resistance Approach with Radiometric Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiometric surface temperature images from aircraft observations over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, a semiarid rangeland watershed, were used with ground-based meteorological data at a reference site for extrapolating estimates of ...

William P. Kustas; Karen S. Humes

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Lightning in wildfire smoke plumes observed in Colorado during summer 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrocumulus clouds above three Colorado wildfires (Hewlett Gulch, High Park, and Waldo Canyon; all in summer 2012) electrified and produced localized intracloud discharges whenever the smoke plumes grew above 10 km MSL (above mean sea level; ...

Timothy J. Lang; Steven A. Rutledge; Brenda Dolan; Paul Krehbiel; William Rison; Daniel T. Lindsey

116

Relationships between Evaporative Fraction and Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Semiarid Rangelands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band ...

W. P. Kustas; T. J. Schmugge; K. S. Humes; T. J. Jackson; R. Parry; M. A. Weltz; M. S. Moran

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Spatiotemporal Variability of Summer Precipitation in Southeastern Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Southeastern Arizona covers ~150 km2 and receives the majority of its annual precipitation from highly variable and intermittent summer storms during the North American monsoon. In this study the ...

Susan Stillman; Xubin Zeng; William J. Shuttleworth; David C. Goodrich; Carl L. Unkrich; Marek Zreda

118

The Welsh Government's Action Plan for wild deer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCW CCW WG via FCW WG (SF-SEED) WG (BETS- FDD) To be completed by Dec 2011 Ongoing from 2012 Priority Government BETS Business, Enterprise, Technology and Science FDD Farm Development Division FFMDD Food, Fish

119

Home Automation in the Wild: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automation in two groups: 1) Do-it-yourselfers (DIY) who have installed automation themselves and 2 purposes [33]. To compare and contrast these two groups, we recruited both DIY and Outsourced households

Rajamani, Sriram K.

120

Adaptive Evolution and Effective Population Size in Wild House Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of the proportion of amino acid substitutions that have been fixed by selection (a) vary widely among taxa, ranging from zero in humans to over 50 % in Drosophila. This wide range may reflect differences in the efficacy of selection due to differences in the effective population size (Ne). However, most comparisons have been made among distantly related organisms that differ not only in Ne but also in many other aspects of their biology. Here, we estimate a in three closely related lineages of house mice that have a similar ecology but differ widely in Ne: Mus musculus musculus (Ne; 25,000120,000), M. m. domesticus (Ne; 58,000200,000), and M. m. castaneus (Ne; 200,000733,000). Mice were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array, and the proportions of replacement and silent mutations within subspecies were compared with those fixed between each subspecies and an outgroup, Mus spretus. There was significant evidence of positive selection in M. m. castaneus, the lineage with the largest Ne, with a estimated to be approximately 40%. In contrast, estimates of a for M. m. domesticus (a 5 13%) and for M. m. musculus (a 5 12 %) were much smaller. Interestingly, the higher estimate of a for M. m. castaneus appears to reflect not only more adaptive fixations but also more effective purifying selection. These results support the hypothesis that differences in Ne contribute to differences among species in the efficacy of selection.

Megan Phifer-rixey; Francxois Bonhomme; Pierre Boursot; Gary A. Churchill; Jaroslav Pilek; Priscilla K. Tucker; Michael W. Nachman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

File:WildRoseDR-COAs.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook...

122

6 20082009 State of the Wild Source:AlexanderHafemann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Guy G.F. Lemieux, and Mark R. Greenstreet University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada of British Columbia, 2008. [16] L. Zhang, Y. Hu, and C.-P. Chen. Statistical timing analysis in sequentialEstimating Reliability and Throughput of Source-synchronous Wave-pipelined Interconnect Paul Teehan

123

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Turning Data Into Wild...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers at KIPAC, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics andCosmology, at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and StanfordUniversity. Rather than relying purely...

124

Understanding invaded urban `wild lands' as novel communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pechmann et al. Tuesday, August 5, 2008 - 2:10 PM COS 36-3: Vegetative assemblage distribution and long carbon sinks Human interface: Place for contact with nature and natural processes Spaces where natural

125

A walk from the wild side: the genetics of domestication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* and Pam Wiener2 Summary The phenotypic variation found in domesticated plants and animals is striking, so much so that Darwin used it to illustrate the power of selection to effect change. Recent developments colour or growth rate, two traits that have been strongly selected during livestock domestication. His

Goodrich, Justin

126

Wild deer management An issues paper to inform the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide important sources of employment, and the revenue d and Lyme disease (the latter of which affects (Lyme disease), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (the causal agent of pasture fever and facilitating pathogen

127

Wild and Scenic River Management Plan Sisters Ranger District,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Riparian/Fish/Wildlife Habitat illustrations from Respect The River materials The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individuals income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights,

Forest Service; Whychus Creek; Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Whychus Creek; Deschutes National Forest; John Schubert; Scott Cotter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

How predictable : patterns of human economic behavior in the wild  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shopping is driven by needs (to eat, to socialize, to work), but it is also a driver of where we go. I examine the transaction records of 80 million customers and find that while our economic choices predict mobility ...

Krumme, Katherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Optimization Online - Benchmark of Some Nonsmooth Optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2006 ... Benchmark of Some Nonsmooth Optimization Solvers for Computing Nonconvex Proximal Points. Warren Hare (whare ***at*** cecm.sfu.ca)

130

Publications S  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Settle, JL, Greenberg, E., Hubbard, WN, O'Hare, PAG, The Standard Molar Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Hydrogen Fluoride .DELTA.fH.degree.m ...

131

INFORME COMERCIAL wSecretarias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lignina e celulose, que fortalecem as paredes da célula (Mandell e Baker, 1991). Jabaji-Hare et al. (1994

Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

132

The value of primary, secondary and plantation forests for Amazonian birds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, lignina e celulose, que fortalecem as paredes da célula (Mandell e Baker, 1991). Jabaji-Hare et al. (1994

Barlow, Jos

133

The process of delexicalization and functionalization - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 24, 2003... it is a sufficiently good simulation to have sent many generations of philosophers haring after semantic theories, even long before truth-tables...

134

Plant Methods BioMed Central Methodology Chromatin immunoprecipitation: optimization, quantitative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Haring et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Data Normalization; Max Haring; Sascha Offermann; Tanja Danker; Ina Horst; Christoph Peterhansel; Maike Stam

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NVN-89306 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVN-89306 NVN-89306 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: NVN-89306 CU at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration, Spring Gulch MT Survey General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CU Applicant Terra Gen Dixie Valley Development Co Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Magnetotellurics Comments MT Survey, Spring Gulch Project Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency Nevada Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Winnemucca Managing Field Office Humboldt River Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM

136

Evapoclimatonomy III: The Reconciliation of Monthly Runoff and Evaporation in the Climatic Balance of Evaporable Water on Land Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study is the third in a sequel by Lettau and Baradas. The Evapoclimatonomy I model has been discussed and applied by various authors including Hare, Hay, Kutzbach, Pinker, and Corio. In the present study the semiempirical method of ...

Heinz H. Lettau; Edward J. Hopkins

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Improving The Representation Of Human Error In The Use Of The Flight Crew Human Factors Integration Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-15. Norman, D.A. (1983). Position paper on human error.Research Workshop on Human Error . Bellagio, Italy. O'Hare,M. (1996). Breakdown of human error models , Prepared for

Gosling, Geoffrey; Roberts, Karlene H.; Jayaswal, Arpana

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

CSE - International Workshop on Photon Tools for Combustion and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Conversion Travel View Argonne Site Map Argonne National Laboratory is about 45 minutes by car from each of the two major Chicago airports, O'Hare and Midway (see map)....

139

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, March 13-17, 2000 1 Nauru99 Ship and Buoy Intercomparison J. E. Hare and A. A. Grachev Cooperative Institute for...

140

Why some airport-rail links get built and others do not : the role of institutions, equity and financing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis seeks to provide an understanding of reasons for different outcomes of airport ground access projects. Five in-depth case studies (Hongkong, Tokyo-Narita, London- Heathrow, Chicago- O'Hare and Paris-Charles de ...

Nickel, Julia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Scaling air quality effects from alternative jet fuel in aircraft and ground support equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many of the nation's largest airports, including Los Angeles International Airport, the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Chicago O'Hare International Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport are ...

Donohoo, Pearl (Pearl Elizabeth)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

HopperToEdison.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intel* C, C ++ OpenMP Cray UPC Cray S hmem GNU Python, P erl, S hells POSIX T hreads Java POSIX S hared M emory Chapel UPC Coarray F ortran Chapel --- 7 --- *) I ntel c ompiler...

143

Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O'Hare M, Kammen DM. 2006. Biofuels Can Contribute to EnergyN. 2004. Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End AmericasService Koplow D. 2006. Biofuels - At What Cost? Governement

Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sun, Wind, and Comfort A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks in Four Downtown Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plan as o f Bibliography Sun, Wind, and Comfort Arens,Flores, and Terence O'Hare, Sun and Light for Downtown SanSUN, WIND, AND COMFORT A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

BIOSORPTION OF PHENOL BY A CHEMICALLY TREATED WILD MACROFUNGUS: EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenol is one of the most common water pollutants found in industrial effluents. The phenol removal potential of a chemically modified macrofungus Trametes sp., was investigated in a batch system. The effects of particle size, pH, temperature, contact time and biosorbent dosage have been investigated. The optimum conditions for phenol removal were found to be particle size: 150-300 m, pH: 6.0 and biosorbent dosage: 6 g/L. The rate of biosorption of phenol was found to be rapid during the initial 30 min and equilibrium was established after 4 h. The results of equilibrium isotherm study showed that the data fitted well to Langmuir isotherm model within the concentration range studied (100-500 mg/L). The maximum adsorption capacity of the biosorbent was found to be 39.37 mg/g. Sorption kinetics was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. Desorption with 0.1 M NaOH resulted in 87 % desorption of phenol from the biosorbent. The present study proved the applicability of Trametes sp., for the removal of phenol from waste waters.

R. Vimala; A. Nirmala Grace

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Tatyana V. Wilds, Most Pure Heart of Mary School, Topeka, KS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in San Francisco Stalin, Churchill/Attlee meet in Potsdam US drops Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki) Churchill's "Iron Curtain" speech in Fulton, Missouri 1949 Soviets detonate their first Atomic Bomb in the Cold War. For example, what if Truman had not fired General Macarthur and he had decided to drop bombs

Peterson, Blake R.

147

Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Beamline 11.0.2, it was possible to combine this technique with the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) to image the spatial distribution of the compounds. Some...

148

Identification of mildew resistance in wild and cultivated Central Asian grape germplasm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Caucasus Armenia, Azerbaijan, Egypt, Israel, Lebanon,H HF 2642Mtp2 Matrassa Azerbaijan H HF 2657Mtp1 Soakiwas acquired from the Azerbaijan collection, and is

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy.

150

Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.3.2 and Beamline 11.0.2, it was possible to combine this technique with the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) to image the spatial distribution of the compounds....

151

Resilience, Community, and Perceptions of Marcellus Shale Development in the Pennsylvania Wilds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas development in deep shale formations forms a major, promising option for energy development. The Marcellus Shale in the northeastern United States is (more)

Weigle, Jason

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Wild-Inspired Intrusion Detection System Framework for High Speed Networks f|p IDS Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the rise of the Internet and the high speed networks made information easier to acquire, faster to exchange and more flexible to share, it also made the cybernetic attacks and crimes easier to perform, more accurate to hit the target victim and ... Keywords: Cybernetic Attacks, Framework, High Speed Network, Intrusion Detection, Monitoring

Hassen Sallay; Mohsen Rouached; Adel Ammar; Ouissem Ben Fredj; Khalid Al-Shalfan; Majdi Ben Saad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Catch me if you can: performance bug detection in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profilers help developers to find and fix performance problems. But do they find performance bugs -- performance problems that real users actually notice? In this paper we argue that -- especially in the case of interactive applications -- traditional ... Keywords: latency bug, perceptible performance, profiling

Milan Jovic; Andrea Adamoli; Matthias Hauswirth

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

An eye for vulgarity : how MoMA saw color through Wild Bill's lens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an examination of the 1976 Museum of Modern Art exhibition of color photographs by William Eggleston-the second one-man show of color photography in the museum's history- with particular attention to the ...

Kivlan, Anna Karrer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE...

156

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: THE WILD CARD IN RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forcings of climate change over the industrial period. Cooling forcings of tens of watts per square meter Understanding 2 1 0 1 2 3 Radiativeforcing(Wattspersquaremetre) CoolingWarming The global mean radiative forcing scattering -- Cooling influence Light absorption -- Warming influence, depending on surface Indirect Effects

Schwartz, Stephen E.

157

Raising The Wild Flag: E. B. White, World Government, and Local Cosmopolitanism in the Postwar Moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Case for the World State.and Government: Cosmopolitan Ideas in the History of Westernin which visions of cosmopolitan connection and possible

Zipp, Samuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wild food practices: understanding the wider implications for design and HCI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethnographic studies in their many forms have played a major role in informing the design and development of a multitude of systems, from pervasive games to ubiquitous systems that support market traders. This paper presents an alternative response to ... Keywords: design, ethnography, food, rural

Alan Chamberlain, Chloe Griffiths

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Implications of selenium deficiency for wild herbivore conservation: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium (Se) has been identified as an essential micronutrient in all animals. It is required at the most fundamental physiological level as a component of the selenoproteins containing the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Adequate levels of Se are vital to proper reproductive performance, bone metabolism, immune function and iodine metabolism. Yet, Se is a relatively rare element, and is often present at low concentrations in soil and vegetation. Selenium deficiencies are widespread in domestic stock and are unavoidable in some wildlife populations. This may be especially true for populations confined to high elevation ranges, or on areas with granitic bedrock with low Se content, or that have lost access to Se-containing parts of their ranges such as mineral licks or low-elevation winter range. The condition may be exacerbated by increased levels of oxidative stress. Because our understanding of Se as a micronutrient is relatively new, many wildlife managers are unaware of the elements importance in physiology and population dynamics. Severe deficiency results in obvious symptoms such as white muscle disease. However, more frequently, deficiency may be chronic and subclinical. Individuals then display no obvious signs of malady, yet performance suffers until their populations decline without apparent cause. While mysterious population declines are not always due to Se deficiency, the wildlife manager should be aware of the possibility. Therefore, this review presents not only a summary of the wildlife literature regarding Se nutrition, but also a comprehensive look at the role of Se in mammalian physiology, and the behavior of this important element in the environment. Finally, the role of the biogeochemical Se cycle is discussed, and evidence is provided that the levels of available Se in the environment are decreasing while physiological demands often are increasing.

Werner T. Flueck; J.M. Smith Flueck; J. Mionczynski; B.J. Mincher

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Oregon's coastal ocean is wild, beautiful and a treasure for all  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vessels over two summers, at an estimated cost of $6 million inclusive of processing, purchase and lease a demanding new field. A manager will coordinate data, necessary equipment would be purchased and cutting of equipment, interpretation and ground-truthing. Creative funding solutions will be sought, including state

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Juvenile Epilobocera sinuatifrons growth rates and ontogenetic shifts in feeding in wild populations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Freshwater amphibious crabs are understudied and found in tropical streams of many parts of the world and have the potential to influence stream and terrestrial (more)

Fraiola, Kauaoa Matthew Sam

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation and Monitoring of Wild/Natural Steelhead Production, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Several key study streams in the Salmon River and Clearwater River drainages were snorkeled in the summer of 1995. The current Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) goal is to maintain a parr density at 70% of the rated carrying capacity. All streams snorkeled are considerably below the current goal (6.4% to 54.3% of goal). Weirs were operated in Chamberlain Creek, West Fork Chamberlain Creek, Running Creek, and Rush Creek during the spring adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss spawning migration. An adult steelhead migration barrier was operated in Rapid River. Adult steelhead escapements in all but Rapid River are at critically low levels. An adult salmon 0. sp. weir was operated in Running Creek using a new passive electronic/video counting facility. Five adult chinook salmon 0. fshawyfscha were captured on video as they passed the counting facility. A video record of all resident fish in excess of 10 to 12 in was also obtained. The video system performed adequately in most circumstances. Additional testing and modification will continue during the 1996 salmon spawning migration. An upstream migration barrier was operated in Rapid River during the salmon spawning migration. Four adult male salmon were passed above the barrier; no females were captured or passed above the barrier. Rotary screw traps were operated in Running Creek and Rapid River during the spring and fall to monitor the juvenile steelhead and salmon downstream migration. Migration timing in Running Creek indicates that the majority of smolt size fish moved downstream out of Running Creek in the fall and few smolt size fish left Running Creek in the spring. Migration timing at Rapid River indicates a more equal distribution of the smolt size fish moving downstream out of Rapid River in the spring. Juvenile steelhead were PIT-tagged in Chamberlain Creek, Running Creek and Rapid River during the summer and fall of 1995. Detections at the lower Snake and Columbia rivers from the 1994 tagging indicate a substantial drop in detection rates at successive hydroelectric projects. The majority of PIT tag detections at Lower Granite Dam occurred from April 9-May 25, with the peak detection on May 9.

Holubetz, Terry B.; Leth, Brian D. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DRAM errors in the wild: a large-scale field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in dynamic random access memory (DRAM) are a common form of hardware failure in modern compute clusters. Failures are costly both in terms of hardware replacement costs and service disruption. While a large body of work exists on DRAM in laboratory ... Keywords: data corruption, dimm, dram, dram reliability, ecc, empirical study, hard error, large-scale systems, memory, soft error

Bianca Schroeder; Eduardo Pinheiro; Wolf-Dietrich Weber

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sensors in the wild: exploring electrodermal activity in child-robot interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in biosensor technology enabled the appearance of commercial wireless sensors that can measure electrodermal activity (EDA) in user's everyday settings. In this paper, we investigate the potential benefits of measuring EDA to better understand ... Keywords: affect recognition, children, electrodermal activity, social robots

Iolanda Leite; Rui Henriques; Carlos Martinho; Ana Paiva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mitigating Amphibian Disease: Strategies to maintain wild populations and control chytridiomycosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.R.D. , E. Kpfer, and D.C.W. , unpublished data).and unpublished results. DCW was supported by the ClarazUSA. Authors contributions DCW coordinated the review and

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evidence for metabolic imbalance of vitamin A2 in wild fish chronically exposed to metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ulationsocc:upy microhabitats that usually provide rcm;irkably st;tl,le tenlperatnres in macroenvironments where temperatlires

Bernatchez, Louis

167

Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Corps of Engineers, electrical power demand forecasts, and other criteria. The substantial electrical load to be met by all generating projects in the region, the Snake projects could be operated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.1: Flow and Spill Forecasts

Washington at Seattle, University of

168

Colorado wildlife on the move: a wildly successful road ecology awareness campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Highway Administration, the Colorado Department ofTransportation (CDOT), and Colorado State University,initiated Linking Colorados Landscapes to identify and

DiGiorgio, Monique

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wild, willful, and wicked: African American childhood and the nineteenth-century literary imagination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines nineteenth-century depictions of African American children in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), Frank J. Webb's The Garies and Their Friends (more)

Brewington, Paulette F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Taming Wild Horses: The Need for Virtual Time-based Scheduling of VMs in Network Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of scalable network simulators employ virtual machines (VMs) to act as high-fidelity models of traffic producer/consumer nodes in simulated networks. However, network simulations could be inaccurate if VMs are not scheduled according to virtual time, especially when many VMs are hosted per simulator core in a multi-core simulator environment. Since VMs are by default free-running, on the outset, it is not clear if, and to what extent, their untamed execution affects the results in simulated scenarios. Here, we provide the first quantitative basis for establishing the need for generalized virtual time scheduling of VMs in network simulators, based on an actual prototyped implementations. To exercise breadth, our system is tested with multiple disparate applications: (a) a set of message passing parallel programs, (b) a computer worm propagation phenomenon, and (c) a mobile ad-hoc wireless network simulation. We define and use error metrics and benchmarks in scaled tests to empirically report the poor match of traditional, fairness-based VM scheduling to VM-based network simulation, and also clearly show the better performance of our simulation-specific scheduler, with up to 64 VMs hosted on a 12-core simulator node.

Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Henz, Brian J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Long-Term Surveillance Plan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AL/62350-235 AL/62350-235 REV. 1 LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE ESTES GULCH DISPOSAL SITE NEAR RIFLE, COLORADO November 1997 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Estes Gulch Disposal Site Near Rifle... http://lts1.lm.doe.gov/documents/rfl/ltsp.html 1 of 25 5/20/2009 1:38 PM Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division UMTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico

172

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal 100 3 4,979 0.00 66.09 261.5 Solar PV 150 2 3,805 0.00 21.37 144.3 Power Plant Fuel Efficiency its thermal efficiency Thus, a power plant with a heat rate of 6,824 Btu/kWh has a fuel efficiency SGT5-8000HTM MW Langley Gulch Power Plant Idaho Power Co ­ 570 MW output ­ 60 % thermal efficiency

173

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Visiting Fermilab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Current Status of Access to Fermilab Transportation to and from Chicago O'Hare Airport or Midway Airport is available by limousine, taxi or car rental. There is no public transportation to Fermilab. Car Rental All of the usual rental companies (Hertz, Avis, Budget, National, etc.) are located at the airports. For the best price, we recommend Ace Rent-a-Car at O'Hare Airport, telephone 1-800-243-3443 or 847-297-3350, as their prices are competitive and include the cost of insurance. Limousine Service Reservations for limousine service should be made in advance when possible. West Suburban Limousine: 1-800-345-LIMO or 630-668-9600. For pickup instructions after your arrival at O'Hare Airport or Midway Airport, call 1-800-942-LIMO. Local Restaurants

176

Transportation Resources | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Resources Transportation Resources The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports: O'Hare International and Midway. Car Rental Agencies There are various car rentals available from the airports. Alamo 800-327-9633 Avis 800-331-1212 (O'Hare) 800-831-2847 (Midway) Budget 800-527-0700 Dollar 800-800-4000 Enterprise 800-566-9249 (Midway) Hertz 800-654-3131 National 800-328-4567 (O'Hare) 800-227-7368 (Midway) Thrifty 800-847-4389 (Midway) Limousines In general, limousine transportation to Argonne from the aiports is less expensive than a taxi or car rental. A-1 Limousine 630-833-3788 Hinsdale United Limousine Service 630-455-7003 888-483-6129 My Chauffeur (Formerly American Limousine) 800-244-6200

177

Mitigation action plan for remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailing Sites and Disposal Site, Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Estes Gulch disposal site is approximately 10 kilometers (6 miles) north of the town of Rifle, off State Highway 13 on Federal land administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The Department of Energy (DOE) will transport the residual radioactive materials (RRM) by truck to the Estes Gulch disposal site via State Highway 13 and place it in a partially below-grade disposal cell. The RRM will be covered by an earthen radon barrier, frost protection layers, and a rock erosion protection layer. A toe ditch and other features will also be constructed to control erosion at the disposal site. After removal of the RRM and disposal at the Estes Gulch site, the disturbed areas at all three sites will be backfilled with clean soils, contoured to facilitate surface drainage, and revegetated. Wetlands areas destroyed at the former Rifle processing sites will be compensated for by the incorporation of now wetlands into the revegetation plan at the New Rifle site. The UMTRA Project Office, supported by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), oversees the implementation of the MAP. The RAC executes mitigation measures in the field. The TAC provides monitoring of the mitigation actions in cases where mitigation measures are associated with design features. Site closeout and inspection compliance will be documented in the site completion report.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Distribution, ecology and reproductive biology of wild tomatoes and related nightshades from the Atacama Desert region of northern Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the manuscript, Lynn Kimsey (UC-Davis) for identi?cationLynn Kimsey at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC-Davis.

Chetelat, Roger T.; Pertuz, Ricardo A.; Fandez, Luis; Graham, Elaine B.; Jones, Carl M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Quantitative analysis of carbon fluxes for fat biosynthesis in wild-type and IRS-1 knockout brown adipocytes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive fat synthesis and the subsequent dysregulation of lipid metabolism constitute the major pathological factors of obesity and type 2 diabetes through triggering insulin resistance. Thus, controlling fat synthesis ...

Yoo, Hyun-Tae, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

February 21, 2012 ---Isotopic measurements of a chondrule in a Comet Wild 2 grain tell the story of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building blocks. Comets travel on elliptical orbits around the Sun and those with orbital paths that reach particles and fragments in the Stardust aerogel that Ogliore and colleagues examined, they chose one called gliore and colleagues extracted the cometary particle Iris from a track in a wedge of aerogel (see image

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

How ancient agriculturalists managed yield fluctuations through crop selection and reliance on wild plants: An example from central India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land under the principal crops grown in the Centraland the loss of Amazonian crop genetic resources. I. TheEngland. Howard, A. 1924. Crop production in India. Humphrey

Smith, Monica L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

SHORT COMMUNICATIONS Jours a! of Wild1 fe Diseases, 32(1). 1996, pp. 105-108  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available for inspection. Skeletal samples and an autopsy data- base comprise data from over 2400 moose. Throughout the study, lower mandibles and any bones with lesions were collected. Since 1979, all skulls found

183

Bioengineering 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of exact solutions of equations. BE2-HHMT2 Heat and mass transport II DR D. O'HARE Chemical kinetics: rates mechanisms, multistep reactions, the steady state approximation, enzyme kinetics, applications in pharmacokinetics, experimental approaches to chemical kinetics. Thermodynamics: phase equilibria, the phase rule

184

Metrics and Task Scheduling Policies for Energy Saving in Multicore Computers J. Mair, K. Leung, Z. Huang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metrics and Task Scheduling Policies for Energy Saving in Multicore Computers J. Mair, K. Leung, Z) in their schedules. Our experiments show that, on a modern multicore computer, the Hare Policy can save energy up to 20% of energy over standard scheduling policies. Keywords-Speedup per Watt (SPW), Power per Speedup

Huang, Zhiyi

185

Derivative-Free Optimization Proximal Point Methods Derivative-Free Proximal Point Conclusion Derivative-Free Optimization via Proximal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivative-Free Optimization Proximal Point Methods Derivative-Free Proximal Point Conclusion Derivative-Free Optimization via Proximal Point Methods Yves Lucet & Warren Hare July 24, 2013 1 / 26 #12;Derivative-Free Optimization Proximal Point Methods Derivative-Free Proximal Point Conclusion Outline 1

186

EXTENDED ABSTRACT A Field Computer for Animal Trackers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handhelds and compatibles. Our system was initially developed from February 1996 and tested in the Karoo considerable impact. It has been used in four African National Parks: Karoo National Park and Kruger National Hare, Karoo National Park and the trackers, Karel Bernadie, Chocolate Bosch and James Minye

Blake, Edwin

187

C:\\MyFiles\\ORR NERP Web site\\data lists\\wildflowerlst.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

flower watercress wild geranium wild plum wild stonecrop wild yam willow amsonia wood anemone wood sorrel wood sorrel wood-rush wood-rush woodland bluegrass yellow rocket...

188

Statement of Basis and Purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected final remedial action for Drury Gulch on Kodiak Island, Alaska, which was chosen in accordance with the Federal Comprehensive-Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfimd Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and, to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the information contained in the Administrative Record for this site. The Administrative Record can be found in the Information Repository located at the Kodiak

Drury Gulch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

NONE

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Identification of Fish Hosts for Wild Populations of Rare Freshwater Mussels (Lampsilis cariosa and Leptodea Ochracea) Using a Molecular DNA Key.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The yellow lampmussel (Lampsilis cariosa) and tidewater mucket (Leptodea ochracea) are two species of freshwater mussels of conservation concern throughout their range. They are listed (more)

Kneeland, Stephen C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Responses of Human-Habituated Wild Atlantic Spotted Dolphins to Play Behaviors Using a Two-Way Human/Dolphin Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were placed in locations (jars) anchored to the anchor line,but transparent plastic jars that were suspended in theneeded a human to open the jar. To communicate this, the

Herzing, Denise L.; Delfour, Fabienne; Pack, Adam A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers three of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME) and was completed by Oncorh Consulting as a contract deliverable to the Yakama Nation and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The YKFPME (Project Number 1995-063-25) is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation (Contract No. 00022449) and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract No. 22370). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME.

Knedsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Monitoring and Evaluation of Supplemented Spring Chinook Salmon and Life Histories of Wild Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde Basin, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the ninth annual report for a multi-year project designed to monitor and evaluate supplementation of endemic spring Chinook salmon in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River. These two streams historically supported anadromous fish populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries, but in recent years, have experienced severe declines in abundance. Conventional and captive broodstock supplementation methods are being used to restore these spring Chinook salmon populations. Spring Chinook salmon populations in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, and other streams in the Snake River Basin have experienced severe declines in abundance over the past two decades (Nehlsen et al. 1991). A supplementation program was initiated in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, incorporating the use of both captive and conventional broodstock methods, in order to prevent extinction in the short term and eventually rebuild populations. The captive broodstock component of the program (BPA Project 199801001) uses natural-origin parr collected by seining and reared to maturity at facilities near Seattle, Washington (Manchester Marine Laboratory) and Hood River, Oregon (Bonneville Hatchery). Spawning occurs at Bonneville Hatchery, and resulting progeny are reared in hatcheries. Shortly before outmigration in the spring, juveniles are transferred to acclimation facilities. After an acclimation period of about 2-4 weeks, volitional release begins. Any juveniles remaining after the volitional release period are forced out. The conventional broodstock component uses returning adults collected at traps near the spawning areas, transported to Lookingglass Hatchery near Elgin, Oregon, held, and later spawned. The resulting progeny are reared, acclimated, and released similar to the captive broodstock component. All progeny released receive one or more marks including a fin (adipose) clip, codedwire tag, PIT tag, or visual implant elastomer tag. The numbers of adults used for conventional broodstock are determined by an agreement among comanagers (Zimmerman and Patterson 2002). Activities for this project focus on two life stages of spring Chinook salmon: juveniles during the migration from freshwater to the ocean and adults during prespawning migration through the end of spawning. Life history, production, and genetics are monitored and used to evaluate program effectiveness.

Boe, Stephen J.; Crump, Carrie A.; Weldert, Rey L. [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

Scientists seeking to capture the power of the sun could soon stumble over one of humankind's earliest quarries -the wild boar -as they hunt for a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or three times a year to keep the animals' numbers in check, and some residents still decorate the outsides company in Marseille but frequently helps her brother at his restaurant, the Palais de la Bière countries like Russia afford to move in. Odette Navarro, 61, expects a flood of new customers at the Bar de

196

Directions to Argonne | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne From O'Hare International Airport: Take I-294 south to I-55. Exit west on I-55 (toward St. Louis) and continue for about four miles to Cass Avenue. Exit south on Cass and turn right at the Argonne sign on Northgate Road, immediately south of I-55. Follow Northgate Road to the Argonne Information Center. Google Maps directions from O'Hare external link From Midway Airport: Take Cicero Avenue north to I-55. Enter I-55 south and continue for about 14 miles to Cass Avenue. Exit south on Cass and turn right at the Argonne sign on Northgate Road, immediately south of I-55. Follow Northgate Road to the Argonne Information Center. Google Maps directions from Midway external link By public transportation: Take the Metra train to the Westmont Metrastation. PACE bus #715 leaves the

197

Informal workshop on intense polarized ion sources: a summary  

SciTech Connect

An Informal Workshop on Intense Polarized Ion Sources was held on March 6, 1980, at the O'Hare Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the Workshop was to discuss problems in developing higher-intensity polarized proton sources, particularly the optically-pumped source recently proposed by L.W. Anderson of the University of Wisconsin. A summary of the discussions is reported.

Schultz, P.F. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

199

Microsoft Word - GUN 2005 CR.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UMTRCA Title I Annual Report UMTRCA Title I Annual Report December 2005 Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison Disposal Site, inspected on June 21, 2005, was in excellent condition. Six perimeter sign and the entrance sign were missing and bullets had damaged several others. All former erosion areas were stable. Areas reseeded in 2004 along the former Chance Gulch haul road require further monitoring, and therefore, the BLM right-of-way permit is still active. Revegetation of reseeded areas on Tenderfoot Mountain haul road is completed (determined to meet BLM Wildlife Mitigation Plan criteria for closure). No cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection was identified. 8.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Gunnison, Colorado,

200

Microsoft Word - GUN 2006 CR.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UMTRCA Title I Annual Report UMTRCA Title I Annual Report December 2006 Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison Disposal Site, inspected on May 30 and 31, 2006, was in excellent condition. The disposal cell, its cover, and associated drainage features are performing as designed. Several missing or illegible perimeter signs and the entrance sign were replaced. All former erosion areas continue to be stable. The BLM agreed to terminate the right-of-way permit for the reseeded areas along the former reclaimed Chance Gulch haul road based on successful revegetation (determined to meet BLM Wildlife Mitigation Plan criteria for closure). No cause for a follow- up or contingency inspection was identified. 8.2 Compliance Requirements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rifle_D  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Disposal Site Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Rifle, Colorado, Disposal Site Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Estes Gulch Disposal Site Near Rifle, Colorado Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Fact Sheet Annual Inspection Report Long-Term Surveillance Plan Fact Sheet Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites and Disposal Site Fact Sheet December 15, 2011 Annual Inspection Report

202

Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Other Sites Summary Other Sites Summary Search Other Sites Considered Sites Other Sites All LM Quick Search All Other Sites 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 ANC Gas Hills Site - 040 Argonne National Laboratory - West - 014 Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Chevron Panna Maria Site - 030 Clive Disposal Cell - 036 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Conoco Conquista Site - 031 Cotter Canon City Site - 009 Dawn Ford Site - 038 EFB White Mesa Site - 033 Energy Technology Engineering Center - 044 Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 Exxon Ray Point Site - 032 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory - 016 Fernald Environmental Management Project - 027 Fort St Vrain - 011 Geothermal Test Facility - 001 Hecla Durita Site - 012

203

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ranking criteria were developed to rate 19 tributaries on the Coeur d`Alene Indiana Reservation for potential of habitat enhancement for westslope cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, and bull trout, Salvelinus malma. Cutthroat and bull trout habitat requirements, derived from an extensive literature review of each species, were compared to the physical and biological parameters of each stream observed during an aerial -- helicopter survey. Ten tributaries were selected for further study, using the ranking criteria that were derived. The most favorable ratings were awarded to streams that were located completely on the reservation, displayed highest potential for improvement and enhancement, had no barriers to fish migration, good road access, and a gradient acceptable to cutthroat and bull trout habitation. The ten streams selected for study were Bellgrove, Fighting, Lake, Squaw, Plummer, Little Plummer, Benewah, Alder, Hell`s Gulch and Evans creeks.

Graves, Suzy

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

LACK OF EVIDENCE FOR IN SITU DECAY OF ALUMINUM-26 IN COMET 81P/WILD 2 CAI-LIKE REFRACTORY PARTICLES `INTI' AND `COKI'. H. A. Ishii1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission electron microscopes ((S)TEM) to produce mineral maps. An FEI Nova NanoLab600 dual-beam FIB [11] were prepared at UW and placed on thin C substrates on Cu TEM grids. Analytical TEM analyses were to failure of the C substrate of the TEM grid. Figure 1. TEM and FIB preparation for NanoSIMS meas- urements

205

Transportation - AFC Workshop (April 2011) - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Events AFC Workshop (Apr. '11) AFC Workshop Home First Announcement Second Announcement Participants Program Hotels & Accomodations Venue Transportation Registration Contact Organizers Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Data Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Workshop on "Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics" April 14-16, 2011, Argonne National Laboratory Bookmark and Share Transportation The following means of transportation are available for getting to Argonne. Airports Argonne is located within 25 miles of two major Chicago airports: O'Hare International and Midway.

206

NETL-RUA: Collaborative R&D for Technology Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Shared Laboratories, S hared Intellect, Shared Resources NETL-RUA: Collaborative R&D for Technology Innovation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has a 100-year history of partnering with academia and industry to solve the nation's energy issues by developing and commercializing new technologies. NETL is continuing these long-standing partnerships through the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA). This partnership combines the facilities, expertise, and resources

207

H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H ybrid M PI/OpenMP, UPC, a nd C AF a t N ERSC Yun ( Helen) H e a nd W oo---Sun Y ang NERSC U ser G roup M eeFng February 2 , 2 012 2 Outline * Architecture T rend * Benefits o f H ybrid M PI/OpenMP * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP P rogramming M odel * Hybrid M PI/OpenMP I ssues * Compile a nd R un h ybrid M PI/OpenMP * Using U PC a nd C AF o n H opper 3 Common A rchitectures * Shared M emory A rchitecture - MulFple C PUs s hare g lobal m emory, c ould h ave l ocal c ache - Uniform M emory A ccess ( UMA) - Typical S hared M emory P rogramming M odel: O penMP, P threads, ... * Distributed M emory A rchitecture - Each C PU h as o wn m emory - Non---Uniform M emory A ccess ( NUMA) - Typical M essage P assing P rogramming M odel: MPI, ... * Hybrid A rchitecture - UMA w ithin o ne S MP n ode - NUMA a cross n odes - Typical H ybrid P

208

7. Soil Monitoring7. Soil Monitoring 7. soil monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 2. Foodstuffs Comparison Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 3. Wild Edible Plants

209

5. Surface Water, Groundwater, and Sediments Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995 147  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 2. Foodstuffs Comparison Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 3. Wild Edible Plants

210

5. Surface Water, Groundwater, and Sediments Environmental Surveillance and Compliance at Los Alamos during 1996 113  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 2. Foodstuffs Comparison Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 3. Wild Edible Plants

211

Estuarine Vegetation at Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve, San Franciso Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creeping wild rye) and Ambrosia psilostachya (westernwest- ern goldenrod), Ambrosia psilostachya (western rag-

Whitcraft, Christine R.; Grewell, Brenda J.; Baye, Peter R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Jan. 2004, p. 293300 Vol. 70, No. 1 0099-2240/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.70.1.293300.2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

macroenvironments into egg microhabitats. The two most important physical factors for wild eggs on plant leaves

Goodman, Robert M.

213

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Drive (Power Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop Tuesday, July 24, 2012 - Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL Event Objective: DOE aims to obtain stakeholder input on the Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) goals of the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. This input will advise the aggressive next-generation technology research and development necessary to enable U.S. companies to be the first in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years. The EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop was attended by senior officials of the Department of Energy and representatives from the following

214

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Energy Budget Surface Energy Budget Measurements from Nauru99 C. W. Fairall, J. E. Hare, A. A. Grachev, and A. B. White National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown conducted a series of measurements in transit to and in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site on Nauru in June-July 1999 as part of a joint NOAA-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program intensive study of air-sea interaction and cloud/radiative processes in the tropical western Pacific. This cruise, which has been designated Nauru99, was a follow-up to an earlier study at Manus Island (Post et al. 1997). Also participating in

215

Transcript of the March 29, 2006 Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2006 9, 2006 www.Vcall.com * 800-327-3400 * Copyright © 2006 Vcall 1 Transcript Public Technical Conference on U.S. Department of Energy Congestion Study and Criteria for Designation of National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors Hilton Garden Inn Chicago O'Hare Airport 2930 South River Road Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 March 29, 2006 SESSION 1: Welcome and Opening Statements by U.S. Department of Energy David Meyer, Acting Assistant Director, Division of Permitting, Siting, and Analysis, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I'm David Meyer from the Department of Energy. Kevin Kolevar, Director of our Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, was intending to be here to get us started

216

EV Everywhere EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 7/20/2012 - 7/20/2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop Tuesday, July 24, 2012 - Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL Event Objective: DOE aims to obtain stakeholder input on the Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) goals of the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. This input will advise the aggressive next- generation technology research and development necessary to enable U.S. companies to be the first in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years. 8:30-8:35 AM CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 8:30-8:35 AM CALL TO ORDER Mr. Patrick Davis, DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program

217

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examination of Island Effects on Near-Surface Examination of Island Effects on Near-Surface Bulk Meteorology and Air-Sea Fluxes from the Nauru99 Field Program C. W. Fairall and M. J. Post National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado J. E. Hare, A. B. White, and A. A. Grachev Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel Ronald H. Brown conducted a series of measurements in transit to and in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE/ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART)

218

Comments received on the plan presented at the March 29, 2006 conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Comments to the U.S. Department of Energy on the Plan Presented at the March 29, 2006, Public Technical Conference on the Transmission Congestion Study Plan and Designation of National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (NIETCs) The following material comprises comments received by the U.S. Department of Energy in response to a request at the March 29, 2006, Public Technical Conference on the Transmission Congestion Study Plan and Designation of National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (NIETCs) held at the Hilton Garden Inn O'Hare Airport. These comments were received via e- mail to EPACT1221@hq.doe.gov. It was requested that all comments be submitted by close-of- business Friday, April 14, 2006. The U.S. Department of Energy presents the comments as received and without any endorsement

219

Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

102813_dod 102813_dod 10/28/2013 Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead for the DoD Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LLNL served as technical lead and integrator on an important test to assess a new conventional warhead designed by the Lab. Dave Hare, Livermore's program manager of the test, called it an "unequivocal success." Below is the press release from the Department of Defense Defense Department successfully conducts warhead sled test The Defense Department announced recently the successful testing of an advanced conventional precision effects warhead, a critical part of a national effort to establish a conventional prompt strike capability. This capability will contribute to the country's ability to defend its interests

220

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

"U ,-r-r-r ..- - "U ,-r-r-r ..- - ku 117 Booker case Pilu Jtav. prot. Duror.0 -1.Y.S. Dupartaant of Lau lkw York, Icu rork I A. Pmduetlom klnion: 591 drmr of K-65 have been dumped into the lower aectlon otthe 0 toimr sina* the iwuption or operst1ona. making a tatal or 199e tom 6f slud@ mow stored therein. Irfteentona ot SSP 505Test Bonctor roda shippad rzy IPOC to Bridy"" Panas Corpsn~ to be cold dryprior to m.%hWng" e Mlaoellaneou~ rod shlplsnt.reremad.toBstbLaba-Stab Co-, Alls,@+ney-LudluStml Conpany,Nationalbsd~~,?emald~. Gwmnl Bectrlc Ccapany,Banford. andArgonn.~Eation~Labora:o~kSSS. Shiped of rodm. acrap and oxidm mre rscslrd Iram karlcan Yheblne k Foundry Co.. OE,Nanford, Allegbausy-Ludlun and Eethleham. Approximately lS.OW pounds of machined uraniv metal hare beem

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Directions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Directions Directions New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (189KB) Points of Contact (POCs) History Directions Jobs Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov About Directions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The New Brunswick Laboratory is located on the Argonne National Laboratory Site. New Brunswick Laboratory 9800 S. Cass Ave. Building 350 Argonne, IL 60439-4899 To reach Argonne from O'Hare International Airport, take I-294 south to I-55. Exit west on I-55 (toward St. Louis ) and continue for about four

222

Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids Consisting of the Physical Properties of Ionic Liquids Consisting of the 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Cation with Various Anions and the Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide Anion with Various Cations Hui Jin, Bernie O'Hare, Jing Dong, Sergei Arzhantsev, Gary A. Baker, James F. Wishart, Alan J. Benesi, and Mark Maroncelli J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 81-92 (2008). [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Physical properties of 4 room-temperature ionic liquids consisting of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation with various perfluorinated anions and the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N-) anion with 12 pyrrolidinium-, ammonium-, and hydroxyl-containing cations are reported. Electronic structure methods are used to calculate properties related to the size, shape, and dipole moment of individual ions. Experimental measurements of

223

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop Spring 2009 Technical Workshop in Support of U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Congestion Study Webcast, transcript, and presentations available at: http://www.congestion09.anl.gov/ Crowne Plaza Chicago O'Hare Hotel & Conference Center March 25-26, 2009 Agenda Day 1 - Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:00 a.m. Registration Check-In & Continental Breakfast 10:00 a.m. DOE Welcome/Purpose of Workshop David Meyer, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-OE) 10:15 a.m. Session 1 - Historic Congestion in the Western Interconnection The Western Electric Coordinating Council Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee has conducted an analysis of historic congestion in the Western

224

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observation of 4-5 Day Meridional Wind Observation of 4-5 Day Meridional Wind and Surface Stress Oscillations During Nauru99 A. A. Grachev and J. E. Hare University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The existence of the easterly wave disturbances in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) has been recognized since early studies in the 1940s and 1950s (e.g., Riehl 1945). These synoptic-scale disturbances are westward propagating organized structures moving parallel to the equator. They are observed within the intertropical convergence zone (westward direction is associated with the trade

225

Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE_Tech_Conf_Jim_Busbin.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDC and Its Data as Used in the IDC and Its Data as Used in the IDC and Its Data as Used in the IDC and Its Data as Used in the Interpretation of Congestion in Interpretation of Congestion in the Eastern Interconnection the Eastern Interconnection Jim Busbin Chair, NERC IDC Working Group Spring 2009 Technical Conference - DOE 2009 Congestion Study Crowne Plaza Chicago O'Hare Hotel & Conference Center March 25-26, 2009 IDC 2007 historical data was provided for the DOE 2009 Congestion Study. Important to understand what the IDC is and what it does. Developed in the 1998-99 timeframe when volume of schedules was increasing significantly. Purpose of the IDC is to aid Reliability Coordinators in the Eastern Interconnection in implementing the Transmission Loading Relief (TLR) procedures as specified by NERC in Reliability Standard IRO-006 and

226

CMN  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

sl sl CMN - t%1UB SECRET Copy 15 MI.-396 L a SCIOTO LABORATORY MARION, OHIO ~S5_ Ct-Jt4 0 This Document Consists of 57 Pages This is Copy / o rf 23A ~S~~g.^a^~T CAMLM-396 !eo T /xY/ 'INITIALS i Contract Number AT-33-1-CEN-53 RHTG # I 1- BOX ry scIOTr LABORATORY C Operated By MONSANTO CHEMICAL COMPANY MARION, OHIO Er M. M. Haring ,u Laboratory Director rq - -- r - Er OUTLINE FOR "COLD STAND-BY" OPERATION OF SCIOTO LABORATORY * (Limited Operation and Maintenance) CAUTION This document contains information af- fecting the National Defense of the United States. Its transmission or the disclosure of its contents in any manner to an unauthorized person is prohibited and may result in severe criminal penal- ties under applicable Federal Laws. RESTRICTED DATA This document contains restricted data as

227

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1. Illustration of daytime heating producing a thermal internal boundary layer effect over Nauru, which in turn produces cumulous clouds above the boundary layer. Figure 2. Illustration of Nauru heat-island produced by convective rolls forming cloud streets. Figure 3. Satellite images of Nauru on December 13, 2000 showing the cloud

228

Big Weasels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Weasels Big Weasels Nature Bulletin No. 512-A January 12, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BIG WEASELS The Weasel Family includes the mink, skunks, otters, badger, martens and wolverine as well as the bloodthirsty little weasel -- all carnivorous fur-bearers having a pair of anal glands containing musky fluid which, except in the otters, badger and fisher, has a vile penetrating odor. The Pine Marten or American Sable, a little smaller than a house cat, is the tree-living member of the family. It dens and does much of its hunting in trees where it is a deadly enemy of squirrels and birds. On the ground it preys on marmots, chipmunks, hares, mice, grouse and reptiles. Honey, nuts and berries are eaten also. Aside from the lynx, eagles, owls and the fisher, a marten's chief enemy is man.

229

Mike Norman, Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diary of a Nobel Guest - II Diary of a Nobel Guest - II Mike Norman, Argonne National Laboratory Having read David Mermin's entertaining account of his own adventures in Stockholm during the 1996 Nobel festivities, I could not help but offer my own observations during this year's (2003) events. This was made possible by Alex's gracious invitation to come and help him celebrate. Friday, December 5 Get to airport almost two hours in advance. Turns out to be a near mistake. O'Hare is a disaster that day, with one hour lines at both the counter and security checkpoint. But we (George Crabtree and I) make it (barely). My neighbor is a talkative doctor shuttling between Norway and Spain (European version of our Florida snowbirds). As a result, never check whether Alex (Alexei Abrikosov) and family are on the plane or not.

230

Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

Gilbert, J.R. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)); Ng, E.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

rifle.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

JUNCTION JUNCTION RIFLE GRAND DISPOSAL SITE N NEW RIFLE 70 DENVER COLORADO MILLSITE 6 65 MILES 20 10 0 133 30 OLD RIFLE MILLSITE RIFLE C O L O R A D O RIVER 13 R I F L E C R E E K GLENWOOD SPRINGS NEW CASTLE M:\LTS\111\0017\01\S0016200.DWG The Grand Junction Office has provided cost-effective and efficient stewardship for more than 10 years F A C T S H E E T Overview Regulatory Setting Rifle Disposal Site Uranium and vanadium ores were processed at two millsites near Rifle, Colorado, between 1924 through 1981. Milling operations created process-related wastes and tailings, a sandlike waste product containing radio- active materials and other contaminants. In 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings from the two millsites in an engineered disposal cell at Estes Gulch, north of Rifle. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission included the

232

Microsoft Word - appxa.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A.1 Surface-Water Discharge Data A.1.1 GS01: Woman Creek at Indiana Street A.1.2 GS03: Walnut Creek at Indiana Street A.1.3 GS05: Woman Creek at West Fenceline A.1.4 GS08: South Walnut Creek at Pond B-5 Outlet A.1.5 GS10: South Walnut Creek at B-1 Bypass A.1.6 GS11: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-4 Outlet A.1.7 GS12: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-3 Outlet A.1.8 GS13: North Walnut Creek above Pond A-1 A.1.9 GS31: Woman Creek at Pond C-2 Outlet A.1.10 GS33: No Name Gulch at Walnut Creek A.1.11 GS51: Ditch South of 903 Pad A.1.12 GS59: Woman Creek Upstream of Antelope Springs Confluence A.1.13 SW018: Functional Channel 2 at FC-2 Wetland A.1.14 SW027: South Interceptor Ditch at Pond C-2 A.1.15 SW093: North Walnut Creek 1,300 feet Upstream of A-1 Bypass

233

Microsoft Word - appxa  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GS05: Woman Creek at West Fenceline GS05: Woman Creek at West Fenceline A.1.4 GS08: South Walnut Creek at Pond B-5 Outlet A.1.5 GS10: South Walnut Creek at B-1 Bypass A.1.6 GS11: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-4 Outlet A.1.7 GS12: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-3 Outlet A.1.8 GS13: North Walnut Creek Above Pond A-1 A.1.9 GS31: Woman Creek at Pond C-2 Outlet A.1.10 GS33: No Name Gulch at Walnut Creek A.1.11 GS51: Ditch South of Former 903 Pad A.1.12 GS59: Woman Creek Upstream of Antelope Springs Confluence A.1.13 B5INFLOW: South Walnut Creek Above Pond B-5 A.1.14 SW018: Functional Channel 2 at FC-2 Wetland A.1.15 SW027: South Interceptor Ditch at Pond C-2 A.1.16 SW093: North Walnut Creek 1,300 feet Upstream of A-1 Bypass A.2 Precipitation Data A.2.1 PG58: Gaging Station GS01

234

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- phylla, G. rolfei, and G. sinensis), one narrowly distributed species found in southern Azerbaijan Schnabel 10 Wild collected Astara, Azerbaijan G. japonica Miq. Arnold Arboretum #13-38 Wild collected China

235

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Cooperative Transportation Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Wild Resource...

236

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the following 3 parts of the project: Part 1--Improve wild steelhead trout smolt-to-adult survival rate information by PIT tagging additional wild steelhead trout juveniles. Part 2--Estimating the stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon and forecasting wild/natural smolt production. Part 3--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Letter Head Shell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Primeline Monofilament Duralume Light Sticks Complete Longline Fishing Systems ... Wild fish stocks are already strained and government ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thursday, december 22, 2011 LiTTLejohn coLiseum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there are some associated risks, such as diseases transmitted from wild animals (e.g. Lyme Disease). As part

Bolding, M. Chad

239

Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2009201010 Significantly, we found that infected larch needles can  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there are some associated risks, such as diseases transmitted from wild animals (e.g. Lyme Disease). As part

240

Emergence of Fusion/Fission Cycling and Self-Organized Criticality from a Simulation Model of Early Complex Polities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanish, Charles, 2007. An Agent-based Model of Prehistoriccase of spatial agent- based models) that simulates wild

Griffin, Arthur F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Death Valley Indian Farming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mills and handstones, long employed for wild seeds, were pressed into service for grinding corn and wheat into flour, and

Wallace, William J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental monitoring at Ames Laboratory: calendar year 1980  

SciTech Connect

The results and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring programs for the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR) and other Laboratory facilities are presented. The major areas of radiological monitoring were ALRR effluent air, environmental air, effluent water and environmental water. A summary of the radioactivity found in the environment is presented. The ALRR ceased operation on December 1, 1977. Decommissioning activities began January 3, 1978, and are scheduled for completion October 1, 1981. Analysis of air samples collected at the ALRR on-site station showed no radioactivity that could be attributed to ALRR operations. The radiosotope of significance in the ALRR stack effluent was tritium (H-3). The yearly individual dose from H-3 at the exclusion fence was estimated to be 0.016 mRem and the estimated dose to the entire population within an 80 Km (50 mile) radius of the ALRR was 26.6 man-Rem. These values are 0.0032% and 0.026%, respectively, of the doses derived from the concentration guides. On September 1, 1978, the ALRR site was connected to the City of Ames sanitary sewage system. All liquids (except building foundation and roof water) from the ALRR complex are now discharged to the sewage system negating the requirement for monitoring chemical constituents of effluent and environmental waters. In the radioactive liquid waste released to the City of Ames sewage system from the ALRR complex, H-3 was the predominant isotope. After dilution with other waste water from the ALRR complex, the potential dose was not more than 0.68% of the dose derived from the concentration guide. Building foundation and roof water are discharged to a drainage gulch on site.

Voss, M.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Intergrated 3-D Ground-Penetrating Radar,Outcrop,and Boreholoe Data Applied to Reservoir Characterization and Flow Simulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing reservoir models are based on 2-D outcrop;3-D aspects are inferred from correlation between wells,and so are inadequately constrained for reservoir simulations. To overcome these deficiencies, we initiated a multidimensional characterization of reservoir analogs in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in Utah.The study was conducted at two sites(Corbula Gulch Coyote Basin); results from both sites are contained in this report. Detailed sedimentary facies maps of cliff faces define the geometry and distribution of potential reservoir flow units, barriers and baffles at the outcrop. High resolution 2-D and 3-D ground penetrating radar(GPR) images extend these reservoir characteristics into 3-D to allow development of realistic 3-D reservoir models. Models use geometric information from the mapping and the GPR data, petrophysical data from surface and cliff-face outcrops, lab analyses of outcrop and core samples, and petrography. The measurements are all integrated into a single coordinate system using GPS and laser mapping of the main sedimentologic features and boundaries. The final step is analysis of results of 3-D fluid flow modeling to demonstrate applicability of our reservoir analog studies to well siting and reservoir engineering for maximization of hydrocarbon production. The main goals of this project are achieved. These are the construction of a deterministic 3-D reservoir analog model from a variety of geophysical and geologic measurements at the field sites, integrating these into comprehensive petrophysical models, and flow simulation through these models. This unique approach represents a significant advance in characterization and use of reservoir analogs. To data,the team has presented five papers at GSA and AAPG meetings produced a technical manual, and completed 15 technical papers. The latter are the main content of this final report. In addition,the project became part of 5 PhD dissertations, 3 MS theses,and two senior undergraduate research projects.

McMechan et al.

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nick Balthaser! LBNL/NERSC Storage Systems Group GlobusOnline/HPSS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GlobusOnline/HPSS GlobusOnline/HPSS Demo --- 1 --- HUF 2 013 November 5, 2013 Agenda * Background - GlobusOnline, g ridFTP, a nd H PSS D SI - gridFTP/HPSS a t N ERSC * Mo;va;on f or I mplementa;on * Live Demo - Web---enabled t ransfer * PiEalls, W ish L ist, a nd T o---Dos * Further I nfo --- 2 --- Background * GlobusOnline i s a u ser---friendly i nterface f or m anaging g ridFTP data t ransfers - Both w eb a nd C LI t ransfer m anagement i nterfaces a re s upported - gridFTP/HPSS c ommunicaJon i s i mplemented v ia G lobus T oolkit D ata Storage I nterface ( DSI) s upport * DSI i s a s hared l ibrary i nterface f or gridFTP c ommunicaJon w ith n on---file s ystem storage b ackends * HPSS D SI u ses c lient A PI t o c ommunicate w ith H PSS * gridFTP/HPSS i nterface h as b een i n p roduc;on a t N ERSC s ince HPSS 5.x - HPSS 5 .x

245

Richard Gerber! NERSC Senior Science Advisor! User Services Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Group Lead User Services Group Lead NUG Webinar January 2014 --- 1 --- January 9 , 2 014 Agenda * Edison C onfigura6on f or A Y 2 014 * Alloca6on Y ear R ollover I ssues * Project D irectories p er P roject * NUG 2 014 U ser G roup M ee6ng * Automa6c I /O P rofiling f or Y our C ode * Give / T ake U 6lity f or S haring F iles * NUG Q ueue C ommiRee U pdate * User Survey Needs Your Input * Open D iscussion --- 2 --- Edison Update --- 3 --- Jeff B roughton NERSC D eputy f or O pera6ons Systems D epartment H ead Edison at a Glance * First C ray X C30 * Intel I vy B ridge 1 2---core, 2 .4GHz processors * Aries i nterconnect w ith D ragonfly topology for great scalability * Performs 2 ---4 x H opper p er n ode o n real a pplica6ons * 12 x 512GB login nodes to support visualiza6on a nd a naly6cs --- 4 --- * 3 L ustre s cratch

246

MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

This Doeumr;t Consists of 116 ?zges This Doeumr;t Consists of 116 ?zges This is COPY of i.3 k MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd By MONSAmOC~ALGoMPANY MIAMISBURG, OHIO REPORT NO. 3 OF STIEUING CaW'M'B FOR DISPUSAL CF UNITS 111 AND IV (Completion Report for Disposal of UrLt IV, Runnymeade Road sr,d Dixon live. Dayton, Ohlo) . Date: April 17, 1950 Prepared By: -36L254- F. L. Halbach Chairnan., St33ricg Gcicmittes 1ssue.d: DISTRIHJTION copy 1. - Dr. Carroll A. Hochwalt copy 2. - Dr. M. M. Haring copy 3. - Dr. J. J. Ehmbage COPY 4. - Mr. F. L. Halbach . - Copy 5. - 5 '3 . . ., I Copy 6. - Area Ahmger COPY 7. - Area Y@mger CWY 8. - Area Qinagsr copy 9. - Area Ydager CT -Files&?& d3i' V.-u c 4. copy 11. - Central Files i copy 12. - Central Files

247

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The ADVANCE project: Formal evaluation of the targeted deployment. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

ADVANCE [Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation ConcEpt] was a public/private partnership conceived and developed by four founding parties. The founding parties include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University operating together under the auspices of the Illinois Universities Transportation Research Consortium (IUTRC), and Motorola, Inc. The major responsibilities of each party are fully described in the Project agreement. Subsequently, these four were joined on the Steering Committee by the American Automobile Association (AAA). This unique blending of public sector, private sector and university interests, augmented by more than two dozen other private sector participants, provided a strong set of resources for ADVANCE. The ADVANCE test area covered over 300 square miles including portions of the City of Chicago and 40 northwest suburban communities. The Project encompasses the high growth areas adjacent to O`Hare International Airport, the Schaumbura/Hoffman Estates office and retail complexes, and the Lake-Cook Road development corridor. It also includes major sports and entertainment complexes such as the Arlington International Racecourse and the Rosemont Horizon. The population in the area is more than 750,000. This volume provides a summary of the insights and achievements made as a result of this field test, and selected appendices containing more detailed information.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The ADVANCE project: Insights and achievments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADVANCE [Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation ConcEpt] was a public/private partnership conceived and developed by four founding parties. The founding parties include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University operating together under the auspices of the Illinois Universities Transportation Research Consortium (IUTRC), and Motorola, Inc. The major responsibilities of each party are fully described in the Project agreement. Subsequently, these four were joined on the Steering Committee by the American Automobile Association (AAA). This unique blending of public sector, private sector and university interests, augmented by more than two dozen other private sector participants, provided a strong set of resources for ADVANCE. The ADVANCE test area covered over 300 square miles including portions of the City of Chicago and 40 northwest suburban communities. The Project encompasses the high growth areas adjacent to O`Hare International Airport, the Schaumburg/Hoffman Estates office and retail complexes, and the Lake-Cook Road development corridor. It also includes major sports and entertainment complexes such as the Arlington International Racecourse and the Rosemont Horizon. The population in the area is more than 750,000. The Insights and Perspectives Compendium is intended to provide useful information to project managers, system developers, and system integrators of future similar ITS implementations. It is intended for those that are technically interested in the ADVANCE Project and have a basic understanding of the project.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

State of Asian Elephant Conservation in 2003 i Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;State of Asian Elephant Conservation in 2003 i Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Conservation Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Executive Summary: The state of wild Asian elephant conservation in 2003

New, Mark

251

Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ecological and social impact. The carrying capacity for wild dogs of the Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species 85 community...

Wangchuk, Tashi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume, July 2012 Potential for...

253

SMT Reflow Jig Material Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most wildly used composite material is scattering glass fiber composite ... Properties of Closed-Cell Aluminum Foams Reinforced with Fly Ash Particles.

254

Fish kill mechanisms and toxins exploration for the harmful alga Chattonella marina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The marine alga Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae) has long attracted global attention for its association with massive mortality in wild and cultured fish worldwide. Respiratory disorder (more)

Shen, Min ( ??)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

x00DC;ber die Beteilligung von ATP bei der Regelung ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the monsoon season Chrysocoris stollii were found in large numbers as a pest on the wild chilly plants growing abundantly in fields south of Mussalapur...

256

ANL:MCS-P1995-0112.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Experimental Study of Global and Local Search Algorithms in Empirical Performance Tuning 1 Prasanna Balaprakash, Stefan M. Wild, and Paul D. Hovland Mathematics and Computer...

257

The Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide: The Blue Movement Directory (2005-2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magazine, California Coast & Ocean, California Wild, andReview: The Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide: The BlueMiller San Francisco, USA The Ocean and Coastal Conservation

Miller, Ryder W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, June 26 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Vegetarian salad wrap -...

259

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, September 22 - Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken - Tuna Melt on Nine Grain - BBQ Ribs - Chicken Casserole - Buffalo Chicken Wrap - Mexican...

260

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 -Cream of Wild Mushroom -Blackened Fish Filet Sandwich -Southern Fried Chicken -Tuna Casserole -Eggplant Parmesan Panini -Assorted Slice Pizza -Assorted Sub Sandwich Wilson...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Jan. 14 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine-grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo krispy chicken wrap...

262

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, June 29 -Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken -Tuna Melt on Nine Grain -BBQ Ribs -Chicken Casserole -Buffalo Chicken Wrap -Assorted Slice...

263

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, April 3 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Vegetarian salad wrap -...

264

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, April 24 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Vegetarian salad wrap -...

265

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, Feb. 12 - Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken - Tuna Melt on Nine Grain - Smart Cuisine: Italian Meatloaf - Chicken Casserole - Smart...

266

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Oct. 21 - Breakfast: apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - *Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo krispy chicken...

267

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, July 1 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

268

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, June 4 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

269

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, June 16 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

270

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, March 8 -Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken -Tuna Melt on Nine Grain -BBQ Ribs -Chicken Casserole -Buffalo Chicken Wrap -Assorted Slice...

271

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, July 14 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart Cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

272

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, May 7 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

273

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, Nov. 3 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

274

THE ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA: A PUBLIC POLICY APPROACH TO SAVING AN ICONIC SPECIES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) is perhaps the most magnificent and most marvelous nomadic wild animal living in the world. It lives in the (more)

O'Brien, Timothy Patrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Estimating the Cost of Large Superconducting Thin Solenoid Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for making a preliminary cost estimate of proposed one of afor making a budgetary cost estimate of relatively lightbut in other cases, the cost estimates are wildly different

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

August 2009 Final Approval Package for TPA Tentative Agreement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act (ARRA) Wild Card (More Money - No worries?) Timing (Generally announced but actual Hanford dollars delayed by a month or more) August 2009 Tentative Agreement Outline Page 3...

277

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fowl in a number of Asian countries, including China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, and Cambodia, and has now spread to wild bird populations. More recently,...

278

MOLTEN METAL REACTORS - Energy Innovation Portal  

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID), Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID), Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID), Wilding, Bruce M. (IdahoFalls, ID) ...

279

Ghetto Fabulous: Inner City Car Culture, the Law, and Authenticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. (Producer). (2005). Oakland cars gone wild: Are autoabout pretty women, classy cars and just generally showingK. (1997). Cruisin': Car culture in America. Minneapolis,

Brown, Roger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Available Technologies: Energy Crops Engineered for Increased ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Biofuel feedstock plants; ADVANTAGES: Reduced lignin or phenolic compounds compared with wild type plants; Up to a 10 percent increase in ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publishing. nazarewicz, W., Schunck, n., Wild, S.,* "Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory," Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, May 2012, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 6-7. ALCF | 2012...

282

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory wild@mcs.anl.gov ABSTRACT Code optimization in the high-performance computing realm has traditionally focused on reducing execution time. The problem, in...

283

Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the kinetic energy of the wind and converts it into rotary motion to drive the generator, which produces either AC or wild AC (variable frequency, variable voltage), which...

284

Perfect Babies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by breeding selectively, and this has been done for millennia. The domestic pig, cow, dog, etc. are very different from their wild ancestors because of this. People breed...

285

Biological Nitrification Inhibition (BNI) Potential in Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biological nitrification inhibition by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). New Phytol 2008;180:442-451.in the root-DCM wash (?g) Wild sorghums Fig. 3. Relationship

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Distribution of Clokey's Eggvetch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environment, Safety and Health Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office implements the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This program ensures compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, delineates and describes NTS ecosystems, and provides ecological information for predicting and evaluating potential impacts of proposed projects on those ecosystems. Over the last several decades, has taken an active role in providing information on the tatus of plant species proposed for protection under the Endangered Species Act(ESA). One such species is Clokey's eggvetch (Astragalus oophorus var. clokeyanus), which is a candidate species under the listing guidelines of the ESA. Surveys for this species were conducted on the NTS in 1996, 1997, and 1998. Field surveys focused on potential habitat for this species in the southern Belted range and expanded to other areas with similar habitat. Over 30 survey day s were completed; five survey days in 1996, 25 survey days in 1997, and three survey days in 1998. Clokey's eggvetch was located at several sites in the southern Belted Range. It was found through much of the northern section of Kawich Canyon, one site at the head of Gritty Gulch, and a rather extensive location in Lambs Canyon. It was also located further south at Captain Jack Springs in the Eleana Range, in much of Falcon Canyon and around Echo Peak on Pahute Mesa, and was also found in the Timber and Shoshone Mountains. Overall, the locations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appears to form a distinct bridge between populations of the species located further north in the Belted and Kawich Ranges and the population located in the Spring Mountains. Clokey's eggvetch was commonly found along washes and small draws, and typically in sandy loam soils with a covering of light tuffaceous rock. It occurs primarily above 1830 meters (6000 feet) in association with single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata). Overall, the populations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appear to be vigorous and do not appear threatened. It is estimated that there are approximately 2300 plants on the NTS. It should be considered as a species of concern because of its localized distribution, but it does not appear to warrant protection under the ESA.

David C. Anderson

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geomorphic and Geochemical Characteristics of Five Alpine Fens in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fens are abundant in the San Juan Mountains. By exploring the geomorphology and geochemistry of fen wetlands, the functions that fens serve can be better understood. In this research, two main studies were conducted involving the geomorphology and geochemistry of fens. The first study involved a complex investigation of the geomorphology of five fen sites in the San Juan Mountains near Silverton, Colorado. Geomorphic maps were constructed for each fen site at a scale of ~1:3,000. A geomorphic classification scheme was then made based on fen location, and fens were placed in one of three categories: 1) valley-bottom, 2) valley-side, and 3) terrace. Fen circularity and elongation values were calculated for thirty fens to determine morphometry. A pattern for elongation of fens emerged between the three types of alpine fens with valley-bottom fens having an average elongation value of 1.7, valley-side 2.4, and terrace 1.9. Valley-side fens are more elongated than valley-bottom and terrace fens, which exhibit similar elongation values. In addition, sediment samples at each site were sectioned along visual breaks in the sediment column and were sieved. Mean phi values were calculated for each section and at each site. The mean phi values at California Gulch, Glacial Lake Ironton, Howardsville, Red Mountain Pass North, and Red Mountain Pass South, are 0.2112, 0.9045, 1.6028, 0.0178, and 1.0516, respectively. Overall, coarse-grained particles are associated with valley-side fens, and medium-grained particles are associated with valley-bottom and terrace fens. The second part of the study involved investigating the geochemistry of fen sediment. The geochemistry portion of this research focused on concentration and isotopic ratios of Pb and the amount of 137Cs in fen sediment to better understand variations of Pb with depth and calculate approximate sedimentation rates. Based on isotopic ratios of Pb, binary mixing was determined with the presence of ore mineralized Pb and non-ore mineralized. Binary mixing of two types of ore-mineralized Pb is present at the Howardsville fen and both ore-mineralized and non-ore mineralized Pb is present at the Red Mountain Pass North fen. Based on 137Cs in fen sediment at Howardsville, an average rate of deposition of sediment is approximately 0.16 cm/yr, with a visible change in sedimentation rates pre- and post-1960s.

McClenning, Bree Kathleen 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent efforts to optimize oil recovery from Green River reservoirs, Uinta Basin, have stimulated the need for better understanding of the reservoir connectivity at the scale of the operational unit. This study focuses on Green River reservoirs in the Wells Draw study area where oil production response to implemented waterflood is poor and a better understanding of the reservoir connectivity is required to enhance future secondary oil recovery. Correlating the sand bodies between well locations in the area remains difficult at 40-acre well spacing. Thus, interwell connectivity of the reservoirs is uncertain. Understanding the reservoir connectivity in the Wells Draw study area requires integration of all static and dynamic data for generation of probabilistic models of the reservoir at the interwell locations. The objective of this study is two-fold. The first objective was to determine reservoir connectivity at the interwell scale in the Wells Draw study area. To achieve this goal, I used well log and perforation data in the Wells Draw study area to produce probabilistic models of net-porosity for four producing intervals: (1) Castle Peak, (2) Lower Douglas Creek, (3) Upper Douglas Creek, and (4) Garden Gulch. The second objective was to find readily applicable methods for determining interwell connectivity. To achieve this goal, I used sandstone net thickness and perforation data to evaluate interwell connectivity in the Wells Draw study area. This evaluation was done to: (1) assess and visualize connectivity, (2) provide an assessment of connectivity for validating / calibrating percolation and capacitance based methods, and (3) determine flow barriers for simulation. The probabilistic models encompass the four producing intervals with a gross thickness of 1,900 ft and enable simulation assessments of different development strategies for optimization of oil recovery in the Wells Draw study area. The method developed for determining interwell connectivity in Wells Draw study area is reliable and suited to the four producing intervals. Also, this study shows that the percolation based method is reliable for determining interwell connectivity in the four producing intervals.

Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tenant Guidelines National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credited, are by Michael Wilde. Design and layout are by Clay Johnson and Michael Wilde. The authors would, Tel. (415) 561-4332, Fax (415) 561-4350. Download this document from the World Wide Web: http://www.eren.doe.gov/femp, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

Diamond, Richard

290

Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of 333 stream sections were sampled in 1994 to monitor in chinook salmon and steelhead trout parr populations in Idaho. Percent carry capacity and density estimates were summarized by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon. These data were also summarized by cells and subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992-1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

Hall-Griswold, Judy A.; Leitzinger, Eric J.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

293

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

294

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 7050 of 28,560 results. 41 - 7050 of 28,560 results. Rebate Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Established by The Wild Resource Conservation Act of 1982, the Wild Resource Conservation Program is a part of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The program works closely with... http://energy.gov/savings/wild-resource-conservation-program-pennsylvania Rebate Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also... http://energy.gov/savings/wildlife-management-areas-maryland Rebate Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of

295

The impact of over 100years of wildfires on mercury levels and accumulation rates in two lakes in southern California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 years of wild?res on mercury levels and accumulationbe an important source of mercury (Hg) to local watersheds.transport of gaseous mercury from a large scale Canadian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Eternity of the World and Renaissance Historical Thought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that comprises Nimrod, Noahs Flood and the Tower of Babel (particularly floods (like Noahs) or plagues, to eliminatePelacani declared the story of Noah bringing the wild beasts

Connell, William J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

TAO: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Referencing TAO Impact Who We Are Acknowledgements License Contact Us Papers TAO 2.0 Users Manual, T. Munson, J. Sarich, Stefan M. Wild, S. Benson, and L....

298

John Muir  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

glaciers, and with the giant Sequoias. His studies furnished proof that the Yosemite Valley was glacier-made and not the results of earthquakes. Though he traveled the wild...

299

The new phrenology: the limits of localizing cognitive processes in the brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New, noninvasive imaging technologies allow us to observe the brain while it is actively engaged in mental activities. Uttal cautions, however, that the excitement of these new research tools can lead to a neuroreductionist wild goose chase. With more ...

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Intragenic and extragenic suppressors of temperature sensitive mutations replication initiation genes dnaD and dnaB of Bacillus subtilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The Bacillus subtilis genes dnaD and dnaB are essential for the initiation of DNA replication and are required for loading of the replicative helicase at the chromosomal origin of replication oriC. Wild type ...

Grossman, Alan D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coal keeps the home fires burning, at a price  

SciTech Connect

The wild ride of 2007 thermal and coking coal and freight prices does not show any signs of abating as 2008 nears, leaving consumers coping with historic high costs, except in the US. 3 figs.

O'Connell, J.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Title: One Day in September Cafeteria Thursday, September 25 Wild mushroom bisque Tuna casserole 3.50 Roasted pork loin 4.75 Turkey and Swiss on a pretzel roll 4.75 Jack...

303

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, March 3 Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken Soup Tuna Melt on Nine Grain 4.75 Breaded Veal with Mushroom Cream Sauce 3.75 Sweet & Sour Pork...

304

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINAR THIS WEEK Cafeteria Thursday, August 26 Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken Tuna Melt on Nine Grain 4.75 Breaded Veal with Mushroom Cream Sauce 3.75 Sweet & Sour Pork...

305

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Dileptons in Run II at CDF Cafeteria Thursday, May 6 Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken Tuna Melt on Nine Grain SW Skillet Steaks 4.75 Jumbo Stuffed Baked Potatoes 2.75 BLT Ranch...

306

The Sweet Potato  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-- by Columbus in the West Indies, by Balboa in Central America, and by Pizarro in Peru. Like corn, it was not found growing wild, but it had been cultivated by the Incan and...

307

Differential Gene Expression Pre-processing: from CEL files to ExpressionSet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different between mutants and wild types Install Libraries and Load Data > source-processing: from CEL files to ExpressionSet Gene Annotation Visualize Expression Profile using Heatmap Produce

Qiu, Weigang

308

Web-Style Multimedia Annotations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Semantic Web. World Wide Web Consortium, Working Draft20] Erik Wilde. Declarative Web 2.0. In Weide Chang andUCB iSchool Report 2007-014 Web-Style Multimedia Annotations

Shaw, Ryan; Wilde, Erik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Web Site Metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International World Wide Web Conference, pages 11231124,Erik Wilde. Site Metadata on the Web. In Proceedings of theUCB ISchool Report 2009-028 Web Site Metadata [4] David R.

Wilde, Erik; Roy, Anuradha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ecology, 81(2), 2000, pp. 500508 2000 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distributed spider mite species that feeds on crops and wild plants in most areas of the world (Jeppson et al Survey Bulletin 33:141­174. Jeppson, L. R., H. H. Keifer, and E. W. Baker. 1975. Mites injurious

Agrawal, Anurag

311

Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.) Broodstock Nutrition: The Role Of Arachidonic Acid And Astaxanthin As Determinants Of Egg Quality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cod hatcheries rely greatly on wild-caught broodstock as egg quality from farm-reared broodstock tends to be poor. Broodstock diet and levels of essential fatty acids (more)

Sawanboonchun, Jarin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cranberries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acres of bogs in Massachusetts -- where their culture from wild plants was begun on Cape Cod in the early 1800' s -- and in New Jersey and Wisconsin. Cranberries grow in peat bogs...

313

The Role of Spire and Cofilin in Actin Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wild-type cofilin as a standard. BPM and ANP cross-linkingBPM and ANP cross-linking were performed as describedBPM cross-linked actin with ANP cross-linked actin due to

Chen, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Chromosome- and Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chromosome- and Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Various HRR or NHEJ Deficient Mutant Chinese Hamster Cells and Their Wild-type Counterparts in G0G1 or LateSG2...

315

Eavesdroppers : how scientists are learning to listen in on the animal kingdom : four stories on wildlife and sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically, if scientists want to study animals in the wild they rely on field observations by eye. If they want to track those species to know where they are, where they are going, and how they behave, then researchers may ...

Quill, Elizabeth H. (Elizabeth Helene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Osage Orange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hunt wild game, there have been herdsmen and farmers who have had to build fences. Fence building and fence repairing, whether they be stone walls, living thorn hedges, rail...

317

Insect oils: Nutritional and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many researchers have investigated wild plants as a new source of oils, but until now few have seriously considered insects. A recent analysis from Sudan indicates that insect oils offer several nutritional benefits and meet many of the specifications for

318

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers efforts to monitor age composition of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River Basin. Accurately determining the ocean age proportions of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon is important information for monitoring the status and trends of these species. During this report period, project personnel selected the preferred structure for aging, set up a database to track all samples collected, developed procedures and ordered equipment for structure preparation and reading, and aged the adults that were sampled in 1999. Chinook salmon carcasses were sampled from representative spawning areas throughout the Snake River Basin. Ocean age proportions were determined for each 5 centimeter fork length group for wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River. These ocean age proportions were applied to the number and estimated length frequency distribution of wild chinook salmon adults passing Lower Granite Dam to estimate the number of adult returns for each ocean age group.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Anderson, Dave; Johnson, June (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

Benson, Etienne Samuel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bacterial growth in the plant apoplast is limited by nutrient availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wild type Pss B728a produced water-soaking zones that were ?and Pto DC3000 produced no water-soaking but did producemutants produced smaller but detectable water-soaked zones

RAMOS, MARIA EUGENIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Indian Dyes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from wild grapes; yellow from sunflowers and yellow coneflowers. Their enemies, the Blackfeet, obtained a beautiful yellow from a moss that grew among the fir trees in the Rocky...

322

NREL: Wind Research - Avian Reports Published by NREL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of NREL-published documents on avian issues. These reports are also available in the Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD). An Assessment of the Impacts of Green...

323

Christmas in Early America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one with the only spoon, fat meat of the "wild cattle" and, as a special treat, boiled dog. You probably won't have boiled dog but have a Merry Christmas anyway. To return to the...

324

NEWTON's Zoology Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planet - Videos Section Animal Planet online lets you see videos about cat breeds, dog breeds, wild animals and pets and much more. See and learn about animals courtesy of...

325

2011 , , , . P. 45  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] [unification church study] [quiz study] [role playing game] SF [Science Fictionfantasy literature study] [geography] [railroad study] [astronomy] [science] [biology] [outdoor activity] [wild creature study training] [volleyball] [volleyball] [handball] [field hockey] [figure skating] [fencing] [bowling

Takada, Shoji

326

[symphony orchestra] [light music  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] [Christianity] [life philosophy] [unification church study] [quiz study] [role playing game] SF [Science] [geography] [railroad study] [astronomy] [science] [biology] [outdoor activity] [wild creature study training] [volleyball] [volleyball] [handball] [field hockey] [figure skating] [fencing] [bowling

Takada, Shoji

327

MS&T '04 Tour Information - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Ride on the Wild Side Date: Monday, September 27, 2004. Time: 8:00am-12: 00pm. Cost: $55.00. Located just twenty minutes from downtown New Orleans,...

328

Anything But Routine: A Selectively Annotated Bibliography of William S. Burroughs v. 1.0.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extract from The Wild Boys. [M&M]. C307. UFO, No. 1 (June1971). {M&M C308 & 309} ? ?UFO Space Bulletin?Revolutiontranslation. [M&M] C308. UFO, No. 2 (October 1971). {M&M

Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ANYTHING BUT ROUTINE: A Selectively Annotated Bibliography of William S. Burroughs v. 2.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extract from The Wild Boys. [M&M]. C309. UFO, No. 1 (June1971). {M&M C308 & 309} ?UFO Space Bulletin?Revolutiontranslation. [M&M] C310. UFO, No. 2 (October 1971). {M&M

Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Anything But Routine: A Selectively Annotated Bibliography of William S. Burroughs, v. 3.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extract from The Wild Boys. [M&M]. C311. UFO, No. 1 (June1971). {M&M C308 & 309} UFO Space BulletinRevolutiontranslation. [M&M] C312. UFO, No. 2 (October 1971). {M&M

Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Digestive enzyme activities and gastrointestinal fermentation in wood-eating catfishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our data on wild-caught wood-eating catWshes appear to bein the Amazo- nian basin, and the wood-eating species likelyby reducing the particle size of wood from coarse debris to

German, Donovan P.; Bittong, Rosalie A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Vermont Pasture Network Calendar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cleaning grain, the milling process, and packaging flour. He'll also discuss the history of milling for a tour of Wild Hive Farm Community Grain Project and a look at how local milling plays an important role

Hayden, Nancy J.

333

This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company Syngenta Crop Protection TruGreen Chem Lawn UAP Southeast Whole Mill Flour Production Wild Oats, Inc. Pew Charitable Trust Pioneer Hi-bred Progressive Insurance Purina Mills Rabo Agrifiance Sanderson

Arnold, Jonathan

334

Foliage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time in the past decade. Unless we have a long hot dry spell, we should have a bumper crop of wild blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. The tree leaves are exceptionally...

335

Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture and Home Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the soil, and is sometimes found in both wild and domesticated animals. The animals sometimes infected `wool-sorter's disease.' It gets on the surface of the skin, and then enters through cuts, cuticle tears

Castillo, Steven P.

336

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the soil, and is sometimes found in both wild and domesticated animals. The animals sometimes infected `wool-sorter's disease.' It gets on the surface of the skin, and then enters through cuts, cuticle tears

Castillo, Steven P.

337

The Olive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it was first domesticated, was probably on the limestone hills near the sea between Greece and Syria. The wild olive is a rather straggling small tree or bush with thorny...

338

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Significant Decadal Brightening of Downwelling Shortwave in the Continental US C. N. Long, E. G. Dutton, J. A. Augustine, W. Wiscombe, M. Wild, S. A. McFarlane, and C. J. Flynn 5....

339

Executive Summary...................................................................................................................................................................................... iii Water and Coastal Biodiversity Conservation........  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cover Photo PHILIPPINE FISHERMAN: Fishers in the Philippines and around the world are often the poorest members of society. Their livelihoods depend on diverse and abundant wild fisheries. Many of USAIDs biodiversity programs work to restore and protect

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the following 3 parts of the Project: Part 1--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer Chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin in 2003 to predict smolt-to-adult return rates Part 2--Development of a stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon to forecast natural smolt production Part 3--Improve the precision of smolt-to-adult survival rate estimates for wild steelhead trout by PIT tagging additional juveniles.

Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers July 5, 2011 - 1:46pm Addthis Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Bob Wilds has worked at Waukesha Electric Systems for the last 12 years as a coil winder. Waukesha Electric Systems makes transformers -- an essential part of the electric grid, transferring electrical current from one circuit to another. The coils that Bob works with are one of the most important components that make transformers work. The component involves winding insulated copper wire, but workers involved in transformer

343

Turkeys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 619 November 26, 1960 No. 619 November 26, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist TURKEYS : WILD AND DOMESTICATED The story of the first Thanksgiving in 1621 and of the wild "Turkies" which the Pilgrims hunted to provide meat for the feast is familiar to every American. Today, although very few of us can claim that we had ancestors on the Mayflower, a lot of us imagine that our Thanksgiving bird is descended from those wild turkeys. This is not quite correct. A century before, in Mexico, the early Spanish adventurers had found Indians raising turkeys around their homes. The Aztec emperor, Montezuma, kept them in his famous zoo, it is said, as food for the other animals. It is not known how long those Mexican birds had been tamed and bred but they are the true ancestors of our only domestic animal with an origin in North America.

344

DISPATCHES Emergence of African Swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008, African swine fever was introduced into Georgia, after which it spread to neighboring Armenia, Azerbaijan, and the Russian Federation. That same year, PCR and sequence analysis identifi ed African swine fever virus in samples from 3 dead female wild boars in northwestern Iran. Wild boars may serve as a reservoir. African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable, highly contagious, lethal, hemorrhagic disease in domestic pigs (1,2). ASF virus (ASFV) (International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses database no. 00.002.0.01.001), an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus, is the only known DNA arbovirus (3). Maintenance and transmission of ASFV involves cycling of virus between soft ticks of the genus Ornithodoros and wild pigs (warthogs, bush pigs, and giant forest boars) (1,2). The virus can also be acquired through

Pooneh Rahimi; Amir Sohrabi; Javad Ashrafihelan; Rosita Edalat; Mehran Alamdari; Mohammadhossein Masoudi; Saied Mostofi; Kayhan Azadmanesh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Bacterial systems for selective plugging in secondary oil production  

SciTech Connect

In order to improve the secondary recovery of petroleum from Lower Cretaceous bitumen and heavy oil deposits in Alberta, Canada, plugging studies of anaerobic bacteria, capable of the controlled production of slime, in situ were undertaken. Known cultures of L. mesenteroides (NRRL B512, B512F, B742 and B523) and 75 wild strains were tested in a model core flooding apparatus for their ability to produce stable, water insoluble polysaccharide slimes. Slime was not formed using glucose/fructose nutrient but was formed by the known cultures and four wild strains when sucrose nutrient media was used. However, wherein the polysaccharides slime produced by the wild strains was found to be water soluble dextran polymers and thus unstable, that produced by the known L. mesenteroides strains was water insoluble and stable. It is thus possible to produce a water stable core plug by injecting an appropriate strain of L. mesenteroides followed by an injection of sucrose solution.

Jack, T.R.; Diblasio, E.; Thompson, B.G.; Ward, V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Spindle dynamics and cell cycle regulation of dynein in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We have used time-lapse digital- and videoenhanced differential interference contrast (DE-DIC, VE-DIC) microscopy to study the role of dynein in spindle and nuclear dynamics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The real-time analysis reveals six stages in the spindle cycle. Anaphase B onset appears marked by a rapid phase of spindle elongation, simultaneous with nuclear migration into the daughter cell. The onset and kinetics of rapid spindle elongation are identical in wild type and dynein mutants. In the absence of dynein the nucleus does not migrate as close to the neck as in wild-type cells and initial spindle elongation is confined primarily to the mother cell. Rapid oscillations of the elongating spindle between the mother and bud are observed in wild-type cells, followed by a slower growth

Elaine Yeh; Robert V. Skibbens; Judy W. Cheng; E. D. Salmon; Kerry Bloom

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their homes vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66: Regulation for Administration and 66: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water

349

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wang, Zhi "Luke" (Zhi "Luke" Wang) - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Fresno Wania, Frank (Frank Wania) - Departments of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto Wells, Scott A. (Scott A. Wells) - Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Portland State University Wilde, Gene (Gene Wilde) - Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University Wildenschild, Dorthe (Dorthe Wildenschild) - School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University Wilkinson, Mark (Mark Wilkinson) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Woltemade, Christopher J. (Christopher J. Woltemade) - Department of Geography-Earth Science, Shippensburg University

350

Population Dynamics and Environmental Degradation in Nepal: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cover, scholars on forestry estimate this percent as low as 29 percent. This shows that deforestation has taken place at an alarnling rate in Nepal. Forest ecosystems have developed over long periods of time and get adapted to certain climatic and other... is of the opinion that agricultural productivity is directly related to the quality and quantity of wild vegetation. If the wild vegetation continues to deteriorate, fewer It is the rule, not the exception, that in most of the central and southern Kamali zone...

Uprety, Laya Prasad

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

Howe, Gregg A. (East Lansing, MI); Itoh, Aya (Tsuruoka, JP)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOEs Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would be used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA includes a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis.

353

Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has been conducting Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research since the early 1990s. NATURES studies have looked at a variety of mechanisms to enhance production of wild-like salmonids from hatcheries. The goal of NATURES research is to develop fish culture techniques that enable hatcheries to produce salmon with more wild-like characteristics and increased postrelease survival. The development of such techniques is called for in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This document is the draft report for the Supplemental Fish Quality Contract DE-AI79-91BP20651 Over the history of the project, the effects of seminatural raceway habitats, automated underwater feeders, exercise current velocities, live food diets, and predator avoidance training have been investigated. The findings of these studies are reported in an earlier contract report (Maynard et al. 1996a). The current report focuses on research that has been conducted between 1999 and 2002. This includes studies on the effect of exercise on salmon and steelhead trout, effects of predator avoid training, integration of NATUES protocols into production hatcheries, and the study of social behavior of steelhead grown in enriched and conventional environments. Traditionally, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are reared in barren concrete raceways that lack natural substrate, in-stream structure, or overhead cover. The fish are fed in an unnatural manner with artificial feeds mechanically or hand broadcast across the water surface. This traditional approach has increased the egg-to-smolt survival of hatchery-reared fish by an order of magnitude over that experienced by wild-reared salmon. However, once hatchery-reared fish are released into the wild their smolt-to-adult survival is usually much lower than wild-reared salmon. The reduced postrelease survival of hatchery-reared fish may stem from differences in their behavior and morphology compared to wild-reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still meeting their adult mitigation goals.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

SMSlingshot: An Expert Amateur DIY Case Study Patrick Tobias Fischer, Eva Hornecker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SMSlingshot: An Expert Amateur DIY Case Study Patrick Tobias Fischer, Eva Hornecker University contributed to the success of the urban intervention. The design process of this `product' has many DIY of being an amateur! Author Keywords Design Process, Creative Process, DIY in the wild. ACM Classification

Hornecker, Eva

356

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 3, 1199-1213, November 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the glp-1 protein (10 epidermal growth factor [EGF]-like and 3 LNG repeats extracellularly and 6 cdcl, all four missense mutations in one phenotypic class map to the N-terminal EGF-like repeats and all six al., 1987). Based on these loss-of-func- tion defects, it has been proposed that wild-type glp-1

Maine, Eleanor

357

University of Missouri-Columbia The College of Arts and Science Winter 2005 a student's unique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the fungus -- they take wing, using up scant energy reserves when they should be holed up until warmer rarely bite humans, though vampire bats feed on the blood of cattle, horses, deer and other wild mammals derived from vampire-bat saliva is used to treat human heart-disease patients and stroke victims. Bats

Glaser, Rainer

358

FranklinAvenue SouthDepysterStreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grille F10 Pita Pit F11 Bu alo Wild Wings F12 College Creamery F13 Euro Gyro F14 College Coneys F15 Taco (one way tra c) foottraconlyfoottraconly SouthWaterStreetNorthWaterStreet Red listings, see map

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

359

he Northwest Power Planning Council and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas Edison invented the phonograph and 12 years before Portland would have elec- tric street lights Scien- tific Group in 1996, the National Research Council, also in 1996, and the National Fish Hatchery harvest is being recon- sidered in light of issues such as genetic impacts on wild stocks and the capacity

360

Evaluation of genetically modified potatoes against the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; 4First Potato Dynamics (FPD), 19 Oxford Street is very unlikely (Khalil et al., 1987), researchers usually experiment with crosses between wild potato of resistance against the potato tuber moth (Lagnaoui et al., 2001). This is disappointing in the light

Douches, David S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY College of Arts and Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/01 University of Delaware, Department of History Lecture Series, May 2001 A Widespread and Understandable Activism," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, (December, 1988). "We Can Hold an Atomic Bomb Exhibit (July 18, 2003) (My title was "Still Wild About Harry?") "The 1945 Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki

Lansky, Joshua

362

A closer look at FATS.... According to the Dietary Guidelines, your fat intake should be kept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Bandettini, Peter A.

363

An important part of a healthy diet is eating fiber-rich foods. This handout will explain what fiber is, where it's found, and how to increase the amount of fiber in your diet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Sheridan, Jennifer

364

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Tullos, Desiree

365

Operations Manual for the McCormick Grist Mill I. History of the McCormick Mill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

366

CHOLESTEROL FRIENDS & ENEMIES Lowering your cholesterol is a large part of improving heart health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

O'Toole, Alice J.

367

Ris Energy Report 5 Wind 2 In the past 20 years wind energy has proved itself as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the technology base exists; both are responsive and the prices are falling. The energy is clean and the fuelRisø Energy Report 5 Wind 2 6.1 Status In the past 20 years wind energy has proved itself of market incentives is apparent both from these two markets and also from the wild oscillatory behaviour

368

Vol. 153, No. 1JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Jan. 1983, p. 45-56 0021-9193/83/010045-12$02.00/0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Certain Multicopy Hybrid nif Plasmids GERARD E. RIEDEL,12t* SUSAN E. BROWN,1 AND FREDERICK M. AUSUBEL, we have observed that certain hybrid nif plasmids drastically inhibit the expression of the chromosomal nif genes of Klebsiella pneumonia. Wild-type (Nif) K. pneumoniae strains that acquire certain

Ausubel, Frederick M.

369

Texas A&M University Association of Former Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Soil and Crop Sciences 1986 John R. Gold, Associate Professor, Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Wayne T, Soil and Crop Sciences Frank M. Hons, Associate Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences James R. Wild, Assistant Professor, Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences Joanne R. Lupton, Associate Professor, Animal

370

VARUN: Discovering Extensible Motifs under Saturation Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of motifs in biosequences is frequently torn between the rigidity of the model on one hand and the abundance of candidates on the other hand. In particular, motifs that include wild cards or don't cares escalate exponentially ... Keywords: Computational genomics, pattern discovery, data mining, motif, protein sequence, protein family.

Alberto Apostolico; Matteo Comin; Laxmi Parida

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-00625145,version1- #12;II Dedicated: To my parents and my family in Iran To my wife Maryam and my children conservation genetic and his willingness to travel around Iran sampling wild and domestic sheep for the study Weinberg and Amjad Tahir Virk for their help during the field sampling in Iran, Azerbaijan, Turkey

Prevedouros, Panos D.

372

Chloroplast DNA Variation Confirms a Single Origin of Domesticated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity. This result led them to conclude that these lines do, in fact, trace back to a single origin of single vs. multiple origins of sunflower domestication based on patterns of cpDNA variation in wild loci per lane on an automated DNA sequencer, PCR products were labeled by including a fluorescently

Burke, John M.

373

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps,Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseiller, Tom; Cotter, Michael (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps, Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008-2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseillier, Tom; Cotter, Michael [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

The adoption and use of 'BABBLE': a field study of chat in the workplace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way to gain a principled understanding of computer-mediated communication (CMC) use in the wild is to consider the properties of the communication medium, the usage practices, and the social context in which practices are situated. We describe the ...

Erin Bradner; Wendy A. Kellogg; Thomas Erickson

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

BLAINE LIBRARY READING LIST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for her friends. Henry, Marguerite. Misty of Chincoteague Misty begins her life as a wild descendant is adopted by the loving Beebe family. This is the first of several stories about Misty. This author has to be? Shang, Wendy. The Great Wall of Lucy Wu Lucy Wu loves her friends and playing basketball. She

Pritchard, Jonathan

378

62 Projects to Make with a Dead Computer: And Other Discarded Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer hacking takes on a whole new meaning when you're going at it with a screwdriver and hammer: announcing the most wildly inventive, eco-friendly craft book on repurposing everyday objects since Generation T. Except in this case the raw material ...

Randy Sarafan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Raw material sources for the long-chain omega-3 market:Trends and sustainability. Part 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific and popular press is awash in headlines and articles depicting the impending collapse of the global wild fisheries. Headlines such as "Oceans in Peril," "Ocean Life Fading, What Can Be Done?" "The Fishing Catastrophe and What We Can Do About

380

In this project, researchers de-veloped alternative feeds for two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high-quality poultry by-products, concentrated corn protein, Spirulina and chicken liver meal (for, such as soy, canola oil and poultry fat, to further reduce industry's reliance on wild species. In the project of chicken meal, Spirulina and corn could be used as a substi- tute for fishmeal. In a series of experiments

Tryon, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- organisms, bark or ambrosia beetles, and woody host tissue: an annotated bibliography, 1956­1974. USDA and ambrosia beetles. In: Wilding N, Collins NM, Ham- mond PM, Webber JF, eds. Insect-fungus interactions origins of ambrosia fungi. Mycologia 88:596­601. De Beer ZW, Harrington TC, Vismer HF, Wingfield BD

Arnold, Jonathan

382

Modeling Avena fatua seedling emergence dynamics: An artificial neural network approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Avena fatua is an invasive weed of the semiarid region of Argentina. Seedling emergence patterns are very irregular along the season showing a great year-to-year variability mainly due to a highly unpredictable precipitation regime. Non-linear regression ... Keywords: Emergence prediction, Hydrothermal-time, Non-linear regression, Semiarid region, Wild oat

Guillermo R. Chantre; AnBal M. Blanco; Mariela V. Lodovichi; Alberto J. Bandoni; Mario R. Sabbatini; Ricardo L. LPez; Mario R. Vigna; RamN GigN

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Research Summary Assessing and communicating animal disease risks for countryside users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initially on Lyme disease, an infection caused by a spiral bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi that is found in a number of wild animal hosts and which can be transferred to humans by infected ticks. Lyme disease in Lyme disease resulting from changes in environmental factors mdevelop appropriate risk assessment

384

Index structures for efficiently searching natural language text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many existing indexes on text work at the document granularity and are not effective in answering the class of queries where the desired answer is only a term or a phrase. In this paper, we study some of the index structures that are capable of answering ... Keywords: indexing natural language text, querying performance, wild card queries

Pirooz Chubak; Davood Rafiei

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

W W W. N A T U R E . C O M / N A T U R E | 1 SUPPLEMENTARYINFORMATION doi:10.1038/nature12652  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 complex by flag antibody (M2) followed by Western blot analysis to detect endogenous EHMT1 protein and endogenous EHMT1 protein were detected by Western blotting. -actin protein was shown as a loading control in the BAT of wild-type (WT) and Ehmt1myf5 KO embryos at P1 using Image J software. n=145-154. #12

Cai, Long

386

Recent Sediments of the Monterey Deep-Sea Fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T Or THE MONTEREV DEEP SEA FAN PLAlE Conpl1.d and ren1our.dO F THE MONTEREY DEEP- SEA FAN by P a t Wilde Berkeley,of segmented alluvial fans in w e s t e r n F r e s n o

Wilde, Pat

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Simple Parcel Method for Prediction of Cumulus Onset and Area-Averaged Cloud Amount over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to compare several methods for predicting the onset and quantitative amount of cloud cover over heterogeneous land surfaces. Among the methods tested are that of Wilde et al. (1985) and a new, simple parcel approach. ...

Peter J. Wetzel

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, oil shale and nahcolite mining, ORV use, overgrazing, trampling by wild horses · Land ownership · Occurrences: 6 · Individuals: 4000-6000 · Primary threats: oil and gas development, oil shale development, ORV use, overgrazing, oil shale mining · Land ownership/management: BLM, private, USFS #12;Phacelia

389

The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525/99/10/7/6 $5.00 The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 147, Number 1, October 4, 1999 712  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the concentration of doxycycline (DX), amount of virus, and length of time after removal of DX. Very high levels-bound form; ARF6­WT, wild-type ARF6; BL, basolateral; DX, doxycycline; gal, galactosidase; pIgR, polymeric

Apodaca, Gerard

390

Hoax' of Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, etc. and not to be disturbed by the ever shrinking resources of wild foods. Not to think of the large-scale soil erosion and salinity. Not to think about depletion of major energy sources such as fossil fuel, oils, natural gas and coal...

Misra, P K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Molecular Cell, Volume 37 Supplemental Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a gradual increase in NF-kB p65 nuclear concentration. (A) Wild-type HCT 116 cells were stimulated with increasing doses of TNF for 20 minutes. The nuclear translocation of NF-kB was assessed by immunofluorescence that increasing TNF doses induce uniformly increasing nuclear localization of NF-kB in the cell population. (C) We

Bulyk, Martha L.

392

Department of Mechanical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis, wheel profile optimization, bogie hunting etc. Measuring Wheel is also essential for analysis Explore and understand applicable science Create new materials #12;Indian Railways #12;Wheel Impact Load Design Indian Railways #12;Indian Railways Wheel Impact Load Detection System (WILD) #12;A prototype

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

393

Meteoritics & Planetary Science 43, Nr 1/2, 315334 (2008) Abstract available online at http://meteoritics.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic, cometary C in both particles. Using energy-filtered and high-resolution imaging it was shown comet Wild 2 by impact into ultra-low density aerogel with an encounter velocity of 6.1 km/s-1 (Brownlee

394

A&A 398, 345352 (2003) DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361:20021673  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of comet 81P/Wild 2, the target of the STARDUST mission. Broad-band filter images and medium resolution-situ, and collect coma material on a special capture medium (aerogel) for return to Earth (Brownlee et al. 1994

Stüwe, Jogy

395

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of smolt condition for travel time analysis (ASCTTA) project provided information on the level of smoltification in Columbia River hatchery and wild salmonid stocks to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), for the primary purpose of in-river management of flows.

Schrock, Robin M; Beeman, John W; VanderKooi, Scott P [US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Artful infrastructuring in two cases of community PD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we use the notions of artful integrations and infrastructure to analyze two cases of community Participatory Design 'in the wild'. Though the communities are quite different on the outside, they bear surprising similarities when it comes ... Keywords: artful integrations, community design, dog breeding, ecology, information management, infrastructure, participatory design

Helena Karasti; Anna-Liisa Syrjnen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Studies on activated carbon capacitor materials loaded with different amounts of ruthenium oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speci®c capacitance [4]. However, the cost of ruthenium and its compounds limits its wide spread usage in electric/hybrid vehicles and consumer electronics. Substitutes for Ru oxides do not show compar- able 100 F/g, much lower than 720 F/g reported for amorphous RuO2. Wilde et al. [9] synthesized SrRuO3

Popov, Branko N.

398

D A R G A N M . W . F R I E R S O N D E P A R T M E N T O F A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arabia of wind ¡ Could provide 9 times US electricity usage just in lower 48 ?? Oldddddd technology of the electricity anywhere ¡ Denmark deals with this by selling excess power to Norway Having a grid reached at 30 mph" Produce electricity ¾ of the time at Wild Horse" " " " " Turbines - 351 feet tall from

Frierson, Dargan

399

Use of Climatic Data to Identify Potential Sites in the United States for Growing Papaver bracteatum as a Pharmaceutical Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure utilizing maps in the National Climatic Atlas was used to survey the United States to find areas for domesticating Papaver bracteatum, a wild poppy from the Trans-Caucasus. This poppy has unique properties which make it a possible ...

R. E. Neild

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Membrane function in lipid mutants of Arabidopsis. Second year progress report, [June 15, 1992--June 14, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fad2 mutants are deficient in activity of the endoplasmic reticulum oleate desaturase that is the main enzyme responsible for polyunsaturated lipid synthesis in developing seeds of oil crops. A comparison of wild type and fad2 seeds developing on heterozygous (Fad2/-) plants was used as a model for genetically engineered high oleate oilseeds of species such as soybean and canola. When fad2 seeds developed at normal temperatures (22{degree}C), they showed high viability comparable to wild type seeds. When a portion of seed development took place at 6{degree}C, germination of the wild type siblings remained high but germination of fad2 segregants declined considerably. This was true even when exposure to low temperature was limited to the final stages of seed filing and maturation. Compared to wild type, fully viable fad2 seeds produced at 22{degree}C had reduced lipid contents and were slower to germinate at 10{degree}C and 6{degree}C. These results indicate that for some oilseed species at least, molecular genetic manipulation of oleate levels in the oil may result in plant lines with unacceptable performance in the field.

Browse, J.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor / Regulates Very Low Density Lipoprotein Production and Catabolism in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor / Regulates Very Low Density Lipoprotein Production, Pennsylvania 16802 The results of recent studies using selective agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated as well as lowered lipoprotein lipase activity in serum compared with wild-type controls. The latter

Omiecinski, Curtis

402

Laws of Cyber Security Ravi Sandhu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to macroeconomics, which involves the "sum total of economic activity, dealing with the issues of growth, inflation Generation firewalls deployed 1992 IP Spoofing attacks proliferate in the wild 1993 VPNs emerge late 1990's Vulnerability shifts to accessing end-point Network Admission Control 2000's © Ravi Sandhu 5

Sandhu, Ravi

403

The Journal of Immunology Tissue-Expressed B7x Affects the Immune Response to and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,*, and Xingxing Zang* B7x (B7-H4 or B7S1), a member of the B7 family, inhibits in vitro T cell proliferation and cytokine production by binding to an unidentified receptor on activated T cells, but its in vivo function­deficient, mice were significantly more resistant to S. pneumoniae pulmonary infection than their wild

Zang, Xingxing

404

Lake Pend Oreille Fishery Recovery Project, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum water level of Lake Pend Oreille was raised from 625.1 m to 626.4 m elevation during the winter of 1998-99 in an attempt to recover the impacted kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka fishery. This report covers the third year of testing higher winter levels. Hydroacoustic surveys and mid-water trawling were conducted in the fall of 1999 to assess the kokanee population. We estimated the abundance of each age class of kokanee as: 6.023 million age-0 (wild and hatchery fry), 883,000 age-1, 409,000 age-2, 579,000 age-3, 861,000 age-4, and 87,000 age-5. Wild fry abundance was estimated at 2.57 million fish. These originated from 43.1 million eggs spawned in the wild during the fall of 1998. The survival from wild spawned eggs to wild fry was, therefore, 6.0%. This was lower than the 9.6% survival rate calculated last year but was much higher than the 1.4% calculated in 1995 prior to changing lake levels. To date, years of higher winter lake elevations have out-performed years of full drawdown. Based on data collected during trawl sampling, the total number of eggs laid in the lake in the fall of 1999 was 74.8 million. Mean fecundity per female was 379 eggs. Hatchery personnel collected 22.4 million eggs, leaving 52.4 million eggs to be laid by wild fish in tributary streams and along the lake shoreline. These eggs will be used to assess wild kokanee survival during 2000. Peak counts of spawning kokanee were 3,500 fish on the shoreline and 16,400 fish in tributary streams. This represents only a fraction of the total kokanee spawning population. Opossum shrimp Mysis relicta increased slightly in the southern two sections of the lake but decreased in the northern end. Immature and mature shrimp (excluding young-of-the-year shrimp) densities averaged 302 shrimp/m{sup 2}, down from 426 shrimp/m{sup 2} the previous year. The relatively stable shrimp population was not thought to affect the outcome of the lake level testing.

Maiolie, Melo A.; Ament, William J.; Harryman, Bill (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome c3 in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Metabolism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role of tetraheme cytochrome c3 (CycA) in the metabolism of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) was investigated by deletion of the cycA gene using a marker-exchange deletion strategy. A highly abundant periplasmic cytochrome, CycA has the important function of transferring electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd, Hyn, Hys) to transmembrane complexes which transport the electrons to the cytoplasm where sulfate is reduced. Previous studies have indicated that during its interaction with periplasmic hydrogenases, CycA is also involved in the reduction of toxic metals. Growth of the cycA mutant strain on lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor showed that, despite its abundance, CycA is not essential for DvH growth. However, the rate of growth of the mutant strain was significantly lower, and the extent of growth less, than rates and extents of growth of the wild type and complement strains on lactate/sulfate medium. This indicates that a portion of the electrons generated from cytoplasmic lactate oxidation are transported by CycA for energy production, possibly in a hydrogen cycling mechanism employed to generate ATP. Failure of the mutant strain to grow on either formate or H2, with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors, further indicated that CycA may be the only redox partner of periplasmic hydrogenases. The cycA mutant strain also did not grow as well as either the wild type or complement strains on medium supplemented with pyruvate/sulfate. Final growth on pyruvate/sulfate was comparable, but the mutant grew more slowly than the wild type and complement strains. Interestingly, the mutant grew better than the wild type or complement strains on pyruvate alone, possibly due to the release of H2 and/or CO2 in concentrations which may be somewhat inhibitory to wild type growth.

Semkiw, Elizabeth; Zane, Grant; Wall, Judy

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.  

SciTech Connect

Developing quantum chemistry programs on the coming generation of exascale computers will be a difficult task. The programs will need to be fault-tolerant and minimize the use of global operations. This work explores the use a task-based model that uses a data-centric approach to allocate work to different processes as it applies to quantum chemistry. After introducing the key problems that appear when trying to parallelize a complicated quantum chemistry method such as coupled-cluster theory, we discuss the implications of that model as it pertains to the computational kernel of a coupled-cluster program - matrix multiplication. Also, we discuss the extensions that would required to build a full coupled-cluster program using the task-based model. Current programming models for high-performance computing are fault-intolerant and use global operations. Those properties are unsustainable as computers scale to millions of CPUs; instead one must recognize that these systems will be hierarchical in structure, prone to constant faults, and global operations will be infeasible. The FAST-OS HARE project is introducing a scale-free computing model to address these issues. This model is hierarchical and fault-tolerant by design, allows for the clean overlap of computation and communication, reducing the network load, does not require checkpointing, and avoids the complexity of many HPC runtimes. Development of an algorithm within this model requires a change in focus from imperative programming to a data-centric approach. Quantum chemistry (QC) algorithms, in particular electronic structure methods, are an ideal test bed for this computing model. These methods describe the distribution of electrons in a molecule, which determine the properties of the molecule. The computational cost of these methods is high, scaling quartically or higher in the size of the molecule, which is why QC applications are major users of HPC resources. The complexity of these algorithms means that MPI alone is insufficient to achieve parallel scaling; QC developers have been forced to use alternative approaches to achieve scalability and would be receptive to radical shifts in the programming paradigm. Initial work in adapting the simplest QC method, Hartree-Fock, to this the new programming model indicates that the approach is beneficial for QC applications. However, the advantages to being able to scale to exascale computers are greatest for the computationally most expensive algorithms; within QC these are the high-accuracy coupled-cluster (CC) methods. Parallel coupledcluster programs are available, however they are based on the conventional MPI paradigm. Much of the effort is spent handling the complicated data dependencies between the various processors, especially as the size of the problem becomes large. The current paradigm will not survive the move to exascale computers. Here we discuss the initial steps toward designing and implementing a CC method within this model. First, we introduce the general concepts behind a CC method, focusing on the aspects that make these methods difficult to parallelize with conventional techniques. Then we outline what is the computational core of the CC method - a matrix multiply - within the task-based approach that the FAST-OS project is designed to take advantage of. Finally we outline the general setup to implement the simplest CC method in this model, linearized CC doubles (LinCC).

Taube, Andrew Garvin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Use of Automated External Defibrillators  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to improve survival from cardiac arrest, the American Heart Association (AHA) has promoted the Chain of Survival concept, describing a sequence of prehospital steps that result in improved survival after sudden cardiac arrest. These interventions include immediate deployment of emergency medical services, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation when indicated, and early initiation of advanced medical care. Early defibrillation has emerged as the most important intervention with survival decreasing by 10% with each minute of delay in defibrillation. Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) is a condition in which there is uncoordinated contraction of the heart cardiac muscle of the ventricles in the heart, making them tremble rather than contract properly. VF is a medical emergency and if the arrhythmia continues for more than a few seconds, blood circulation will cease, and death can occur in a matter of minutes. During VF, contractions of the heart are not synchronized, blood flow ceases, organs begin to fail from oxygen deprivation and within 10 minutes, death will occur. When VF occurs, the victim must be defibrillated in order to establish the hearts normal rhythm. On average, the wait for an ambulance in populated areas of the United States is about 11 minutes. In view of these facts, the EFCOG Electrical Safety Task Group initiated this review to evaluate the potential value of deployment and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for treatment of SCA victims. This evaluation indicates the long term survival benefit to victims of SCA is high if treated with CPR plus defibrillation within the first 3-5 minutes after collapse. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), survival rates as high as 74% are possible if treatment and defibrillation is performed in the first 3 minutes. In contrast survival rates are only 5% where no AED programs have been established to provide prompt CPR and defibrillation. ["CPR statistics" American Heart Association] Early intervention with both CPR and defibrillation can result in high long-term survival rates for SCA, as demonstrated by a study investigating the beneficial effects of AED devices at Chicagos OHare and Midway airports. The American Medical Association (AMA) advocates the widespread placement of AEDs [AMA Res. 413, A-02; Res. 424, A-04]; supports increasing government and industry funding for the purchase of AED devices; and encourages the American public to become trained in CPR and the use of AEDs. Some states, including Maryland, have enacted legislation requiring AED devices and a certified responder be available at high school and school-sponsored athletic events due the risk of SCA to athletes (the most common cause of death in young athletes). Ensuring AED availability at Department of Energy (DOE) sites would serve as a means of preventative intervention for over 14,000 DOE employees and 193,000 contract workers. It is estimated 1 per 1,000 adults 35 years of age and older will experience SCA in a given year.

Gregory K Christensen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2000 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2000 the Nez Perce Tribe released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 36% of the 1999 number. The wild chinook catch was 34% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 121% of 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 139% of 1999 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 689 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2000, the Snake River trap captured 40 hatchery and 92 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 159 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 16. There were no down days due to high flows or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 96%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 66% of 1999 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 90% of the 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 147% of the previous years catch. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 22. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon, there was a 3.0 and 16.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead, there was a 2.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. The statistical analysis could not detect a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for wild steelhead in 2000. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery chinook salmon at the 0.05 level of significance and at the 0.1 level of significance for wild chinook salmon. Migration rate increased 3.2- and 1.9-fold, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 57% for hatchery chinook, 65% for wild chinook, 73% for hatchery steelhead and 71% for wild steelhead. Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were 53% for hatchery chinook, 64% for wild chinook salmon, 68% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 65% for wild steelhead trout.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

New York | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all times and to comply with Department inquiries for information on the status of a given dam. October 16, 2013 Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers in New York State, except

415

GRR/Section 17-FD-b - WSR FERC Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-FD-b - WSR FERC Process 7-FD-b - WSR FERC Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-FD-b - WSR FERC Process 17FDBWSRFERCProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies National Park Service United States Forest Service Bureau of Land Management Fish and Wildlife Service Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations & Policies Wild and Scenic Rivers Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17FDBWSRFERCProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act prohibits the Federal Energy Regulatory

416

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO SUPPORT MILITARY ENERGY GOALS May 30-31, 2013 WILD HORSE PASS HOTEL AND CASINO 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd. Chandler, Arizona The seventh in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum is designed to provide information for western U.S. tribal leaders and military leaders on the renewable energy resource development potential on tribal lands, and the opportunities for partnerships between tribes and military installations to promote energy development on tribal lands to achieve military energy security goals. Tribal leaders will also have the opportunity to directly converse with each other and key military leadership by participating in a roundtable discussion to

417

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N. Mariana Islands - Renewables Portfolio Standard N. Mariana Islands - Renewables Portfolio Standard The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands enacted its Renewables Portfolio Standard in September 2007, in which a certain percentage of its net electricity sales must come from renewable energy. Under the law, the Commonwealth Utilities Corporation (the Islands' only and semi-autonomous public utility provider) must meet the following benchmarks: * 10% of net electricity sales by December 31, 2008 * 20% of net electricity sales by December 31, 2010 * 40% of net electricity sales by December 31, 2012 * 80% of net electricity sales by December 31, 2014 October 16, 2013 Myakka River Wild and Scenic Designation and Preservation Act (Florida) The Myakka was designated as the state's only "Florida Wild and Scenic

418

Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE-it gets into DOE's system and becomes a budget line item as well  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICEIWG ICEIWG May 29, 2013 WILD HORSE PASS HOTEL & CASINO 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler, AZ AGENDA CONFERENCE ROOM: ACACIA CD WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013 8:00-9:00am REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST ** Continental breakfast will be provided on-site. ** 9:00-11:00am WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS Opening Prayer by ICEIWG Tribal Representative Tracey A. LeBeau, Director, U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy (IE) & DOE ICEIWG Co-Chair Jim Manion, Warm Springs Delegate & Tribal ICEIWG Co-Chair Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, DOE-IE ICEIWG Members - Current & New Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon: Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power General Manager Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians: William Micklin, CEO Gila River Indian Community: Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community

419

Proposed Action Title: (0470-1517) Donald Danforth Plant Science Center -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(0470-1517) Donald Danforth Plant Science Center - (0470-1517) Donald Danforth Plant Science Center - Center for Enahnced Camelina Oil Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Location(s) (City/County/State): Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of genetically modified (GM) camelina that grows at an increased yield and produces more seed oil than wild- type camelina for use as a biofuel feedstock. Proposed work will consist of (1) genetically modifying camelina to improve carbon capturel assimilation and light utilization, and to redirect carbon flux towards seed oil synthesis, including synthesis of oleic acid; (2) fabricating and testing phenomics chambers used to analyze plant metabolism under varying conditions (e.g. humidity, temperature); (3) growing selected lines of non-GM, wild-type camelina in contained

420

fulltext.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIOENERGY BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum Xiongjun Shao & Babu Raman & Mingjun Zhu & Jonathan R. Mielenz & Steven D. Brown & Adam M. Guss & Lee R. Lynd Received: 3 June 2011 / Revised: 6 July 2011 / Accepted: 15 July 2011 # Springer-V erlag 2011 Abstract Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorgan- ism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum A TCC 27405

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

422

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Empirical Empirical performance modeling of GPU kernels using active learning 1 Prasanna Balaprakash 2 , Karl Rupp 2 , Azamat Mametjanov 2 , Robert B. Gramacy 3 , Paul D. Hovland 2 , Stefan M. Wild 2 Mathematics and Computer Science Division Preprint ANL/MCS-P4097-0713 July 2013 1 Support for this work was provided through the SciDAC program funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. 2 Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 3 Booth School of Business, University of Chicago Empirical performance modeling of GPU kernels using active learning Prasanna Balaprakash 1 , Karl Rupp 1 , Azamat Mametjanov 1 Robert B. Gramacy 2 , Paul D. Hovland 1 , Stefan M. Wild 1 Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439

423

The Life Span of Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Span of Animals Span of Animals Nature Bulletin No. 486-A March 24, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE LIFE SPAN OF ANIMALS Signs of senility, or extreme old age, are seldom seen in the wild. Animals living under natural conditions rarely approach their maximum possible age because of very high death rates due to infant mortality, diseases, predators, bad weather, accidents, or competition for food and shelter. For this reason, most of the reliable information about the length of the life span comes from zoos, where accurate records are kept and animals live under conditions almost ideally suited to prolong life. A mouse whose life is measured in months in the wild can survive years of captivity.

424

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MATCH Program (North Dakota) MATCH Program (North Dakota) The MATCH Program supports the funding needs of a borrower whose financial capacity is very strong. The borrower must have a long-term credit rating of BBB or better as determined by a national rating agency. The Bank of North Dakota offers an interest rate .25% to .50% over an equivalent U.S. Treasury Note. The rate can be fixed for as long as five years. October 16, 2013 Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) The lower portion of the St. Croix River in Minnesota and Wisconsin is regulated under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Program. Most new residential, commercial, and industrial uses are prohibited, riverway lands are protected by acreage, frontage, and setback requirements, and affected municipalities are required to adopt zoning ordinances in the spirit of

425

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 16220 of 28,905 results. 11 - 16220 of 28,905 results. Rebate Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) The State aims to preserve and protect Minnesota rivers and adjacent lands with outstanding scenic, recreational, natural, historical, scientific and similar values. Chapter 103F defines... http://energy.gov/savings/scenic-river-protection-policy-minnesota-wild-and-scenic-rivers-act-minnesota Rebate Soil Conservation Districts Law (North Dakota) This chapter aims to provide for the conservation of the soil and soil resources of this state and for the control and prevention of soil erosion, and to preserve the state's natural resources,... http://energy.gov/savings/soil-conservation-districts-law-north-dakota Rebate Soil Erosion (Minnesota)

426

EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of 5: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho Summary DOE's Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would be used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA includes a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis.

427

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Performance modeling for exascale autotuning: An integrated approach ∗ Prasanna Balaprakash, Stefan M. Wild, and Paul D. Hovland Mathematics and Computer Science Division Preprint ANL/MCS-P5000-0813 July 2013 ∗ Support for this work was provided through the SciDAC program funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. 1 Performance modeling for exascale autotuning: An integrated approach Prasanna Balaprakash ∗ , Stefan M. Wild, and Paul D. Hovland Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 The usual suspects-shrinking integrated circuit feature sizes, heterogeneous nodes with many- core processors, deep memory hierarchies, an ever-present power wall, energy efficiency demands, and resiliency concerns-make exascale

428

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2013 29, 2013 V-144: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer A vulnerability was reported in HP Printers. April 26, 2013 V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild Java issues are being exploited in the wild by exploit kits, with Cool and Redkit specifically being known to use these bugs, and others likely to follow shortly. April 25, 2013 V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code A vulnerability was reported in Oracle Java. April 24, 2013 V-141: HP ElitePad 900 Secure Boot Bug Lets Local Users Boot to Other Operating Systems A vulnerability was reported in HP ElitePad 900 April 19, 2013 V-138: Red Hat update for icedtea-web This fixes two vulnerabilities, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions

429

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2004 5, 2004 Calendar Thursday, February 5 2:30 Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: S. Fleming, Carnegie Mellon University Title: Lessons from Soft-Collinear Effective Theory 3:30 DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - 1 West Speaker: K. Shepard, Argonne National Laboratory Title: Superconducting RF Technology for Ion Accelerators Friday, February 6 3:30 DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 Joint Experimental Theoretical Physics Seminar - 1 West Speaker: R. Jaffe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Title: Exotica Cafeteria Wednesday, February 4 Wild Mushroom Bisque Baked lemon rosemary chicken w/wild rice and choice of vegetable $4.75 Turkey, roast beef and smoked bacon w/cheddar cheese on your choice of bread served w/a side salad $4.75

430

EA-1895: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Draft Environmental Assessment 5: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1895: Draft Environmental Assessment Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho DOE's Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would be used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA includes a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis. EA-1895-DEA-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications

431

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Trüssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G König-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

432

Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) January 26, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICEIWG January 26, 2012 GILA RIVER INDIAN COMMUNITY Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino 5040 Wild Horse Pass Boulevard Chandler, AZ 85226 (520) 796-7272 Action Items DRAFT PURCHASING POLICY GUIDANCE  The draft policy guidance was distributed to ICEIWG at the Portland meeting in October 2011. IE is accepting comments from ICEIWG as they arise.  The goal is to get final comments and to work through the internal review process. Once that is finalized, it will go through the formal leadership review process so that it can be published as draft policy guidance. This will kick-off formal consultations with tribes. IE would like to get the draft out to Indian country for comment and consultation by the end of February.  IE will send out a "Dear Tribal Leader" letter in regards to the consultations to all tribes and will

433

Microsoft Word - Searchlight Wind Energy Project_FEIS_December 2012_no Appendicies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments | A Comments | A State Agency State A Agency Comments s |1 State A Agency Comments s |2 State A Agency Comments s |3 State A Agency Comments s |4 Comment noted. State A Agency Comments s |5 State A Agency Comments s |6 State A Agency Comments s |7 State A Agency Comments s |8 MM-VIS-5 in Se to incorporate the ection 4.9.4-Mitiga ese suggestions, as State A ation Measures has s appropriate. Agency Comments been updated s |9 Information on N Overdimensional Potential Federal Nevada Department l Vehicle Permit w l, State, and Local P State Ag t of Transportation was added to Table Permits for the Pro gency Comments n 1.6-2. oposed Project. |10 Chuckwalla was corrected. Section 3.4.4-Spe Section 3.4.4-Spe Table 3.4-3 has b added to the list. S ecial-Status Wildli ecial-Status Wildli

434

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 17270 of 28,905 results. 61 - 17270 of 28,905 results. Download HC Organization Chart PDF version of the HC Organizational chart http://energy.gov/hc/downloads/hc-organization-chart Download JOBAID-SELF-RECORDING LEARNING EVENT The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of self-recording items and external learning events. http://energy.gov/hc/downloads/jobaid-self-recording-learning-event Download 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Loan Program Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Loan Program Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/2013-annual-planning-summary-loan-program-office Article V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild Java issues are being exploited in the wild by exploit kits, with Cool and Redkit specifically being known to use these bugs, and others likely to

435

TRPM channels are required for rhythmicity in the ultradian defecation rhythm of C. elegans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.V.) but not the period is altered. A: The mean period for each population of worms and the mean coefficient of variation (C.V.). Error bars are SEM. B: The period of 15 consecutive defecation cycles for representative controls (a-e) and gon-2(RNAi);gtl-1(RNAi) (f- j... al , s ec Cycle number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11121314 15 Wild-type + cat (control) De fe ca tio n in te rv al , s ec Cycle number Wild-type + gon-2;gtl-1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11121314 15 B f h j i g 0 60 120 0 60 120 0 60 120 0 60 120 0 60 120 e 0...

Kwan, Claire S M; Vazquez-Manrique, Rafael P; Ly, Sung; Goyal, Kshamata; Baylis, Howard A

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

Development of innovative techniques and principles that may be used as models to improve plant performance. Technical progress report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods and techniques for transferring germplasm from wild to cultivated species are being developed. The transferred germplasm is being shown to be valuable in plant breeding and in cultivar development. Forty cytoplasms from the wild grassy subspecies monodii (primary gene pool) of Pennisetum glaucum are being tested for cytoplasmic effects on morphological characteristics and forage yield. A`-genome chromosomes from P. purpureum (secondary gene pool) have been transferred to cultivated pearl millet. The A`-chromosome derived lines have been developed into excellent male pollinator lines to produce a new high quality, high yielding grain hybrid for the US. Significant progress is being made in transferring the genes controlling apomixis (to produce true-breeding hybrids) from the tertiary gene pool to cultivated pearl millet. Backcross-4 plants are more pearl millet-like and reproduce by apomixis. New genome combinations have been produced in the apomixis genes transfer program which demonstrate the impact of apomixis on speciation and evolution.

Hanna, W.W.; Burton, G.W.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Klickitat Only Monitoring and Evaluation, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The monitoring and evaluation activities described in this report were determined by consensus of the scientists from the Yakama Nation (YN). Klickitat Subbasin Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of YKFP's Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP project biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - Accurately characterize baseline available habitat and salmonid populations pre-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) EDT Modeling - Identify and evaluate habitat and artificial production enhancement options. (3) Genetics - Characterize the genetic profile of wild steelhead in the Klickitat Basin. (4) Ecological Interactions - Determine the presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information.

Sampson, Melvin; Evenson, Rolf

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1998 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by relatively moderate spring flows and spill, moderate levels of debris, cool spring, warm summer and fall water temperatures, and increased chinook numbers, particularly wild subyearling chinook collected and transported. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database on fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Price and Load Forecasting in Volatile Energy Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With daily news stories about wildly fluctuating electricity prices and soaring natural gas prices, forecasters' responsibilities are expanding, visibility is increasing, and pressure exists to produce more frequent forecasts and more kinds of forecasts. The proceedings of EPRI's 13th Forecasting Symposium, held November 13-15 in Nashville, Tennessee, address current forecasting issues and developments, as well as explain the role that forecasters have played in recent events in energy markets.

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Field Guide: Transmission Line Aerial Marking and Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission lines and wild birds must co-exist. Power lines traverse birds' flight routes, birds commonly roost on lines and poles, and birds make their neststhe largest of which weigh thousands of poundson transmission structures. Some avian activities can have deleterious effects on outdoor structures and transmissionfor example, nests have been known to collapse and span critical clearances during storms, resulting in outages. Accordingly, it is important for ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Constitutively Phosphorylated Guanylyl Cyclaselinked Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Mutant Is Resistant to Desensitization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dephosphorylation of the natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is hypothesized to mediate its desensitization in response to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding. Recently, we identified six phosphorylation sites within the kinase homology domain of NPR-A and determined that the conversion of these residues to alanine abolished the ability of the receptor to be phosphorylated or to be activated by ANP and ATP. In an attempt to generate a form of NPR-A that mimics a fully phosphorylated receptor but that is resistant to dephosphorylation, we engineered a receptor variant (NPR-A-6E) containing glutamate substitutions at all six phosphorylation sites. Consistent with the known ability of negatively charged glutamate residues to substitute functionally, in some cases, for phosphorylated residues, we found that NPR-A-6E was activated 10-fold by ANP and ATP. As determined by guanylyl cyclase assays, the hormone-stimulated activity of the wild-type receptor declined over time in membrane preparations in vitro, and this loss was blocked by the serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor microcystin. In contrast, the activity of NPR-A-6E was more linear with time and was unaffected by microcystin. The nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue adenosine 5?-(?,?-imino)triphosphate was half as effective as ATP in stimulating the wild-type receptor but was equally as potent in stimulating NPR-A-6E, suggesting that ATP is required to keep the wild-type but not 6E variant phosphorylated. Finally, the desensitization of NPR-A-6E in whole cells was markedly blunted compared with that of the wild-type receptor, consistent with its inability to shed the negative charge from its kinase homology domain via dephosphorylation. These data provide the first direct test of the requirement for dephosphorylation in guanylyl cyclase desensitization and they indicate that it is an essential component of this process.

Lincoln R. Potter; Tony Hunter

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Field Guide: Visual Inspection of Avian Issues on Transmission and Distribution Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission lines and wild birds must co-exist. Power lines traverse birds' flight routes, birds commonly roost on lines and poles, and birds make their neststhe largest of which weigh thousands of poundson transmission structures. Some avian activities can have deleterious effects on outdoor structures and transmissionfor example, nests have been known to collapse and span critical clearances during storms, resulting in outages. Accordingly, it is important for ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Social network analysis of behavioural interactions influencing the development of fin damage in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as in mammals and other animals (Lynn, 1994, Sneddon, 2003a , Sneddon , 2003 b). However, central nervous system structures differ from those of mammals in spatial distribution and degree of development (Sloman et al., 2005 , Sneddon et al., 2003 ). B... (Huntingford and Turner, 1987 , Krebs and Davis, 1978 , Smith and Price, 1973 ). One of the main causes of aggressive behaviour is dispute over boundaries by wild animals where the concepts of individual space? and social space? has been widely recognised...

Caon Jones, Hernn Alberto

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

Field Guide: Visual Inspection of Avian Issues on Transmission and Distribution Structures (Hard Copy and Standard PDF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission lines and wild birds must co-exist. Power lines traverse birds' flight routes, birds commonly roost on lines and poles, and birds make their neststhe largest of which weigh thousands of poundson transmission structures. Some avian activities can have deleterious effects on outdoor structures and transmissionfor example, nests have been known to collapse and span critical clearances during storms, resulting in outages. Accordingly, it is important for ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

nature genetics volume 28 july 2001 241 Functional analysis of secreted and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, somitogenesis is perturbed as revealed by in situ hybridization with the somite marker Mox1 (Fig. 3g). Mutant, disorganized somites, as revealed by Mox1 expression at E8.5 (g, bottom; compare with wild type, top, ventral-independent ES cell lines and the Oct4 probe, C. Wright for the Mox1 probe, J. Gladden for his help on the PST9

Goodrich, Lisa V.

448

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

SciTech Connect

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

DIRECTRECOVERYRATESOF LESSERSCAUPBANDEDIN NORTHWESTMINNESOTA:SOURCESOFHETEROGENEITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildli{'e Management Area (TLWMA) and Agassiz National Wildlif'e Iiefirge (ANWR) in northwestem Minnesota, and released drrring 4 ()ctober 8 Novernber l9u3-u6 at TLWMA, and l9lJ436 at ANWR. Drrring l9fl4-f16, we also captrrre; (3) scaup at TLWMA were recovtrrecl at greater rates than scaup at ANWR; (4) hatching-year (IIY

Afton, Alan D.

451

www.frontiersin.org September 2010 | Volume 1 | Article 36 | 1 Original research article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildli{'e Management Area (TLWMA) and Agassiz National Wildlif'e Iiefirge (ANWR) in northwestem Minnesota, and released drrring 4 ()ctober 8 Novernber l9u3-u6 at TLWMA, and l9lJ436 at ANWR. Drrring l9fl4-f16, we also captrrre; (3) scaup at TLWMA were recovtrrecl at greater rates than scaup at ANWR; (4) hatching-year (IIY

Allman, John M.

452

Evaluation of Infrasound and Strobe Lights to Elicit Avoidance Behavior in Juvenile Salmon and Char.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental tests were conducted using hatchery reared and wild juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, eastern brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, and rainbow trout O. mykiss to determine specific behavior responses to infrasound (<20 Hz) and flashing strobe lights. Caged fish were acclimated in a static test tank and their behavior was recorded using low light cameras. Species specific behavior was characterized by measuring movements of the fish within the cage as well as observing startle and habituation responses. Wild chinook salmon (40-45 mm) and hatchery reared chinook salmon (45-50mm) exhibited avoidance responses when initially exposed to a 10 Hz volume displacement source. Rainbow and eastern brook trout (25-100 mm) did not respond with avoidance or other behaviors to infrasound. Habituation to the infrasound source was evident for chinook salmon during repeated exposures. Wild and hatchery chinook displayed a higher proportion of movement during the initial exposures to infrasound when the acclimation period in the test tank was 2-3 h as compared to a 12-15 h acclimation period. A flashing strobe light produced higher and more consistent movement rates in wild chinook (60% of the tests); hatchery reared chinook salmon (50%) and rainbow trout (80%). No measurable movement or other responses was observed for eastern brook trout. Little if any habituation was observed during repeated exposures to strobe lights. Results from this study indicate that consistent repeatable responses can be elicited from some fish using high intensity strobe lights under a controlled laboratory testing. The specific behaviors observed in these experiments might be used to predict how fish might react to low frequency sound and strobe lights in a screening facility. Because sub-yearling salmonids and resident species are susceptible from becoming entrained at water diversion structures we conducted tests in conjunction with our evaluation of juvenile fish screening facilities. This is the reason our tests focused on fry life stages.

Mueller, Robert, P.; Neitzel, Duane A.; Amidan, Brett G.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

MINOR DIVISION LEAGUE A LEAGUE B LEAGUE C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEAGUE P LEAGUE Q LEAGUE R Bumble Bee Tuna 4 0 Dime Droppers 4 0 Rack Of Lamb 4 0 Sofa King 3 1 Run-N-Gun Wizards 1 3 Penguins 1 4 Wild Stallions 0 5 #12;LEAGUE AA LEAGUE BB LEAGUE CC The Starr's 3 0 Run-N-Gun 4 Da Warriors 0 4 LEAGUE GG Sale's Abusement Park 3 0 America's Team 2 1 Twenty One Nickel 2 2 Pickle

Yener, Aylin

454

Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 2008 Annual Report : October 2007 - September 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 2008. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on seventeen complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on fifteen complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) subbasin wild summer and winter steelhead smolt production, (4) numbers of hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts leaving the subbasin; (5) smolt migration timing past Bonneville Dam, (6) wild and hatchery steelhead smolt-to-adult survival rates; (7) wild summer and winter steelhead egg to smolt survival rates; and (8) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP relative to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids (see Ardren Draft), (2) evaluate the HRPP's progress towards achieving the biological fish objectives defined in the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) and the Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program (HDR|FishPro, ODFW, and CTWSRO 2008), (3) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (4) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity.

Reagan, Robert E.; Olsen, Erik A. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Selective detection of inactivating mutations of the p53 tumour suppressor gene: Development of a new functional assay in yeast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alterations of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in human cancer are mainly missense mutations. We have previously described a functional assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on a HIS3 reporter system, which allows the selective detection of mutations which have inactivated the transcriptional activity of p53. We have now developed a simpler reporter system in which yeast change color according to their p53 status. We used an ade2-1 strain which contains an intergrated copy of the ADE2 open reading frame controlled by a p53-sensitive promoter. In the absence of wild-type p53, the strain is red due to the accumulation of an intermediate in adenine metabolism. As in the previous assay, we transform PCR-amplified p53 cDNA directly into the strain and clone them into a p53 expression vector by homologous recombination in vivo. Colonies that contain wild-type p53 overcome the block in adenine synthesis and become white. After two days, the white/red system allows to distinguish very easily wild-type and mutant p53 alleles. This new assay is a simple and rapid method to detect inactivating p53 mutations in clinical samples.

Frebourg, T.; Flaman, J.M. [CHU de Rouen (France); Iggo, R. [ISREC, Epalinges (Switzerland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Use of Metronidazole to Isolate Nif- Mutants of Rhodupseudurnonas capsulata, and the Identification of a Mutant with Altered Regulatory Properties of Nitrogenase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metronidazole (2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole- 1-ethanol) was used to select nitrogen fixation (Nif-) mutants of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, either by enrichment with metronidazole, or by direct selection on agar medium containing the drug. By the latter method, approximately 50 % of the isolates obtained were Nif-. Several Nif- mutants showed the phenotype expected for mutants defective in electron transport to nitrogenase: their nitrogenase activity (determined as rate of acetylene reduction) relative to that of the wild-type strain was higher when assayed in toluenetreated cells in the presence of dithionite, than when assayed in resting cell suspensions with DLmalate as source of electrons. Glutamate-grown cells of one such mutant (RC5) resembled N-starved cells of the wild-type, and differed from glutamate-grown cells of the wild type in that nitrogenase activity in toluene-treated cells was unaffected by the addition of Mn2+ and the rate of H2 production by resting cell suspensions was significantly higher than the rate of acetylene reduction. These observations implied that glutamate-grown cells of the mutant contained predominantly nitrogenase A, the form of nitrogenase which is independent of the Mn2+dependent membrane-bound activating factor, suggesting that the mutant may be affected in the interconversion of nitrogenase between the regulatory forms A and R.

C. Willison; Paulette; M. Vignais

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Transgenic Plants Lower the Costs of Cellulosic Biofuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion. Expression of a single gene derived from bacteria in plants has resulted in transgenic plants that are easier and cheaper to convert into biofuels. Part of the high production cost of cellulosic biofuels is the relatively poor accessibility of substrates to enzymes due to the strong associations between plant cell wall components. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have created transgenic maize expressing an active glycosyl hydrolase enzyme, E1 endoglucanase, originally isolated from a thermophilic bacterium, Acidothermus cellulolyticus. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced severity pretreatments and post-pretreatment enzymatic hydrolysis. This reduction in recalcitrance was manifested through lower severity requirements to achieve comparable levels of conversion of wild-type biomass. The improvements observed are significant enough to positively affect the economics of the conversion process through decreased capital construction costs and decreased degradation products and inhibitor formation.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1989 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1989. Estimated kokanee abundance in late August was 7.71 million fish. Decreased population size is the result of lower hatchery and wild fry recruitment and low age 1+ survival. Lower recruitment of wild fry in 1989 resulted from a smaller parental escapement in 1988 and lower wild fry survival. Six fry release strategies were evaluated in 1989. Two groups were released in Clark Fork River to help improve a spawning run to Cabinet Gorge Hatchery. Survival from the mid-summer release, which was barged down Clark Fork River to avoid low flow problems, was not significantly different from the early release. The final assessment of these release strategies will be evaluated when adults return to Cabinet gorge Hatchery in 1992 and 1993. Fry released to support the Sullivan Springs Creek spawning run also survived will in 1989. Two open-water releases were made during early and mid-summer. 30 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

Hoelscher, Brian

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

In human and non-human primates,...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An impressive body of research has focused on the mechanisms by which the steroid estrogens (E), progestins (P), and glucocorticoids (GC) ensure successful pregnancy. With the advance of non-invasive techniques to measure steroids in urine and feces, steroid hormones are routinely monitored to detect pregnancy in wild mammalian species, but hormone data on fetal loss have been sparse. Here, we examine fecal steroid hormones from five groups of wild yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus) in the Amboseli basin of Kenya to compare the hormones of successful pregnancies to those ending in fetal loss or stillbirth. Using a combination of longitudinal and cross-sectional data, we analyzed three steroid hormones (E, P, GC) and related metabolites from 5 years of fecal samples across 188 pregnancies. Our results document the course of steroid hormone concentrations across successful baboon pregnancy in the wild and demonstrate that fecal estrogens predicted impending fetal loss starting 2 months before the externally observed loss. By also considering an additional 450 pregnancies for which we did not have hormonal data, we determined that the probability for fetal loss for Amboseli baboons was 13.9%, and that fetal mortality occurred throughout gestation (91 losses occurred in 656 pregnancies; rates were the same for pregnancies with and without hormonal data). These results demonstrate that our longstanding method for early detection of pregnancies based on observation of external indicators closely matches hormonal identification of

Jacinta C. Beehner A; Nga Nguyen A; Emmanuel O. Wango B; Susan C. Alberts C; Jeanne Altmann A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild hare gulch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an

Lanjun Zhao; Shuting Jia; Wenru Tang; Jun Sheng; Ying Luo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Raman, Babu [ORNL; Zhu, Mingjun [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Zhu, Mingjun [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Enzyme catalysts for a biotechnology-based chemical industry. Quarterly progress report, September 29--December 28, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to engineer enzymes to be efficient and economically attractive catalysts for the chemical industry. The author is attempting to demonstrate generally-applicable approaches to enzyme improvement as well as develop specific catalysts for potential industrial application. In this report attention is focused on random mutagenesis of pNB esterase -- improved activity and stability. The most thermostable esterases obtained by sequential random mutagenesis (6H7) and random mutagenesis plus recombination (6sF9) each contain 9 amino acid mutations and a number of silent mutations, relative to the wild-type sequence. Eight of the mutations are present in both genes, for a total of ten potentially adaptive mutations. Because several of these mutations occurred in the same generation, it is difficult to identify the mutations responsible for the increases in activity and stability. In order to aid in this identification, the thermostable genes were recombined with the wild-type gene, in hopes of removing neutral mutations. The gene from the first-generation variant, with five amino acid substitutions was also recombined with wild-type.

Arnold, F.H.

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Pyruvate Decarboxylase: An Indispensable Enzyme for Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Glucose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decarboxylase. Replacement mutations in these genes were introduced in a homothallic wild-type strain, using the dominant marker genes APT1 and TnSble. A pyruvate-decarboxylase-negative (Pdc-) mutant lacking all three PDC genes exhibited a three-fold lower growth rate in complex medium with glucose than the isogenic wild-type strain. Growth in batch cultures on complex and defined media with ethanol was not impaired in Pdc- strains. Furthermore, in ethanol-limited chemostat cultures, the biomass yield of Pdc- and wild-type S. cerevisiae were identical. However, Pdc- S. cerevisiue was unable to grow in batch cultures on a defined mineral medium with glucose as the sole carbon source. When aerobic, ethanol-limited chemostat cultures (D = 0.10 h- ') were switched to a feed containing glucose as the sole carbon source, growth ceased after approximately 4 h and, consequently, the cultures washed out. The mutant was, however, able to grow in chemostat cultures on mixtures of glucose and small amounts of ethanol or acetate (5 % on a carbon basis). No growth was observed when such cultures were used to inoculate batch cultures on glucose. Furthermore, when the mixed-substrate cultures were switched to a feed containing glucose as the sole carbon source, wash-out occurred. It is concluded that the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex cannot function as the sole source of acetyl-CoA during growth of S. cerevisiae on glucose, neither in batch cultures nor in glucose-limited chemostat cultures. KEY WORDS- pyruvate decarboxylase; sugar metabolism; Succharomyces cerevisiae; metabolic compartmentation; acetyl-CoA

Marcel T. Flikweertt; Linda Van; Der Zandens; Wouter M. Th. M. Janssent; H. Yde Steensmati; Johannes P. Van; Dijkent; Jack T. Pronkt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Analysis of metabolic flux phenotypes for two Arabidopsis mutants with severe impairment in seed storage lipid synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major storage reserves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds are triacylglycerols (seed oils) and proteins. Seed oil content is severely reduced for the regulatory mutant wrinkled1 (wri1-1; At3g54320) and for a double mutant in two isoforms of plastidic pyruvate kinase (pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}; At5g52920 and At3g22960). Both already biochemically well-characterized mutants were now studied by {sup 13}C metabolic flux analysis of cultured developing embryos based on comparison with their respective genetic wild-type backgrounds. For both mutations, in seeds as well as in cultured embryos, the oil fraction was strongly reduced while the fractions of proteins and free metabolites increased. Flux analysis in cultured embryos revealed changes in nutrient uptakes and fluxes into biomass as well as an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity for both mutations. While in both wild types plastidic pyruvate kinase (PK{sub p}) provides most of the pyruvate for plastidic fatty acid synthesis, the flux through PK{sub p} is reduced in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} by 43% of the wild-type value. In wri1-1, PK{sub p} flux is even more reduced (by 82%), although the genes PKp{beta}{sub 1} and PKp{alpha} are still expressed. Along a common paradigm of metabolic control theory, it is hypothesized that a large reduction in PK{sub p} enzyme activity in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha} has less effect on PK{sub p} flux than multiple smaller reductions in glycolytic enzymes in wri1-1. In addition, only in the wri1-1 mutant is the large reduction in PK{sub p} flux compensated in part by an increased import of cytosolic pyruvate and by plastidic malic enzyme. No such limited compensatory bypass could be observed in pkp{beta}{sub 1}pkp{alpha}.

Lonien, J.; Schwender, J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase  

SciTech Connect

The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat (UNM); (IIT); (UMBI)

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

470

Lake Pend Oreille Fishery Recovery Project, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The elevation of Lake Pend Oreille was kept 1.2 m higher during the winter of 1997-1998 in an attempt to recover the impacted kokanee fishery. This was the second winter of a scheduled three-year test. Hydroacoustic surveys and trawling were conducted in the fall of 1998 to assess the kokanee population. We estimated the abundance of wild and hatchery fry in the lake at 3.71 million by hydroacoustics. These originated from an estimated 11.2 million eggs spawned during the fall of 1997. The survival from wild spawned eggs to wild fry was 9.7%, which is the highest egg-to-fry survival rate on record. This is the strongest indication to date that higher lake levels were having a direct benefit to the kokanee population. By trawling, we found that total kokanee abundance in the lake dropped to a new record low of 2.8 million fish. The number of adult kokanee in the lake was below average: 100,000 age 4 kokanee (100% mature) and 730,000 age 3 kokanee (29% mature). These fish laid an estimated 52.1 million eggs in 1998. Hatchery personnel collected 9.0 million eggs which were cultured, marked by cold branding the otoliths, and the resulting fry stocked into the lake in 1999. Peak counts of spawning kokanee were 5,100 fish on the shoreline and 9,700 fish in tributary streams; unusually high considering the low population in the lake. Opossum shrimp Mysis relicta declined in the southern two sections of the lake but increased in the northern end. Immature and mature shrimp (excluding young-of-the-year [YOY] shrimp) densities averaged 426 shrimp/m{sup 2}. The number of waterfowl using the lake in the winter of 1998-1999 increased from the previous three years to over 30,000 ducks, geese, and swans.

Maiolie, Melo A.; Ament, William J.; Harryman, Bill (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Development of a Markerless Genetic Exchange System in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Its Use in Generating a Strain with Increased Transformation Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); whereas, a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this inframe deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system, that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

Keller, Kimberly L.; Bender, Kelly S.; Wall, Judy D.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

473

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

SciTech Connect

Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Liao, James C [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Development of a Markerless Genetic Exchange System in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Its Use in Generating a Strain with Increased Transformation Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); whereas, a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this inframe deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system, that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

Keller, Kimberly L.; Bender, Kelly S.; Wall, Judy D.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

475

Viruses in laboratory-reared cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae), is a non-native species threatening a variety of native cacti, particularly endangered species of Opuntia (Zimmerman et al. 2001), on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Cactoblastis cactorum populations have expanded from Florida northward along the Atlantic coast as far as Charleston, SC, and westward along the Gulf of Mexico to Dauphin Island, south of Mobile, AL. It is feared that further movement to the west will allow C. cactorum to enter the US desert Southwest and Mexico, particularly the latter. Numerous cactus species, especially those of the genera Opuntia and Nopalea, are native to the U.S. and Mexico. Local economies based on agricultural and horticultural uses of cacti could be devastated by C. cactorum (Vigueras and Portillo 2001). A bi-national control program between the US and Mexico is being developed, utilizing the sterile insect technique (SIT). In the SIT program, newly emerged moths are irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source and released to mate with wild individuals. The radiation dose completely sterilizes the females and partially sterilizes the males. When irradiated males mate with wild females, the F1 progeny of these matings are sterile. In order for the SIT program to succeed, large numbers of moths must be reared from egg to adult on artificial diet in a quarantined rearing facility (Carpenter et al. 2001). Irradiated insects must then be released in large numbers at the leading edge of the invasive population and at times which coincide with the presence of wild individuals available for mating. Mortality from disease in the rearing colony disrupts the SIT program by reducing the numbers of insects available for release.

Marti, O.G.; Myers, R.E.; Carpenter, J.E. [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Protection and Management Research Laboratory, PO Box 748, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States); Styer, E.L. [University of Georgia, Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory, PO Box 1389, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Military Applications Leveraging Tribal Renewable Energy Resources to Support Military Energy Goals May 31-31, 2013 Wild Horse Pass Chandler, AZ Sacred Power Corporation Sacred Power Products 6/24/2013 Sacred Power Corporation Sacred Power Corporation?  Longevity Oldest Native American Solar Company  Diversity Manufacturing & Installation  Experience Over 100 years combined  Products 3 Patented Products  Ethnicity Native American Owned  Reputation Established Government Contractor  Awards Top 100 Companies in US  Flexibility Open to New Ideas 6/24/2013 Sacred Power Corporation About Sacred Power  Design / Manufacturer  8A Contractor  Distribution  Training 6/24/2013 Sacred Power Corporation

477

watchlist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Common Name Scientific Name Date Found Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii * INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans * LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius * SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum * CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata * NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea **u PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata **u SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula **u Forbs ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus * WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa * YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata * BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta ** COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum ** CUP-PLANT Silphium perfoliatum **u NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae ** PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum ** RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium ** STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida **

478

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

479

Price Dispersion on the Internet: Good Firms and Bad Firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Internet firms charge a wide range of prices for homogeneous products, and high-priced firms remain high-priced and low-priced firms remain low-priced over long periods. One explanation is that high-price firms are charging a premium for superior service. An alternative, price-dispersion explanation is that firms vary the prices for informed and uniformed consumers (Salop and Stiglitz, 1977) or serious shoppers and others (Wilde and Schwartz, 1979). The pricing pattern for a digital camera and a flatbed scanner is consistent with the price-dispersion model and inconsistent with the service-premium hypothesis. I.

Kathy Baylis; Jeffrey M. Perloff

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the fact that soluble sugar levels have been postulated to play an important role in the control of a wide variety of plant metabolic and developmental pathways, the mechanisms by which plants respond to soluble sugar levels remain poorly understood. Plant responses to soluble sugar levels are also important in bioenergy production, as plant sugar responses are believed to help regulate both carbon fixation and carbon partitioning. For example, accumulation of soluble sugars, such as sucrose and glucose, in source tissues leads to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis, thereby decreasing rates of carbon fixation. Soluble sugar levels can also affect sink strengths, affecting the rates of accumulation of carbon-based compounds into both particular molecular forms (e.g. carbohydrates versus lipids versus proteins) and particular plant organs and tissues. Mutants of Arabidopsis that are defective in the ability to respond to soluble sugar levels were isolated and used as tools to identify some of the factors involved in plant sugar response. These sugar insensitive (sis) mutants were isolated by screening mutagenized seeds for those that were able to germinate and develop relatively normal shoot systems on media containing 0.3 M glucose or 0.3 M sucrose. At these sugar concentrations, wild-type Arabidopsis germinate and produce substantial root systems, but show little to no shoot development. Twenty-eight sis mutants were isolated during the course of four independent mutant screens. Based on a preliminary characterization of all of these mutants, sis3 and sis6 were chosen for further study. Both of these mutations appear to lie in previously uncharacterized loci. Unlike many other sugar-response mutants, sis3 mutants exhibit a wild-type or near wild-type response in all phytohormone-response assays conducted to date. The sis6-1 mutation is unusual in that it appears to be due to overexpression of a gene, rather than representing a loss of function mutation. Characterization of mutant and wild-type plants has revealed that sugars inhibit breakdown of seed storage lipids. In addition, high concentrations of exogenous sugars largely eliminate the development of mature chloroplasts by developing seedlings. Affymetrix GeneChip experiments have revealed that expression of many plant genes is partially regulated by sugar levels, with approximately two percent of genes exhibiting alterations in steady-state mRNA levels in response to changing sugar concentrations. Ultimately, a better understanding of plant sugar responses may allow improvements in rates of carbon fixation and manipulation of carbon partitioning. These improvements will be needed to help make production of energy from biomass more economically attractive.

Gibson, Susan I.

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options Options for the West Coast Region John Kadyszewski Winrock International Fifth Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration, Alexandria, Virginia May 10, 2006 Reforestation, Forest Management and Reducing Emissions from Uncharacteristically Severe Wild Fires 2 Objectives Shasta County Pilot - Reforestation - about 550,000 acres of rangeland in Shasta County appear to have potential - Fuel treatments to reduce uncharacteristically severe fires - more than 850,000 acres of forest land in Shasta County could benefit - Conservation management on timberlands Lake County Pilot - Fuel treatments to reduce uncharacteristically severe fires - Assess sequestration potential for hybrid poplars Potential for Linkage with Geologic Sequestration Phase II Terrestrial Sequestration Overview

482

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

483

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG May 29, 2013 Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino Chandler, Arizona MEETING OVERVIEW The U.S. Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Indian Energy (IE) h