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  1. Andrew Cherry | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrew Cherry HPC Systems Administration Specialist Andrew Cherry Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 2123 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-4296 acherry@alcf.anl

  2. Cherry A. Murray | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cherry A. Murray About Us Cherry A. Murray - Dean, Harvard University School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Cherry A. Murray Cherry A. Murray is Dean of Harvard University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and Professor of Physics. Previously, Murray served as principal associate director for science and technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 2004-2009 and was president of the

  3. Guidelines for management of noxious weeds at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, R.C.; Malady, M.B.

    1995-10-27

    Integrated Pest Management Services is responsible for management and control of noxious weeds on the Hanford Site. Weed species and populations are prioritized and objective defined, according to potential site and regional impact. Population controls are implemented according to priority. An integrated approach is planned for noxious weed control in which several management options are considered and implemented separately or in coordination to best meet management objectives. Noxious weeds are inventories and monitored to provide information for planning and program review.

  4. J. Cherry & Sons: Hot, Humid climate Region 40+% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    This case study describes highly efficient features of homes built by Cherry & Sons Home Builders in Port Saint Lucie, Florida.

  5. EIS-0349: Cherry Point Co-generation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to support BP West Coast Products, LLC proposal to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery.

  6. Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cherry Fork is a village in Adams County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 2nd congressional district.12 References ...

  7. NREL's Keith Emery Awarded Prestigious Cherry Award - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL NREL's Keith Emery Awarded Prestigious Cherry Award Top PV award goes to researcher who brought credibility to testing of solar cells and modules June 19, 2013 An engineer from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) whose testing and characterization laboratory brings credibility to the measurement of efficiency of solar cells and modules has been awarded the prestigious William R. Cherry Award by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  8. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  9. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  10. Bonneville Power Administration, Lower Columbia Region: Noxious Weed Management, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR; Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program

    1996-01-01

    During the 1996 season ODA executed the contract between BPA and ODA. Execution of this contract included the following activities: Survey for target noxious weeds, such as Gorse; collection and redistribution of biological control agents, for example, Apion seed weevils for Scotch broom, bioagents for diffuse and spotted knapweed, Gorse spider mite, and gall fly releases for control of Canada thistle and bull thistle; and control of isolated infestations of Gorse on BPA rights-of-way. Training was provided for line crews at the Chemawa, Alevy and North Bend districts. The purpose of the program is to assist BPA in the integrated prevention and control of noxious weed species on BPA transmission line maintenance right-of-ways.

  11. Boron Boosts Graphene's Sensitivity to Noxious Gases | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Boron Boosts Graphene's Sensitivity to Noxious Gases Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 07.20.16 Boron Boosts

  12. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people's perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  13. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people`s perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  14. Dr. Cherry Murray Confirmed as Director of the Office of Science

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Cherry Murray confirmed by the Senate on Thursday, December 10, 2015 as Director of the Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

  15. NREL's Jerry Olson Wins Prestigious Cherry Award from IEEE - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL NREL's Jerry Olson Wins Prestigious Cherry Award from IEEE Physicist pioneered multi-junction cells for space craft and for terrestrial uses June 20, 2011 Golden, Colo. A physicist from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) who was a pioneer in multi-junction solar cells for use in outer space and on Earth has been awarded the prestigious Cherry Award by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Jerry Olson, a principal

  16. NREL's Sarah Kurtz Wins Prestigious Cherry Award from IEEE - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL NREL's Sarah Kurtz Wins Prestigious Cherry Award from IEEE Physicist helps advance solar industry with multi-junction cell, Concentrating PV June 7, 2012 Sarah Kurtz Sarah Kurtz A physicist from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) who helped launch super-efficient multi-junction solar cells and who is a leader in photovoltaic (PV) systems reliability has been awarded the prestigious Cherry Award by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics

  17. Cherry Creek High School Wins Colorado Science Bowl - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Chernobyl, Ukraine A catastrophic nuclear accident occurs at Chernobyl Reactor #4 in the then Soviet Republic of Ukraine

    Cherry Creek High School Wins Colorado Science Bowl Greenwood Village School Heads to Washington D.C. to Challenge for National Title January 28, 2012 Golden, Colo., Jan. 28, 2012 - Students from Cherry Creek High School won the Colorado High School Science Bowl today. The school will go on to the 22nd

  18. BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-09-19

    BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Cherri Schmidt Working with National Labs.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE's National Laboratories Cherri J Schmidt Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program 28 April 2015 Overview * National Laboratories as Engines of Innovation * Several Partnership Mechanisms * A Few Rules of Engagement * Getting Started 4/30/2015 CSchmidt | Working with National Labs 2 National Laboratories as Engines of Innovation *Leveraging Unique Skills (SPP) *Partnering to Advance Technology (CRADA) *Driving New Jobs and New Industries (Procurement) *Leveraging Unique Facilities

  20. Wild Rose Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wild Rose Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Wild Rose Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory...

  1. PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Scott Hickman

    2002-06-01

    Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

  2. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  3. NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (45) Apply Africa filter...

  4. Hog wild | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hog wild Hog wild Posted: May 7, 2014 - 5:28pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 2 | 2014 Tennessee inventor Jake Gish, winner of the third annual Y-12 Innovation Competition, has it out for feral hogs, and with good reason. Originally found across much of Europe and Asia, the beasts, which are the size of small bears, have wreaked havoc on humans since at least the Middle Ages. The wild boars have since expanded their territory and in the past few decades have become increasingly prevalent - and

  5. Interagency Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council's WSRA...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to use the flowcharts created by the Interagency Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council. Author The Interagency Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council Published The...

  6. Wild Horse Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse Wind Power Project Facility Wild Horse Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  7. Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Authors: ...

  8. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (1968) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (1968) The National Wild and Scenic Rivers System was created by Congress in 1968 (Public Law 90-542; 16 U.S.C. 1271 et seq.) to preserve certain rivers ...

  9. Wild Horse II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse II Wind Farm Facility Wild Horse II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  10. Reservoir characterization of a Permian Slope Fan/basin-floor fan complex: Cherry Canyon Formation, Ward County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spain, D.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The Cherry Canyon Formation consists of a 925-ft- (280-m) thick section of up to 25 different sandstone and siltstone units that were deposited in a deep-water environment in the Delaware basin. Lowstand sedimentation by fluid density currents with periodic turbidity currents resulted in a broad-migrating channelized slope fan/basin-floor fan complex interpreted to exhibit an intricate reservoir geometry. Thirteen lithofacies are identified. Primary reservoirs are found in massive channel sandstones, and beds of lesser reservoir quality are present in laminated overbank/interchannel sandstones. Original depositional fabric modified by diagenetic cements and authigenic clays created three petrophysical rock types. Type I reservoirs contain intergranular macroporosity relatively free of carbonate cement and authigenic clay. Types II and III reservoirs contain mesoporosity and abundant microporosity created by moderate to abundant carbonate cementation and plugging of pore throats by authigenic grain-coating chlorite and pore-bridging fibrous illite. Depositional and diagenetic factors combine with insufficient oil column height to yield low initial oil saturations that decrease with depth in a hydrocarbon-water transition zone. Mercury injection capillary pressure measurements illustrate the vertical stratification of petrophysical rock types that exist in the section; reservoirs which contain all water are interbedded with reservoirs containing mostly oil. Subsequently, a slight change in height above free water can drive production from all water to all oil. Hydrocarbon column heights greater than 60 ft are required to establish water-free oil production. Accurate reservoir water saturations can be derived using Archie's equation; when combined with a movable oil analysis and drainage relative permeability/fractional flow curves, initial water cuts can be predicted to maximize deliverability.

  11. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Photo Library Wild Flowers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wild Flowers NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photo Library - Wild Flowers Wild flowers such as Cane Spring suncup and White bearpoppy are included among the 750 varieties of plants located on the Nevada National Security Site. Instructions: Click the photograph THUMBNAIL to view the photograph details Thumbnail Category http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/photos/thumbs/CaneSpringsuncup.jpg Wild Flowers http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/photos/thumbs/Clokeys.jpg Wild Flowers

  12. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as wild, scenic, or recreational. These classifications necessitate differing levels of environmental protection under the Act. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1968...

  13. Technical Report of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating Council...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Technical Report of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Coordinating...

  14. V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Java issues are being exploited in the wild by exploit kits, with Cool and Redkit specifically being known to use these bugs, and others likely to follow shortly.

  15. The antitrust wild card and electricity restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelberg, A.W.; Ongman, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    If competitive policy issues in electricity restructuring are not addressed soon--preferably in federal legislation--it`s likely that someone will use the antitrust wild card to achieve its ends. Experience teaches that this may not be the best way to make public policy. As the electric utility industry restructures, it is widely assumed that Congress, the state legislatures, and regulators will set the ground rules for the restructured markets. Experience to date would seem to confirm this view: California`s restructuring legislation, FERC`s Order 888, and the restructuring proceedings in numerous states are all examples. And yet, there remains another player whose role could be equally important: The federal judiciary. While court decisions under the antitrust laws have had little influence to date on the industry`s direction, there is reason to believe that their role could increase dramatically. Certainly this is the history of other industries that have undergone similar transformations. The authors expect that forces at work in the electric utility industry could lead to antitrust actions playing a far greater role in the industry`s future than most observers currently expect. The electric utility industry has already experienced a close brush with the potential for antitrust rulings to unravel critical elements of regulatory policy on restructuring. The DC Circuit`s now famous (or infamous) dicta in the Cajun Electric Power case illustrated how a simple antitrust principle--the prohibition on so-called tying arrangements--could defeat the FERC`s policy with respect to utilities` recovery of billions of dollars of stranded costs. The FERC rebutted that dicta in its remand decisions and elsewhere, and it appears that the issue in now moot in the Cajun litigation itself. But the tying arrangement argument is far from dead.

  16. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31

    The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just

  17. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and maintained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife.

  18. COLLOQUIUM: A Wild Solution for Climate Change | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab 15, 2015, 2:00pm to 3:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: A Wild Solution for Climate Change Professor Thomas E. Lovejoy George Mason University Presentation: PDF icon WC15APR2015_TELovejoy.pdf The impacts of climate change on biodiversity and nature is increasingly prevalent. Projected ahead climate change has increasingly greater impacts beyond what the Climate Convention refers to as allowing systems to adapt naturally. The presentation will examine the two degree target for

  19. Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD)(Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) What is WILD? The Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD), developed and main- tained by the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is comprised of over 1,000 citations pertaining to the effects of land-based wind, offshore wind, marine and hydrokinetic power systems, power lines, and communication and television towers on wildlife. For the wind energy sector, WILD serves as an

  20. Transgenic crops get a test in the wild

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherfas, J.

    1991-02-22

    A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

  1. Wild Horse 69-kV transmission line environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc. (Hill County) proposes to construct and operate a 69-kV transmission line from its North Gildford Substation in Montana north to the Canadian border. A vicinity project area map is enclosed as a figure. TransCanada Power Corporation (TCP), a Canadian power-marketing company, will own and construct the connecting 69-kV line from the international border to Express Pipeline`s pump station at Wild Horse, Alberta. This Environmental Assessment is prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) as lead federal agency to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as part of DOE`s review and approval process of the applications filed by Hill County for a DOE Presidential Permit and License to Export Electricity to a foreign country. The purpose of the proposed line is to supply electric energy to a crude oil pump station in Canada, owned by Express Pipeline Ltd. (Express). The pipeline would transport Canadian-produced oil from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Caster, Wyoming. The Express Pipeline is scheduled to be constructed in 1996--97 and will supply crude oil to refineries in Wyoming and the midwest.

  2. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print Wednesday, 30 May 2007 00:00 NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination

  3. WAC - 232-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    32-12-064 Live Wildlife-Taking from the wild Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 232-12-064 Live...

  4. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's 200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81PWild...

  5. Title 36 CFR 297 Wild and Scenic Rivers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Section 7 of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act provides for the protection of the free-flowing, scenic, and natural values of rivers designated as components or potential...

  6. Title 36 C.F.R. 297 Wild and Scenic Rivers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Section 7 of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act provides for the protection of the free-flowing, scenic, and natural values of rivers designated as components or potential...

  7. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  8. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  9. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  10. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  11. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  12. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  13. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's $200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the hundreds of scientists and dozens of experimental techniques in facilities around the world that contributed to the preliminary examination of the first samples. Adding to recent advances in cometary science showing the

  14. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after

  16. Cherry Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    100C373.15 K 212 F 671.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 4.5 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. Studies Concerning the Accumulation of Minerals and Heavy Metals in Fruiting Bodies of Wild Mushrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stihi, Claudia; Radulescu, Cristiana; Gheboianu, Anca; Bancuta, Iulian; Popescu, Ion V.; Busuioc, Gabriela

    2011-10-03

    The minerals and heavy metals play an important role in the metabolic processes, during the growth and development of mushrooms, when they are available in appreciable concentration. In this work the concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Pb were analyzed using the Flame Atomic Absorption spectrometry (FAAS) together with Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) in 3 wild mushrooms species and their growing substrate, collected from various forestry fields in Dambovita County, Romania. The analyzed mushrooms were: Amanita phalloides, Amanita rubescens and Armillariella mellea. The accumulation coefficients were calculated to assess the mobility of minerals and heavy metals from substrate to mushrooms [1].

  19. Science on Saturday: The Wild and Wacky World of Epigenetics | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab 6, 2016, 9:30am Science On Saturday PPPL, MBG Auditorium Science on Saturday: The Wild and Wacky World of Epigenetics Professor Shirley Tilghman Princeton University Abstract: PDF icon 02 Tilghman.pdf LIVE STREAMING LINK: https://mediacentral.princeton.edu/id/1_wdp1m3et Tweet us your questions @PPPLSciEd and/or #scionsat Science_on_Saturday16Jan2016_STilghman Contact Information Coordinator(s): Ms. Deedee Ortiz-Arias dortiz@pppl.gov Host(s): Dr. Andrew Zwicker

  20. Fukushima derived radiocesium in subsistence-consumed northern fur seal and wild celery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Duncan, Colleen; Dickerson, Bobette; Williams, Michael; Gelatt, Thomas; Bell, Justin; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-11-28

    In July 2014, our investigative team traveled to St. Paul Island, Alaska to measure concentrations of radiocesium in wild-caught food products, primarily northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus). The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident released radiocesium into the atmosphere and into the western Pacific Ocean; other investigators have detected Fukushima-derived radionuclides in a variety of marine products harvested off the western coast of North America. We tested two subsistence-consumed food products from St. Paul Island, Alaska for Fukushima-derived radionuclides: 54 northern fur seal, and nine putchki (wild celery, Angelica lucida) plants. Individual northern fur seal samples were below minimummore » detectable activity concentrations of 137Cs and 134Cs, but when composited, northern fur seal tissues tested positive for trace quantities of both isotopes. Radiocesium was detected at an activity concentration of 37.2 mBq 134Cs kg-1 f.w. (95% CI: 35.9–38.5) and 141.2 mBq 137Cs kg-1f.w. (95% CI: 135.5–146.8). The measured isotopic ratio, decay-corrected to the date of harvest, was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.25–0.28). The Fukushima nuclear accident released 134Cs and 137Cs in roughly equal quantities, but by the date of harvest in July 2014, this ratio was 0.2774, indicating that this population of seals has been exposed to small quantities of Fukushima-derived radiocesium. Activity concentrations of both 134Cs and 137Cs in putchki were below detection limits, even for composited samples. Northern fur seal is known to migrate between coastal Alaska and Japan and the trace 134Cs in northern fur seal tissue suggests that the population under study had been minimally exposed Fukushima-derived radionuclides. Despite this inference, the radionuclide quantities detected are small and no impact is expected as a result of the measured radiation exposure, either in northern fur seal or human populations consuming this species.« less

  1. Fukushima derived radiocesium in subsistence-consumed northern fur seal and wild celery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Duncan, Colleen; Dickerson, Bobette; Williams, Michael; Gelatt, Thomas; Bell, Justin; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-11-28

    In July 2014, our investigative team traveled to St. Paul Island, Alaska to measure concentrations of radiocesium in wild-caught food products, primarily northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus). The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident released radiocesium into the atmosphere and into the western Pacific Ocean; other investigators have detected Fukushima-derived radionuclides in a variety of marine products harvested off the western coast of North America. We tested two subsistence-consumed food products from St. Paul Island, Alaska for Fukushima-derived radionuclides: 54 northern fur seal, and nine putchki (wild celery, Angelica lucida) plants. Individual northern fur seal samples were below minimum detectable activity concentrations of 137Cs and 134Cs, but when composited, northern fur seal tissues tested positive for trace quantities of both isotopes. Radiocesium was detected at an activity concentration of 37.2 mBq 134Cs kg-1 f.w. (95% CI: 35.9–38.5) and 141.2 mBq 137Cs kg-1f.w. (95% CI: 135.5–146.8). The measured isotopic ratio, decay-corrected to the date of harvest, was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.25–0.28). The Fukushima nuclear accident released 134Cs and 137Cs in roughly equal quantities, but by the date of harvest in July 2014, this ratio was 0.2774, indicating that this population of seals has been exposed to small quantities of Fukushima-derived radiocesium. Activity concentrations of both 134Cs and 137Cs in putchki were below detection limits, even for composited samples. Northern fur seal is known to migrate between coastal Alaska and Japan and the trace 134Cs in northern fur seal tissue suggests that the population under study had been minimally exposed Fukushima-derived radionuclides. Despite this inference, the radionuclide quantities detected are small and no impact is expected as a result of the measured radiation

  2. Digital Mapping and Environmental Characterization of National Wild and Scenic River Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A; Bosnall, Peter; Hetrick, Shelaine L; Smith, Brennan T

    2013-09-01

    Spatially accurate geospatial information is required to support decision-making regarding sustainable future hydropower development. Under a memorandum of understanding among several federal agencies, a pilot study was conducted to map a subset of National Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs) at a higher resolution and provide a consistent methodology for mapping WSRs across the United States and across agency jurisdictions. A subset of rivers (segments falling under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service) were mapped at a high resolution using the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The spatial extent and representation of river segments mapped at NHD scale were compared with the prevailing geospatial coverage mapped at a coarser scale. Accurately digitized river segments were linked to environmental attribution datasets housed within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program database to characterize the environmental context of WSR segments. The results suggest that both the spatial scale of hydrography datasets and the adherence to written policy descriptions are critical to accurately mapping WSRs. The environmental characterization provided information to deduce generalized trends in either the uniqueness or the commonness of environmental variables associated with WSRs. Although WSRs occur in a wide range of human-modified landscapes, environmental data layers suggest that they provide habitats important to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and recreation important to humans. Ultimately, the research findings herein suggest that there is a need for accurate, consistent, mapping of the National WSRs across the agencies responsible for administering each river. Geospatial applications examining potential landscape and energy development require accurate sources of information, such as data layers that portray realistic spatial representations.

  3. The Origin of Refractory Minerals in Comet 81P/Wild 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi, M; Ishii, H A; Simon, S B; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Joswiak, D J; Browning, N D; Matrajt, G

    2008-11-20

    Refractory Ti-bearing minerals in the calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusion (CAI) Inti, recovered from the comet 81P/Wild 2 sample, were examined using analytical (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (STEM) methods including imaging, nanodiffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Inti fassaite (Ca(Mg,Ti,Al)(Si,Al){sub 2}O{sub 6}) was found to have a Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} ratio of 2.0 {+-} 0.2, consistent with fassaite in other solar system CAIs. The oxygen fugacity (log f{sub O{sub 2}}) of formation estimated from this ratio, assuming equilibration among phases at 1509K, is -19.4 {+-} 1.3. This value is near the canonical solar nebula value (-18.1 {+-} 0.3) and in close agreement with that reported for fassaite-bearing Allende CAIs (-19.8 {+-} 0.9) by other researchers using the same assumptions. Nanocrystals of osbornite (Ti(V)N), 2-40 nm in diameter, are embedded as inclusions within anorthite, spinel and diopside in Inti. Vanadium is heterogeneously distributed within some osbornite crystals. Compositions range from pure TiN to Ti{sub 0.36}V{sub 0.64}N. The possible presence of oxide and carbide in solid solution with the osbornite was evaluated. The osbornite may contain O but does not contain C. The presence of osbornite, likely a refractory early condensate, together with the other refractory minerals in Inti, indicates that the parent comet contains solids that condensed closer to the proto-sun than the distance at which the parent comet itself accreted. The estimated oxygen fugacity and the reported isotopic and chemical compositions are consistent with Inti originating in the inner solar system as opposed to it being a surviving CAI from an extrasolar source. These results provide insight for evaluating the validity of models of radial mass transport dynamics in the early solar system. The oxidation environments inferred for the Inti mineral assemblage are inconsistent with an X-wind formation

  4. A Refractory Inclusion Returned by Stardust from Comet 81P/Wild 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, S B; Joswiak, D J; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Chi, M; Grossman, L; Al?on, J; Brownlee, D E; Fallon, S; Hutcheon, I D; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K D

    2008-05-20

    Among the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft is a suite of particles from one impact track (Track 25) that are Ca-, Al-rich and FeO-free. We studied three particles from this track that range in size from 5.3 x 3.2 {micro}m to 15 x 10 {micro}m. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show that they consist of very fine-grained (from {approx}0.5 to {approx}2 {micro}m) Al-rich, Ti-bearing and Ti-free clinopyroxene, Mg-Al spinel, anorthite, perovskite, and osbornite (TiN). In addition to these phases, the terminal particle, named 'Inti', also contains melilite. All of these phases, with the exception of osbornite, are common in refractory inclusions and are predicted to condense at high temperature from a gas of solar composition. Osbornite, though very rare, has also been found in meteoritic refractory inclusions, and could have formed in a region of the nebula where carbon became enriched relative to oxygen compared to solar composition. Compositions of Ti-pyroxene in Inti are similar, but not identical, to those of fassaite from Allende inclusions. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that Ti-rich pyroxene in Inti has Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} within the range of typical meteoritic fassaite, consistent with formation under reducing conditions comparable to those of a system of solar composition. Inti is {sup 16}O-rich, with {delta}{sup 18}O {approx} {delta}{sup 17}O {approx} 40{per_thousand}, like unaltered phases in refractory inclusions and refractory IDPs. With grain sizes, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and an oxygen isotopic composition like those of refractory inclusions, we conclude that Inti is a refractory inclusion that formed in the inner solar nebula. Identification of a particle that formed in the inner Solar System among the comet samples demonstrates that there was transport of materials from the inner to the outer nebula, probably either in a bipolar outflow or by turbulence.

  5. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  6. Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blouin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree

  7. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  8. Cherry Valley Elementary School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Yankton School District Wind Project

  9. Appendix 2. Task Force Members Biographies Cherry A. Murray...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... in 1977. She received her Ph.D. in atomic physics from the University of ... Deputy Project Manager for the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope 2004-2005. In 2007 she was ...

  10. Cherry Tree, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tree, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7414755, -94.6432774 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  11. Genome sequence and analysis of a stress-tolerant, wild-derived strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in biofuels research

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McIlwain, Sean J.; Peris, Davis; Sardi, Maria; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Zhan, Fujie; Myers, Kevin S.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Buzzell, Alyssa; Parreiras, Lucas S.; Ong, Irene M.; et al

    2016-04-20

    The genome sequences of more than 100 strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been published. Unfortunately, most of these genome assemblies contain dozens to hundreds of gaps at repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, tRNAs, and subtelomeric regions, which is where novel genes generally reside. Relatively few strains have been chosen for genome sequencing based on their biofuel production potential, leaving an additional knowledge gap. Here, we describe the nearly complete genome sequence of GLBRCY22-3 (Y22-3), a strain of S. cerevisiae derived from the stress-tolerant wild strain NRRL YB-210 and subsequently engineered for xylose metabolism. After benchmarking several genome assemblymore » approaches, we developed a pipeline to integrate Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) and Illumina sequencing data and achieved one of the highest quality genome assemblies for any S. cerevisiae strain. Specifically, the contig N50 is 693 kbp, and the sequences of most chromosomes, the mitochondrial genome, and the 2-micron plasmid are complete. Our annotation predicts 92 genes that are not present in the reference genome of the laboratory strain S288c, over 70% of which were expressed. We predicted functions for 43 of these genes, 28 of which were previously uncharacterized and unnamed. Remarkably, many of these genes are predicted to be involved in stress tolerance and carbon metabolism and are shared with a Brazilian bioethanol production strain, even though the strains differ dramatically at most genetic loci. Lastly, the Y22-3 genome sequence provides an exceptionally high-quality resource for basic and applied research in bioenergy and genetics.« less

  12. Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

    2007-01-04

    The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

  13. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  14. Optimization of scat detection methods for a social ungulate, the wild pig, and experimental evaluation of factors affecting detection of scat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keiter, David A.; Cunningham, Fred L.; Rhodes, Jr., Olin E.; Irwin, Brian J.; Beasley, James C.

    2016-05-25

    Collection of scat samples is common in wildlife research, particularly for genetic capture-mark-recapture applications. Due to high degradation rates of genetic material in scat, large numbers of samples must be collected to generate robust estimates. Optimization of sampling approaches to account for taxa-specific patterns of scat deposition is, therefore, necessary to ensure sufficient sample collection. While scat collection methods have been widely studied in carnivores, research to maximize scat collection and noninvasive sampling efficiency for social ungulates is lacking. Further, environmental factors or scat morphology may influence detection of scat by observers. We contrasted performance of novel radial search protocolsmore » with existing adaptive cluster sampling protocols to quantify differences in observed amounts of wild pig (Sus scrofa) scat. We also evaluated the effects of environmental (percentage of vegetative ground cover and occurrence of rain immediately prior to sampling) and scat characteristics (fecal pellet size and number) on the detectability of scat by observers. We found that 15- and 20-m radial search protocols resulted in greater numbers of scats encountered than the previously used adaptive cluster sampling approach across habitat types, and that fecal pellet size, number of fecal pellets, percent vegetative ground cover, and recent rain events were significant predictors of scat detection. Our results suggest that use of a fixed-width radial search protocol may increase the number of scats detected for wild pigs, or other social ungulates, allowing more robust estimation of population metrics using noninvasive genetic sampling methods. Further, as fecal pellet size affected scat detection, juvenile or smaller-sized animals may be less detectable than adult or large animals, which could introduce bias into abundance estimates. In conclusion, knowledge of relationships between environmental variables and scat detection may allow

  15. Transportation as a Means of Increasing Wild Juvenile Salmon Survival : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 4 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Donn L.

    1993-06-01

    Smolt transportation on the Snake and Columbia Rivers has been under nearly continuous study for 25 years. Most controversy surrounds transport of spring/summer chinook, so most analyses and discussion are devoted to that species. Sockeye migrate at the same time as spring/summer chinook as do the earliest of the fall chinook. Therefore, action taken o spring/summer chinook will also affect sockeye and fall chinook. Many factors influenced transportation study results including population structure change -- the shift from nearly all wild fish to nearly all hatchery fish; new dams; the number of turbines at Snake River dams alone increased from 3 in 1968 to 24 by 1979; installation of juvenile fish pass facilities; and calamitous natural events such as the 1977 drought. All the above had negative effects on the survival of wild fish in general and on transport test results specifically, except that when smolts were transported from the upper dam their survival was not influenced by new or existing structures downstream from the transport site.

  16. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

    2007-08-28

    Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

  18. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for

  19. Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Water Quality at Multiple Locations on the Snake and Columbia Rivers using CRiSP/RealTime, 1998 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beer, W. Nicholas; Hayes, Joshua A.; Shaw, Pamela

    1999-07-21

    Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged through monitoring and research programs conducted by the Columbia River fisheries agencies and Tribes. Workers at the University of Washington have used detection data at Lower Granite Dam to generate predictions of arrival distributions for various stocks at the dam. The prediction tool is known as RealTime. In 1996, RealTime predictions were linked to a downstream migration model, CRiSP.1. The composite model, known as CRiSP/RealTime, predicts the arrival distribution and fraction transported at downriver locations.

  20. Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

    2009-12-10

    New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

  1. International Power Sources Symposium, 33rd, Cherry Hill, NJ, June 13-16, 1988, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The present conference discusses Li rechargeable batteries, oxyhalide nonrechargeable batteries, reserve and thermal batteries, nonrechargeable thermal batteries, aqueous rechargeable and nonrechargeable batteries, advanced rechargeable batteries, high power/pulse power ambient temperature batteries, Li nonrechargeable batteries, fuel cells, and power generation/conditioning/charging technologies. Attention is given to the layer-formation of Li and its implications for secondary Li batteries, spirally wound Li-TiS2 cells, the electrochemistry of C relative to batteries and fuel cells, glass-seal corrosion in Li-SOCl2 batteries, a lithium-thionyl chloride battery for missile applications, low temperature thermal battery electrolytes, Al-air batteries, ovonic Ni/metal hydride batteries, Na/S cells, ultracapacitor filtering characteristics, long-life 'coin' cells, AgO cathode decomposition, and monolithic fuel-cell designs.

  2. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  5. Wild and Scenic Rivers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scenic Rivers Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildandScenicRivers&oldid612228" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  6. Wild Fire Computer Model Helps Firefighters

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Canfield, Jesse

    2014-06-02

    A high-tech computer model called HIGRAD/FIRETEC, the cornerstone of a collaborative effort between U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides insights that are essential for front-line fire fighters. The science team is looking into levels of bark beetle-induced conditions that lead to drastic changes in fire behavior and how variable or erratic the behavior is likely to be.

  7. Proposed Wild Horse Pass Substation Option

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LAK E C ITY, U T PAN EL 2 ELEC TR IC ITY D ISTR IBU TION AN D EN D -U SE: H OW D O W E MAN AGE C H ALLEN GES AN D OPPOR TU N ITIES? AP R I L 2 5 , 2 0 1 6 Gila River Indian ...

  8. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanova, Natalia; Schwientek, Patrick; Tripp, H. James; Rinke, Christian; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Visel, Axel; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Rubin, Edward

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  9. Director of the Office of Science Homepage | U.S. DOE Office...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cherry Murray sworn in by Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ernest Moniz. Dr. Cherry Murray sworn in by Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ernest Moniz. Dr. Cherry Murray Director, Office of Science ...

  10. Taming the Wild World of Management, Performance and Communication - 13459

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    Management has evolved a long way from its original meaning of 'governing a horse'. The industrial revolution fostered 'scientific management'; 1930's Hawthorne studies discovered that people's social interactions could alter productivity; and the dawn of the computer age in the post-war 1950's brought general systems theory into management thinking. Today, mobile wireless connectivity aims to transform ever-changing networks of players, mandates, and markets into something that can be 'managed'. So why is there no clear and simple recipe for how to practice management? We talk about financial management, safety management, and operations management, but surely the 'management' part of those endeavors will share the same set of practices. Instead, we are still arguing for 'management' to include everything from developing people to negotiating contracts. A manager's job may include many things, but one of them, the job of management, needs to be nailed down. Three standard practices for managing in a network are developed: (a) support the dialogues that connect people vital to accomplishing a goal or objective; (b) develop and sustain the scoreboards that serve as a road-map to reach the goal; and (c) control the feedback to 'govern the horse'. These three practices are useful for more than reaching goals, as they also support coordinating across boundaries and running productive meetings. The dialogues for productive relationships, scoreboards for goals and deliverables, and feedback for performance together constitute a recipe for managing in a networked world. (authors)

  11. Dosage compensation can buffer copy-number variation in wild...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd. Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full ...

  12. CX-005539: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cherry Hill Solar Project - Municipal BuildingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 03/30/2011Location(s): Cherry Hill, New JerseyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. CX-006419: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey-City-Cherry Hill, Township ofCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 03/05/2010Location(s): Cherry Hill, New JerseyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  14. Indiana County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Armagh, Pennsylvania Black Lick, Pennsylvania Blairsville, Pennsylvania Cherry Tree, Pennsylvania Chevy Chase Heights, Pennsylvania Clymer, Pennsylvania Commodore,...

  15. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE HOGSBACK CHIMNEY BUT TE BIG PINEY AREA TIP TOP UNI T LINCOLN ROAD BLU E FOREST DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER BEND ...

  16. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE HOGSBACK CHIMNEY BUT TE BIG PINEY AREA TIP TOP UNI T LINCOLN ROAD BLU E FOREST SWAN DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER ...

  17. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; et al

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  18. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  19. Selective progressive response of soil microbial community to wild oat roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Brodie, E.L.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Andersen, G.L.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Roots moving through soil enact physical and chemical changes that differentiate rhizosphere from bulk soil, and the effects of these changes on soil microorganisms have long been a topic of interest. Use of a high-density 16S rRNA microarray (PhyloChip) for bacterial and archaeal community analysis has allowed definition of the populations that respond to the root within the complex grassland soil community; this research accompanies previously reported compositional changes, including increases in chitinase and protease specific activity, cell numbers and quorum sensing signal. PhyloChip results showed a significant change in 7% of the total rhizosphere microbial community (147 of 1917 taxa); the 7% response value was confirmed by16S rRNA T-RFLP analysis. This PhyloChip-defined dynamic subset was comprised of taxa in 17 of the 44 phyla detected in all soil samples. Expected rhizosphere-competent phyla, such as Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, were well represented, as were less-well-documented rhizosphere colonizers including Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Nitrospira. Richness of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria decreased in soil near the root tip compared to bulk soil, but then increased in older root zones. Quantitative PCR revealed {beta}-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria present at about 10{sup 8} copies of 16S rRNA genes g{sup -1} soil, with Nitrospira having about 10{sup 5} copies g{sup -1} soil. This report demonstrates that changes in a relatively small subset of the soil microbial community are sufficient to produce substantial changes in function in progressively more mature rhizosphere zones.

  20. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this tangle, the picture that emerged is of cometary particles containing primarily silicate materials formed within the Solar System, including some grains born in the high...

  1. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    them contributed to many of the findings that are shedding new light on how the Solar System was formed. The Stardust results show that the mixing of materials throughout the...

  2. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particles from Comet 81PWild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes Print NASA's 200-million, seven-year-long Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the...

  3. Comet 81P/Wild 2 Under a Microscope (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Comet 81PWild 2 Under a Microscope Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comet ... Publication Date: 2007-01-16 OSTI Identifier: 897746 Report Number(s): ...

  4. Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stardust mission returned to Earth thousands of tiny particles snagged from the coma of comet 81PWild 2. Four ALS beamlines and the researchers using them were among the...

  5. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface

  6. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP ... LINCOLN ROAD BLU E FOREST DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER BEND DRY PINEY SWAN S ...

  7. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP ... BLU E FOREST SWAN DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER BEND DRY PINEY SWAN S HOGSBACK AREA ...

  8. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    most concentrated, shipping, production, or drilling operations could be curtailed due to air quality (noxious fumes from the oil) or fire hazard. Ships transiting fouled water...

  9. Microsoft Word - toc.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D Photographs of Utah and San Juan County-Listed Noxious Weeds and Undesirable Weeds Photographs taken from: Weeds of the West, Tom D. Whitson, Editor published by The Western Society of Weed Science, Newark, California 9th Edition, 2002 U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Annual sunflower, Helianthus annuus Undesirable Bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Buffalobur, Solanum rostratum Noxious (found near site) Camelthorn, Alhagi maurorum Noxious (on list)

  10. Ecological Forecasting in Chesapeake Bay: Using a Mechanistic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    oxygen, and the likelihood of encountering several noxious species, including harmful algal blooms and water-borne pathogens, for the purpose of monitoring the Bay's ecosystem. ...

  11. EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical andor spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and...

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Subpart D of 10 CFR Part 1021; involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed ...

  13. EIS-0285-SA-38: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation ... resprouting noxious weeds and tall-growing species along access roads and tower sites. ...

  14. Gas scrubbing liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lackey, Walter J.; Lowrie, Robert S.; Sease, John D.

    1981-01-01

    Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

  15. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix B

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... is to prescribe methods to help prevent and manage the spread of noxious weeds during and following construction of the Searchlight Wind Energy Project in Clark County (Project). ...

  16. Document ID Number: RL-721

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated D noxious weeds, or invasive species such that the action is NOT contained or confined in a manner designed,...

  17. Critical Nuclear Utilities Upgrade Project (CNUUP) (4572)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  20. Water Tanks Demolition and Deactivation (D&D) Project (4589)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  1. Microsoft Word - CX-AlveyDistWoodPoles_FY13_WEB.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  2. Dry Air Glovebox Project (4592), 5/31/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  3. 9983-CC Demolition Project (4574)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  4. Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) Research Project (4582)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  5. Dry Pipe Sprinkler Piping Replacement Project (4588), 4/30/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  6. Sustainable Environment Technologies (4578)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  7. MEMORANDUM FOR SEAN LEV DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL FOR ENVIRONMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eradicate Burning, and Revegetation Methods on the 150,000 noxious weeds and invasive plants, and promote desirable plant species and wildlife Hanford Site, Richland,...

  8. Sprinkler Head Replacement (4586), 4/24/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  9. Protection Upgrades Project (4580)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  10. Unneeded Materials and Chemicals Clean-out Project (4581)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  11. Californium Shuffler Removal Projects (4585), 4/12/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  12. Microsoft Word - CX-NorthBendWoodPoles_FY13_WEB.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  13. Southwestern Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  14. Categorical Exclusion 4596: High Contamination Area (HCA) Cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, govemmenta(y designated noxious weeds, or invasive species. unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  15. Facilities Infrastructure & Services Unneeded Materials and Chemicals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  16. Coal Pile Basin Project (4595), 5/31/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  17. Electric Discharge Machining (EDM) Projects (4584), 4/11/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  18. Categorical Exclusion 4598: Security Upgrade Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contai"ed or confined in a manner...

  19. Direct Application of TiBor Coatings Projects (4583), 3/12/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  20. Jack Case Showers Project (4593), 5/29/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  1. Duct Chase Sprinkler Replacement Project (4594), 5/31/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  2. Cork Alternatives Project (4573)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed activity would be contained or confined in a manner...

  3. ORNI 9, LLC, AND ORMAT NEVADA INC. APPLICATIONS FOR PERMIT TO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    All onsite drilling materials and chemicals shall be properly stored to ensure the ... andor noxious fluids are spilled during drilling, testing, and completion operations, ...

  4. EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington

  5. Otsego County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cherry Valley, New York Cooperstown, New York Decatur, New York Edmeston, New York Exeter, New York Gilbertsville, New York Hartwick, New York Laurens, New York Maryland, New...

  6. Mr. Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2 Department of Energy Washington , DC 20585 September 9, 2013 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Drive ...

  7. ARRA additions to the north slope of Alaska. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Richardson, Scott 1 ; Cherry, Jessica 2 ; Stuefer, Martin 2 ; Zirzow, Jeffrey A. ; Zak, Bernard Daniel ; Ivey, Mark D. ; Verlinde, Johannes 1 + Show Author ...

  8. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  9. EIS-0349: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cogeneration Project, Washington and Oregon This notice announces the availability of the ROD to implement the proposed action identified in the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration ...

  10. Record of Decision (ROD) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0, 2003 EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project October 31, 2003 EIS-0312: Record of Decision Fish and Wildlife...

  11. EIS-0349: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    49: Record of Decision EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has...

  12. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians - Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Supply Options (Sustainable) * Wood lot improvement whole tree chips * Straw * Pellets * Farm Wood Mill Waste * Other (clean waste, cherry pits, corn..) Larger Scale ...

  13. Cross County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Cross County, Arkansas Cherry Valley, Arkansas Hickory Ridge, Arkansas Parkin, Arkansas Wynne, Arkansas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCross...

  14. LighthouseSolar (New Paltz) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Cherry Hill Rd Place: New Paltz, New York Zip: 12561 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Solar Electric and Solar Thermal Website:...

  15. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 22, 1997, Electrical Arc Blast at Building F-Zero Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Cherri J. Langenfeld, Manager, Chicago Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Adair County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Adair County, Oklahoma Bell, Oklahoma Cherry Tree, Oklahoma Chewey, Oklahoma Christie, Oklahoma Fairfield, Oklahoma Greasy, Oklahoma...

  17. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a rangemore » of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation, below spontaneous levels observed in control mice. Lastly, the 18F-FDG RBE was <1.0, indicating that the mixed radiation quality and/or low dose rate from PET scans is less damaging than equivalent doses of gamma radiation.« less

  18. EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point...

  19. Wind Development on the Rosebud

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFP was issued in Fall of 2007 Rosebud Sioux Tribe and Citizens Wind entered into an MOA ... WAPA 115 kv, and Cherry Todd Substation RST Met tower installed Fall of 2003 Citizens Wind ...

  20. Murray confirmed as Office of Science Director | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Murray confirmed as Office of Science Director Dr. Cherry Murray was confirmed by the Senate on Thursday, December 10, 2015 as the Director of the Department of Energy's Office of...

  1. Chris Benmore

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aging of glassy pharmaceuticals made using acoustic levitation", C.J. Benmore, J.K.R. Weber, A.N. Tailor, B. Cherry, J.L. Yarger, Q.Mou, W. Weber, J. Neuefeind, S.R. Byrn. J....

  2. CREST Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and cherry-picked the best features. For those who find NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) too complex for their analysis needs but still want an analytically robust levelized...

  3. CREST Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and cherry-picked the best features. For those who find NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) too complex for their analysis needs but still want an analytically robust levelized...

  4. Presentation: Hubs+ Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Constructs for Energy R&D in the DOE (Hubs+) delivered by the Task Force Chair, Cherry Murray, Harvard University Hubs+ Report (882.11 KB) More Documents & Publications Report of ...

  5. The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force to Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... SEAB Hubs + Report DOE Response to SEAB Hubs+ Report SEAB Task Force on HubsEFRCsBRCsARPA-E Members: Cherry Murray, Harvard University, TF Chair, * Rafael Bras, Georgia ...

  6. Session Name: Data Transfer (session D2SD) Co-Chairs: Andrew...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transfer (session D2SD) Co-Chairs: Andrew Cherry, Eli Dart 1 Contributors * Curt ... monitoring o Most sites run perfSONAR * Dedicated data paths for some programs (e.g. ...

  7. MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DESCRIPTIONS Loblolly pine-sweet gum-broom sedge Loblolly pine-black cherry- Japanese honeysuckle . . Loblolly pine-sweet gum-red bay Loblolly pine-swamp gum-naked withe-rod . . ...

  8. Thermal Pretreatment of Wood for Cogasification/cofiring of Biomass and Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ping; Howard, Bret; Hedges, Sheila; Morreale, Bryan; Van Essendelft, Dirk; Berry, David

    2013-10-29

    Utilization of biomass as a co-feed in coal and biomass co-firing and co-gasification requires size reduction of the biomass. Reducing biomass to below 0.2 mm without pretreatment is difficult and costly because biomass is fibrous and compressible. Torrefaction is a promising thermal pretreatment process and has the advantages of increasing energy density, improving grindability, producing fuels with more homogenous compositions and hydrophobic behavior. Temperature is the most important factor for the torrefaction process. Biomass grindability is related to cell wall structure, thickness and composition. Thermal treatment such as torrefaction can cause chemical changes that significantly affect the strength of biomass. The objectives of this study are to understand the mechanism by which torrefaction improves the grindability of biomass and discuss suitable temperatures for thermal pretreatment for co-gasification/cofiring of biomass and coal. Wild cherry wood was selected as the model for this study. Samples were prepared by sawing a single tangential section from the heartwood and cutting it into eleven pieces. The samples were consecutively heated at 220, 260, 300, 350, 450 and 550oC for 0.5 hr under flowing nitrogen in a tube furnace. Untreated and treated samples were characterized for physical properties (color, dimensions and weight), microstructural changes by SEM, and cell wall composition changes and thermal behaviors by TGA and DSC. The morphology of the wood remained intact through the treatment range but the cell walls were thinner. Thermal treatments were observed to decompose the cell wall components. Hemicellulose decomposed over the range of ~200 to 300oC and resulted in weakening of the cell walls and subsequently improved grindability. Furthermore, wood samples treated above 300oC lost more than 39% in mass. Therefore, thermal pretreatment above the hemicelluloses decomposition temperature but below 300oC is probably sufficient to improve

  9. Microsoft Word - S12421_2014 Annual Rpt.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 3.2.12 Summary The Ecology Program at the Site conducts monitoring of the ecological resources to ensure regulatory compliance and to preserve, protect, and manage those resources. Proactive management of the natural resources is critical to the long-term sustainability of the ecosystems at the Site. Noxious weeds continue to be a top priority, as does the revegetation of the COU. Data from 2014 documented the continuing establishment of vegetation at revegetation locations. Noxious weed

  10. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Alaska/ARM Climate Research Facilities: North Slope of Alaska/ARM Climate Research Facilities: An Update An Update Mark Ivey Mark Ivey 1 1 , Johannes Verlinde , Johannes Verlinde 2 2 , Scott Richardson , Scott Richardson 2 2 , Bernard Zak , Bernard Zak 1 1 , Jeff Zirzow , Jeff Zirzow 1 1 ,Martin Stuefer ,Martin Stuefer 3 3 , Jessica Cherry , Jessica Cherry 3 3 , Bob Busey , Bob Busey 3 3 (1) (1) Sandia National Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, (2) (2) Pennsylvania State University,

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - pancake.thursPM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productivity - Are We Addressing the Right Issues? Cherri M. Pancake Northwest Alliance for Computational Science & Engineering (NACSE) Oregon State University pancake@nacse.org HPC Productivity - Are We Asking the Right Questions? Cherri M. Pancake Northwest Alliance for Computational Science & Engineering (NACSE) Oregon State University pancake@nacse.org We're Fellow Travelers ... HPC isn't a goal - it's a road High(way to) Performance Computing But ...this year's talks all cited

  12. Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

  13. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a range of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation, below spontaneous levels observed in control mice. Lastly, the 18F-FDG RBE was <1.0, indicating that the mixed radiation quality and/or low dose rate from PET scans is less damaging than equivalent doses of gamma radiation.

  14. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  15. Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Calendar Year 2015

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Table 105. 2015 Wetland Mitigation Credit at the Rocky Flats Site 3.2.11 Summary The Ecology Program at the Site conducts monitoring of the ecological resources to ensure regulatory compliance and to preserve, protect, and manage those resources. Proactive management of the natural resources is critical to the long-term sustainability of the ecosystems at the Site. Noxious weeds continue to be a priority, as does the revegetation of the COU. Data from 2015 documented the continuing

  16. Microsoft Word - S11432_2013Annual Rpt.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    April 2014 Page 410 3.2.11 Summary The Ecology Program at the Site conducts monitoring of the ecological resources to ensure regulatory compliance and to preserve, protect, and manage those resources. Proactive management of the natural resources is critical to the long-term sustainability of the ecosystems at the Site. Noxious weeds continue to be a top priority, as does the revegetation of the COU. Data from 2013 documented the continuing establishment of vegetation at revegetation locations.

  17. Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pence, Dallas T.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1980-01-01

    Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Hanford Advisory Board Health, Safety, and Environmental Protection Committee E.M. Bowers, RL J.M. Rodriguez, MSA April 19, 2012 2 Biological Control Services * Migratory Birds (Osprey) * Mosquito Control (West Nile Virus) * Animal Control (rad control / health & safety such as Hantavirus) * Vegetation Control - Industrial Weeds (Tumbleweeds) - Noxious Weeds (Rush skeletonweed) * Revegetation 3 Biological Control Staff * Manager / CPA (1) * Teamster / CPOs (8) * RCT (1) * Operator (0.1

  19. Mr. Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2 Department of Energy Washington , DC 20585 September 9, 2013 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South Denver, CO 80246-1530 Subject: Notification that GS01 is no longer an RFLMA Point of Compliance (POC) Reference: Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) Attachment 2, Section 5.1, "Monitoring Requirements" Dear Mr. Spreng: In accordance with the criteria provided in Section 5.1 of RFLMA

  20. Public Meeting Commission Members TJ Glauthier, Co-Chair; Jared Cohon, Co-Chair; Susan Hockfield; Charles Elachi;

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Minutes of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Public Meeting Commission Members TJ Glauthier, Co-Chair; Jared Cohon, Co-Chair; Susan Hockfield; Charles Elachi; in Attendance: Wanda Austin; Paul Fleury; Cherry Murray; Norm Augustine (by phone) Date and Time: 10:30 AM - 4:00 PM, July 18, 2014 Location: Department of Energy, Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20585 Purpose: Meeting of the

  1. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Chair; Arun Majumdar, Vice Chair; Richard A. Meserve; Rafael L.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Arun Majumdar, Vice Chair; Richard A. Meserve; Rafael L. Bras; Deborah Jin; Michael McQuade; Francis Beinecke; Cherry Murray; Ram Shenoy Date and Time: June 17, 2015, 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM EST Location: Applied Research Center, Garden Room, 301 Gateway Drive, Aiken, SC Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Karen Gibson, Designated Federal Officer; Corey Williams-Allen, Deputy Designated Federal Officer; Matthew Schaub, Deputy Director DOE Staff: Secretary

  2. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Co-Chair; Persis Drell, Co-Chair; Frances Beinecke; Albert

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary Minutes of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Co-Chair; Persis Drell, Co-Chair; Frances Beinecke; Albert Carnesale; Shirley Jackson; Deborah Jin; Paul Joskow; Steven Koonin; Michael McQuade; Richard Meserve; Cherry Murray; Carmichael Roberts; Ram Shenoy; Martha Schlicher; Daniel Yergin Date and Time: 9:00 AM- 12:00 NOON, March 28, 2014 Location: U.S. Department of Energy Forrestal Building, 1000

  3. Secretary's 2013 Achievement Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Summary Minutes of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Co-Chair; Persis Drell, Co-Chair; Rafael Bras; Albert Carnesale; Shirley Ann Jackson; Deborah Jin; Steven Koonin; Arun Majumdar; Michael McQuade; Richard Meserve; Cherry Murray; Dan Reicher; Carmichael Roberts; Martha Schlicker; Ram Shenoy; Dan Yergin Date and Time: 8:30 AM - 12:15 PM, June 20, 2014 Location: Argonne National Laboratory, TSC Conference

  4. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Chair; Frances Beinecke, Rafael Bras, Albert Carnesale, Deborah

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chair; Frances Beinecke, Rafael Bras, Albert Carnesale, Deborah Jin, Paul Joskow, Steve Koonin, Michael McQuade, Richard Meserve, Cherry Murray, Dan Reicher, Ram Shenoy, Ellen Tauscher, Dan Yergin Date and Time: 11:30AM - 12:30PM ET, February 17, 2015 Location: Conference Call Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Karen Gibson, Designated Federal Officer; Corey Williams-Allen, Deputy Designated Federal Officer; and Matthew Schaub, Deputy Director Meeting

  5. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Co-Chair; Frances Beinecke; Albert Carnesale; Shirley Jackson;

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Beinecke; Albert Carnesale; Shirley Jackson; Deborah Jin; Paul Joskow; Steven Koonin; Arun Majumdar (via teleconference); Michael McQuade; Richard Meserve; Cherry Murray; Carmichael Roberts; Ram Shenoy; Martha Schlicher; Daniel Yergin; Date and Time: 9:00 AM- 12:15 PM, September 5, 2014 Location: U.S. Department of Energy Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20585 Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Karen Gibson, Designated

  6. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Co-Chair; Persis Drell, Co-Chair; Albert Carnesale; Ram Shenoy;

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    John Deutch, Co-Chair; Persis Drell, Co-Chair; Albert Carnesale; Ram Shenoy; Cherry Murray; Shirley Jackson; Dan Reicher; Martha Schlicher; Rafael Bras; Albert Carnesale; Dan Yergin; Deborah Jin; Michael McQuade; John Podesta Date and Time: 8:00 AM- 12:15 PM, December 3, 2013 Location: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Amy Bodette, Designated Federal Officer; Karen

  7. EA-2008: Colorado River Storage Project Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Coconino, Maricopa, Navajo, and Yavapai Counties (Arizona) and San Juan County (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of Western’s programmatic operations and management (O&M) process and an integrated vegetation management (IVM) program on the Colorado River Storage Project System. O&M activities would consist of aerial and ground patrols, regular and preventive maintenance, inspections and repairs, and road repair. The IVM program would remove vegetation to protect facilities from fire, control the spread of noxious weeds to protect environmental quality, establish and maintain stable, low-growing plant communities in the ROW, and activities for public and worker safety around transmission lines and other facilities.

  8. CX-100326 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100326 Categorical Exclusion Determination STM and NWTC Biocontrol for Noxious Weeds, NREL Tracking No. 15-028 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: DOE/EA-1914, DOE/EA-1968 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date: 08/04/15 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy's (National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is proposing to conduct integrated weed management activities by releasing biocontrol

  9. DOE/EA-2008: Colorado River Storage Project Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Coconino, Maricopa, Navajo, and Yavapai Counties (Arizona) and San Juan County (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of Westerns programmatic operations and management (O&M) process and an integrated vegetation management (IVM) program on the Colorado River Storage Project System. O&M activities would consist of aerial and ground patrols, regular and preventive maintenance, inspections and repairs, and road repair. The IVM program would remove vegetation to protect facilities from fire, control the spread of noxious weeds to protect environmental quality, establish and maintain stable, low-growing plant communities in the ROW, and activities for public and worker safety around transmission lines and other facilities.

  10. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

  11. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  12. Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  13. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1987-04-13

    A method of processing materials. The invention enables ultrafine, ultrapure powders to be formed from solid ingots in a gas free environment. A plasma is formed directly from an ingot which insures purity. The vaporized material is expanded through a nozzle and the resultant powder settles on a cold surface. An inductively coupled plasma may also be used to process waste chemicals. Noxious chemicals are directed through a series of plasma tubes, breaking molecular bonds and resulting in relatively harmless atomic constituents. 3 figs.

  14. Spring into Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    into Energy Savings Spring into Energy Savings April 14, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis Amy Foster Parish No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn. - Hal Borland In my part of the country, winter seems to hang on an interminably long time. So I always look forward to the first signs of spring with unbridled glee. At the first glimpse of a cherry blossom, the winter boots are banished to the back of the closet and the sandals are put to work in earnest. But while spring may give the perfect

  15. The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Solar Projects | Department of Energy The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two Innovative Solar Projects The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two Innovative Solar Projects March 19, 2012 - 2:05pm Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs For nearly a year, Congressional critics of the Energy Department's loan programs have demonstrated a consistent pattern of cherry-picking individual emails from

  16. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) meeting |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) March 22-23, 2016 Gaithersburg, Md. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (135KB) BER Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees BER Home Meetings March 22-23, 2016 Gaithersburg, Md. Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Agenda .pdf file (108KB) Presentations: Cherry Murray, Director .pdf file (8.1MB) News from the Office of

  17. Driving Green: Spring has Sprung, but don't 'Spring Ahead' | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON - Dr. Cherry Murray was confirmed by the Senate on Thursday, December 10, 2015 as the Director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science. "Dr. Murray will be an outstanding Director of the Office of Science, drawing upon her experience in academia as professor and dean of one of country's leading universities of engineering and applied sciences, key R&D leadership roles in industry, and as

  18. Science & Technology Review May/June 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, D J

    2008-03-19

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Biomedical Technology Has a Home at Livermore--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) Shaping the Future of Aneurysm Treatments--Livermore foam devices may offer significant advantages for treating some forms of aneurysms; (3) Ring around a Stellar Shell: A Tale of Scientific Serendipity--Using a three-dimensional model, Livermore scientists have solved a long-standing puzzle of stellar evolution; and (4) On Assignment in Washington, DC--Livermore personnel in Washington, DC, support federal sponsors and become valuable assets to Laboratory programs.

  19. Science and Technology Review January/February 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aufderheide, M

    2005-12-07

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Our Monthly Progress Report--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) Mimicking Nature's Crystalline Structures--Advanced microscopy and molecular modeling are providing insight on how crystals grow; (3) Simulating Materials for Nanostructural Designs--Models of water interacting with materials at the nanoscale show important property changes that will influence the design of nanodevices; (4) Zeroing In on New Targets--Livermore engineers and machinists craft tiny laser targets to specifications unattainable elsewhere; (5) Monitoring Nuclear Reactors with Antineutrinos--A new detector promises to ease the tracking of how much plutonium is being formed in the heart of a working nuclear reactor.

  20. March 28, 2014 SEAB Meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8, 2014 SEAB Meeting March 28, 2014 SEAB Meeting March 28, 2014 - 9:24am Addthis SECRETARY OF ENERGY ADVISORY BOARD AGENDA U.S. Department of Energy, Room 8E-069 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC March 28, 2014 Download Meeting Minutes 9:00 - 9:15 AM Welcome and Opening Comments Secretary Ernest J. Moniz 9:15 - 9:45 AM Discussion Hubs+ Task Force Final Report (download report) (download presentation) [John Deutch, Session Chair] Public Comment Report presented by Cherry Murray, Task

  1. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  2. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  3. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Co-Chair; Frances Beinecke, Rafael Bras, Albert Carnesale, Shirley

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Shirley Ann Jackson, Deborah Jin, Paul Joskow, Arun Majumdar, Michael McQuade, Richard Meserve, Cherry Murray, Carmichael Roberts, Martha Schlicher, Ram Shenoy, Dan Yergin Date and Time: 11:00 - 11:35 AM, August 1, 2014 Location: Conference Call Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Corey Williams-Allen, Deputy Designated Federal Officer Meeting Summary John Deutch, SEAB co-chair, opened the meeting at 11:00AM and asked Albert Carnesale, Task Force Chair,

  4. DearMayor Kimble:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .' Department of Energy Washington; ' DC 20585 r FEBiO 1995' The Honorable Fred Kimble '. * '. -161 S. Cherry Street in Galesburg, Ill<inois. 61401, DearMayor Kimble: ,', .-. ; .,-.: " I' Secretary of Energy .Hazel O'Leary has announced a,new,approach toopenness in the Department of ,Energy (DOE) and its cotmnunications~with the.public.. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to,forward the.enc1ose.d information related to the former Midwest.Manufacturing Co. site in your

  5. CAPTAIN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  6. Title 16 U.S.C. 1278(a) Restrictions on Water Resources Projects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under the Federal Power Act on or directly affecting any river which is designated as a component of the national wild and scenic rivers system under the Wild and Scenic Rivers...

  7. Advocate- Issue 47- July 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here are some of the topics from this issue: Wild West Tour, EM SSAB Chairs’ Meeting, and Reservation Updates.

  8. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume II, Steelhead Stock Summaries, Stock Transfer Guidelines, Information Needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1985-07-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of wild and hatchery-raised steelhead trout stocks in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

  9. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  10. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  11. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol

  12. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

  13. Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers July 5, 2011 - 1:46pm Addthis Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Bob Wilds has worked at Waukesha Electric Systems for the last 12 years as a coil winder.

  14. ckm4195.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Threshold effects concentration Threshold effect level U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service . ... Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wild- life Service (USFWS), ...

  15. Derivative-free optimization for parameter estimation in computational...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nuclear physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Derivative-free optimization for parameter estimation in computational nuclear physics Authors: Wild, S ; ...

  16. Once nearly extinct, Idaho sockeye regaining fitness advantage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the wild once more. A newly published analysis by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Northwest Fisheries Science Center shows endangered Snake River...

  17. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aging an anesthetized bobcat Wildlife studies in the Chernobyl exclusion zone Chernobyl wolf Amanda attaching satellite transmitter to a vulture Anesthetizing a wild pig ...

  18. SREL Reprint #3246

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We artificially incubated wood duck (Aix sponsa) eggs at three temperature regimes (low, 35.0; ... ducklings from each temperature treatment were placed with wild foster mothers ...

  19. SREL Reprint #3203

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA 4Bulmer and Associates, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: In 1957, Troughton described the wild dog of New Guinea, naming it Canis hallstromi. ...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/12-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us State Biological Resource Considerations (12-ID-a) The Idaho Department of Fish & Game preserves wildlife against any direct take, including wild animals, birds, and...

  1. Structure of the DUF2233 Domain in Bacteria and the Stuttering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    importance of most of these conserved residues as judged by comparison with the activity of wild-type UCE and its influence on trafficking to the Golgi. Similar...

  2. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power...

  3. Appliance Rebates: Frequently Asked Questions | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spikes Former Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory The appliance rebate program has been wildly successful in many states. So successful, in fact, that people...

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/20-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on one of the following: Indian lands; Wilderness areas; Wild and scenic rivers; Wetlands; Units of the National Park System, National Refuges, or National Fish Hatcheries;...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on one of the following: Indian lands; Wilderness areas; Wild and scenic rivers; Wetlands; Units of the National Park System, National Refuges, or National Fish Hatcheries;...

  6. Technical Sessions S. Lovejoy, A. Davis, Y. Tessier Physics Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C. Gautier, D. Lavallee Earth Space Research Group University of California Santa Barbara, ... and wild statistics which require an infinite number of exponents to characterize. ...

  7. Social behavior and the microbiome (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Social behavior and the microbiome Prev Next Title: Social behavior and the microbiome Social interactions influence the communities of microbes that live in wild baboons. ...

  8. Earth melter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Christopher C.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed either by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, or by constructing a melt zone in an apparatus above grade and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials.

  9. Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Christopher C.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials.

  10. Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, C.C.

    1994-10-11

    An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus is described, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials. 3 figs.

  11. The fairness hypothesis and managing the risks of societal technology choices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantor, R.; Rayner, S.

    1987-01-01

    Much of the literature on risk perception and management published over the last few years has asked how society should resolve the question, ''How safe is safe enough.'' This paper argues that, from a societal risk-management perspective, we should be addressing a different range of questions that views societal risk as a whole rather than as the sum of individual hazards. Resolving the question, ''How safe is safe enough.'' is less important in making societal technology choices than ''How fair is safe enough.'' A recent empirical pilot study is reported which explored the fairness hypothesis in the context of nuclear power. The results indicate that the process of technology choice should recognize explicitly the preferred principles different parties hold with respect to obtaining consent from those affected by the risks, distributing the liabilities, and justifying trust in the relevant institutions. The paper closes with a discussion of future prospects for the fairness approach to areas such as noxious facility siting.

  12. Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov

    2009-04-15

    It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

  13. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  14. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, John M.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  15. Laser Polishing: Green Path to Improved Accelerator Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Michael

    2015-10-06

    We pursued three paths toward reducing the initial cost and operating expense of particle accelerators. First, we investigated laser surface melting as an alternative to the present cavity processing approach using noxious chemicals. We successfully demonstrated a process that can be scaled up and defined the path to do so. Second, we sought to develop tailored laser pulsing as a way to simulate the thermal fatigue environment responsible for damaging accelerator components. Though the first three steps along the path were successfully accomplished, the final segment depended on collaborators with unique facilities, whose program was terminated. The third segment aimed to acquire a fundamental understanding of the widely used chemical process that yields the rough surfaces smoothed by laser melting. We found that the roughness is an inherent and unavoidable outcome that limits the performance of components processed thusly.

  16. The role of plants and animals in isolation barriers at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Cadwell, L.L.; Petersen, K.L.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Landeen, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, and in minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. Plants will serve to minimize drainage and erosion, but present,the potential for growing roots into wastes. Animals burrow holes into the soil, and the burrow holes could allow water to preferentially drain into the waste. They also bring soil to the surface which, if wastes are incorporated, could present a risk for the dispersion of wastes into the environment. This report reviews work done to assess the role of plants and animals in isolation barriers at Hanford. It also reviews work done to understand the potential effects from climate change on the plants and animals that may inhabit barriers in the future.

  17. Instrumentation of dredge spoil for landfill construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byle, M.J.; McCullough, M.L.; Alexander, R.; Vasuki, N.C.; Langer, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Delaware Solid Waste Authority's Northern Solid Waste Management Center is located outside of Wilmington Delaware at Cherry Island, a former dredge disposal site. Dredge spoils, of very low permeability, range in depths up to 30 m (100 feet) which form a natural liner and the foundation for the 140 ha (350-acre) municipal solid waste landfill. The soils beneath the landfill have been extensively instrumented to measure pore pressure, settlement and deflections, using inclinometer casings, standpipe piezometers, vibrating wire piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, settlement plates, liquid settlement gages, total pressure cells and thermistors. The nature of the existing waste and anticipated settlements (up to 6 m (19 feet)) have required some unique installation details. The instrumentation data has been integral in planning the landfilling sequence to maintain perimeter slope stability and has provided key geotechnical parameters needed for operation and construction of the landfill. The performance of the instrumentation and monitoring results are discussed.

  18. Confidentiality Concerns Raised by DNA-Based Tests in the Market-Driven Managed Care Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotval, Jeroo S.

    2006-07-28

    In a policy climate where incentives to cherry pick are minimized, Managed Care Organizations can implement practices that safeguard medical privacy to the extent that data is protected from falling into the hands of third parties who could misuse it to discriminate. To the extent that these practices have been codified into the regulatory Network of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Consumers may be able to rest easy about their genetic data being revealed to third parties who may discriminate. However, there are limitations to the use of policy instruments to prevent the discrimination of an entire genre of clients by market driven managed care organizations. Policy measures, to assure that knowledge of genetic conditions and their future costs would not be used by market driven managed care organizations to implement institutional policies and products that would implicitly discriminate against a genre of clients with genetic conditions, present difficulties.

  19. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides

  20. Apparatus for burning bales of trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazar, C. A.

    1985-08-13

    Bales of combustible trash made to specific specifications are burned in a furnace having two parallel upright sidewalls between which the bales pass during burning. A horizontal grate extends between the sidewalls. The bales, if remotely made from the furnace, are bound by an easily meltable strap. The length of the bale is measurably smaller than the distance between said sidewalls to accurately accommodate springback. A ram, after compacting the waste in segmental fashion, pushes each bale to a position between said sidewalls; with the length of the bale being perpendicular to the sidewalls, so that a bale enters the furnace. Springback following the melting of straps allows the bale to expand to fill the gap between the sidewalls. This facilitates ignition and/or burning of the bales and provides a seal against furnace sidewalls. When the ram feeds a fresh bale, previously charged bales (consumed proportional to time in the furnace) are advanced toward the ash discharge port. Before the bales are formed, the trash may be optionally dried by using heated air in the classification into ''light'' sort and ''heavy'' sort. The ''light'' sort is baled and burned as described above. The ''heavy'' sort or a part of the light sort may be premixed with noxious liquid or solid wastes before charging to the furnace. Temperatures consistent with economical use of refractory (1500/sup 0/ F. to 1700/sup 0/ F.) are maintained, for a limited area adjacent the inner wall of the furnace, by addition of liquid water, while interior temperatures of the furnace of about 3000/sup 0/ F. prevail in the central portion of the furnace necessary for the incineration of noxious wastes.

  1. Blue light photoreceptors and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cashmore, Anthony Robert; Ahmad, Margaret; Lin, Chentao

    1998-01-01

    The invention features a substantially pure preparation of a nucleic acid encoding a HY4 or a HY4-related gene. The invention further features transgenic plants encoding a HY4 gene having a shorter stem than substantially homozygous wild type nontransgenic plants; and, transgenic plants comprising complementary HY4 sequences having a longer stem than substantially homozygous wild type nontransgenic plants.

  2. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibitioninduction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria ?-oxidation. -- Highlights: ? Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ? Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ? Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ? Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  3. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall-Griswold, Judy A.; Leitzinger, Eric J.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID

    1995-11-01

    A total of 333 stream sections were sampled in 1994 to monitor in chinook salmon and steelhead trout parr populations in Idaho. Percent carry capacity and density estimates were summarized by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon. These data were also summarized by cells and subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992-1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  4. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hosted a Northern Saw-Whet Owl banding demonstration by master bander, Tim Tolford. Bird banding is a technique used to study wild birds by attaching a tag to their leg to...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... K. ; Ishikawa, Tetsuya ; La Trobe) ; RIKEN) ; ESRF) June 2016 , Advances in X-Ray Optics;SPIE;129-139 Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Flynn, G.J. ; ...

  6. 180C

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fragua Council of State Governments-ERC Conrad Smith P. Edwards R. Pinney M. Mulhare C. Richardson M. Vyenielo W. Sherman C. Smith C. Smith E. Wilds C. Smith W. Sherman J. ...

  7. SREL Reprint #3331

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deer and wild boar within the Chernobyl exclusion zone are similar to those in four (uncontaminated) nature reserves in the region and wolf abundance is more than 7 times higher. ...

  8. Coal keeps the home fires burning, at a price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, J.

    2007-11-15

    The wild ride of 2007 thermal and coking coal and freight prices does not show any signs of abating as 2008 nears, leaving consumers coping with historic high costs, except in the US. 3 figs.

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with a "wild" annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. ...

  10. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with a "wild" annual grass, Avena fatua, which is commonly a dominant plant in Mediterranean-type annual grasslands around the world; the plant was grown in its grassland soil. ...