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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Wild Cherries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cherries Cherries Nature Bulletin No. 201-A October 9, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILD CHERRIES This is a year of bountiful harvests, rewarding the labor of the farmer and the gardener, and also producing an abundance of wild fruits which may be had for the picking. In our forest preserves, all wild fruits have been unusually large, juicy and full of flavor -- strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, currants, gooseberries, elderberries, grapes, plums, haws, crabapples and cherries. To some of us, the last is the tastiest of them all and, a month ago, the outer twigs of the wild cherry trees were drooping with heavy clusters of this fruit. The familiar Wild Black Cherry is the only one of the four kinds of wild cherries found in this region which grows to be a large forest tree widespread throughout the eastern half of North America. Its reddish- brown close-grained wood, strong and rather hard, takes a satiny finish and compares favorably with mahogany. It is highly prized for fine cabinet work and some of our most beautiful pieces of antique furniture from colonial and pioneer times were made of wild cherry.

2

BP Cherry Point Congeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVISED 404 (B) (1) REVISED 404 (B) (1) ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Prepared for: BP West Coast Products, LLC Revised June 29, 2004 1501 Fourth Avenue, Suite 1400 Seattle, WA 98101-1616 (206) 438-2700 33749546.05070 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 I NT RODUCTI ON ................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 P URPOSE AND NEE D .......................................................................................................... 1 2.1 RELIABILITY .................................................................................................... 1 2.2 COST-EFFECTIVENESS ................................................................................... 3 2.3 SIZE OF FACILITY............................................................................................

3

Cherry A. Murray | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cherry A. Murray Cherry A. Murray About Us Cherry A. Murray - Dean, Harvard University School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Cherry A. Murray Cherry A. Murray is Dean of Harvard University's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and Professor of Physics. Previously, Murray served as principal associate director for science and technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 2004-2009 and was president of the American Physical Society (APS) in 2009. Before joining Lawrence Livermore, Murray was Senior Vice President of Physical Sciences and Wireless Research after a 27 year long career at Bell Laboratories Research. Murray was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1999, to the

4

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2004 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council July 12, 2004 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your reference is the abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. This document is designed to correct information and further explain what was provided in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-megawatt gas-fired combined cycle cogeneration facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional

5

Cherry Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherry Creek Geothermal Area Cherry Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cherry Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.85,"lon":-114.905,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

ChangeinImportanceValue BlackCherry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-30.0 -20.0 -10.0 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 ChangeinImportanceValue 1987-2004 BlackCherry YellowPoplar Red&Black measurement periods. -30.0 -20.0 -10.0 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 ChangeinImportanceValue 1987-2004 BlackCherry YellowPoplar Red&BlackOak WhiteOak OtherOak SugarMaple RedMaple WhiteAsh Miscellaneous Species Group Aspect Code 1

7

Wild Rice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an Algonquin Indian name for Wild Rice, the most productive and valuable wild grain crop we have. Wild rice and acorns were two crops harvested in autumn by the Indians in...

8

Noxious Weed Monitoring at the U.S. Air Force Academy-Year 1 Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This project was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of ongoing management of noxious weeds at the Academy..................................................................................... 20 Figure 13. Treated individuals of Scotch thistle near the power substation along the Water. ................................................................................................................. 28 TABLE OF TABLES Table 1. Noxious weed management objectives for species targeted in this study

9

A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents, and thus it is now common for local residents to be compensated for the presence of the facility. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent premia between cities that result from the presence of the facility. However, most of the focus has been on the behavior of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. The authors use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. They find that renters and owners differ in their response to noxious facilities, although the differences are not systematic. Furthermore, the differences between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or socio-demographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations of noxious facilities by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

Clark, D.E. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Cherry-Todd Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherry-Todd Electric Coop, Inc Cherry-Todd Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Cherry-Todd Electric Coop, Inc Place South Dakota Utility Id 3435 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Heat Rate <100 kW Electric Heat Rate Large Consumer >100 kW Electrical Thermal Storage Rate Schedule A, Rural Residential Residential Schedule A, Town Residential and Small Commercial Commercial Schedule GS, Commercial Three-Phase over 100KW Commercial Schedule GS, Industrial Three-Phase Over 100KW Industrial

11

NREL: News Feature - Prestigious Cherry Award Goes to NREL Scientist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prestigious Cherry Award Goes to NREL Scientist Prestigious Cherry Award Goes to NREL Scientist June 20, 2011 In this photo, the two scientists are smiling as they peer at instruments that process and measure solar cells. Enlarge image National Renewable Energy Laboratory post-doc, John Simon, left, and NREL Principal Scientist, Jerry Olson, right, view test materials in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) reactor in their lab at the Solar Energy Research Facility at NREL in Golden, Colo. Credit: Dennis Schroeder A physicist from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory who was a pioneer in multi-junction solar cells for use in outer space and on planet Earth has been awarded the prestigious Cherry Award by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Jerry Olson, a principal scientist at NREL, received the award at the

12

Wild Onions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Onions Onions Nature Bulletin No. 184 March 21, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILD ONIONS In 1673-74, when Father Marquette and his party journeyed from what is now Green Bay, Wisconsin, and returned by way of what is now Chicago. It is recorded that one of their chief foods was the "wild onion": probably the Wild Leek and the Meadow Garlic in the woods of Wisconsin, and the Nodding Onion so abundant in the wet prairies around Chicago. Two of the first plants to push through the ground in spring, along with the skunk cabbage, are the wild leek and the wild garlic. A woodsman will eat handfuls of their tender leaves, which is all right if he stays in the woods away from people. Believe it or not, leeks, garlics and onions are "outlaw" members of the lily family. Their flavor and odor are due to an oil-like vegetable compound of sulfur which is volatile and dissipated by heat, making them more palatable when cooked -- particularly if boiled In 3 different waters.

13

Wild Roses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roses Roses Nature Bulletin No. 382-A May 16, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILD ROSES The wild flowers of our forest preserves come into bloom, fade and go to seed, one after another, to present an almost year-long pageant of color. The most spectacular displays are in spring when the woodlands are carpeted with a multitude of delicate blossoms; in May when the landscape is dominated by the pink and white masses of crabapple and hawthorn; and in late summer when the prairies blaze with bands of rich golds, blues and purples. This parade begins quietly in February when the queer hooded bloom of the skunk cabbage pushes up through the crusted snow; and ends in autumn, after the snow has begun to fly again, with the uncoiling of the slender yellow petals of the witch hazel. But, for many of us, the stars of this production are the Wild Roses that show their faces during the long days of June and Midsummer.

14

Safety Topic Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Topic ­ Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical vapors and gases. A face velocity of 100 feet per minute (fpm) provides efficient vapor capture the better. (T) (F) A chemical hood can be used for storage of volatile, flammable, or odiferous materials

Cohen, Robert E.

15

A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters  

SciTech Connect

The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents. As a result, one would expect people`s residential and employment choices to reflect a desire to avoid proximity to such facilities. Ibis behavior would in turn affect labor and housing prices. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value impacts of noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent differentials among cities that result from environmental amenities and disamenities. However, most of the research focus has been on the behavioral response of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. We use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. Although the magnitude of the responses of renters and owners to noxious facilities and other environmental characteristics varies, the signs are generally consistent. The differences in values between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or sociodemographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences in characteristics between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

Clark, D.E. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cherry Valley Elementary School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Elementary School Wind Project Valley Elementary School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Cherry Valley Elementary School Wind Project Facility Cherry Valley Elementary School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location CO Number of Units 1 Wind Turbine Manufacturer SkyStream Wind for Schools Portal Turbine ID 120342 References Wind Powering America[1] Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

17

NREL: News - NREL's Keith Emery Awarded Prestigious Cherry Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

713 713 NREL's Keith Emery Awarded Prestigious Cherry Award Top PV award goes to researcher who brought credibility to testing of solar cells and modules June 19, 2013 An engineer from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) whose testing and characterization laboratory brings credibility to the measurement of efficiency of solar cells and modules has been awarded the prestigious William R. Cherry Award by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Keith Emery, a principal scientist at NREL, received the award at the 39th IEEE's Photovoltaic Specialists Conference in Tampa Bay. "Accredited measurements from Emery's laboratories are considered the gold standard by the U.S. and international PV communities," said NREL

18

An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values  

SciTech Connect

Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values  

SciTech Connect

Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 5, 2003 EFSEC Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council September 5, 2003 Dear Reader: Enclosed for your review is the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project. The proponent, BP West Coast Products, LLC, has requested to build a 720-Megawatt Gas-Fired Combined Cycle Cogeneration Facility in Whatcom County, Washington, and interconnect this facility into the regional power transmission grid. To integrate the new power generation into the transmission grid, Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) may need to re-build 4.7 miles of an existing 230-kV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendices Appendices DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 5, 2003 SITING AND WETLAND 404(b)1 ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS BP CHERRY POINT COGENERATION PROJECT [REVISED] Prepared for: BP West Coast Products, LLC Submitted by: Golder Associates Inc. March 2003 013-1421.541 March 2003 i 013-1421.541 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED 5 3. ALTERNATIVES 6 3.1 No Action Alternative 6 3.1.1 Self-Reliance 6 3.1.2 Efficiency 6 3.1.3 Reliability 6 3.1.4 Other Impacts of the No Action Alternative 7 3.2 Project Site Location Alternative Selection Process 7 3.2.1 Sufficient Acreage Available

22

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Cherry Hill, New Jersey. [Hotels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar heating and hot water system installed in existing buildings at the Cherry Hill Inn in Cherry Hill, New Jersey is described in detail. The system went into operation November 8, 1978 and is expected to furnish 31.5% of the overall heating load and 29.8% of the hot water load. The collectors are General Electric Company liquid evacuated tube type. The storage system is an above ground insulated steel water tank with a capacity of 7,500 gallons.

Not Available

1979-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wild Birds in Captivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wild Birds in Captivity Name: Suzanne Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Our cat has found a young cedar waxwing - which he left unharmed - on our lawn. We have taken...

24

Michael Wilde | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael Wilde Software Architect Michael Wilde is a software architect and a Fellow in the Computation Institute. Research Interests Parallel programming Parallel scripting...

25

BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their respective decision-making processes associated with the Applicant's request to interconnect to Bonneville's transmission system and proposed location of the project within wetland areas. Therefore, this Draft EIS serves as the environmental review document for SEPA and for NEPA as required by Bonneville for the interconnection and the Corps for its 404 individual permit. The EIS addresses direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the proposed project, and potential mitigation measures proposed by the Applicant, as well as measures recommended by EFSEC. The information and resulting analysis presented in this Draft EIS are based primarily on information provided by the Applicant in the ASC No. 2002-01 (BP 2002). Where additional information was used to evaluate the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, that information has been referenced. EFSEC's environmental consultant, Shapiro and Associates, Inc., did not perform additional studies during the preparation of this Draft EIS.

N /A

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (DOE/EIS-0349) (11/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Cherry Poi BP Cherry Poi nt Cogeneration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has decided to implement the proposed action identified in the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0349, August 2004). Under the proposed action, Bonneville will offer contract terms for interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (Project) with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS), as requested by BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP) and proposed in the FEIS. The proposed Project involves constructing and operating a new 720-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power generation facility at a 265-acre site adjacent to BP's existing Cherry Point Refinery between Ferndale and

27

Domestic Animals that go Wild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and become tamer than their wild relatives. By the artificial selection of breeding stock, these domesticated animals have been greatly modified to fill man's needs for better...

28

PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

T. Scott Hickman

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tetraquark resonances with the triple flip-flop potential, decays in the cherry in a broken glass approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a unitarized formalism to study tetraquarks using the triple flip-flop potential, which includes two meson-meson potentials and the tetraquark four-body potential. This can be related to the Jaffe-Wilczek and to the Karliner-Lipkin tetraquark models, where we also consider the possible open channels, since the four quarks and antiquarks may at any time escape to a pair of mesons. Here we study a simplified two-variable toy model and explore the analogy with a cherry in a glass, but a broken one where the cherry may escape from. It is quite interesting to have our system confined or compact in one variable and infinite in the other variable. In this framework we solve the two-variable Schr\\"odinger equation in configuration space. With the finite difference method, we compute the spectrum, we search for localized states and we attempt to compute phase shifts. We then apply the outgoing spherical wave method to compute in detail the phase shifts and and to determine the decay widths. We explore the model in the equal mass case, and we find narrow resonances. In particular the existence of two commuting angular momenta is responsible for our small decay widths.

Pedro Bicudo; Marco Cardoso

2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

Wild Steelhead Studies, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was attained in implementing the complex and challenging studies of wild steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss production in Idaho. Study sites were selected and techniques were developed to collect the needed data in remote wilderness locations. Cursory examination of existing data provides indication that most wild steelhead stocks are under escaped, especially the Group B stocks. Abundance of wild steelhead is generally declining in recent years. The portable weir concept and electronic fish counting developed through this project have been well received by land owners and reviewing governmental agencies with less impact to the land, stream, and fishery resources than conventional permanent weirs.

Holubetz, Terry B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

32

York's Wild Kingdom : a development proposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

York's Wild Kingdom is a privately held zoo and amusement park in York, a Massachusetts based shopping center developer and investment compa Kingdom and the 150 acres that surround it. The community is culturaIl ( and York ...

Rae, Kimberley Whiting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Clean Diesel: Overcoming Noxious Fumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative braking to capture cially in medium-sized trucks used for deliveries, and fuel-cell energy

Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Daniel; Dwyer, Harry A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1982 State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Established by The Wild Resource Conservation Act of 1982, the Wild Resource Conservation Program is a part of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The program works closely with the Pennsylvania Game

35

Cherry Picking in Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Farming in the UK struggles to survive and land usage declines; prime agricultural land in impoverished nations is diverted towards export crops instead of feeding the indigenous peoples; meanwhile the global ecosystem suffers from the excessive... or imports a type of product it did not have before, that country is altered. If a country imports a technology or improves an item it already had, it is changed. This can be as simple as knives and forks or clothing, or as complex as cars, tractors...

Rowbotham, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

37

Wild Brush Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brush Energy Brush Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Brush Energy Place Seattle, Washington Product Washington State-based clean energy company and publicly traded junior energy firm based in Seattle. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

NREL: Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) Wind Research WILD WILD Browse By Reset All Geography Africa (11) Apply Africa filter Asia (12) Apply Asia filter Australia and Oceania (10) Apply Australia and Oceania filter Europe (219) Apply Europe filter Global (7) Apply Global filter North America (217) Apply North America filter Technology Land-Based Wind (280) Apply Land-Based Wind filter Marine Energy (58) Apply Marine Energy filter Offshore Wind (161) Apply Offshore Wind filter Power Lines (66) Apply Power Lines filter Towers (23) Apply Towers filter Animal Birds (334) Apply Birds filter Fish (71) Apply Fish filter Invertebrates (44) Apply Invertebrates filter Mammals (185) Apply Mammals filter Reptiles (10) Apply Reptiles filter Publication Year 2013 (92) Apply 2013 filter

39

Wild Horse and Burro Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wild Horse and Burro Management Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

40

Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD) contains citations to more than 1,000 journal articles, government publications, conference proceedings, and other reports.

Sinclair, K.; Sandberg, T.; Cohn, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

42

Myakka River Wild and Scenic Designation and Preservation Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Myakka was designated as the state's only "Florida Wild and Scenic River" by the Florida State Legislature in 1985. The act provides for preservation and management of the 34-mile portion of...

43

Wild Horse II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wild Horse II Wind Farm Wild Horse II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse II Wind Farm Facility Wild Horse II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Puget Sound Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location Kittitas County Coordinates 47.000782°, -120.190609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.000782,"lon":-120.190609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Crop to wild introgression in lettuce: following the fate of crop genome segments in backcross populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

article as: Uwimana et al. : Crop to wild introgression infollowing the fate of crop genome segments in backcrossto the wild parent reduces the crop genome content in amount

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for maintaining a state water plan, intended to implement state policies for water management. A portion of the plan is reserved for rivers

46

Detecting Adversarial Advertisements in the Wild Google, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting Adversarial Advertisements in the Wild D. Sculley Google, Inc. dsculley@google.com Matthew Eric Otey Google, Inc. otey@google.com Michael Pohl Google, Inc. mpohl@google.com Bridget Spitznagel Google, Inc. drsprite@google.com John Hainsworth Google, Inc. hainsworth@google.com Yunkai Zhou

Cortes, Corinna

47

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Wild Horse Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse Wind Power Project Facility Wild Horse Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location Kittitas County Coordinates 47.000782°, -120.190609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.000782,"lon":-120.190609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present, wild hogs exist in Texas in free-ranging populations numbering in the millions. These populations continue to expand, and now are pervasive in almost all land resource areas of the state. Wild hogs have a noted presence in the ranching and farming industry. This presence is both biophysical and socioeconomic in nature. The hogs financially influence agriculture as both a valuable asset and expensive liability. The economic presence of this influence reflects opposing personal preferences which play an important part in opposing valuations. Biological information is available which concerns the hogs, but no research has centered specifically around the economic effects of the hog's presence upon agricultural producers. To properly perform any economic analysis of wild hog impacts on the state's agricultural producers, good data was needed and became a primary focus of this study. A second need and focus of the study was the employment of enterprise budgeting as an economic research method to discover values for the positive and negative financial effects of the hogs. These methods were used to yield sound values for the economic effects of the wild hogs on the Texas agriculture producers which were the focus of this study. This research effort demonstrates the economic effects of wild hogs on eight selected Texas agricultural producers. An intensive survey was conducted which involved gathering primary data which focused on the effects the hogs have on the respondent's operations. This data was used to construct both full and partial combination effect enterprise budgets for the respondent's agriculture enterprises. These budgets yield values for the benefits and damages that result from the hog's growing influence on landowners / managers. The values for the economic effects of the hogs are presented and discussed in an attempt to offer information and alternatives which may help efficiently manage populations of the hogs in Texas. This information can be used to evaluate biophysical and socioeconomic options for that management effort in several areas. These are the establishment of legal ownership of the hogs, legal liability, and creation of rules, regulations, and programs which increase the efficiency of management efforts.

Bach, Joel Paul

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock 1 cup wild rice, rinsed Sea ground pepper to taste 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons buttermilk or plain low-fat

Blanchette, Robert A.

52

Effects of hunting and season of fire on wild turkey populations in South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses impacts to wild turkey populations from hunting and prescribed fire. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To compare survival rates and causes of mortality of wild turkey gobblers between hunted and unhunted populations; (2) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on nesting success, survival and habitat use of wild turkey hens; (3) To determine the effects of dormant versus growing season prescribed burns on the availability of wild turkey plant foods.

Moore, William, F.; Kilgo, John, C.; Guynn, David, C.; Davis, James, R.

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

BP Cherry Point Congeneration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Responses to Comments Responses to Comments DOE/EIS-0349 Lead Agencies: Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Bonneville Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2004 Volume 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ......................................................................................................... i 1. INTRODUCTION TO VOLUME 2, RESPONSES TO COMMENTS ....................................... 1 1.1 Background .............................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Organization of Volume 2 ....................................................................................................... 1 1.3 References Cited in Volume 2.................................................................................................

54

Transgenic crops get a test in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel British research program called PROSAMO - Planned Release of Selected and Modified Organisms - has just produced its first batch of results on the ecological behavior of a genetically manipulated variety of oil seed rape (known to Americans as canola). As expected, the preliminary data indicate that these plants do not outgrow their competitors in the wild, nor is there any evidence that they pass on their foreign genes to other species. PROSAMO is moving on to test other crops with other foreign genes. If these results are as reassuring, scientists around the world will have solid evidence with which to soothe fears.

Cherfas, J.

1991-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Electric Coop, Inc Rice Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Rice Electric Coop, Inc Place Minnesota Utility Id 20639 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AUTOMATIC YARD LIGHT SERVICE Lighting FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 10 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 15 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 25 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 37.5 KVA transformer Residential FARM AND HOME SERVICE - Up to 50 KVA transformer Residential

56

Wild Horse 69-kV transmission line environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc. (Hill County) proposes to construct and operate a 69-kV transmission line from its North Gildford Substation in Montana north to the Canadian border. A vicinity project area map is enclosed as a figure. TransCanada Power Corporation (TCP), a Canadian power-marketing company, will own and construct the connecting 69-kV line from the international border to Express Pipeline`s pump station at Wild Horse, Alberta. This Environmental Assessment is prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) as lead federal agency to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as part of DOE`s review and approval process of the applications filed by Hill County for a DOE Presidential Permit and License to Export Electricity to a foreign country. The purpose of the proposed line is to supply electric energy to a crude oil pump station in Canada, owned by Express Pipeline Ltd. (Express). The pipeline would transport Canadian-produced oil from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Caster, Wyoming. The Express Pipeline is scheduled to be constructed in 1996--97 and will supply crude oil to refineries in Wyoming and the midwest.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wild Steelhead Studies, Salmon and Clearwater Rivers, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To enumerate chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss adult escapements, weirs were operated in Marsh, Chamberlain, West Fork Chamberlain, and Running creeks. Beginning in late July 1994, a juvenile trap was installed in Running Creek to estimate juvenile outmigrants. Plans have been completed to install a weir in Rush Creek to enumerate steelhead adult escapement beginning in spring 1995. Design and agreements are being developed for Johnson Creek and Captain John Creek. Data collected in 1993 and 1994 indicate that spring chinook salmon and group-B steelhead populations and truly nearing extinction levels. For example, no adult salmon or steelhead were passed above the West Fork Chamberlain Creek weir in 1984, and only 6 steelhead and 16 chinook salmon were passed into the important spawning area on upper Marsh Creek. Group-A steelhead are considerably below desirable production levels, but in much better status than group-B stocks. Production of both group-A and group-B steelhead is being limited by low spawning escapements. Studies have not been initiated on wild summer chinook salmon stocks.

Holubetz, Terry B; Leth, Brian D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) GRR/Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-FD-a - Wild & Scenic Rivers Section 7(a) 17FDAWildScenicRiversSection7AProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies National Park Service Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service United States Forest Service Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations & Policies Wild and Scenic Rivers Act 36 CFR 297 Wild and Scenic Rivers Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17FDAWildScenicRiversSection7AProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

59

V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild 3: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild April 26, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A new Metasploit module for the Java 7u17 sandbox bypass emerged PLATFORM: All versions of Java SE-7 (including the recently released 1.7.0_21-b11) ABSTRACT: Java issues are being exploited in the wild by exploit kits, with Cool and Redkit specifically being known to use these bugs, and others likely to follow shortly. REFERENCE LINKS: SecList SE-2012-01 Security Explorations IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: It can be used to achieve a complete Java security sandbox bypass on a target system. IMPACT: Manipulation of data System access SOLUTION: Vendor recommends patch systems immediately Addthis Related Articles V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary

60

Ian Foster, Ti Leggett, Mike Papka, Mike Wilde Win the Analytics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ti Leggett, Mike Papka, and Mike Wilde were part of the team that won the Analytics Challenge at SC07 for presenting a new approach for protecting cyberinfrastructure. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation and Monitoring of Wild /Natural Steelhead Trout Production, 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to provide additional, and more definitive, information regarding wild steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations in Idaho. Important streams for wild steelhead production were identified and selected for monitoring. Monitoring activities employed among streams varied, but generally included: aerial redd counts, placement of adult weirs, enumeration of juveniles through mask and snorkel counts, and emigrant trapping. This report details activities during the 1996 field season.

Leth, Brian D.; Holubetz, Terry B.; Nemeth, Doug (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive The lower portion of the St. Croix River in Minnesota and Wisconsin is

63

Protection of Wild Adult Steelhead in Idaho by Adipose Fin Removal: 1985-1988 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steelhead trout reared in Idaho hatcheries for release during the 1984--1988 outmigrations were adipose fin clipped to differentiate between wild/natural and hatchery-reared fish. From 1984--1988, 34 million hatchery-reared steelhead trout were clipped and 30.1 million were released; the difference being made up by hatchery mortality and the percent of acceptable clips. Since 1987, the adipose clip has given protection to all wild/natural steelhead and identified them from hatchery stocks. 135 refs.

Duke, Rodney C.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this study are to (1) characterize the outmigration timing of different wild stocks of spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers, (2) determine if consistent patterns are apparent, and (3) determine what environmental factors influence outmigration timing. The authors PIT tagged wild spring/summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1993, and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary Dams during spring, summer, and fall 1994. This report details their findings.

Achord, Stephen; Matthews, Gene M.; Kamikawa, Daniel J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A comparison of Texas and Iowa broodstocks for eastern wild turkey restoration in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Objectives of this study were to compare mortality, reproduction, and movements of eastern wild turkeys (Meleagis gallopavo silvestris) from Iowa and Texas which were relocated (more)

Gainey, Jeffery Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Abstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

52820). Sequence analysis of ScNLE protein A BLAST search of the GenBank protein database revealed transcription factors, we searched the ScNLE promoter for different sequence motifs recog- nizedAbstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum

67

Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis of feces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting intraannual dietary variability in wild mountain gorillas by stable isotope analysis 10016; and Departments of c Biology and e Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Board November 1, 2012 (received for review September 19, 2012) We use stable isotope ratios in feces

Rothman, Jessica M.

68

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We PIT tagged wild spring/summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1995 and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during spring and summer 1996.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced

70

Cherry Road Building Fire Washington DC 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the computer model was developed from 3 sources; the District of Columbia ... doors provided outside air (oxygen) to a pre-heated, under ventilated ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wild Pigs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlike other pigs its hind feet have only three toes instead of four; also there is a gland on its back that gives off a foul-smelling secretion. It is noted for devouring...

72

Program on Technology Innovation: Technology R&D Strategy for the Electric Power Industry: "Wild Cards"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address the many challenges facing the electric power industry during the next 20 years, an effective process of technology R&D planning is needed. To augment recently completed scenario-based planning, this report identifies the technology and R&D needs that result from 21 additional institutional, political, financial, technical, or social changes ("wild cards") not addressed in the prior scenarios project (see EPRI Report 1014385). This report also identifies key R&D priorities that occur in multip...

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Knapp, Steve

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

The abundance of presolar grains in comet 81P/WILD 2  

SciTech Connect

We carried out hypervelocity impact experiments in order to test the possibility that presolar grains are preferentially destroyed during impact of the comet 81P/Wild 2 samples into the Stardust Al foil collectors. Powdered samples of the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 were shot at 6 km s{sup -1} into Stardust flight spare Al foil. Craters from the Acfer 094 test shots, as well as ones from the actual Stardust cometary foils, were analyzed by NanoSIMS ion imaging to search for presolar grains. We found two O-rich presolar grains and two presolar SiC grains in the Acfer 94 test shots, with measured abundances in the foils of 4 and 5 ppm, respectively, significantly lower than the amount of presolar grains actually present in this meteorite. Based on known abundances of these phases in Acfer 094, we estimate a loss of over 90% of the O-rich presolar grains; the fraction of SiC lost is lower, reflecting its higher resistance to destruction. In the Stardust cometary foils, we identified four O-rich presolar grains in 5000 {mu}m{sup 2} of crater residue. Including a presolar silicate grain found by Leitner et al., the overall measured abundance of O-rich presolar grains in Wild 2 is {approx}35 ppm. No presolar SiC has been found in the foil searches, although one was identified in the aerogel samples. Based on the known abundances of presolar silicates and oxides in Acfer 094, we can calculate the pre-impact abundances of these grains in the Stardust samples. Our calculations indicate initial abundances of 600-830 ppm for O-rich presolar grains. Assuming a typical diameter of {approx}300 nm for SiC suggests a presolar SiC abundance of {approx}45 ppm. Analyses of the Stardust samples indicated early on that recognizable presolar components were not particularly abundant, an observation that was contrary to expectations that the cometary material would, like interplanetary dust particles, be dominated by primitive materials from the early solar system (including abundant presolar grains), which had remained essentially unaltered over solar system history in the cold environment of the Kuiper Belt. Our work shows that comet Wild 2, in fact, does contain more presolar grains than measurements on the Stardust samples suggest, with abundances similar to those observed in primitive IDPs.

Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Ong, W. J. [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kearsley, Anton T. [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)] [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, Mark J., E-mail: floss@wustl.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE Joint Genome Institute: First Wild Grass Species and Model System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 10, 2010 February 10, 2010 First Wild Grass Species and Model System for Energy Crops Sequenced WALNUT CREEK, CA-As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works toward developing sustainable sources of clean renewable energy, perennial grasses have emerged as major candidates for the commercial production of cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks. However, little is known about the specific biological traits of the grasses that might contribute to their usefulness for energy production, in part because such grasses typically have long lifecycles and possess large, complex genomes, making them difficult to study. Representative genomes for two of the three major subfamilies of grasses-those that include rice, maize, sorghum and sugar cane-have already been sequenced. Now in the February 11 edition of the journal

76

A simulation model of Rio Grande wild turkey dynamics in the Edwards Plateau of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I investigated the effect of precipitation and predator abundance on Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo; RGWT) in Texas. My results suggested that RGWT production was strongly correlated with cumulative winter precipitation over the range of the RGWT in Texas. However, I found no evidence that predator abundance influenced RGWT production, although spatial-asynchrony of predator populations at multiple spatial scales might have masked broad-scale effects. Using the results of these analyses, as well as empirical data derived from the literature and from field studies in the southern Edwards Plateau, I developed a stochastic, density-dependent, sex- and agespecific simulation model of wild turkey population dynamics. I used the model to evaluate the effect of alternative harvest management strategies on turkey populations. Sensitivity analysis of the model suggested that shape of the density-dependence relationship, clutch size, hatchability, juvenile sex ratio, poult survival, juvenile survival, and nonbreeding hen mortality most strongly influenced model outcome. Of these, density-dependence, sex ratio, and juvenile survival were least understood and merit further research. My evaluation of fall hen harvest suggested that current rates do not pose a threat to turkey populations. Moreover, it appears that hen harvest can be extended to other portions of the RGWT range without reducing turkey abundance, assuming that population dynamics and harvest rates are similar to those in the current fall harvest zone. Finally, simulation of alternative hen harvest rates suggested that rates ?5% of the fall hen population resulted in significant declines in the simulated population after 25 years, and rates ?15% resulted in significant risk of extinction to the simulated population.

Schwertner, Thomas Wayne

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Mineral and geothermal resource potential of Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake roadless areas Plumas, Shasta, and Tehama Counties, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical surveys in Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake Roadless Areas indicate no potential for metallic or non-metallic mineral resources in the areas and no potential for coal or petroleum energy resources. However, Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and part of Heart Lake Roadless Area lie in Lassen Known Geothermal Resources Area, and much of the rest of Heart Lake Roadless Area is subject to non-competitive geothermal lease applications. Both areas are adjacent to Lassen Volcanic National Park, which contains extensive areas of fumaroles, hot springs, and hydrothermally altered rock; voluminous silicic volcanism occurred here during late Pleistocene and Holocene time. Geochemical data and geological interpretation indicate that the thermal manifestations in the Park and at Morgan and Growler Hot Springs (immediately west of Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area) are part of the same large geothermal system. Consequently, substantial geothermal resources are likely to be discovered in Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and cannot be ruled out for Heart Lake Roadless Area.

Muffler, L.J.P.; Clynne, M.A.; Cook, A.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Dose-rate-effects in XRCC1 wild-type and mutant CHO cell lines using An ?AM source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on both the AA8 (wild-type CHO cells) and EM9 (XRCC1 null CHO mutants) cell lines. In particular, this study performed clonogenic survival and growth assays to ...

Chambers, Dwight McCoy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Genomic organization of chromosomal centromeres in the cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., and its wild progenitor, O. rufipogon Griff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centromeres are responsible for sister-chromatid cohesion, kinetochore formation, and accurate transmission of chromosomes. Rice provides an excellent model for organizational and functional studies of centromeres since several of its chromosomes contain limited amounts of satellite and other repetitive sequences in their centromeres. To facilitate molecular characterization of the centromeres, we screened several BIBAC and BAC libraries of japonica and indica rice, using several centromere-specific repeat elements as probes. The positive clones were identified, fingerprinted and integrated into our whole genome physical map databases of the two rice subspecies. BAC/BIBACbased physical maps were constructed for the centromeric regions of the subspecies. To determine whether the genomic organization of the centromeres has changed since the cultivated rice split from its progenitor and to identify the sequences potentially playing an important role in centromere functions, we constructed a large-insert BIBAC library for the wild progenitor of Asian cultivated rice, O. rufipogon. The library contains 24,192 clones, has an average insert size of 163 kb, and covers 5 x haploid genome of wild rice. We screened the wild rice library with two centromere 8-specific overgo probes designed from the sequences flanking centromere 8 of japonica rice. A BIBACbased map was constructed for wild rice centromere 8. Two of the clones, B43P04 and B15E04, were found to span the entire region of the wild rice centromere and thus selected for sequencing the centromere. By sequencing the B43P09 clone, a 95% genomic sequence of the long arm side of wild rice centromere 8 was obtained. Comparative analysis revealed that the centromeric regions of wild rice have a similar gene content to japonica rice, but the centromeric regions of japonica rice have undergone chromosomal rearrangements at both large scale and nucleotide levels. In addition, although the 155-bp satellite repeats showed dramatic changes at the middle region, they are conserved at the 5' and 3' ends of satellite monomers, suggesting that those regions might have important functional roles for centromeres. These results provide not only new insights into genomic organization and evolution, but also a platform for functional analysis of plant centromeres.

Uhm, Taesik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Digital Mapping and Environmental Characterization of National Wild and Scenic River Systems  

SciTech Connect

Spatially accurate geospatial information is required to support decision-making regarding sustainable future hydropower development. Under a memorandum of understanding among several federal agencies, a pilot study was conducted to map a subset of National Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs) at a higher resolution and provide a consistent methodology for mapping WSRs across the United States and across agency jurisdictions. A subset of rivers (segments falling under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service) were mapped at a high resolution using the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The spatial extent and representation of river segments mapped at NHD scale were compared with the prevailing geospatial coverage mapped at a coarser scale. Accurately digitized river segments were linked to environmental attribution datasets housed within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program database to characterize the environmental context of WSR segments. The results suggest that both the spatial scale of hydrography datasets and the adherence to written policy descriptions are critical to accurately mapping WSRs. The environmental characterization provided information to deduce generalized trends in either the uniqueness or the commonness of environmental variables associated with WSRs. Although WSRs occur in a wide range of human-modified landscapes, environmental data layers suggest that they provide habitats important to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and recreation important to humans. Ultimately, the research findings herein suggest that there is a need for accurate, consistent, mapping of the National WSRs across the agencies responsible for administering each river. Geospatial applications examining potential landscape and energy development require accurate sources of information, such as data layers that portray realistic spatial representations.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bosnall, Peter [National Park Service] [National Park Service; Hetrick, Shelaine L [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Refractory Inclusion Returned by Stardust from Comet 81P/Wild 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft is a suite of particles from one impact track (Track 25) that are Ca-, Al-rich and FeO-free. We studied three particles from this track that range in size from 5.3 x 3.2 {micro}m to 15 x 10 {micro}m. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show that they consist of very fine-grained (from {approx}0.5 to {approx}2 {micro}m) Al-rich, Ti-bearing and Ti-free clinopyroxene, Mg-Al spinel, anorthite, perovskite, and osbornite (TiN). In addition to these phases, the terminal particle, named 'Inti', also contains melilite. All of these phases, with the exception of osbornite, are common in refractory inclusions and are predicted to condense at high temperature from a gas of solar composition. Osbornite, though very rare, has also been found in meteoritic refractory inclusions, and could have formed in a region of the nebula where carbon became enriched relative to oxygen compared to solar composition. Compositions of Ti-pyroxene in Inti are similar, but not identical, to those of fassaite from Allende inclusions. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that Ti-rich pyroxene in Inti has Ti{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} within the range of typical meteoritic fassaite, consistent with formation under reducing conditions comparable to those of a system of solar composition. Inti is {sup 16}O-rich, with {delta}{sup 18}O {approx} {delta}{sup 17}O {approx} 40{per_thousand}, like unaltered phases in refractory inclusions and refractory IDPs. With grain sizes, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and an oxygen isotopic composition like those of refractory inclusions, we conclude that Inti is a refractory inclusion that formed in the inner solar nebula. Identification of a particle that formed in the inner Solar System among the comet samples demonstrates that there was transport of materials from the inner to the outer nebula, probably either in a bipolar outflow or by turbulence.

Simon, S B; Joswiak, D J; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Chi, M; Grossman, L; Al?on, J; Brownlee, D E; Fallon, S; Hutcheon, I D; Matrajt, G; McKeegan, K D

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Evaluation of the Reproductive Success of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead in Hatchery and Natural and Hatchery Environments : Annual Report for 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the field, laboratory, and analytical work from December 2007 through November 2008 on a research project that investigates interactions and comparative reproductive success of wild and hatchery origin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout in Forks Creek, a tributary of the Willapa River in southwest Washington. First, we continued to successfully sample hatchery and wild (i.e., naturally spawned) adult and wild smolt steelhead at Forks Creek. Second, we revealed microsatellite genotype data for adults and smolts through brood year 2008. Finally, four formal scientific manuscripts were published in 2008 and two are in press, one is in revision and two are in preparations.

Quinn, Thomas P.; Seamons, todd; Hauser, Lorenz; Naish, Kerry

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m2) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree analysis, the relative total reproductive success (adult-to-adult production) of hatchery (H{sub old} or H{sub new}) and wild (W) fish for two populations, over multiple brood years. Our analyses of samples from fish that bred in the early to mid 1990's show that fish of 'old' hatchery stocks have much lower total fitness than wild fish (17% to 54% of wild fitness), but that 'new' stocks have fitness that is similar to that of wild fish (ranging from 85% to 108% of wild fitness, depending on parental gender and run year). Therefore, our results show that the decision to phase out the old, out-of-basin stocks and replace them with new, conservation hatchery stocks was well founded. We also conclude that the H{sub new} fish are leaving behind substantial numbers of wild-born offspring. The similar fitnesses of H{sub new} and W fish suggests that wild-born offspring of H{sub new} fish are unlikely to have negative genetic effects on the population when they in turn spawn in the wild. We will test this hypothesis once enough F2 offspring have returned. Another interesting result is that we were unable to match a large fraction of the unclipped, returning fish with parents from their brood year. Furthermore, we were missing more fathers than mothers. Because we sampled almost every possible anadromous parent, these results suggest that nonanadromous trout or precocious parr may be obtaining a substantial number of matings. Substantial reproduction by precocious parr could be one unintended consequence of the hatchery program.

Blouin, Michael

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cherry Tree, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4755°, -94.6432774° 4755°, -94.6432774° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7414755,"lon":-94.6432774,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio: Energy Resources Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8875703°, -83.6143632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8875703,"lon":-83.6143632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Cherry County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

474114°, -101.1617356° 474114°, -101.1617356° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.474114,"lon":-101.1617356,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Cherry Hills Village, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

16544°, -104.9594253° 16544°, -104.9594253° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6416544,"lon":-104.9594253,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

Cherry Grove, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

39.0725616°, -84.3218825° 39.0725616°, -84.3218825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0725616,"lon":-84.3218825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

NREL: News Feature - Third Consecutive IEEE Cherry Award for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economical than silicon to make a big dent in the market, Emery says. "They have a huge learning curve to keep costs down," he said, referring to thin films, organic PV,...

94

Evaluation of the 1994 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook in the Snake River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1988, wild salmon have been PIT-tagged under programs conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The detection of tagged individuals at Lower Granite Dam provides a measure, of the temporal and spatial distribution of the wild populations. PIT Forecaster was developed to take advantage of this historical data to predict the proportion of a particular population which had arrived at the index site in real-time and to forecast elapsed time to some future percentile in a migration. This report evaluates the performance of the Least Squares (LS) method and the Synchronized historical pattern matching (SYNC) method used in the PIT Forecaster and two other possible methods of prediction reminiscent of methods recommended by the Fish Passage Center (FPC). Alternative No. 1 bases predictions on the historical proportion of PIT-Tags recovered in a specific year and Alternative No. 2 uses the historical cumulative distribution of smolt predicted of a previous season. Over the entire 1994 season, the LS method had the best prediction performance for both aggregate and individual streams. However, for the first half of the season, Alternative No. 1 was clearly a better predictor. This performance deteriorated for the last half of the season, and the LS method improved prediction for aggregate streams and for the individual streams. The algorithms used by PIT Forecaster provide a better prediction as the season progresses. For the first half of the season, Alternative No. 1 did very well for both index years selected. For the 1995 season, Alternative No. 1 will be combined with the LS method to create an improved predictor.

Townsend, Richard L.; Westhagen, P.; Yasuda, D.; Skalski, J.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Macro and microclimate: from beneficial to noxious action on the animals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object of research was to evaluate the microclimate parameters by determining the correlation between the incidence of potentially mycotoxigenic fungi strains in forages given to dairy cows, and the temperature, relative humidity and rainfall in ... Keywords: animals, factors, interaction, macroclimate, microclimate

Violeta-Elena Simion; Alexandru T. Bogdan; Viorel Andronie; Iudith Ipate; Monica Prvu; Brndu?a Covaci; Elena Mitr?nescu; Cristina Andronie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Contrasting colonization and plant growth promoting capacity between wild type and gfp-derative of the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 in hybrid poplar  

SciTech Connect

This study aims to investigate the colonization of poplar by the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 and its capacity to promote plant growth. Poplar cuttings were inoculated with P. putida W619 (wild-type or gfp-labelled). The colonization of both strains was investigated and morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to evaluate plant growth promotion. Inoculation with P. putida W619 (wild-type) resulted in remarkable growth promotion, decreased activities of antioxidative defence related enzymes, and reduced stomatal resistance, all indicative of improved plant health and growth in comparison with the non-inoculated cuttings. In contrast, inoculation with gfp-labelled P. putida W619 did not promote growth; it even had a negative effect on plant health and growth. Furthermore, compared to the wildtype strain, colonization by the gfp-labelled P. putida W619::gfp1 was much lower; it only colonized the rhizosphere and root cortex while the wild-type strain also colonized the root xylem vessels. Despite the strong plant growth promoting capacity of P. putida W619 (wild-type), after gfp labelling its growth promoting characteristics disappeared and its colonization capacity was strongly influenced; for these reasons gfp labelling should be applied with sufficient caution.

Weyens N.; van der Lelie D.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, D.; Timmermans, J.-P.; Prinsen, E.; Van Oevelen, S.; D"Haen, J.; Smeets, K.; Taghavi, S.; Vangronsveld, J.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington November 10, 2003 EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis September 5, 2003 EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project July 21, 2003 EIS-0317: Record of Decision Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek

99

Wild Teas and Tonics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roots. Tonics brewed from wormwood seed, the leaves and twigs of spicebush or prickly ash, and yarrow leaves, tasted too much like bitter medicine. Basswood flowers, red clover...

100

Wild Cats and Dogs  

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moving to a new location or going on vacation, will either walk off and leave a dog or cat to shift for itself, or dump it in the forest preserves. It would be far kinder to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

102

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008 Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are listed below: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m{sup 2}) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

Transportation as a Means of Increasing Wild Juvenile Salmon Survival : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 4 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Smolt transportation on the Snake and Columbia Rivers has been under nearly continuous study for 25 years. Most controversy surrounds transport of spring/summer chinook, so most analyses and discussion are devoted to that species. Sockeye migrate at the same time as spring/summer chinook as do the earliest of the fall chinook. Therefore, action taken o spring/summer chinook will also affect sockeye and fall chinook. Many factors influenced transportation study results including population structure change -- the shift from nearly all wild fish to nearly all hatchery fish; new dams; the number of turbines at Snake River dams alone increased from 3 in 1968 to 24 by 1979; installation of juvenile fish pass facilities; and calamitous natural events such as the 1977 drought. All the above had negative effects on the survival of wild fish in general and on transport test results specifically, except that when smolts were transported from the upper dam their survival was not influenced by new or existing structures downstream from the transport site.

Park, Donn L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously shown that the ZN(II) coordination by gp32 employs a metal ligand donor set unrelated to any known zinc-finger motif thus far described and is derived from the His64-XI2-Cys77-Xg-Cys87-X2-CYS90 sequence in the ssDNA-binding core domain of the molecule. Crystallographic studies reveal that His64 and Cys77 are derived from two independent p-strands and are relatively more buried from solvent than are Cys87 and Cys9O, which combine to nucleate an (X-helix. In an effort to understand the origin of the stability of the metal complex, we have employed an anaerobic optical spectroscopic, competitive metal binding assay to determine the coordination geometry and association constants (Ka) for the binding of CO(II) to wild-type gp32 and a series of zinc ligand substitution mutants. We find that all non-native metal complexes retain tetrahedral coordination geometry but are greatly destabilized in a manner essentially independent of whether a new protein-derived coordination bond is forfned (e.g., in H64C gp32) or not. Quantitative Co(H) binding isotherms for the His64 mutants reveal that these gp32s form a dimeric CYS4 tetrathiolate intermediate complex of differing affinities at limiting [Co]f; each then rearranges at high [Co]f to form a monomolecular site of the expected geometry and Ka=IXIO4 M-1. C87S and C90A gp32s, in contrast, form a single complex at all [Co]f, consistent with CYS2-His-H20 tetrahedral geometry of Ka=1-2xlo5 M-1. The susceptibility of all mutant metal sites to oxidation by 02 is far greater than the wild-type protein; none appear to be functional ssDNA binding proteins. These studies reveal that the local protein structure greatly limits accommodation of an altered complex in a ligand-specific manner. The implications of this work for de novo design of zinc complexes in proteins will be discussed.

Guo, Juqian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wild Ennerdale The natural evolution of a wild valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

providers. · Set up and share results from long term monitoring of vegetation and habitat change and people Ennerdale, including limiting the number of cars accessing the site and ensuring that the building's carbon

109

Stefan Wild | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Algorithms for Nonlinear Optimization SUPER: Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy and Resilience TAO: Toolkit for Advanced Optimization XTUNE: Autotuning for Exascale...

110

Robert Van Steenwyk Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) Recommendations for Sweet Cherry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robert Van Steenwyk Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) Recommendations for Sweet of male and female SWD flies in each trap. Male SWD have spots on the tip of the wings and females have produced. The preferred ovipositional color was dark red for Bing fruit and red for Black Tartarian

Hammock, Bruce D.

111

November, 2010 J. E. Cherry, International Arctic Research Center and Institute of Northern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In MWh. Load Center Hydro Generated Average Generation Capability % of Capability Used Electricity Load operators. The bars show the portion of the electrical load being met by hydropower generation at the Blue is useful for risk management because prediction tools exist for season-ahead forecasting. Longer- term

112

Evaluation of the 2008 Predictions of Run-Timing and Survival of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Steelhead on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia Basin Research uses the COMPASS model on a daily basis during the outmigration of Snake River Chinook and steelhead smolts to predict downstream passage and survival. Fish arrival predictions and observations from program RealTime along with predicted and observed environmental conditions are used to make in-season predictions of arrival and survival to various dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. For 2008, calibrations of travel and survival parameters for two stocks of fish-Snake River yearling PIT-tagged wild chinook salmon (chin1pit) and Snake River PIT-tagged steelhead (lgrStlhd)-were used to model travel and survival of steelhead and chinook stocks from Lower Granite Dam (LWG) or McNary Dam (MCN) to Bonneville Dam (BON). This report summarizes the success of the COMPASS/RealTime process to model these migrations as they occur. We compared model results on timing and survival to data from two sources: stock specific counts at dams and end-of-season control survival estimates (Jim Faulkner, NOAA, pers. comm. Dec. 16, 2008). The difference between the predicted and observed day of median passage and the Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between predicted and observed arrival cumulative distributions are measures of timing accuracy. MAD is essentially the average percentage error over the season. The difference between the predicted and observed survivals is a measure of survival accuracy. Model results and timing data were in good agreement from LWG to John Day Dam (JDA). Predictions of median passage days for the chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were 0 and 2 days (respectively) later than observed. MAD for chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks at JDA were 2.3% and 5.9% (respectively). Between JDA and BON modeling and timing data were not as well matched. At BON, median passage predictions were 6 and 10 days later than observed and MAD values were 7.8% and 16.0% respectively. Model results and survival data were in good agreement from LWG to MCN. COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.77 and 0.69 for chin1pit and lgrStlhd, while the data control's survivals were 0.79 and 0.68. The differences are 0.02 and 0.01 (respectively), nearly identical. However, from MCN to BON, COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.74 and 0.69 while the data controls survivals were 0.47 and 0.53 respectively. Differences of 0.27 and 0.16. In summary: Travel and survival of chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were well modeled in the upper reaches. Fish in the lower reaches down through BON suffered unmodeled mortality, and/or passed BON undetected. A drop in bypass fraction and unmodeled mortality during the run could produce such patterns by shifting the observed median passage day to appear artificially early.

Beer, W. Nicholas; Iltis, Susannah; Anderson, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

503 * July 2012 503 * July 2012 Hydrogen photoproduction by 500 mL of sulfur/phosphorus- deprived (-S -P) algal cultures placed in PhBRs with different headspace volumes (165-925 mL). The final percentages of H 2 gas in the gas phase of the PhBRs are indicated in the figure inset; the Y-axis reports actual amounts of H 2 produced. The yield of H 2 gas in the PhBR with a historically small gas phase volume is shown as a dotted line. A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume Project: Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction Team: Maria L. Ghirardi and Michael Seibert, NREL; Sergey N. Kosourov, Khorcheska A. Batyrova, Ekaterina P. Petushkova, and Anatoly A. Tsygankov, IBBP, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

115

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NICKEL FOAM HEAT EXCHANGERS Kristin Wild  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to design and troubleshooting suggestions, he saved me many hours of work and improved this project with his

Sun, Yu

118

Detecting adversarial advertisements in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a large online advertising system, adversaries may attempt to profit from the creation of low quality or harmful advertisements. In this paper, we present a large scale data mining effort that detects and blocks such adversarial advertisements for ... Keywords: adversarial learning, data mining, online advertisement

D. Sculley; Matthew Eric Otey; Michael Pohl; Bridget Spitznagel; John Hainsworth; Yunkai Zhou

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Diagnosing mobile applications in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a lot of applications that run on modern mobile operating systems. Inevitably, some of these applications fail in the hands of users. Diagnosing a failure to identify the culprit, or merely reproducing that failure in the lab is difficult. ... Keywords: diagnosis, mobile applications

Sharad Agarwal; Ratul Mahajan; Alice Zheng; Victor Bahl

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Wild Geese and Ducks Fly North  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in 1940. Some have been killed in northern or western Canada; some as far south as Venezuela and Columbia in South America; some in California; and many on the Atlantic Coast....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

122

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Environmental Impacts of E-bikes in Chinese Cities Christopher Cherry, Institute of Transportation Studies, Berkeley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Statistics 2003). This is the recycling rate of the entire steel industry, and might not reflect the actual recycling rate of the steel in electric bikes. Likewise the entire copper industry has a recycling rate the machinery of the factory. Perhaps the most energy intensive processes of the assembly process are steel

California at Berkeley, University of

124

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The University of NewMexico Thank you for considering UNM Catering for your event. We can provide a wide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deviled eggs garnished with shrimp Antipasto skewers - artichoke heart, salami, Jack cheese and cherry

New Mexico, University of

126

HighlightsHighlightsHighlightsHighlightsHighlights Is Your Asthma Under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

garnishes, including parsley, watercress, chives, and cilantro, pimento, cherry tomatoes, red pepper

Neimark, Alexander V.

127

Vol. 30:12 December 2006 IN THIS ISSUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for performing some much needed brush control. Persimmon, cherry, Chinese tallow and other "weedy" trees can

Watson, Craig A.

128

The Welsh Government's Action Plan for wild deer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCW CCW WG via FCW WG (SF-SEED) WG (BETS- FDD) To be completed by Dec 2011 Ongoing from 2012 Priority Government BETS Business, Enterprise, Technology and Science FDD Farm Development Division FFMDD Food, Fish

129

Home Automation in the Wild: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automation in two groups: 1) Do-it-yourselfers (DIY) who have installed automation themselves and 2 purposes [33]. To compare and contrast these two groups, we recruited both DIY and Outsourced households

Rajamani, Sriram K.

130

Adaptive Evolution and Effective Population Size in Wild House Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of the proportion of amino acid substitutions that have been fixed by selection (a) vary widely among taxa, ranging from zero in humans to over 50 % in Drosophila. This wide range may reflect differences in the efficacy of selection due to differences in the effective population size (Ne). However, most comparisons have been made among distantly related organisms that differ not only in Ne but also in many other aspects of their biology. Here, we estimate a in three closely related lineages of house mice that have a similar ecology but differ widely in Ne: Mus musculus musculus (Ne; 25,000120,000), M. m. domesticus (Ne; 58,000200,000), and M. m. castaneus (Ne; 200,000733,000). Mice were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array, and the proportions of replacement and silent mutations within subspecies were compared with those fixed between each subspecies and an outgroup, Mus spretus. There was significant evidence of positive selection in M. m. castaneus, the lineage with the largest Ne, with a estimated to be approximately 40%. In contrast, estimates of a for M. m. domesticus (a 5 13%) and for M. m. musculus (a 5 12 %) were much smaller. Interestingly, the higher estimate of a for M. m. castaneus appears to reflect not only more adaptive fixations but also more effective purifying selection. These results support the hypothesis that differences in Ne contribute to differences among species in the efficacy of selection.

Megan Phifer-rixey; Francxois Bonhomme; Pierre Boursot; Gary A. Churchill; Jaroslav Pilek; Priscilla K. Tucker; Michael W. Nachman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

File:WildRoseDR-COAs.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook...

132

6 20082009 State of the Wild Source:AlexanderHafemann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Guy G.F. Lemieux, and Mark R. Greenstreet University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada of British Columbia, 2008. [16] L. Zhang, Y. Hu, and C.-P. Chen. Statistical timing analysis in sequentialEstimating Reliability and Throughput of Source-synchronous Wave-pipelined Interconnect Paul Teehan

133

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Turning Data Into Wild...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers at KIPAC, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics andCosmology, at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and StanfordUniversity. Rather than relying purely...

134

Understanding invaded urban `wild lands' as novel communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pechmann et al. Tuesday, August 5, 2008 - 2:10 PM COS 36-3: Vegetative assemblage distribution and long carbon sinks Human interface: Place for contact with nature and natural processes Spaces where natural

135

A walk from the wild side: the genetics of domestication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* and Pam Wiener2 Summary The phenotypic variation found in domesticated plants and animals is striking, so much so that Darwin used it to illustrate the power of selection to effect change. Recent developments colour or growth rate, two traits that have been strongly selected during livestock domestication. His

Goodrich, Justin

136

Wild deer management An issues paper to inform the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide important sources of employment, and the revenue d and Lyme disease (the latter of which affects (Lyme disease), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (the causal agent of pasture fever and facilitating pathogen

137

Wild and Scenic River Management Plan Sisters Ranger District,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Riparian/Fish/Wildlife Habitat illustrations from Respect The River materials The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individuals income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights,

Forest Service; Whychus Creek; Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Whychus Creek; Deschutes National Forest; John Schubert; Scott Cotter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

How predictable : patterns of human economic behavior in the wild  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shopping is driven by needs (to eat, to socialize, to work), but it is also a driver of where we go. I examine the transaction records of 80 million customers and find that while our economic choices predict mobility ...

Krumme, Katherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

CX-005539: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cherry Hill Solar Project - Municipal BuildingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 03/30/2011Location(s): Cherry Hill, New JerseyOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

140

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CAT HYDROCRACKING, DISTILLATE CAT HYDROCRACKING, RESIDUAL DESULFURIZATION, GASOLINE BP West Coast Products LLC California LOS ANGELES Washington FERNDALE (CHERRY POI

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Salt Creek Student Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Creek Investigation Salt Creek Investigation</2> "Whales Dying in the Pacific Ocean" "Fish Dying in Lake Michigan" Recent headlines remind us of environmental problems near and far away. Scientists have been wondering if these problems could be due to the warmer temperatures this past spring and summer or could there be other reasons? Lack of rain and near drought conditions have forced many areas to restrict water use. We know from past history that pollution affects our drinking water and marine life. Remember what we read about Lake Erie and from reading A River Ran Wild by Lynne Cherry. There are many factors affecting the environment around us . . . even in Salt Creek which runs through our area. We may not be able to investigate the Pacific Ocean and Lake Michigan

142

Effector Functions and Regulation of Host Antiviral Immunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Ch25h, we generated a doxycycline-inducible Ch25h-flagred mCherry (Ch25h-mCherry). Doxycycline addition to HEK293TCh25h-mCherry and treated with doxycycline exhibited a dose-

Liu, Su-Yang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Discussions@TMS - MEMBER NEWS FEATURE: Liz Holm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 2, 2009 ... Holm's garden consists of tomatoes, cucumbers, green chile peppers, and green beans. She also has peach, pear, sour cherry, apple apricot,...

144

View / Download  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

toes, cucumbers, green chile peppers, and green beans. She also has peach, pear, sour cherry, apple, apricot, and plum trees. However, not all of the fruit.

145

Fermi 3/29/02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Custard Tarts DINNER THURSDAY, APRIL 15 Mussel Placki Grilled Mongolian Lamb with Thai Curry Sauce and Tropical Mint Chutney Mixed Grilled Vegetables Kirsch and Tart Cherry...

146

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Browse wiki Jump to: navigation, search Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Address 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South + Depiction File:Url.jpg + FoafHomepage...

147

Mr. Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2 Department of Energy Washington , DC 20585 September 9, 2013 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek...

148

APS Colloquium 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

also invited to spend an additional day visiting with scientists at Argonne. Science and Technology for Future Communications Networks (Dec. 4) Cherry Murray, Bell Laboratories,...

149

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

259 Cherry Blossom Way, Georgetown, KY I-75 Green Corridor Project Install retail biofuel (E85) fueling infrastructure along the Interstate 75 corridor. 02 16 2010 Steven W....

150

EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to...

151

EIS-0349: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has decided to implement...

152

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project http:energy.govnepadownloadseis-0349-final-environmental-impact-statem...

153

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington http:energy.govnepadownloads...

154

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project http:energy.govnepadownloadseis-0349-draft-environmental-impact-statem...

155

b925395e 1634..1636  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the display of biomolecules and inorganic nanoparticles. We thank Dr Caroline Ajo-Franklin for providing the Escherichia coli strain that overexpress mCherry, Dr Virginia...

156

Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004) Pre-Cammpaign Plan. Colorado Tax Initiative. (Sic).Cherry JR. Lorillard. Colorado - Montana - Oregon. 12 AprRS. Tobacco Institute. Colorado Tax Initiative. 29 Jan 1992.

Landman, BA, Anne; Bialick, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

BIOSORPTION OF PHENOL BY A CHEMICALLY TREATED WILD MACROFUNGUS: EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenol is one of the most common water pollutants found in industrial effluents. The phenol removal potential of a chemically modified macrofungus Trametes sp., was investigated in a batch system. The effects of particle size, pH, temperature, contact time and biosorbent dosage have been investigated. The optimum conditions for phenol removal were found to be particle size: 150-300 m, pH: 6.0 and biosorbent dosage: 6 g/L. The rate of biosorption of phenol was found to be rapid during the initial 30 min and equilibrium was established after 4 h. The results of equilibrium isotherm study showed that the data fitted well to Langmuir isotherm model within the concentration range studied (100-500 mg/L). The maximum adsorption capacity of the biosorbent was found to be 39.37 mg/g. Sorption kinetics was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. Desorption with 0.1 M NaOH resulted in 87 % desorption of phenol from the biosorbent. The present study proved the applicability of Trametes sp., for the removal of phenol from waste waters.

R. Vimala; A. Nirmala Grace

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Tatyana V. Wilds, Most Pure Heart of Mary School, Topeka, KS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in San Francisco Stalin, Churchill/Attlee meet in Potsdam US drops Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki) Churchill's "Iron Curtain" speech in Fulton, Missouri 1949 Soviets detonate their first Atomic Bomb in the Cold War. For example, what if Truman had not fired General Macarthur and he had decided to drop bombs

Peterson, Blake R.

159

Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Beamline 11.0.2, it was possible to combine this technique with the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) to image the spatial distribution of the compounds. Some...

160

Identification of mildew resistance in wild and cultivated Central Asian grape germplasm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Caucasus Armenia, Azerbaijan, Egypt, Israel, Lebanon,H HF 2642Mtp2 Matrassa Azerbaijan H HF 2657Mtp1 Soakiwas acquired from the Azerbaijan collection, and is

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Particles from Comet 81P/Wild 2 Viewed by ALS Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.3.2 and Beamline 11.0.2, it was possible to combine this technique with the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) to image the spatial distribution of the compounds....

162

Resilience, Community, and Perceptions of Marcellus Shale Development in the Pennsylvania Wilds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas development in deep shale formations forms a major, promising option for energy development. The Marcellus Shale in the northeastern United States is (more)

Weigle, Jason

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Wild-Inspired Intrusion Detection System Framework for High Speed Networks f|p IDS Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the rise of the Internet and the high speed networks made information easier to acquire, faster to exchange and more flexible to share, it also made the cybernetic attacks and crimes easier to perform, more accurate to hit the target victim and ... Keywords: Cybernetic Attacks, Framework, High Speed Network, Intrusion Detection, Monitoring

Hassen Sallay; Mohsen Rouached; Adel Ammar; Ouissem Ben Fredj; Khalid Al-Shalfan; Majdi Ben Saad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Catch me if you can: performance bug detection in the wild  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profilers help developers to find and fix performance problems. But do they find performance bugs -- performance problems that real users actually notice? In this paper we argue that -- especially in the case of interactive applications -- traditional ... Keywords: latency bug, perceptible performance, profiling

Milan Jovic; Andrea Adamoli; Matthias Hauswirth

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

An eye for vulgarity : how MoMA saw color through Wild Bill's lens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an examination of the 1976 Museum of Modern Art exhibition of color photographs by William Eggleston-the second one-man show of color photography in the museum's history- with particular attention to the ...

Kivlan, Anna Karrer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE...

167

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: THE WILD CARD IN RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forcings of climate change over the industrial period. Cooling forcings of tens of watts per square meter Understanding 2 1 0 1 2 3 Radiativeforcing(Wattspersquaremetre) CoolingWarming The global mean radiative forcing scattering -- Cooling influence Light absorption -- Warming influence, depending on surface Indirect Effects

Schwartz, Stephen E.

168

Raising The Wild Flag: E. B. White, World Government, and Local Cosmopolitanism in the Postwar Moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Case for the World State.and Government: Cosmopolitan Ideas in the History of Westernin which visions of cosmopolitan connection and possible

Zipp, Samuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wild food practices: understanding the wider implications for design and HCI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethnographic studies in their many forms have played a major role in informing the design and development of a multitude of systems, from pervasive games to ubiquitous systems that support market traders. This paper presents an alternative response to ... Keywords: design, ethnography, food, rural

Alan Chamberlain, Chloe Griffiths

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Implications of selenium deficiency for wild herbivore conservation: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium (Se) has been identified as an essential micronutrient in all animals. It is required at the most fundamental physiological level as a component of the selenoproteins containing the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Adequate levels of Se are vital to proper reproductive performance, bone metabolism, immune function and iodine metabolism. Yet, Se is a relatively rare element, and is often present at low concentrations in soil and vegetation. Selenium deficiencies are widespread in domestic stock and are unavoidable in some wildlife populations. This may be especially true for populations confined to high elevation ranges, or on areas with granitic bedrock with low Se content, or that have lost access to Se-containing parts of their ranges such as mineral licks or low-elevation winter range. The condition may be exacerbated by increased levels of oxidative stress. Because our understanding of Se as a micronutrient is relatively new, many wildlife managers are unaware of the elements importance in physiology and population dynamics. Severe deficiency results in obvious symptoms such as white muscle disease. However, more frequently, deficiency may be chronic and subclinical. Individuals then display no obvious signs of malady, yet performance suffers until their populations decline without apparent cause. While mysterious population declines are not always due to Se deficiency, the wildlife manager should be aware of the possibility. Therefore, this review presents not only a summary of the wildlife literature regarding Se nutrition, but also a comprehensive look at the role of Se in mammalian physiology, and the behavior of this important element in the environment. Finally, the role of the biogeochemical Se cycle is discussed, and evidence is provided that the levels of available Se in the environment are decreasing while physiological demands often are increasing.

Werner T. Flueck; J.M. Smith Flueck; J. Mionczynski; B.J. Mincher

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Oregon's coastal ocean is wild, beautiful and a treasure for all  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vessels over two summers, at an estimated cost of $6 million inclusive of processing, purchase and lease a demanding new field. A manager will coordinate data, necessary equipment would be purchased and cutting of equipment, interpretation and ground-truthing. Creative funding solutions will be sought, including state

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

172

Juvenile Epilobocera sinuatifrons growth rates and ontogenetic shifts in feeding in wild populations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Freshwater amphibious crabs are understudied and found in tropical streams of many parts of the world and have the potential to influence stream and terrestrial (more)

Fraiola, Kauaoa Matthew Sam

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Evaluation and Monitoring of Wild/Natural Steelhead Production, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Several key study streams in the Salmon River and Clearwater River drainages were snorkeled in the summer of 1995. The current Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) goal is to maintain a parr density at 70% of the rated carrying capacity. All streams snorkeled are considerably below the current goal (6.4% to 54.3% of goal). Weirs were operated in Chamberlain Creek, West Fork Chamberlain Creek, Running Creek, and Rush Creek during the spring adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss spawning migration. An adult steelhead migration barrier was operated in Rapid River. Adult steelhead escapements in all but Rapid River are at critically low levels. An adult salmon 0. sp. weir was operated in Running Creek using a new passive electronic/video counting facility. Five adult chinook salmon 0. fshawyfscha were captured on video as they passed the counting facility. A video record of all resident fish in excess of 10 to 12 in was also obtained. The video system performed adequately in most circumstances. Additional testing and modification will continue during the 1996 salmon spawning migration. An upstream migration barrier was operated in Rapid River during the salmon spawning migration. Four adult male salmon were passed above the barrier; no females were captured or passed above the barrier. Rotary screw traps were operated in Running Creek and Rapid River during the spring and fall to monitor the juvenile steelhead and salmon downstream migration. Migration timing in Running Creek indicates that the majority of smolt size fish moved downstream out of Running Creek in the fall and few smolt size fish left Running Creek in the spring. Migration timing at Rapid River indicates a more equal distribution of the smolt size fish moving downstream out of Rapid River in the spring. Juvenile steelhead were PIT-tagged in Chamberlain Creek, Running Creek and Rapid River during the summer and fall of 1995. Detections at the lower Snake and Columbia rivers from the 1994 tagging indicate a substantial drop in detection rates at successive hydroelectric projects. The majority of PIT tag detections at Lower Granite Dam occurred from April 9-May 25, with the peak detection on May 9.

Holubetz, Terry B.; Leth, Brian D. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

DRAM errors in the wild: a large-scale field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors in dynamic random access memory (DRAM) are a common form of hardware failure in modern compute clusters. Failures are costly both in terms of hardware replacement costs and service disruption. While a large body of work exists on DRAM in laboratory ... Keywords: data corruption, dimm, dram, dram reliability, ecc, empirical study, hard error, large-scale systems, memory, soft error

Bianca Schroeder; Eduardo Pinheiro; Wolf-Dietrich Weber

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sensors in the wild: exploring electrodermal activity in child-robot interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in biosensor technology enabled the appearance of commercial wireless sensors that can measure electrodermal activity (EDA) in user's everyday settings. In this paper, we investigate the potential benefits of measuring EDA to better understand ... Keywords: affect recognition, children, electrodermal activity, social robots

Iolanda Leite; Rui Henriques; Carlos Martinho; Ana Paiva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mitigating Amphibian Disease: Strategies to maintain wild populations and control chytridiomycosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.R.D. , E. Kpfer, and D.C.W. , unpublished data).and unpublished results. DCW was supported by the ClarazUSA. Authors contributions DCW coordinated the review and

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evidence for metabolic imbalance of vitamin A2 in wild fish chronically exposed to metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ulationsocc:upy microhabitats that usually provide rcm;irkably st;tl,le tenlperatnres in macroenvironments where temperatlires

Bernatchez, Louis

178

Evaluation of the 1998 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Corps of Engineers, electrical power demand forecasts, and other criteria. The substantial electrical load to be met by all generating projects in the region, the Snake projects could be operated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.1: Flow and Spill Forecasts

Washington at Seattle, University of

179

Colorado wildlife on the move: a wildly successful road ecology awareness campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Highway Administration, the Colorado Department ofTransportation (CDOT), and Colorado State University,initiated Linking Colorados Landscapes to identify and

DiGiorgio, Monique

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Wild, willful, and wicked: African American childhood and the nineteenth-century literary imagination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines nineteenth-century depictions of African American children in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), Frank J. Webb's The Garies and Their Friends (more)

Brewington, Paulette F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy.

182

Taming Wild Horses: The Need for Virtual Time-based Scheduling of VMs in Network Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of scalable network simulators employ virtual machines (VMs) to act as high-fidelity models of traffic producer/consumer nodes in simulated networks. However, network simulations could be inaccurate if VMs are not scheduled according to virtual time, especially when many VMs are hosted per simulator core in a multi-core simulator environment. Since VMs are by default free-running, on the outset, it is not clear if, and to what extent, their untamed execution affects the results in simulated scenarios. Here, we provide the first quantitative basis for establishing the need for generalized virtual time scheduling of VMs in network simulators, based on an actual prototyped implementations. To exercise breadth, our system is tested with multiple disparate applications: (a) a set of message passing parallel programs, (b) a computer worm propagation phenomenon, and (c) a mobile ad-hoc wireless network simulation. We define and use error metrics and benchmarks in scaled tests to empirically report the poor match of traditional, fairness-based VM scheduling to VM-based network simulation, and also clearly show the better performance of our simulation-specific scheduler, with up to 64 VMs hosted on a 12-core simulator node.

Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Henz, Brian J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Three ACE awards for California Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editor Janet White accepted the awards during the 2012 ACEa noxious weed. Three ACE awards for California AgricultureAgriculture team has won three awards from the Association

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington

185

Gas scrubbing liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowrie, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE/EIS-0281; Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Final Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and solar energy. SNLNM's efforts to reduce noxious emissions include the onsite use of battery-powered carts and low-emission (particularly compressed natural gas) vehicles....

187

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1021, Subpart 0 , Appendix B; (5) involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed...

188

U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Admin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1021, Subpart D, Appendix B; (5) involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed...

189

Genus/Common Name Cultivar Acalypha Kilanea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Begonia Baby Wing Pink Begonia Summerwings White Begonia Deep Red Begonia Cherry Begonia Dragon Pink Alternanthera Red Threads Alternanthera Pinot Gris Alternanthera Sommelier Alyssum Clear Crystals Alyssum Clear Begonia Baby Wing White Begonia Baby Wing Pink Begonia White Baby Wing Begonia Go-Go Cherry Begonia Big

190

Mast  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mast Mast Nature Bulletin No. 355-A October 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MAST Mast, according to Webster, was an Anglo-Saxon word for the nuts, especially beechnuts, which littered the forest floor and served as food for hogs, deer and grouse. In addition to nuts and acorns, the term is often extended to include the winged seeds of such trees as maple, elm and ash, and even the nuts or seeds of pines -- all eaten by wildlife. Acorns, rich in starch, fat and vitamins, are now most widely available and most commonly eaten. The oily beechnuts on the uplands and pecans in the bottom lands are also important but much less so than in pioneer days. Until about 50 years ago, chestnuts -- now destroyed by a blight from Asia -- were of major importance in eastern United States. Hickory nuts, hazelnuts, walnuts and butternuts, because of their thick hard shells, are eaten principally by squirrels, chipmunks and their kin. In addition to mast, the fruits and berries of gum, cherry, persimmon, hawthorn, crabapple and other trees furnish much food for wildlife; and many shrubs and vines such as wild grape, blueberry and blackberry.

191

Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family Apples and Other Fruits of the Rose Family Nature Bulletin No. 277-A October 7, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation APPLES AND OTHER FRUITS OF THE ROSE FAMILY Bread, meat and potatoes, with vegetables and green salads, may satisfy the inner man and keep us healthy but much of the fun of eating is provided by the rose family. The rose, itself, is the flower of chivalry and love but its relative, the apple, king of the fruits, has been cultivated since prehistoric times. The members of the Rose Family give us more pleasure than we get from any other group of plants. Apples, quinces, pears, peaches, plums, apricots, cherries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries -- whether wild or cultivated -- are all relatives of the roses. Their fruits, raw or cooked, give us desserts, pleasant drinks, and many a between-meal delicacy. Typically, they have showy flowers with five equal petals arranged around a central cup bearing one or more fruit-forming pistils and a large number of pollen-bearing stamens. Their leaves are placed alternately on the twigs or stalks -- some of them simple leaves; some of them compound leaves divided into three, five or more leaflets like the rose itself. Some are trees, some are shrubs, and some are vining herbs.

192

Distribution, ecology and reproductive biology of wild tomatoes and related nightshades from the Atacama Desert region of northern Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the manuscript, Lynn Kimsey (UC-Davis) for identi?cationLynn Kimsey at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC-Davis.

Chetelat, Roger T.; Pertuz, Ricardo A.; Fandez, Luis; Graham, Elaine B.; Jones, Carl M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Quantitative analysis of carbon fluxes for fat biosynthesis in wild-type and IRS-1 knockout brown adipocytes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excessive fat synthesis and the subsequent dysregulation of lipid metabolism constitute the major pathological factors of obesity and type 2 diabetes through triggering insulin resistance. Thus, controlling fat synthesis ...

Yoo, Hyun-Tae, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

February 21, 2012 ---Isotopic measurements of a chondrule in a Comet Wild 2 grain tell the story of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building blocks. Comets travel on elliptical orbits around the Sun and those with orbital paths that reach particles and fragments in the Stardust aerogel that Ogliore and colleagues examined, they chose one called gliore and colleagues extracted the cometary particle Iris from a track in a wedge of aerogel (see image

195

How ancient agriculturalists managed yield fluctuations through crop selection and reliance on wild plants: An example from central India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land under the principal crops grown in the Centraland the loss of Amazonian crop genetic resources. I. TheEngland. Howard, A. 1924. Crop production in India. Humphrey

Smith, Monica L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SHORT COMMUNICATIONS Jours a! of Wild1 fe Diseases, 32(1). 1996, pp. 105-108  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available for inspection. Skeletal samples and an autopsy data- base comprise data from over 2400 moose. Throughout the study, lower mandibles and any bones with lesions were collected. Since 1979, all skulls found

197

Microsoft Word - toc.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D D Photographs of Utah and San Juan County-Listed Noxious Weeds and Undesirable Weeds Photographs taken from: Weeds of the West, Tom D. Whitson, Editor published by The Western Society of Weed Science, Newark, California 9th Edition, 2002 U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Annual sunflower, Helianthus annuus Undesirable Bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Buffalobur, Solanum rostratum Noxious (found near site) Camelthorn, Alhagi maurorum Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Canada thistle, Cirsium arvense Noxious (found near site) Cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum Undesirable U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Diffuse knapweed, Centaurea diffusa Noxious (on list) Dyer's woad, Isatis tinctoria Noxious (on list) U n c o n t r o l l e d c o p y Field bindweed, Convolvulus arvense

198

The future of electric two-wheelers and electric vehicles in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001. Life cycle assessment of electric bike application inSystems. Cherry, C. , 2007. Electric Two-Wheelers in China:2007. 2006 Analysis of Electric Bike Market (2006 China

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ANR @ MSUANR @ MSU AgBioResearchAgBioResearch Expert Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fruit, Red delicious: 44 mm fruit Pear: Bartlett: 32 mm fruit Sweet Cherry: Hedelfingen: 24 mm fruit be a significant threat. Large sphinx moths are now on the wing, so larvae may begin to appear in the next few

200

MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pine-sassafras-dollarleaf . Slash pine-black cherry-water oak Longleaf pine-turkey oak-wire grass Longleaf pine-turkey oak- bracken fern . Longleaf pine-moneywort . Longleaf...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bob Scowcroft: Executive Director, Organic Farming Research Foundation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the other one was from Michigan. And were talking aboutAnd the other one, Michigan. Hey, Ive got five papers ands going to do a lot for Michigan cherry growers. Hah-hah-

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 18 from injuries sustained from an accident in a crosswalk on the U of A campus. A Yoshino cherry at Alpena, Batesville, Beebe, Monticello, Russellville, Damascus, Fayetteville, Booneville and Hot Springs

Argamon, Shlomo

203

Partners Newsletter Center of Excellence for Poultry Science Vol. 9, No. 1, 2001 April 2001 Vol. 9, no. 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 18 from injuries sustained from an accident in a crosswalk on the U of A campus. A Yoshino cherry at Alpena, Batesville, Beebe, Monticello, Russellville, Damascus, Fayetteville, Booneville and Hot Springs

Brye, Kristofor R.

204

Concentration and distribution of 210 Po in the tissues of the scallop Chlamys varia and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is considered as an important source of internal radiation dose to marine organisms (Cherry and Shannon, 1974 of the radiation exposure of humans to background radiation, particularly through seafood consumption (CEC, 1989

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

Essays in economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first chapter analyzes incentives and quality in hospitals with physician-investors. Proponents of physician ownership argue that it improves care; opponents claim that physician-investors "cherry-pick" profitable ...

Swanson, Ashley (Ashley Terese)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

noxious weeds along its right-of-way (ROW) on the Curecanti to Lost Canyon (CCI-LCN) transmission lines from structure numbers 433 to 734 and 883 to 922. The proposed...

207

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and treat noxious weeds along its right-of-way (ROW) on the Hesperus to Montrose (HS-MTR) transmission lines from structure numbers 126 to 254. The proposed action would occur...

208

C:\\MyFiles\\ORR NERP Web site\\data lists\\wildflowerlst.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

flower watercress wild geranium wild plum wild stonecrop wild yam willow amsonia wood anemone wood sorrel wood sorrel wood-rush wood-rush woodland bluegrass yellow rocket...

209

Identification of Fish Hosts for Wild Populations of Rare Freshwater Mussels (Lampsilis cariosa and Leptodea Ochracea) Using a Molecular DNA Key.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The yellow lampmussel (Lampsilis cariosa) and tidewater mucket (Leptodea ochracea) are two species of freshwater mussels of conservation concern throughout their range. They are listed (more)

Kneeland, Stephen C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Responses of Human-Habituated Wild Atlantic Spotted Dolphins to Play Behaviors Using a Two-Way Human/Dolphin Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were placed in locations (jars) anchored to the anchor line,but transparent plastic jars that were suspended in theneeded a human to open the jar. To communicate this, the

Herzing, Denise L.; Delfour, Fabienne; Pack, Adam A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers three of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME) and was completed by Oncorh Consulting as a contract deliverable to the Yakama Nation and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The YKFPME (Project Number 1995-063-25) is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation (Contract No. 00022449) and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract No. 22370). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME.

Knedsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Monitoring and Evaluation of Supplemented Spring Chinook Salmon and Life Histories of Wild Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde Basin, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the ninth annual report for a multi-year project designed to monitor and evaluate supplementation of endemic spring Chinook salmon in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River. These two streams historically supported anadromous fish populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries, but in recent years, have experienced severe declines in abundance. Conventional and captive broodstock supplementation methods are being used to restore these spring Chinook salmon populations. Spring Chinook salmon populations in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, and other streams in the Snake River Basin have experienced severe declines in abundance over the past two decades (Nehlsen et al. 1991). A supplementation program was initiated in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, incorporating the use of both captive and conventional broodstock methods, in order to prevent extinction in the short term and eventually rebuild populations. The captive broodstock component of the program (BPA Project 199801001) uses natural-origin parr collected by seining and reared to maturity at facilities near Seattle, Washington (Manchester Marine Laboratory) and Hood River, Oregon (Bonneville Hatchery). Spawning occurs at Bonneville Hatchery, and resulting progeny are reared in hatcheries. Shortly before outmigration in the spring, juveniles are transferred to acclimation facilities. After an acclimation period of about 2-4 weeks, volitional release begins. Any juveniles remaining after the volitional release period are forced out. The conventional broodstock component uses returning adults collected at traps near the spawning areas, transported to Lookingglass Hatchery near Elgin, Oregon, held, and later spawned. The resulting progeny are reared, acclimated, and released similar to the captive broodstock component. All progeny released receive one or more marks including a fin (adipose) clip, codedwire tag, PIT tag, or visual implant elastomer tag. The numbers of adults used for conventional broodstock are determined by an agreement among comanagers (Zimmerman and Patterson 2002). Activities for this project focus on two life stages of spring Chinook salmon: juveniles during the migration from freshwater to the ocean and adults during prespawning migration through the end of spawning. Life history, production, and genetics are monitored and used to evaluate program effectiveness.

Boe, Stephen J.; Crump, Carrie A.; Weldert, Rey L. [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Scientists seeking to capture the power of the sun could soon stumble over one of humankind's earliest quarries -the wild boar -as they hunt for a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or three times a year to keep the animals' numbers in check, and some residents still decorate the outsides company in Marseille but frequently helps her brother at his restaurant, the Palais de la Bière countries like Russia afford to move in. Odette Navarro, 61, expects a flood of new customers at the Bar de

215

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2, 2004 August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Volume 2 August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Figures BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendices BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project June 23, 2004 EIS-0026-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant April 7, 2004 EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington March 12, 2004 EA-1486: Final Environmental Assessment East and West Diversion Screening Proposal Methow Valley Irrigation District Project

216

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NJ-City-Cherry Hill, Township of NJ-City-Cherry Hill, Township of Location: City Cherry Hill, NJ Township of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Upgrade/replace existing HVAC and associated systems/controls at Municipal Complex (Town Hall) and 2) install solar photovoltaic systems on rooftop of Town Hall and Public Works Building Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

217

EIS-0349: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision 49: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision EIS-0349: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Washington and Oregon This notice announces the availability of the ROD to implement the proposed action identified in the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0349, August 2004). Under the proposed action, Bonneville will offer contract terms for interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project (Project) with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS), as requested by BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP) and proposed in the FEIS. EIS-0349-NOA-ROD-2004.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0349: Record of Decision EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement

218

EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery. Approximately 195 acres of undeveloped land would be converted for the cogeneration facility; gas, water, wastewater, and steam pipelines; construction laydown areas; access roads; and wetland mitigation areas.This Draft EIS assesses the existing natural and built environment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts and economic benefits of the proposed action, and identifies mitigation measures to compensate for the unavoidable impacts. Alternative

219

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-45): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5) 5) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Benton County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, 345kV and 500 kV ROWs in Benton County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Benton County, Washington, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Benton County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Benton County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

220

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-46): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6) 6) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Franklin County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, and 500 kV ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Franklin County, Washington in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Franklin County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - SA-07-EIS-0169-biocontrol.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2003 14, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-07) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish & Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) Management Plan calls for noxious weed control at the hatchery and acclimation sites. Biological control agents are being proposed for use at the hatchery and Jack Creek acclimation sites to reduce weeds along BPA-owned property, hatchery structures, roads, and wildlife preserve lands. The Kittitas County Noxious Weed Control Board has targeted the management of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria genistifolia ssp. Dalmatica) as

222

ANR @ MSUANR @ MSU AgBioResearchAgBioResearch Expert Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 10:30 a.m.) Apple: Red Delicious ­ 66 mm fruit Gala ­ 58 mm fruit Yellow Delicious ­ 60 mm fruit Mac. Paula Red harvest is anticipated to start next week, and some Spur Mac orchards will also begin harvest spotted wing drosophila (SWD) in cherry orchards. We are moving adult traps into wine grapes as this crop

223

Energy Policy 30 (2002) 477499 Photovoltaic module quality in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooked egg as a garnish easily meets this protein requirement. Each meal should fu rnish about one garnishes. ~ ~ H ere are a few simple garnishes which may be added. ~ ~ Hard cooked eggs . . halved on makes ail attractive garnish. Serve blueberries and raspberries whole. · Dark sweet cherries with stems

Kammen, Daniel M.

224

Obstacles in Hawaii Laws to Implementation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a hard cooked egg as a garnish easily meets this protein requirement. Each meal should furnish about one garnishes. ' ~ Here are a few simple garnishes which may be added. , ~ Hard cooked eggs . halved, quartered garnish. Serve blueberries and raspberries whole. · Dark sweet cherries with stems on, tiny bunches

225

d'ordre : ANNE 2012 THSE / UNIVERSIT DE RENNES 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BG/P su- percomputer at Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is enabling scientists to better of FLASH using GLEAN to compute the fractal dimension. These evaluations were per- formed on the ALCF, Susan Coghlan, Andrew Cherry, and the ALCF team for discussions and help re- lated to the paper

226

STATE OF COLOAADO Bill Owens, Governor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and improving the health and environment of the people of Colorado 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Laboratory Services. Havelick, CIH Colorado School ofMines Environmental Health and Safety Golden, Colorado 80401-1887 RE: Clay ofPublic Health and Environment A work plan entitled Clay Pits Investigation Colorado School of

227

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid ­ A Novel Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with Simultaneous Sequestration of Carbon is the fluid density, and µ is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid (Freeze and Cherry 1979). The large fluid at a rate greater than 150 ml/min which reduced the range of dynamics that could be studied. Both

Stanford University

228

China's Urban Transportation System: Issues and Policies Facing Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's Urban Transportation System: Issues and Policies Facing Cities Chris Cherry WORKING PAPER UCB-ITS-VWP-2005-4 August 2005 #12;1 1. Introduction China is the most populous country in the world are on the forefront of the political and academic agenda in China and throughout the world. China has experienced

California at Berkeley, University of

229

Foliar response of ten tree species exposed to SO/sub 2/ air pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on the relative susceptibility to SO/sub 2/ damage among 4 birch species - Scotch, Austrian, and eastern white pines, white ash, black cherry, and hybrid poplar - is reported. Controlled exposures were performed and the percentages of plants injured and the percentages of leaf areas damaged were recorded.

Biggs, A.R.; Davis, D.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Logan Cherry Point, NC (Propane) P 1st Rochdale CG New York, NY First Energy, OH A P #12;Co-op Renewables;#12;Co-op Basics Customer owned Serve 35 million people in 47 states 75 percent of nation's area 2 (Propane) Chugach EA Anchorage, AK Flint Energies Reynolds, GA Delaware County EC Delhi, NY (Propane) TVA

231

Combined effects of atomic radiation and other agents in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and possible application of fuzzy theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The survivors of atomic bombings and those who visited Hiroshima and Nagasaki immediately after the atomic bombing could have been subjected to many other possible noxious effects in addition to atomic radiation. Various toxic substances must have been ... Keywords: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, atomic bombing, dose-effects relationships, fuzzy relation, hybrid numbers, lethal dose, radiation effects

Yasushi Nishiwaki; Hiroshi Matsuoka

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Controlled angular redirection of light via nanoimprinted disordered gratings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= mold, noxious off-gases, respiratory problems #12;Stressful work environments Lack of daylight, ventilation, connection with nature ­ eye-strain #12;The Fix ­ Priority on health More daylighting In stairs irrigation system. Or low-flush or dual flush toilets #12;Use Less Land Mixed use land planning = fewer car

233

Aging and user disfunctionings: implications for information system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researches in ergonomics are carried out on factors of work inducing a premature ageing or pathologies, with the purpose of designing or improving workplaces, devices and organisations less noxious for the health or more compatible with possible handicaps ... Keywords: ageing, elderly, ergonomics

Jean-Claude Sperandio

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

YOU ARE INVITED TO PARTICIPATE! Wednesday, September 24, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactions that do not use oxygen) may deplete energy stores at a rapid rate and result in noxious end) 809 6th Street, Cedar Key 10:30 AM--1:00 PM Statewide Clam Industry Task Force Meeting 1:00--1:30 PM Lunch: Sponsored by the Cedar Key Aquaculture Association 1:30--5:30 PM Clam Industry Workshop 5

Florida, University of

235

nvasive nonnative plants are a serious subject for gardeners, farmers, the general public, and land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.invasivespeciesinfo. gov/. United States Department of Agriculture. 2011. PLANTS Database. Washington, DC: United States of the Cascades (EC 1577). #12;6 Yellow archangel (Lamiastrum galeobdolon) is commonly used in window boxes and hanging baskets and as a groundcover. It has been designated as a noxious weed in Washington

236

LACK OF EVIDENCE FOR IN SITU DECAY OF ALUMINUM-26 IN COMET 81P/WILD 2 CAI-LIKE REFRACTORY PARTICLES `INTI' AND `COKI'. H. A. Ishii1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission electron microscopes ((S)TEM) to produce mineral maps. An FEI Nova NanoLab600 dual-beam FIB [11] were prepared at UW and placed on thin C substrates on Cu TEM grids. Analytical TEM analyses were to failure of the C substrate of the TEM grid. Figure 1. TEM and FIB preparation for NanoSIMS meas- urements

237

EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery. This EIS assesses the existing natural and built environment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts and economic benefits of the proposed action, and identifies mitigation measures to compensate for the unavoidable impacts. Alternative project sites, power-generating and pollution-control technologies, and the No Action Alternative also are described. DOE/EIS-0349, Environmental Protection Agency, Notice of Availability, BP

238

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 16, 2005 March 16, 2005 EIS-0312-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan December 23, 2004 EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Hopkins Ridge Wind Interconnection Project September 3, 2004 EIS-0346: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Salmon Creek Project, Water Flow Restoration and Streambed Rehabilitation, Providing Passage for Summer Steelhead and Spring Chinook, Funding, Okanogan County, Washington September 3, 2004 EIS-0346: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Salmon Creek Project August 27, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project August 27, 2004 EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington

239

EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental 49: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery. This EIS assesses the existing natural and built environment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts and economic benefits of the proposed action, and identifies mitigation measures to compensate for the unavoidable impacts. Alternative project sites, power-generating and pollution-control technologies, and the No Action Alternative also are described.

240

EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project BP West Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery. This EIS assesses the existing natural and built environment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts and economic benefits of the proposed action, and identifies mitigation measures to compensate for the unavoidable impacts. Alternative project sites, power-generating and pollution-control technologies, and the No Action Alternative also are described. EIS-0349-FEIS-01-2004.pdf EIS-0349-FEIS-02-2004.pdf EIS-0349-FEIS-Figures-2004.pdf EIS-0349-FEIS-Appendices-2004.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 6200 of 31,917 results. 91 - 6200 of 31,917 results. Download CX-001240: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Colorado Northwestern Community College Craig Campus Geothermal Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 03/19/2010 Location(s): Craig, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001240-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005539: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cherry Hill Solar Project - Municipal Building CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/30/2011 Location(s): Cherry Hill, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005539-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005529: Categorical Exclusion Determination

242

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

243

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hesperus- Hesperus- Montrose 345-kV Transmission Line Private Lands Herbicide Treatment for Vegetation Management San Miguel and Dolores Counties, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Westem Area Power Administration (Western) would survey for and treat noxious weeds along its right-of-way (ROW) on the Hesperus to Montrose (HS-MTR) transmission lines from structure numbers 126 to 254. The proposed action would occur along Western's ROW on private lands only. The activity includes use of backpack, A TV-mounted sprayer or both, to treat individual and groups of noxious weeds and oak brush. The spraying Contractor shall be licensed in the State of Colorado and shall follow all applicable Federal, State and local laws, regulations and guidelines. No ground disturbance will occur. All travel will be

244

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Curecanti- Curecanti- Lost Canyon 230-kV Transmission Line Private Lands Herbicide Treatment for Vegetation Management San Miguel, Dolores, and Montezuma Counties, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) would survey for and treat noxious weeds along its right-of-way (ROW) on the Curecanti to Lost Canyon (CCI-LCN) transmission lines from structure numbers 43/3 to 73/4 and 88/3 to 92/2. The proposed action would occur along Western's ROW on private lands only. The activity includes use of backpack, A TV- mounted sprayer or both, to treat individual and groups of noxious weeds and oak brush. The spraying Contractor shall be licensed in the State of Colorado and shall follow all applicable Federal, State and local laws, regulations and guidelines. No ground disturbance will occur. All travel will

245

Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

Pence, Dallas T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Thomas R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wallowa Canyonlands Weed Partnership : Completion Report November 19, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Noxious weeds threaten fish and wildlife habitat by contributing to increased sedimentation rates, diminishing riparian structure and function, and reducing forage quality and quantity. Wallowa Resources Wallowa Canyonlands Partnership (WCP) protects the unique ecological and economic values of the Hells Canyon grasslands along lower Joseph Creek, the lower Grande Ronde and Imnaha Rivers from invasion and degradation by noxious weeds using Integrated Weed Management techniques. Objectives of this grant were to inventory and map high priority weeds, coordinate treatment of those weeds, release and monitor bio-control agents, educate the public as to the dangers of noxious weeds and how to deal with them, and restore lands to productive plant communities after treatment. With collaborative help from partners, WCP inventoried {approx} 215,000 upland acres and 52.2 miles of riparian habitat, released bio-controls at 23 sites, and educated the public through posters, weed profiles, newspaper articles, and radio advertisements. Additionally, WCP used other sources of funding to finance the treatment of 1,802 acres during the course of this grant.

Porter, Mark C.; Ketchum, Sarah

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

7. Soil Monitoring7. Soil Monitoring 7. soil monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 2. Foodstuffs Comparison Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 3. Wild Edible Plants

248

5. Surface Water, Groundwater, and Sediments Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995 147  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 2. Foodstuffs Comparison Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 3. Wild Edible Plants

249

5. Surface Water, Groundwater, and Sediments Environmental Surveillance and Compliance at Los Alamos during 1996 113  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 2. Foodstuffs Comparison Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 3. Wild Edible Plants

250

Estuarine Vegetation at Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve, San Franciso Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creeping wild rye) and Ambrosia psilostachya (westernwest- ern goldenrod), Ambrosia psilostachya (western rag-

Whitcraft, Christine R.; Grewell, Brenda J.; Baye, Peter R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Jan. 2004, p. 293300 Vol. 70, No. 1 0099-2240/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.70.1.293300.2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

macroenvironments into egg microhabitats. The two most important physical factors for wild eggs on plant leaves

Goodman, Robert M.

252

Fig 1-1 vicinity map  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A N A D A U N I T E D S T A T E S 5 5 5 542 539 539 548 548 544 BELLINGHAM Lynden Ferndale BELLINGHAM Lynden Blaine Ferndale Grandview Road Blaine Road S T R A I T O F G E O R G I A B E L L I N G H A M B A Y L U M M I B A Y B I R C H B A Y Lake Terrell Cherry Point Point Whitehorn Birch Point D R A Y T O N H A R B O R P O R T A G E I S L A N D P O R T A G E I S L A N D L U M M I I S L A N D L U M M I I S L A N D N O O K S A C K R I V E R B U R L I N G T O N N O R T H E R N R A I L R O A D B U R L I N G T O N N O R T H E R N R A I L R O A D PROJECT SITE BP MARINE TERMINAL ALCOA INTALCO WORKS CUSTER SUBSTATION Source: De Lorme Washington Atlas & Gazetteer 1998 BP CHERRY POINT COGENERATION EIS FIGURE 1-1 PROJECT VICINITY MAP 1014003T N N Approximate Scale in Miles 0 3 Graphics Server/Graphics/Billable/BP Cherry Point/EIS/Fig 1-1 Vicinity Map 7.29.03 transmission line SEATTLE

253

Restriction of virus infection by plants. Final report, July 1, 1987--June 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basis of genotypic resistance of the Arlington line of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) against cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has been attributed, to an inhibitor of the processing of CPMV polyproteins. We sought to purify the protein that is postulated to be the inhibitor of polyprotein processing and to characterize the inhibitor and its gene. Such information can be the basis for engineering resistance to specific viruses in plants. In studies with cherry leafroll virus (CLRV) we sought understanding of the biochemical basis of the resistance.

Bruening, G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Science & Technology Review May/June 2008  

SciTech Connect

This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Biomedical Technology Has a Home at Livermore--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) Shaping the Future of Aneurysm Treatments--Livermore foam devices may offer significant advantages for treating some forms of aneurysms; (3) Ring around a Stellar Shell: A Tale of Scientific Serendipity--Using a three-dimensional model, Livermore scientists have solved a long-standing puzzle of stellar evolution; and (4) On Assignment in Washington, DC--Livermore personnel in Washington, DC, support federal sponsors and become valuable assets to Laboratory programs.

Chinn, D J

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

256

Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of processing materials. The invention enables ultrafine, ultrapure powders to be formed from solid ingots in a gas free environment. A plasma is formed directly from an ingot which insures purity. The vaporized material is expanded through a nozzle and the resultant powder settles on a cold surface. An inductively coupled plasma may also be used to process waste chemicals. Noxious chemicals are directed through a series of plasma tubes, breaking molecular bonds and resulting in relatively harmless atomic constituents. 3 figs.

Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

1987-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

Decays of tetraquark resonances in a two-variable approximation to the triple flip-flop potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a unitarized formalism to study tetraquarks using the triple flip-flop potential, which includes two meson-meson potentials and the tetraquark four-body potential. This can be related to the Jaffe-Wilczek and to the Karliner-Lipkin tetraquark models, where we also consider the possible open channels, since the four quarks and antiquarks may at any time escape to a pair of mesons. Here we study a simplified two-variable toy model and explore the analogy with a cherry in a glass, but a broken one where the cherry may escape from. It is quite interesting to have our system confined or compact in one variable and infinite in the other variable. In this framework we solve the two-variable Schroedinger equation in configuration space. With the finite difference method, we compute the spectrum, we search for localized states and we attempt to compute phase-shifts. We then apply the outgoing spherical wave method to compute in detail the phase-shifts and to determine the decay widths. We explore the model in the equal mass case, and we find narrow resonances. In particular the existence of two commuting angular momenta is responsible for our small decay widths.

Bicudo, P.; Cardoso, M. [Dep. Fisica and CFTP, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- phylla, G. rolfei, and G. sinensis), one narrowly distributed species found in southern Azerbaijan Schnabel 10 Wild collected Astara, Azerbaijan G. japonica Miq. Arnold Arboretum #13-38 Wild collected China

262

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Cooperative Transportation Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Wild Resource...

263

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the following 3 parts of the project: Part 1--Improve wild steelhead trout smolt-to-adult survival rate information by PIT tagging additional wild steelhead trout juveniles. Part 2--Estimating the stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon and forecasting wild/natural smolt production. Part 3--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Letter Head Shell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Primeline Monofilament Duralume Light Sticks Complete Longline Fishing Systems ... Wild fish stocks are already strained and government ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

265

Thursday, december 22, 2011 LiTTLejohn coLiseum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there are some associated risks, such as diseases transmitted from wild animals (e.g. Lyme Disease). As part

Bolding, M. Chad

266

Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2009201010 Significantly, we found that infected larch needles can  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there are some associated risks, such as diseases transmitted from wild animals (e.g. Lyme Disease). As part

267

Emergence of Fusion/Fission Cycling and Self-Organized Criticality from a Simulation Model of Early Complex Polities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanish, Charles, 2007. An Agent-based Model of Prehistoriccase of spatial agent- based models) that simulates wild

Griffin, Arthur F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Death Valley Indian Farming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mills and handstones, long employed for wild seeds, were pressed into service for grinding corn and wheat into flour, and

Wallace, William J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Progress in resolving Hanford Site high-level waste tank safety issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interim storage of alkaline, high-level radioactive waste, from two generations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste management activities, has resulted in the accumulation of 238 million liters of waste in Hanford Site single and double-shell tanks. Before the 1990`s, the stored waste was believed to be: (1) chemically unreactive under its existing storage conditions and plausible accident scenarios; and (2) chemically stable. This paradigm was proven incorrect when detailed evaluation of tank contents and behavior revealed a number of safety issues and that the waste was generating flammable and noxious gases. In 1990, the Waste Tank Safety Program was formed to focus on identifying safety issues and resolving the ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, high heat, noxious vapor, and criticality issues. The tanks of concern were placed on Watch Lists by safety issue. This paper summarizes recent progress toward resolving Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tank safety issues, including modeling, and analyses, laboratory experiments, monitoring upgrades, mitigation equipment, and developing a strategy to screen tanks for safety issues.

Babad, H.; Eberlein, S.J.; Johnson, G.D.; Meacham, J.E.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Turner, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 19440 of 26,764 results. 31 - 19440 of 26,764 results. Download CX-006417: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minnesota-City-Coon Rapids CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Coon Rapids, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006417-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006418: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minnesota-County-Saint Louis CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Saint Louis County, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006418-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006419: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey-City-Cherry Hill, Township of CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010

272

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 4510 of 31,917 results. 01 - 4510 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0336: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Tucson Electric Power Company Sahuarita-Nogales Transmission Line http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0336-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Download Inspection Report: INS-9502 Report on Inspection of Analytical Laboratories Oversight at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/inspection-report-ins-9502 Download EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Article Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business

273

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Peach Genome Offers Insights into Breeding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 24, 2013 March 24, 2013 Peach Genome Offers Insights into Breeding Strategies for Biofuels Crops Rapidly growing trees like poplars and willows are candidate "biofuel crops" from which it is expected that cellulosic ethanol and higher energy content fuels can be efficiently extracted. Domesticating these crops requires a deep understanding of the physiology and genetics of trees, and scientists are turning to long-domesticated fruit trees for hints. The relationship between a peach and a poplar may not be obvious at first glance, but to botanists both trees are part of the rosid superfamily, which includes not only fruit crops like apples, strawberries, cherries, and almonds, but many other plants as well, including rose that gives the superfamily its name.

274

Fred Bernthal,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bernthal, Bernthal, president of URA, and Cherri Langenfeld, head of DOE's Chicago Operations Office, sign the new five-year contract for Fermilab management. Photo by Reidar Hahn by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs In a formal ceremony at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on December 18, Universities Research Association, Inc. renewed its contract to manage Fermilab for the U.S. Department of Energy. The five-year deal con- tains performance-based incentives for the first time and shifts more liability from the govern- ment to the contractor and the Lab, as a part of sweeping contract reform efforts in DOE. "This contract is a good example of gov- ernment that works better and costs less," said Volume 20 Friday, January 10, 1997 Number 1 f URA Renews Contract to

275

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

391 - 13400 of 28,905 results. 391 - 13400 of 28,905 results. Download Flash2008-18.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/flash2008-18pdf Download EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Download Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations The Task Force has completed a thorough investigation of the causes of the August 14, 2003 blackout and has recommended actions to minimize the likelihood and scope of similar events in the future. http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/blackout-2003-final-report-august-14-2003-blackout-united-states-and-canada-causes-and

276

Microsoft PowerPoint - TemplatesrnlTechBriefp1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAPL Calculator NAPL Calculator at a glance  easy and quick  based on microsoft excel  guides clean-up decision making  works with soil, soil vapor, or groundwater samples The NAPL Calculator is an analytical model that is a self- executing Microsoft Excel workbook that requires qualitative/quantitative soil, groundwater, or soil vapor sample results and a few simple geotechnical parameters. A classic chemistry approach is used that is based on the work of Shiu, Feenstra, McKay and Cherry and is advocated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The method is known to many academics and researchers but not to many practitioners in environmental clean-up. Even for those who know the method, the calculation can be laborious. The NAPL Calculator is designed to make this

277

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 30200 of 31,917 results. 91 - 30200 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Long-Term Regional Dialogue Policy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0183-doe-notice-availability-record-decision-7 Download EIS-0397: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Bonneville Power Administration Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0397-doe-notice-availability-record-decision Download EIS-0349: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Washington and Oregon http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-doe-notice-availability-record-decision Page Twitter Editor's note: Since the Twitter platform is always evolving, so are our best practices for using it. We welcome feedback and suggestions to keep

278

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2001 - 2010 of 26,777 results. 2001 - 2010 of 26,777 results. Event Concur Government Edition (CGE) Webinar Training Sessions Course Type: Webinar http://energy.gov/dvu/events/concur-government-edition-cge-webinar-training-sessions Download EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Whatcom County, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Download EIS-0400: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard-Windy Gap Substation Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Grand County, CO http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0400-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations- Day 3,

279

Property:WFSPTurbineID | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WFSPTurbineID WFSPTurbineID Jump to: navigation, search Property Name WFSPTurbineID Property Type Number This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "WFSPTurbineID" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alleghany High School Wind Project + 110,608 + Appanoose Elementary School Wind Project + 108,442 + Auburn-Washburn Wind Project + 105,237 + Avery County High School Wind Project + 110,607 + B Bancroft-Rosalie Public Schools Wind Project + 108,812 + Bloomfield Public Schools Wind Project + 110,699 + Burlington High School Wind Project + 107,678 + C CAES Wind Project + 105,329 + Cedar Rapids Wind Project + 105,272 + Cherry Valley Elementary School Wind Project + 120,342 + Concordia High School Wind Project + 108,482 +

280

The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two Innovative Solar Projects The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two Innovative Solar Projects March 19, 2012 - 2:05pm Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs For nearly a year, Congressional critics of the Energy Department's loan programs have demonstrated a consistent pattern of cherry-picking individual emails from the hundreds of thousands of pages of documents the Department has provided to Congress with the sole purpose of inventing false and misleading controversy. The latest example is an effort to falsely suggest two of the Department's loan guarantees, the Agua Caliente and Antelope Valley Solar Ranch, did not meet the Department's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mr. Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Spreng Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2 Department of Energy Washington , DC 20585 September 9, 2013 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South Denver, CO 80246-1530 Subject: Notification that GS01 is no longer an RFLMA Point of Compliance (POC) Reference: Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) Attachment 2, Section 5.1, "Monitoring Requirements" Dear Mr. Spreng: In accordance with the criteria provided in Section 5.1 of RFLMA Attachment 2, this is to certify that surface water monitoring location WOMPOC has been functioning as an RFLMA POC for 2 years and now replaces surface water monitoring location GS01 as the POC. This notification completes the process to remove the RFLMA Attachment 2 requirement for monitoring at GSO 1.

282

LighthouseSolar (New Paltz) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LighthouseSolar (New Paltz) LighthouseSolar (New Paltz) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Lighthousesolar Name Lighthousesolar Address 4 Cherry Hill Rd Place New Paltz, New York Zip 12561 Sector Solar Product Solar Electric and Solar Thermal Website http://www.lighthousesolar.com Coordinates 41.742055°, -74.070582° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.742055,"lon":-74.070582,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tor the addition ot bird tor the addition ot bird diversion equipment along the existing Prescott-Pinnacle Peak 230-kV transmission line right-ot-way located in Yavapai County, Arizona . RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes installing Firefly type bird diversion equipment onto static wires (overhead ground wires) of the Prescott-Pinnacle Peak 230-kV transmission line between structures 144/3 and 145/2. The diverters will be spaced approximately 15 ft apart alternating between the two static lines. The diverters will be installed using a hot stick from a helicopter or by accessing the line using existing access roads and rubber-tired vehicles such as cherry pickers, pickup trucks, crew trucks. All work will be done within Westerns existing right-of-way. This

284

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

285

University of Nevada Las Vegas Solar Decathlon 2011 Menu and Recipes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& RECIPES & RECIPES menu Dinner I APPETIZERS fresh watermelon juice with lemongrass fruit kabob virgin mango mojito shrimp cocktail stu ed mushrooms FIRST COURSE mixed green salad with beets and candied walnuts MAIN COURSE braised beef in a rich demi-glace ngerling potatoes and seasonal veggies served with non-alcoholic red wine DESSERT chocolate cake & vanilla creme fraîche and French cherries Dinner II APPETIZERS virgin sea-breeze cocktail blackberry-lemonade spritzer prosciutto and melon with balsamic syrup polenta with sundried tomato hummus FIRST COURSE creamy tomato soup mini-grilled cheese sandwich microgreen salad MAIN COURSE sautéed chicken and mushroom fresh wide noodle pasta in a light garlic cream sauce accompanied by a peach melba cooler with fresh thyme DESSERT

286

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 12480 of 31,917 results. 71 - 12480 of 31,917 results. Page Attachment A.1: Summary of Mandatory Language Provisions 1. Regulatory and non-regulatory activities http://energy.gov/em/attachment-a1-summary-mandatory-language-provisions Download EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/application-environmental-isotopes-evaluation-origin-contamination

287

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2012 19, 2012 The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About Two Innovative Solar Projects For nearly a year, Congressional critics of the Energy Department's loan programs have demonstrated a consistent pattern of cherry-picking individual emails from the hundreds of thousands of pages of documents the Department has provided to Congress with the sole purpose of inventing false and misleading controversy. The latest example is an effort to falsely suggest two of the Department's loan guarantees, the Agua Caliente and Antelope Valley Solar Ranch, did not meet the Department's definition for "innovative" - a definition that was first established during the Bush Administration. March 19, 2012 March Madness: Slam Dunk Energy Efficiency Keep in mind the importance of sparing the real madness by working toward a

288

JENNIFER M  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JENNIFER M JENNIFER M . GRANHOLM OOVERNOR STA'~E OF MIC'I~IGAN OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR LANSING JOHN D. CHERRY. JR. LT. OOMlNOA March 9,2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20685 Dear Secretary Chu: In order that the State of Michigan may receive its share of State Energy Program (SEP) funds under the American Recovery and Renewal Act of 2009 (H.R. 1) (ARRA), I am providing the following assurances. I have written to the Chairman of our Public Service Commission to request that he consider additional actions to promote energy efficiency, consistent with the federal statutory language contained in H.R. 1 and the Commission's obligation to maintain appropriate and reasonable rates while protecting the public. I have also written to Michigan's

289

White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

WHITE LED WITH HIGH PACKAGE WHITE LED WITH HIGH PACKAGE EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY Final Report Report Period Start Date: 10/01/2006 Report Period End Date: 09/30/2008 Authors: Yi Zheng and Matthew Stough Report Submission Date: November 2008 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-06NT42935 Project Manager: Ryan Egidi OSRAM SYLVANIA Product Inc Central Research and Service Laboratory 71 Cherry Hill Dr., Beverly, MA 01915 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

290

Make Locally and Sell Globally | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Make Locally and Sell Globally Make Locally and Sell Globally Make Locally and Sell Globally August 22, 2011 - 11:02am Addthis Less than half the of the world has access to a reliable supply of electricity, creating a unique opportunity for the US to become the leader in developing clean energy technologies that strengthen our economy and meet the demand of the developing world. | Image courtesy NASA Less than half the of the world has access to a reliable supply of electricity, creating a unique opportunity for the US to become the leader in developing clean energy technologies that strengthen our economy and meet the demand of the developing world. | Image courtesy NASA Dr. Arun Majumdar Dr. Arun Majumdar Former Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Other nations are cherry picking our innovations. As a nation, we can

291

Spring into Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring into Energy Savings Spring into Energy Savings Spring into Energy Savings April 14, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis Amy Foster Parish No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn. - Hal Borland In my part of the country, winter seems to hang on an interminably long time. So I always look forward to the first signs of spring with unbridled glee. At the first glimpse of a cherry blossom, the winter boots are banished to the back of the closet and the sandals are put to work in earnest. But while spring may give the perfect excuse to hang up the winter coat, the advent of spring does not mean that we can pack away thoughts of energy efficiency with our wool sweaters. Last winter, Jennifer Carter gave us a number of great energy efficiency tips for winter. Now that spring's milder temperatures are upon us and it's time to consider what energy efficiency

292

Kitchen Knife Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kitchen Knife Safety 1) Use a good quality cutting board (flat and stable). 2) Use a kitchen towel underneath a cutting board so that it won't slip. Observe above: Warped and unbalanced cutting board vs. flat and well-anchored board. 3) Sharp knives are safer knives. Dull knives can skip, slide, snag, or get stuck while cutting, leaving you off balance. 4) Use the right knife for the job. a. Serrated knives are long and lean that help grip and saw through the crust of rustic breads without using too much strength. b. Paring knives are used for smaller foods, such as limes, cherry tomatoes or shallots, for better control and lighter weight (less chance of skipping off of a smaller cutting surface). c. Chef's knives (one of the most used in the kitchen) can be used for

293

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours June 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. RICHLAND, Wash. - It is harvest season for cherries, raspberries and rhubarb in Washington state. But employees at the Hanford site are helping grow the young minds of the nation's future science, technology,

294

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Project lnfonnation Project Title: RMOTC process improvement Old pipe yard clean up. Date: 11-03-09 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Terry Sullivan Project Overview 1. What are the environmental We will dig out the pipe racks that are cemented into the ground, and haul them out. Then remove the impacts? weeds that have taken over the area. Then we will blade the location and have it ready if we ever decide to 2. What is the legal location? make farther improvements. I expect this to take aproximatly one week with two to three hands working on it. The impact to the envoronment should be minimal as this area has already been disturbed. The work will 3. What is the duration of the project? require the use of a backhoe and a blade as well as the cherry picker. This location is located just north of

295

DearMayor Kimble:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.' .' Department of Energy Washington; ' DC 20585 r FEBiO 1995' The Honorable Fred Kimble '. * '. -161 S. Cherry Street in Galesburg, Ill

296

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 8540 of 28,905 results. 31 - 8540 of 28,905 results. Download DOE F 1500.7 Employee Relocation Income Tax (RIT) Allowance Certification http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/doe-f-15007 Download EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-draft-environmental-impact-statement Download Business Roundtable Report http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/business-roundtable-report Download EA-1864: Final Environmental Assessment Electrical District 5 - Palo Verde Hub Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1864-final-environmental-assessment-0 Photo Gallery http://energy.gov/photos/beyond-solyndra-how-energy-department-s-loans-are-accelerating-america-s-transition-clean Video Secretary Moniz Speaks at the 2013 Energy Efficiency Global Forum

297

Notices of Availability (NOA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 23, 2004 December 23, 2004 EIS-0183: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Hopkins Ridge Wind Interconnection Project December 17, 2004 EIS-0365: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Imperial-Mexicali 230-kV Transmission Lines December 3, 2004 EIS-0355: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah November 23, 2004 EIS-0349: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Washington and Oregon November 12, 2004 EIS-0355: EPA Notification of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

298

CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007165: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prescott-Pinnacle Peak Bird Diversion Equipment Addition CX(s) Applied: B1.20 Date: 12/15/2010 Location(s): Yavapai County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western proposes installing Firefly type bird diversion equipment onto static wires (overhead ground wires) of the Prescott-Pinnacle Peak 230-kilovolt transmission line between structures 144/3 and 145/2. The diverters will be spaced approximately 15 feet apart alternating between the two static lines. The diverters will be installed using a hot stick from a helicopter or by accessing the line using existing access roads and rubber-tired vehicles such as cherry pickers, pickup trucks, crew trucks.

299

Confidentiality Concerns Raised by DNA-Based Tests in the Market-Driven Managed Care Setting  

SciTech Connect

In a policy climate where incentives to cherry pick are minimized, Managed Care Organizations can implement practices that safeguard medical privacy to the extent that data is protected from falling into the hands of third parties who could misuse it to discriminate. To the extent that these practices have been codified into the regulatory Network of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Consumers may be able to rest easy about their genetic data being revealed to third parties who may discriminate. However, there are limitations to the use of policy instruments to prevent the discrimination of an entire genre of clients by market driven managed care organizations. Policy measures, to assure that knowledge of genetic conditions and their future costs would not be used by market driven managed care organizations to implement institutional policies and products that would implicitly discriminate against a genre of clients with genetic conditions, present difficulties.

Kotval, Jeroo S.

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 22250 of 28,560 results. 41 - 22250 of 28,560 results. Download EA-1791: Finding of No Significant Impact University of Minnesota - Wind Energy Research Consortium Project, Dakota County, Minnesota http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1791-finding-no-significant-impact Download EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0349-record-decision Download Inspection Report: INS-L-11-02 Implementation of Nuclear Weapons Quality Assurance Requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/inspection-report-ins-l-11-02 Download CX-008008: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minor Road and Utility Operations CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.7, B1.13, B1.32, B4.7 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Washington

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Make Locally and Sell Globally | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Make Locally and Sell Globally Make Locally and Sell Globally Make Locally and Sell Globally August 22, 2011 - 11:02am Addthis Less than half the of the world has access to a reliable supply of electricity, creating a unique opportunity for the US to become the leader in developing clean energy technologies that strengthen our economy and meet the demand of the developing world. | Image courtesy NASA Less than half the of the world has access to a reliable supply of electricity, creating a unique opportunity for the US to become the leader in developing clean energy technologies that strengthen our economy and meet the demand of the developing world. | Image courtesy NASA Dr. Arun Majumdar Dr. Arun Majumdar Former Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Other nations are cherry picking our innovations. As a nation, we can

302

Data:Bbaa448a-43db-46a4-ad9b-7d41703097e0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bbaa448a-43db-46a4-ad9b-7d41703097e0 Bbaa448a-43db-46a4-ad9b-7d41703097e0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Cherry-Todd Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GS, Industrial Three-Phase, 100KW or less Sector: Industrial Description: Available for commercial, industrial, residential and farm/rural service for all uses subject to the established rules, regulations, and line extension policies of the seller. Minimum inside town/villages is $41.53; Minimum rural is $53.99; Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Kelly #4 Source Parent:

303

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sup 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Accomplishments for this past quarter are discussed.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, water flood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Through technology transfer workshops and other present at ions, the knowledge gained in the comparative study of these two fields can then be applied to increase product ion from the more than 100 other Delaware Mountain Group reservoirs.

Dutton, S.P.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir-characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and recovery technology identification and analysis.

Dutton, S.P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, April 1,1996 - June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Progress to date is summarized for reservoir characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope, and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir-characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi 2 in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO 2 flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Through technology transfer workshops and other presentations, the knowledge gained in the comparative study of these two fields can then be applied to increase production from the more than 100 other Delaware Mountain Group reservoirs.

Shirley P. Dutton

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine Unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored.

Dutton, S.P.

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-SA-70: Supplement Analysis 5-SA-70: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). DOE/EIS-0285, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions. (July 2002) More Documents & Publications

311

Microsoft Word - ls295.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Considerations for the Operation of the Radiological Considerations for the Operation of the Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring - Revised H. J. Moe September 24, 1997 1. General This report deals with the radiological considerations of operations using 7700-MeV positron and electron beams in the storage ring (SR) tunnel. The radiological considerations addressed include the following: prompt secondary radiation (bremsstrahlung, giant resonance neutrons, medium and high energy neutrons, and muons) produced by electrons/positrons interacting in a beam stop or by particle losses in the component structures; skyshine radiation, which produces a radiation field in nearby areas and at the nearest off-site location; radioactive gases produced by neutron irradiation of air in the vicinity of a particle loss site; noxious gases (ozone and others) produced in air by the

312

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2, 2003 October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis August 27, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County August 22, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington May 21, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana May 20, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-32: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program

313

EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Supplement Analysis 1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). DOE/EIS-0285-SA-71, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions. (July 2002)

314

CX-008765: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008765: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Six Groundwater Monitoring Wells and Perform General Site Actions at the Bluewater Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Site Near Grants, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 05/16/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Legacy Management The Department of Energy proposes to install six groundwater monitoring wells, perform other actions related to use of existing monitoring wells, obtain a Light Detection and Ranging Survey (LiDAR), install a small weather station, and apply pesticide to control noxious weeds at the Bluewater Site. CX-008765.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008760: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006221: Categorical Exclusion Determination

315

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-96) Snohomish District Substations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6) 6) - Snohomish District Substations Dennis Sjoquist - TFN/Snohomish Snohomish Regional Manager Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following facilities located in the Snohomish District: Bellingham Custer Fidalgo Intalco Lopez Island Monroe Murray, V.M. Snohomish Snoking Whatcom Whatcom Skagit Whatcom San Juan Snohomish Snohomish Snohomish Snohomish Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bareground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Snohomish District of the Snohomish Region. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities.

316

Program or Field Office:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Install six groundwater monitoring wells and perform general site actions at the Bluewater Install six groundwater monitoring wells and perform general site actions at the Bluewater Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act site near Grants, NM. LM 5-12 Location: Near Grants, NM Proposed Action or Project Description: DOE proposes to install six groundwater monitoring wells, perform other actions related to use of existing monitoring wells, obtain a Light Detection and Ranging Survey (LiDAR), install a small weather station, and apply pesticide to control noxious weeds at the Bluewater Site. The wells would be drilled by a truck-mounted rotary drill rig. The B SIB-inch boreholes would extend to depths of 120 to 350 feet (ft) below ground surface. Mud pits to contain drilling fluids and drill cuttings would be required for some of the wells. The mud pits, where required, would be approximately 6 ft by 20 ft in

317

EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex. BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical and/or spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and broadleaf control of landscaped lawn areas; 4) weed control in ornamental shrub areas; and 4) areas requiring only mechanical control to manage unwanted grasses, and shrubs. DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis

318

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-94) Covington District Substations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4) 4) - Covington District Substations Dennis Sjoquist - TFN/Snohomish Snohomish Regional Manager Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following facilities located in the Covington District: Covington Echo Lake Lynch Creek Maple Valley Narrows Raver, P.J. South Tacoma Steilacoom Surprise Lake Tacoma King King Pierce King Pierce King Pierce Pierce Pierce Pierce Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bareground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Covington District of the Snohomish Region. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical substations and associated facilities.

319

EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85-SA-71: Supplement Analysis 85-SA-71: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). DOE/EIS-0285-SA-71, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions. (July 2002)

320

EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Final Environmental Impact Statement : Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure I-1). The seven states offer a great diversity of vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control noxious weeds at our

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85-SA-117: Supplement Analysis 85-SA-117: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex. BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking areas; 2) mechanical and/or spot herbicide control of some broad leafs and noxious weeds; 3) mowing, fertilizing, and broadleaf control of landscaped lawn areas; 4) weed control in ornamental shrub areas; and 4) areas requiring only mechanical control to manage unwanted grasses, and shrubs.

322

Microsoft Word - SHP 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shiprock, New Mexico Shiprock, New Mexico Page 16-1 16.0 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site 16.1 Compliance Summary The Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on May 29, 2008. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures remained in good condition and were functioning as designed. Erosion along the southwest bank of the outflow channel was repaired and in good condition. Scattered deep-rooted shrubs on the top and side slopes of the cell, along with tamarisk in the outflow channel, were treated with herbicide. Halogeton, a noxious weed present on the terrace and along site access roads, was also treated. Tumbleweeds and trash continue to accumulate

323

Microsoft Word - GUN 2009-draft final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gunnison, Colorado Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site 8.1 Compliance Summary The Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on June 2, 2009. The disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in good condition and functioning as designed. Six riprap test areas on the cell apron and diversion ditches were visually inspected; no apparent rock degradation was noted when compared to previous photos. Noxious weeds on the disposal site were treated with herbicide in October 2009. No other maintenance needs or cause for a follow- up or contingency inspection was identified. 8.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Gunnison Disposal Site are

324

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure I-1). The seven states offer a great diversity of vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control noxious weeds at our

325

Microsoft Word - LL-SHE Biological Weed Control.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Weed Control Biological Weed Control at the Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site M. Kastens, D. Johnson, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado The Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site is located approximately 7.5 miles southwest of the town of Wellpinit in Stevens County. The site is approximately 35 miles northwest of Spokane. Mill decommissioning activities were completed in 1995; at that time, the disposal site was reclaimed and revegetated with native species. The site is not enclosed with fences, allowing for land use to return to pre-operational use of wildlife habitat. Significant populations of two noxious weed species, diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria dalmatica), occur throughout and around the Sherwood site. Minor,

326

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(8-89) memorandum DATE: 7/19/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist TO: Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). Location: The ROWs are located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions.

327

Microsoft Word - NAD 2008-final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Naturita, Colorado Naturita, Colorado Page 13-1 13.0 Naturita, Colorado, Disposal Site 13.1 Compliance Summary The Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on May 5, 2008. The site was in excellent condition and the disposal cell and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were functioning as designed. Minor erosion and rock debris identified along and on the access road will be addressed in 2009. The perimeter fence was repaired, noxious weeds were sprayed with herbicide, and pedestrian fence ladders were installed at three key locations as a safety precaution. No other maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection were identified. In accordance with the Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP), DOE has monitored groundwater

328

Microsoft Word - FEIS-0285-SA-449-Kalsipell-KerrNo1_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-449-Kalispell-Kerr #1 Transmission Line Corridor) Project No. PP&A 2083 Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFS/Kalispell Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Kalispell-Kerr #1, 115-kV transmission line corridor right-of-way (ROW) Location: The project is located in Flathead and Lake counties, Montana. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove tall growing and noxious vegetation from the ROW, structure sites, and access roads that can potentially interfere with the operation, maintenance, and reliability of the transmission line. All vegetation management activities will

329

EIS-0285-SA-451: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-451 Carlton-Tillamook Transmission Line Corridor, PP&A-2068) BPA proposes to remove tall growing and noxious vegetation from the ROW, structure sites and access roads that can potentially interfere with the operation, maintenance, and reliability of the transmission line. All vegetation management activities will be performed in accordance with the BPA Master Agreement Statement of Work for Vegetation Control on Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Line Rights-of-Way and in accordance with the specific details identified in the vegetation management checklist and detail/prescription sheet. EIS-0285-SA-451-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications

330

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-81): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 7/9/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 9,2002 July 9,2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-81) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for fifteen Substations in The Dalles District. (See list of facilities under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within The Dalles District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what

331

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-74): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 7/1/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2002 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-74) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for five Substations in the Malin District. (See list of facilities under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Malin District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what mitigation measures are required to protect those resources. In addition,

332

EO 13112: Invasive Species  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

183 183 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 25 / Monday, February 8, 1999 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13112 of February 3, 1999 Invasive Species By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990, as amended (16 U.S.C. 4701 et seq.), Lacey Act, as amended (18 U.S.C. 42), Federal Plant Pest Act (7 U.S.C. 150aa et seq.), Federal Noxious Weed Act of 1974, as amended (7 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.), Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other pertinent statutes, to prevent the introduc- tion of invasive species and provide for their control and to minimize

333

1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANDFILL COVER REVEGETATION AT THE LANDFILL COVER REVEGETATION AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE Jody K. Nelson Exponent, 4940 Pearl East Circle, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80020 ABSTRACT In 1998, a revegetation project was begun on a landfill cover at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado. After final contouring of the landfill cover, the area was broadcast seeded with native species including: Agropyron smithii, Bouteloua gracilis, Buchloe dactlyoides, Andropogon gerardii, Andropogon scoparius, and Linum perenne. In May 1999, the cover was treated by helicopter with Tordon22K ® to control the noxious weed, Centaurea diffusa. During 2001, vegetation cover and species richness was measured along five 50-m transects. A total of 25

334

Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas December 31, 2007 - 8:57am Addthis Jody K. Nelson*, USDOE - Rocky Flats Site, Westminster, CO Smooth Brome (Bromus inermis) - The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth brome (Bromus inermis) is an exotic graminoid species that has been used for over a century across much of North America for range improvement and revegetation. While most "noxious" weeds invade quickly and are quite noticeable, a smooth brome invasion can imperceptibly transform the native grassland diversity to a near monoculture over many years or decades. At the Rocky Flats Site, a U.S. Department of Energy facility near Denver, Colorado, smooth brome is increasingly problematic, as it is along

335

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 12/2/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12/02/02 12/02/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-113-1) Updates 9/27/02 SA-113 Bill Erickson, TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: To perform remedial vegetation management for keeping vegetation a safe distance away from electric power facilities and controlling noxious weeds within a section of BPA's Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Corridor. During a site review conducted in late fall of 2001, the inspector observed various species of hardwood trees resprouted from stumps. The new vegetative growth encroached on the required "Minimum Safe Distance" between the top of vegetation and the conductor cables. The management action is necessary to reduce the current and potential future hazards that tall- growing vegetation poses to transmission

336

Microsoft Word - MAW 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maybell West, Colorado Maybell West, Colorado Page 4-1 4.0 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site 4.1 Compliance Summary The Maybell West, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 2, 2012. The disposal cell, ancillary cell, and all associated surface water diversion and drainage structures were in good condition and functioning as designed. The entrance sign was missing and was replaced. Deep-rooted plants growing on the disposal cell and noxious weeds present on the site were treated with herbicide. No maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 4.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Maybell West site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Maybell West (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal

337

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-82): Supplemental Analysis for Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (August 13, 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3,2002 3,2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-82 Jeffrey Hathhorn Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFI/IDAHO FALLS Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for twenty-four Substations in the Burley District. See list of facilities under planning step 1). Location: See list of facilities under Planning Step 1. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Burley District of the Idaho Falls Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what

338

Microsoft Word - FEIS-0285-SA-451-Carlton-Tillamook-PPA2068_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2011 3, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-451 Carlton-Tillamook Transmission Line Corridor, PP&A-2068) Clayton Tinsley Jacob Marti Natural Resource Specialist - TFBV-Chemawa Natural Resource Specialist - TFBV-DOB Proposed Action: Perform vegetation management along the Carlton-Tillamook No.1 transmission line corridor Location: The project is located along the 230 k-V Carlton-Tillamook No. 1 transmission line corridor. The right-of-way (ROW) traverses both Yamhill and Tillamook counties, Oregon, within the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Chemawa District. Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove tall growing and noxious vegetation

339

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus is described, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials. 3 figs.

Chapman, C.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Earth melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed either by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, or by constructing a melt zone in an apparatus above grade and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials.

Chapman, Christopher C. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Earth melter and method of disposing of feed materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, and method of operating the apparatus, wherein a feed material is converted into a glassified condition for subsequent use or disposal. The apparatus is particularly useful for disposal of hazardous or noxious waste materials which are otherwise either difficult or expensive to dispose of. The apparatus is preferably constructed by excavating a melt zone in a quantity of soil or rock, and lining the melt zone with a back fill material if refractory properties are needed. The feed material is fed into the melt zone and, preferably, combusted to an ash, whereupon the heat of combustion is used to melt the ash to a molten condition. Electrodes may be used to maintain the molten feed material in a molten condition, and to maintain homogeneity of the molten materials.

Chapman, Christopher C. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-78): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (07/01/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-78) Randy Melzer Redmond Deputy Regional Manager - TFR/REDMOND Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for ten Substations in the Redmond District. (See list of facilities listed under planning step 1). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes total vegetation management (bare ground) in the electrical substations, and, noxious weed management and maintenance of landscaping within the property boundaries of the listed facilities. These facilities are all located within the Redmond District of the Redmond Region. Analysis: The attached checklist shows the resources that were found during this analysis and what mitigation measures are required to protect those resources. In

345

Microsoft Word - FEIS-0285-SA-450-Flathead-HotSpringsNo1_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2011 6, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-450- Flathead-Hot Springs Transmission Line Corridor) Project No. PP&A 2084 Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFS/Kalispell Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Flathead-Hot Springs #1 230-kV transmission line corridor right-of-way (ROW) Location: The project is located in Flathead, Lake and Sanders counties, Montana. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove tall growing and noxious vegetation from the ROW, structure sites and access roads that can potentially interfere with the operation, maintenance, and reliability of the transmission line. All vegetation management activities will

346

CX-008765: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008765: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Six Groundwater Monitoring Wells and Perform General Site Actions at the Bluewater Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Site Near Grants, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 05/16/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Legacy Management The Department of Energy proposes to install six groundwater monitoring wells, perform other actions related to use of existing monitoring wells, obtain a Light Detection and Ranging Survey (LiDAR), install a small weather station, and apply pesticide to control noxious weeds at the Bluewater Site. CX-008765.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008760: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006221: Categorical Exclusion Determination

347

Gas turbines fired by solid fuels  

SciTech Connect

Steadily increasing energy requirements have spurred a search for new methods of generating energy from low-cost, abundant fuels. The development of a gas-turbine system equipped for the direct combustion of such fuels is now underway in the U.S. A one-megawatt pilot plant has been operating for over a year, using a fluidized bed to burn coal. The plant has also operated on wood waste and municipal solid waste as fuels. Methods have been developed for the suppression of noxious gases included among the combustion products, but there remain some problems with the removal of particulate matter from the exhaust gas prior to its entry into the turbine. A new high-temperature filter is being installed to alleviate these. A description of the one-megawatt pilot plant is provided, along with a discussion of operational results and mechanical problems and their solutions. A preliminary design for a full-scale plant is included.

Wade, G.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Approach for tank safety characterization of Hanford site waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall approach and associated technical basis for characterizing Hanford Site waste to help identify and resolve Waste Tank Safety Program safety issues has been summarized. The safety issues include flammable gas, noxious vapors, organic solvents, condensed-phase exothermic reactions (ferrocyanide and organic complexants), criticality, high heat, and safety screening. For the safety issues involving chemical reactions (i.e., flammable gas, organic solvents, ferrocyanide, and organic complexants), the approach to safety characterization is based on the fact that rapid exothermic reactions cannot occur if either fuel, oxidizer, or temperature (initiators) is not sufficient or controlled. The approach to characterization has been influenced by the progress made since mid-1993: (1) completion of safety analyses on ferrocyanide, criticality, organic solvent in tank 241-C-103, and sludge dryout. (2) successful mitigation of tank 241-SY-101; (3) demonstration of waste aging in laboratory experiments and from waste sampling, and (4) increased understanding of the information that can be obtained from headspace sampling. Headspace vapor sampling is being used to confirm that flammable gas does not accumulate in the single-shell tanks, and to determine whether organic solvents are present. The headspaces of tanks that may contain significant quantities of flammable gas will be monitored continuously using standard hydrogen monitors. For the noxious vapors safety issue, characterization will consist of headspace vapor sampling of most of the Hanford Site waste tanks. Sampling specifically for criticality is not required to confirm interim safe storage; however, analyses for fissile material will be conducted as waste samples are obtained for other reasons. High-heat tanks will be identified through temperature monitoring coupled with thermal analyses.

Meacham, J.E.; Babad, H.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Eberlein, S.J.; Hamilton, D.W.; Johnson, G.D.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Sherwood, D.J. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from the electric facilities; (2) increase the program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This DEIS establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this EIS). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed: manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 24 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, they consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would factor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

State of Asian Elephant Conservation in 2003 i Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;State of Asian Elephant Conservation in 2003 i Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Conservation Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Executive Summary: The state of wild Asian elephant conservation in 2003

New, Mark

352

Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ecological and social impact. The carrying capacity for wild dogs of the Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species 85 community...

Wangchuk, Tashi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume, July 2012 Potential for...

354

SMT Reflow Jig Material Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most wildly used composite material is scattering glass fiber composite ... Properties of Closed-Cell Aluminum Foams Reinforced with Fly Ash Particles.

355

Fish kill mechanisms and toxins exploration for the harmful alga Chattonella marina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The marine alga Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae) has long attracted global attention for its association with massive mortality in wild and cultured fish worldwide. Respiratory disorder (more)

Shen, Min ( ??)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

x00DC;ber die Beteilligung von ATP bei der Regelung ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the monsoon season Chrysocoris stollii were found in large numbers as a pest on the wild chilly plants growing abundantly in fields south of Mussalapur...

357

ANL:MCS-P1995-0112.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Experimental Study of Global and Local Search Algorithms in Empirical Performance Tuning 1 Prasanna Balaprakash, Stefan M. Wild, and Paul D. Hovland Mathematics and Computer...

358

The Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide: The Blue Movement Directory (2005-2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magazine, California Coast & Ocean, California Wild, andReview: The Ocean and Coastal Conservation Guide: The BlueMiller San Francisco, USA The Ocean and Coastal Conservation

Miller, Ryder W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, June 26 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Vegetarian salad wrap -...

360

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, September 22 - Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken - Tuna Melt on Nine Grain - BBQ Ribs - Chicken Casserole - Buffalo Chicken Wrap - Mexican...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 -Cream of Wild Mushroom -Blackened Fish Filet Sandwich -Southern Fried Chicken -Tuna Casserole -Eggplant Parmesan Panini -Assorted Slice Pizza -Assorted Sub Sandwich Wilson...

362

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Jan. 14 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine-grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo krispy chicken wrap...

363

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, June 29 -Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken -Tuna Melt on Nine Grain -BBQ Ribs -Chicken Casserole -Buffalo Chicken Wrap -Assorted Slice...

364

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, April 3 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Vegetarian salad wrap -...

365

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, April 24 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Vegetarian salad wrap -...

366

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, Feb. 12 - Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken - Tuna Melt on Nine Grain - Smart Cuisine: Italian Meatloaf - Chicken Casserole - Smart...

367

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Oct. 21 - Breakfast: apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - *Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo krispy chicken...

368

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, July 1 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

369

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, June 4 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

370

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, June 16 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

371

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, March 8 -Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken -Tuna Melt on Nine Grain -BBQ Ribs -Chicken Casserole -Buffalo Chicken Wrap -Assorted Slice...

372

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, July 14 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart Cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

373

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Secon Level 3 Wilson Hall Cafe Thursday, May 7 - Minnesota wild rice wchicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo crispy chicken wrap...

374

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Thursday, Nov. 3 - Breakfast: Apple sticks - Minnesota wild rice w chicken - Tuna melt on nine grain - Smart cuisine: Italian meatloaf - Chicken casserole - Buffalo...

375

THE ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA: A PUBLIC POLICY APPROACH TO SAVING AN ICONIC SPECIES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) is perhaps the most magnificent and most marvelous nomadic wild animal living in the world. It lives in the (more)

O'Brien, Timothy Patrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Estimating the Cost of Large Superconducting Thin Solenoid Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for making a preliminary cost estimate of proposed one of afor making a budgetary cost estimate of relatively lightbut in other cases, the cost estimates are wildly different

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

August 2009 Final Approval Package for TPA Tentative Agreement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act (ARRA) Wild Card (More Money - No worries?) Timing (Generally announced but actual Hanford dollars delayed by a month or more) August 2009 Tentative Agreement Outline Page 3...

378

Structure and Receptor Specificity of an Avian Flu Antigen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fowl in a number of Asian countries, including China, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, and Cambodia, and has now spread to wild bird populations. More recently,...

379

MOLTEN METAL REACTORS - Energy Innovation Portal  

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID), Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID), Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID), Wilding, Bruce M. (IdahoFalls, ID) ...

380

Ghetto Fabulous: Inner City Car Culture, the Law, and Authenticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. (Producer). (2005). Oakland cars gone wild: Are autoabout pretty women, classy cars and just generally showingK. (1997). Cruisin': Car culture in America. Minneapolis,

Brown, Roger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Available Technologies: Energy Crops Engineered for Increased ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Biofuel feedstock plants; ADVANTAGES: Reduced lignin or phenolic compounds compared with wild type plants; Up to a 10 percent increase in ...

382

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publishing. nazarewicz, W., Schunck, n., Wild, S.,* "Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory," Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, May 2012, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 6-7. ALCF | 2012...

383

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory wild@mcs.anl.gov ABSTRACT Code optimization in the high-performance computing realm has traditionally focused on reducing execution time. The problem, in...

384

Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the kinetic energy of the wind and converts it into rotary motion to drive the generator, which produces either AC or wild AC (variable frequency, variable voltage), which...

385

Perfect Babies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by breeding selectively, and this has been done for millennia. The domestic pig, cow, dog, etc. are very different from their wild ancestors because of this. People breed...

386

Biological Nitrification Inhibition (BNI) Potential in Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biological nitrification inhibition by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). New Phytol 2008;180:442-451.in the root-DCM wash (?g) Wild sorghums Fig. 3. Relationship

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Tenant Guidelines National Park Service and the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credited, are by Michael Wilde. Design and layout are by Clay Johnson and Michael Wilde. The authors would, Tel. (415) 561-4332, Fax (415) 561-4350. Download this document from the World Wide Web: http://www.eren.doe.gov/femp, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

Diamond, Richard

388

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A total of 333 stream sections were sampled in 1994 to monitor in chinook salmon and steelhead trout parr populations in Idaho. Percent carry capacity and density estimates were summarized by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon. These data were also summarized by cells and subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992-1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

Hall-Griswold, Judy A.; Leitzinger, Eric J.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Final SEAB September 13 Meeting Minutes[2]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page Page 1 o f 3 Summary M inutes o f t he U.S. D epartment o f E nergy ( DOE) Secretary o f E nergy A dvisory B oard Public M eeting Committee M embers: J ohn D eutch, C o---Chair; P ersis D rell, C o---Chair; B rent S cowcroft; R am S henoy; Cherry M urray; S hirley J ackson; D an R eicher; M artha S chlicher; R afael B ras; Albert C arnesale; S teve K oonin; D an Y ergin; C armichael R oberts; D eborah J in; Paul J oskow; R ichard M eserve Date a nd T ime: 8:00 A M--- 1 2:00 P M, S eptember 1 3, 2 013 Location: Department o f E nergy F orrestal B uilding, 1 000 I ndependence A venue, S W, Washington, D C 2 0585 Purpose: Meeting o f t he S ecretary o f E nergy A dvisory B oard ( SEAB) SEAB S taff: Amy B odette, D esignated F ederal O fficer; M ackenzie H uffman, D eputy Designated F ederal O fficer DOE S taff: Secretary E rnest

390

CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MCKEESPORT MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE WALBORN RESERVOIR YOUN GSVILLE RPD-LORAIN -1 INGOMAR-GRUBBS BIG MEADOWS GARD EN ISLE TURT LE CREEK LEWIST ON E BR USH CR EEK FOOT VILLE BU LL CREEK BESSEMER EAGLEVILLE LIVER POOL E RIDGEVILLE E EVANS CIT Y GUIT ONVILLE WOLF S COR NERS WIN DFALL ABBEYVILLE ROC K CAMP LEATH ER WOOD AR COLA CR EEK MEC HANICST OWN NINE MILE RU N WALKCHALK RENFR EW-MCCALMONT BU FFALO N VALENCIA WELLIN GT ON

391

Chewing Gum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chewing Gum Chewing Gum Nature Bulletin No. 621-A December 11, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHEWING GUM Since ancient times, in many lands, people have found relaxation and comfort in the simple act of chewing some gummy substance. Somehow it relieves muscular and nervous tension. For example, at football, basketball and baseball games you will see some of the athletes and many spectators methodically chewing on wads of gum. On the other hand it relieves the tedium of doing nothing. For those reasons, and because it also relieves thirst, chewing gum was included in the combat rations of our armed forces. Here in the Middle West, many years ago when we were boys, chewing gum was not sold in stores as it is now. We were always experimenting with things to chew on. One of our favorites was the aromatic, mucilaginous, inner bark of the slippery elm. Another was paraffin wax, used by our mothers to seal glasses of homemade jelly. For a penny we could buy a black stick of licorice and spit like a tobacco-chewing man. We chewed the gummy sap that exudes from wounds in the bark of peach and cherry trees. We chewed beeswax in honeycombs.

392

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

393

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97303 Phone number 800-720-ODFW Website http://www.dfw.state.or.us/ Coordinates 44.974582°, -123.020498° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.974582,"lon":-123.020498,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2010 5, 2010 CX-006334: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Novi CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Novi, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 5, 2010 CX-006323: Categorical Exclusion Determination Illinois-City-Palatine, Village of CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Palatine, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 5, 2010 CX-006431: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rhode Island-City-Warwick CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Warwick, Rhode Island Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 5, 2010 CX-006419: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey-City-Cherry Hill, Township of CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1

395

Potential value of Cs-137 capsules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We determined the value of Cs-137 compared to Co-60 as a source for the irradiation of fruit (apples and cherries), pork and medical supplies. Cs-137, in the WESF capsule form, had a value of approximately $0.40/Ci as a substitute for Co-60 priced at approximately $1.00/Ci. The comparison was based on the available curies emitted from the surface of each capsule. We developed preliminary designs for fourteen irradiation facilities; seven were based on Co-60 and seven were based on Cs-137. These designs provided the basis for estimating capital and operating costs which, in turn, provided the basis for determining the value of Cs-137 relative to Co-60 in these applications. We evaluated the effect of the size of the irradiation facility on the value of Cs-137. The cost of irradiation is low compared to the value of the product. Irradiation of apples for disinfestation costs $.01 to .02 per pound. Irradiation for trichina-safe pork costs $.02 per pound. Irradiation of medical supplies for sterilization costs $.07 to .12 per pound. The cost of the irradiation source, either Co-60 or Cs-137, contributed only a minor amount to the total cost of irradiation, about 5% for the fruit and hog cases and about 20% for the medical supply cases. We analyzed the sensitivity of the irradiation costs and Cs-137 value to several key assumptions.

Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Hazelton, R.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lezberg, A.J.; Tingey, G.L.; Wilfert, G.L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

397

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

398

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 7050 of 28,560 results. 41 - 7050 of 28,560 results. Rebate Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania) Established by The Wild Resource Conservation Act of 1982, the Wild Resource Conservation Program is a part of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The program works closely with... http://energy.gov/savings/wild-resource-conservation-program-pennsylvania Rebate Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland) Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also... http://energy.gov/savings/wildlife-management-areas-maryland Rebate Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of

399

The impact of over 100years of wildfires on mercury levels and accumulation rates in two lakes in southern California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 years of wild?res on mercury levels and accumulationbe an important source of mercury (Hg) to local watersheds.transport of gaseous mercury from a large scale Canadian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Eternity of the World and Renaissance Historical Thought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that comprises Nimrod, Noahs Flood and the Tower of Babel (particularly floods (like Noahs) or plagues, to eliminatePelacani declared the story of Noah bringing the wild beasts

Connell, William J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TAO: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Referencing TAO Impact Who We Are Acknowledgements License Contact Us Papers TAO 2.0 Users Manual, T. Munson, J. Sarich, Stefan M. Wild, S. Benson, and L....

402

John Muir  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

glaciers, and with the giant Sequoias. His studies furnished proof that the Yosemite Valley was glacier-made and not the results of earthquakes. Though he traveled the wild...

403

The new phrenology: the limits of localizing cognitive processes in the brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New, noninvasive imaging technologies allow us to observe the brain while it is actively engaged in mental activities. Uttal cautions, however, that the excitement of these new research tools can lead to a neuroreductionist wild goose chase. With more ...

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Intragenic and extragenic suppressors of temperature sensitive mutations replication initiation genes dnaD and dnaB of Bacillus subtilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The Bacillus subtilis genes dnaD and dnaB are essential for the initiation of DNA replication and are required for loading of the replicative helicase at the chromosomal origin of replication oriC. Wild type ...

Grossman, Alan D.

405

Coal keeps the home fires burning, at a price  

SciTech Connect

The wild ride of 2007 thermal and coking coal and freight prices does not show any signs of abating as 2008 nears, leaving consumers coping with historic high costs, except in the US. 3 figs.

O'Connell, J.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Title: One Day in September Cafeteria Thursday, September 25 Wild mushroom bisque Tuna casserole 3.50 Roasted pork loin 4.75 Turkey and Swiss on a pretzel roll 4.75 Jack...

407

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secon Level 3 Cafeteria Thursday, March 3 Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken Soup Tuna Melt on Nine Grain 4.75 Breaded Veal with Mushroom Cream Sauce 3.75 Sweet & Sour Pork...

408

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINAR THIS WEEK Cafeteria Thursday, August 26 Minnesota Wild Rice with Chicken Tuna Melt on Nine Grain 4.75 Breaded Veal with Mushroom Cream Sauce 3.75 Sweet & Sour Pork...

409

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Dileptons in Run II at CDF Cafeteria Thursday, May 6 Minnesota Wild Rice wChicken Tuna Melt on Nine Grain SW Skillet Steaks 4.75 Jumbo Stuffed Baked Potatoes 2.75 BLT Ranch...

410

The Sweet Potato  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-- by Columbus in the West Indies, by Balboa in Central America, and by Pizarro in Peru. Like corn, it was not found growing wild, but it had been cultivated by the Incan and...

411

Differential Gene Expression Pre-processing: from CEL files to ExpressionSet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different between mutants and wild types Install Libraries and Load Data > source-processing: from CEL files to ExpressionSet Gene Annotation Visualize Expression Profile using Heatmap Produce

Qiu, Weigang

412

Web-Style Multimedia Annotations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Semantic Web. World Wide Web Consortium, Working Draft20] Erik Wilde. Declarative Web 2.0. In Weide Chang andUCB iSchool Report 2007-014 Web-Style Multimedia Annotations

Shaw, Ryan; Wilde, Erik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Web Site Metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International World Wide Web Conference, pages 11231124,Erik Wilde. Site Metadata on the Web. In Proceedings of theUCB ISchool Report 2009-028 Web Site Metadata [4] David R.

Wilde, Erik; Roy, Anuradha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ecology, 81(2), 2000, pp. 500508 2000 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distributed spider mite species that feeds on crops and wild plants in most areas of the world (Jeppson et al Survey Bulletin 33:141­174. Jeppson, L. R., H. H. Keifer, and E. W. Baker. 1975. Mites injurious

Agrawal, Anurag

415

Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.) Broodstock Nutrition: The Role Of Arachidonic Acid And Astaxanthin As Determinants Of Egg Quality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cod hatcheries rely greatly on wild-caught broodstock as egg quality from farm-reared broodstock tends to be poor. Broodstock diet and levels of essential fatty acids (more)

Sawanboonchun, Jarin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cranberries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acres of bogs in Massachusetts -- where their culture from wild plants was begun on Cape Cod in the early 1800' s -- and in New Jersey and Wisconsin. Cranberries grow in peat bogs...

417

The Role of Spire and Cofilin in Actin Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wild-type cofilin as a standard. BPM and ANP cross-linkingBPM and ANP cross-linking were performed as describedBPM cross-linked actin with ANP cross-linked actin due to

Chen, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Chromosome- and Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chromosome- and Chromatid-type Aberrations after Irradiation of Various HRR or NHEJ Deficient Mutant Chinese Hamster Cells and Their Wild-type Counterparts in G0G1 or LateSG2...

419

Eavesdroppers : how scientists are learning to listen in on the animal kingdom : four stories on wildlife and sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically, if scientists want to study animals in the wild they rely on field observations by eye. If they want to track those species to know where they are, where they are going, and how they behave, then researchers may ...

Quill, Elizabeth H. (Elizabeth Helene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Osage Orange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hunt wild game, there have been herdsmen and farmers who have had to build fences. Fence building and fence repairing, whether they be stone walls, living thorn hedges, rail...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Insect oils: Nutritional and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many researchers have investigated wild plants as a new source of oils, but until now few have seriously considered insects. A recent analysis from Sudan indicates that insect oils offer several nutritional benefits and meet many of the specifications for

422

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers efforts to monitor age composition of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River Basin. Accurately determining the ocean age proportions of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon is important information for monitoring the status and trends of these species. During this report period, project personnel selected the preferred structure for aging, set up a database to track all samples collected, developed procedures and ordered equipment for structure preparation and reading, and aged the adults that were sampled in 1999. Chinook salmon carcasses were sampled from representative spawning areas throughout the Snake River Basin. Ocean age proportions were determined for each 5 centimeter fork length group for wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River. These ocean age proportions were applied to the number and estimated length frequency distribution of wild chinook salmon adults passing Lower Granite Dam to estimate the number of adult returns for each ocean age group.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Anderson, Dave; Johnson, June (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

Benson, Etienne Samuel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Bacterial growth in the plant apoplast is limited by nutrient availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wild type Pss B728a produced water-soaking zones that were ?and Pto DC3000 produced no water-soaking but did producemutants produced smaller but detectable water-soaked zones

RAMOS, MARIA EUGENIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Indian Dyes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from wild grapes; yellow from sunflowers and yellow coneflowers. Their enemies, the Blackfeet, obtained a beautiful yellow from a moss that grew among the fir trees in the Rocky...

426

NREL: Wind Research - Avian Reports Published by NREL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of NREL-published documents on avian issues. These reports are also available in the Wind-Wildlife Impacts Literature Database (WILD). An Assessment of the Impacts of Green...

427

Christmas in Early America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one with the only spoon, fat meat of the "wild cattle" and, as a special treat, boiled dog. You probably won't have boiled dog but have a Merry Christmas anyway. To return to the...

428

NEWTON's Zoology Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planet - Videos Section Animal Planet online lets you see videos about cat breeds, dog breeds, wild animals and pets and much more. See and learn about animals courtesy of...

429

2011 , , , . P. 45  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] [unification church study] [quiz study] [role playing game] SF [Science Fictionfantasy literature study] [geography] [railroad study] [astronomy] [science] [biology] [outdoor activity] [wild creature study training] [volleyball] [volleyball] [handball] [field hockey] [figure skating] [fencing] [bowling

Takada, Shoji

430

[symphony orchestra] [light music  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] [Christianity] [life philosophy] [unification church study] [quiz study] [role playing game] SF [Science] [geography] [railroad study] [astronomy] [science] [biology] [outdoor activity] [wild creature study training] [volleyball] [volleyball] [handball] [field hockey] [figure skating] [fencing] [bowling

Takada, Shoji

431

MS&T '04 Tour Information - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Ride on the Wild Side Date: Monday, September 27, 2004. Time: 8:00am-12: 00pm. Cost: $55.00. Located just twenty minutes from downtown New Orleans,...

432

Anything But Routine: A Selectively Annotated Bibliography of William S. Burroughs v. 1.0.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extract from The Wild Boys. [M&M]. C307. UFO, No. 1 (June1971). {M&M C308 & 309} ? ?UFO Space Bulletin?Revolutiontranslation. [M&M] C308. UFO, No. 2 (October 1971). {M&M

Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ANYTHING BUT ROUTINE: A Selectively Annotated Bibliography of William S. Burroughs v. 2.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extract from The Wild Boys. [M&M]. C309. UFO, No. 1 (June1971). {M&M C308 & 309} ?UFO Space Bulletin?Revolutiontranslation. [M&M] C310. UFO, No. 2 (October 1971). {M&M

Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Anything But Routine: A Selectively Annotated Bibliography of William S. Burroughs, v. 3.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extract from The Wild Boys. [M&M]. C311. UFO, No. 1 (June1971). {M&M C308 & 309} UFO Space BulletinRevolutiontranslation. [M&M] C312. UFO, No. 2 (October 1971). {M&M

Schottlaender, Brian E.C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Digestive enzyme activities and gastrointestinal fermentation in wood-eating catfishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our data on wild-caught wood-eating catWshes appear to bein the Amazo- nian basin, and the wood-eating species likelyby reducing the particle size of wood from coarse debris to

German, Donovan P.; Bittong, Rosalie A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Vermont Pasture Network Calendar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cleaning grain, the milling process, and packaging flour. He'll also discuss the history of milling for a tour of Wild Hive Farm Community Grain Project and a look at how local milling plays an important role

Hayden, Nancy J.

437

This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company Syngenta Crop Protection TruGreen Chem Lawn UAP Southeast Whole Mill Flour Production Wild Oats, Inc. Pew Charitable Trust Pioneer Hi-bred Progressive Insurance Purina Mills Rabo Agrifiance Sanderson

Arnold, Jonathan

438

Foliage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time in the past decade. Unless we have a long hot dry spell, we should have a bumper crop of wild blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. The tree leaves are exceptionally...

439

Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station College of Agriculture and Home Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the soil, and is sometimes found in both wild and domesticated animals. The animals sometimes infected `wool-sorter's disease.' It gets on the surface of the skin, and then enters through cuts, cuticle tears

Castillo, Steven P.

440

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the soil, and is sometimes found in both wild and domesticated animals. The animals sometimes infected `wool-sorter's disease.' It gets on the surface of the skin, and then enters through cuts, cuticle tears

Castillo, Steven P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Olive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it was first domesticated, was probably on the limestone hills near the sea between Greece and Syria. The wild olive is a rather straggling small tree or bush with thorny...

442

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Significant Decadal Brightening of Downwelling Shortwave in the Continental US C. N. Long, E. G. Dutton, J. A. Augustine, W. Wiscombe, M. Wild, S. A. McFarlane, and C. J. Flynn 5....

443

Executive Summary...................................................................................................................................................................................... iii Water and Coastal Biodiversity Conservation........  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cover Photo PHILIPPINE FISHERMAN: Fishers in the Philippines and around the world are often the poorest members of society. Their livelihoods depend on diverse and abundant wild fisheries. Many of USAIDs biodiversity programs work to restore and protect

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the following 3 parts of the Project: Part 1--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer Chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin in 2003 to predict smolt-to-adult return rates Part 2--Development of a stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon to forecast natural smolt production Part 3--Improve the precision of smolt-to-adult survival rate estimates for wild steelhead trout by PIT tagging additional juveniles.

Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Modular 5 MW geothermal power plant design considerations and guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design considerations and guideline documents given define the principal design requirements for a nominal 5 MW geothermal power plant of a type to permit over-the-road transport of its several modules. The power plant system defined is supplied with steam from a single flash steam separator stage, located at the plant area, and supplied with steam from two wells at nominal pressure of 3.8 Kg/cm/sup 2/ Abs (54 psia). In some cases where the content of noxious noncondensable gases is high, a shell and tube condenser would be substituted for the direct contact type condenser specified and an additional module containing an H/sub 2/S removal system would be added. Guidelines are given for the following: site preparation, collection system, plant installation, assembly, and test; turbine generator module; condenser and noncondensable gas removal module; plant control and switchgear module; cooling water circulation pump module; steam-water separator module; maintenance, office, and lavatory module; reinjection pump module; cooling tower modules; spray pond installation and piping; and auxiliary generator module. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts.

Domene, Xavier, E-mail: x.domene@creaf.uab.es [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Sola, Laura; Ramirez, Wilson; Alcaniz, Josep M.; Andres, Pilar [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Catalysis Highlights for FY2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce the nations dependence on imported oil, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other federal and private agencies are investing in understanding catalysis. This report focuses on catalysis research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Using sophisticated instruments in DOEs Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, research was conducted to answer key questions related to the nations use of automotive fuels. Research teams investigated how hydrogen can be safely stored and efficiently released, critical questions to use this alternative fuel. Further, they are answering key questions to design molecular catalysts to control the transfer of hydrogen atoms, hydrides, and protons important to hydrogen production. In dealing with todays fuels, researchers examined adsorption of noxious nitrous oxides in automotive exhaust. Beyond automotive fuel, researchers worked on catalysts to harness solar power. These catalysts include the rutile and anatase forms of titanium dioxide. Basic research was conducted on designing catalysts for these and other applications. Our scientists examined how to build catalysts with the desired properties atom by atom and molecule by molecule. In addition, this report contains brief descriptions of the outstanding accomplishments of catalysis experts at PNNL.

Garrett, Bruce C.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution control equipment manufacturers are continually developing sophisticated systems designed to dramatically reduce plant emissions. One such system, the ionizing wet scrubber (IWS), has demonstrated outstanding air pollution control characteristics while meeting the challenge of energy efficiency. The IWS system removes fine solid and liquid particulate down to 0.05 micron at high collection efficiencies and low energy comsumption. It also simultaneously removes noxious, corrosive and odor-bearing gases from flue gas streams as well as coarse particulate matter above 1 micron in diameter. Due to its simplified design and low pressure drop, operating energy costs of the IWS are only a fraction of those for alternative air pollution control equipment. Pressure drop through a single-stage IWS is only 0.5 to 1.5 in. Water (125 to 374 pa) column and is controlled primarily by pressure drop through the wet scrubber section. Total system energy usage is approximately 2.0-2.5 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min (0.7-0.9 kw/m/sup 3//min) for a single-stage IWS and 4.0-5.0 bhp/1,000 actual ft/sup 3//min for a two-stage installation. These energy requirements represent a significant savings as opposed to other air pollution control systems such as Venturi scrubbers.

Sheppard, S.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

doi:10.1155/2008/362451 Review Article Genomics of Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a subject of plant genomics research based on its importance as one of the worlds leading cereal crops, a biofuels crop of high and growing importance, a progenitor of one of the worlds most noxious weeds, and a botanical model for many tropical grasses with complex genomes. A rich history of genome analysis, culminating in the recent complete sequencing of the genome of a leading inbred, provides a foundation for invigorating progress toward relating sorghum genes to their functions. Further characterization of the genomes other than Saccharinae cereals may shed light on mechanisms, levels, and patterns of evolution of genome size and structure, laying the foundation for further study of sugarcane and other economically important members of the group. Copyright 2008 Andrew H. Paterson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 1. WHY SORGHUM? As a food and feed crop, sorghum is an important failsafe in the global agroecosystem. Worldwide, sorghum is the 5th most important grain crop grown based on tonnage, after maize, wheat, rice, and barley (www.fao.org). Sorghumis unusually

Andrew H. Paterson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The atlas of major Appalachian gas plays. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes. Both pneumatic and hydraulic injection methods will be investigated. Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). Phase 1 is concerned with the development of the grout and a series of predictive models. Phase 1 will also redesign a pneumatic ejector, that was developed to stow limestone, to efficiently stow FBC ash. Phase 2 is a small scale field test at Anker Energy`s Fairfax mine. An inactive panel will be used to evaluate flow, strength, and pressure requirements for hydraulic (grout) injection. The Phase 2 pneumatic injection activities will take place at an Anker Energy mine in Preston County, West Virginia. Air flow requirements, pressure requirements, stowing rate (tons per hour), and stowing efficiency (distance blown) will be determined. Phase 3 is to take 26 months and will be a full scale test at Anker`s eleven acre Long Ridge mine site. The mine will be filled using both pneumatic and hydraulic injection methods. It is expected that the FBC ash will replace what is now an acid mine pool with an alkaline solid so that the ground water will tend to flow around rather than through the previously mined areas. The project will demonstrate whether FBC ash can be successfully disposed of in underground mines.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers Using Experience to Train the Next Generation of Workers July 5, 2011 - 1:46pm Addthis Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Bob Wilds working at a winding machine. | Photo Courtesy of Waukesha Electric Systems Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Bob Wilds has worked at Waukesha Electric Systems for the last 12 years as a coil winder. Waukesha Electric Systems makes transformers -- an essential part of the electric grid, transferring electrical current from one circuit to another. The coils that Bob works with are one of the most important components that make transformers work. The component involves winding insulated copper wire, but workers involved in transformer

455

Turkeys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No. 619 November 26, 1960 No. 619 November 26, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist TURKEYS : WILD AND DOMESTICATED The story of the first Thanksgiving in 1621 and of the wild "Turkies" which the Pilgrims hunted to provide meat for the feast is familiar to every American. Today, although very few of us can claim that we had ancestors on the Mayflower, a lot of us imagine that our Thanksgiving bird is descended from those wild turkeys. This is not quite correct. A century before, in Mexico, the early Spanish adventurers had found Indians raising turkeys around their homes. The Aztec emperor, Montezuma, kept them in his famous zoo, it is said, as food for the other animals. It is not known how long those Mexican birds had been tamed and bred but they are the true ancestors of our only domestic animal with an origin in North America.

456

DISPATCHES Emergence of African Swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008, African swine fever was introduced into Georgia, after which it spread to neighboring Armenia, Azerbaijan, and the Russian Federation. That same year, PCR and sequence analysis identifi ed African swine fever virus in samples from 3 dead female wild boars in northwestern Iran. Wild boars may serve as a reservoir. African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable, highly contagious, lethal, hemorrhagic disease in domestic pigs (1,2). ASF virus (ASFV) (International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses database no. 00.002.0.01.001), an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus, is the only known DNA arbovirus (3). Maintenance and transmission of ASFV involves cycling of virus between soft ticks of the genus Ornithodoros and wild pigs (warthogs, bush pigs, and giant forest boars) (1,2). The virus can also be acquired through

Pooneh Rahimi; Amir Sohrabi; Javad Ashrafihelan; Rosita Edalat; Mehran Alamdari; Mohammadhossein Masoudi; Saied Mostofi; Kayhan Azadmanesh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Bacterial systems for selective plugging in secondary oil production  

SciTech Connect

In order to improve the secondary recovery of petroleum from Lower Cretaceous bitumen and heavy oil deposits in Alberta, Canada, plugging studies of anaerobic bacteria, capable of the controlled production of slime, in situ were undertaken. Known cultures of L. mesenteroides (NRRL B512, B512F, B742 and B523) and 75 wild strains were tested in a model core flooding apparatus for their ability to produce stable, water insoluble polysaccharide slimes. Slime was not formed using glucose/fructose nutrient but was formed by the known cultures and four wild strains when sucrose nutrient media was used. However, wherein the polysaccharides slime produced by the wild strains was found to be water soluble dextran polymers and thus unstable, that produced by the known L. mesenteroides strains was water insoluble and stable. It is thus possible to produce a water stable core plug by injecting an appropriate strain of L. mesenteroides followed by an injection of sucrose solution.

Jack, T.R.; Diblasio, E.; Thompson, B.G.; Ward, V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Spindle dynamics and cell cycle regulation of dynein in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We have used time-lapse digital- and videoenhanced differential interference contrast (DE-DIC, VE-DIC) microscopy to study the role of dynein in spindle and nuclear dynamics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The real-time analysis reveals six stages in the spindle cycle. Anaphase B onset appears marked by a rapid phase of spindle elongation, simultaneous with nuclear migration into the daughter cell. The onset and kinetics of rapid spindle elongation are identical in wild type and dynein mutants. In the absence of dynein the nucleus does not migrate as close to the neck as in wild-type cells and initial spindle elongation is confined primarily to the mother cell. Rapid oscillations of the elongating spindle between the mother and bud are observed in wild-type cells, followed by a slower growth

Elaine Yeh; Robert V. Skibbens; Judy W. Cheng; E. D. Salmon; Kerry Bloom

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their homes vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified on the PNNL Site.

Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Potential air quality impact of geothermal power production in the Imperial Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A regional assessment of the potential impact on air quality of developing the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources for power production is presented. A network of six stations was installed to characterize the air quality and atmospheric transport properties of the valley before development. These measured the ambient air concentrations of H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO, NO/sub x/, CO/sub 2/, Hg, Rn, and particulates. Wind velocity and the directional variability of the winds were also measured to determine atmospheric stability. The geothermal fluids were analyzed chemically to estimate potential emission rates of H/sub 2/S, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, Hg, and Rn from future power plants. Using these data and advanced air quality modeling led to the prediction of the potential valley-wide impact of a 3000 MW development scenario. The impact analysis reveals that H/sub 2/S is the principal gaseous pollutant of concern due to its noxious odor and the potential release rate. The ambient H/sub 2/S concentrations that would result from generating 3000 MW without emission controls exceed the California air quality standard (30 ppb) at least 1% of the time for an area in the northern part of the valley that is roughly 1500 km/sup 2/ in size. This compares with current ambient air concentrations that exceed the standard much less than 0.1% of the time. The population center most impacted is Calipatria, where the standard could be exceeded almost 10% of the time. In addition, the odor of H/sub 2/S will be noticeable at least 1% of the time for most of the valley if the 3000 MW are placed on-line without abatement systems.

Gudiksen, P.H.; Ermak, D.L.; Lamson, K.C.; Axelrod, M.C.; Nyholm, R.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no {open_quotes}proven{close_quotes} long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems.

Wing, N.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Accurate Measurements and Modeling of the PpT Behavior of Pure Substances and Natural Gas-Like Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scale of the energy business today and a favorable and promising economic environment for the production of natural gas, requires study of the thermophysical behavior of fluids: sophisticated experimentation yielding accurate, new volumetric data, and development and improvement of thermodynamic models. This work contains theoretical and experimental contributions in the form of 1) the revision and update of a field model to calculate compressibility factors starting from the gross heating value and the mole fractions of diluents in natural gas mixtures; 2) new reference quality volumetric data, gathered with state of the art techniques such as magnetic suspension densimetry and isochoric phase boundary determinations; 3) a rigorous first-principles uncertainty assessment for density measurements; and 4) a departure technique for the extension of these experimental data for calculating energy functions. These steps provide a complete experimental thermodynamic characterization of fluid samples. A modification of the SGERG model, a standard virial-type model for prediction of compressibility factors of natural gas mixtures, matches predictions from the master GERG-2008 equation of state, using least squares routines coded at NIST. The modification contains new values for parametric constants, such as molecular weights and the universal gas constant, as well as a new set of coefficients. A state-of-the-art high-pressure, single-sinker magnetic suspension densimeter is used to perform density measurements over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This work contains data on nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and a typical residual gas mixture (95% methane, 4% ethane, and 1% propane). Experimental uncertainty results from a rigorous, first-principles estimation including composition uncertainty effects. Both low- and high-pressure isochoric apparatus are used to perform phase boundary measurements. Isochoric P-T data can determine the phase boundaries. Combined with density measurements, isochoric data provides isochoric densities. Further mathematical treatment, including noxious volume and thermal expansion corrections, and isothermal integration, leads to energy functions and thus to a full thermodynamic characterization.

Mantilla, Ivan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66: Regulation for Administration and 66: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water

466

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wang, Zhi "Luke" (Zhi "Luke" Wang) - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Fresno Wania, Frank (Frank Wania) - Departments of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto Wells, Scott A. (Scott A. Wells) - Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Portland State University Wilde, Gene (Gene Wilde) - Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University Wildenschild, Dorthe (Dorthe Wildenschild) - School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University Wilkinson, Mark (Mark Wilkinson) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Woltemade, Christopher J. (Christopher J. Woltemade) - Department of Geography-Earth Science, Shippensburg University

467

Population Dynamics and Environmental Degradation in Nepal: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cover, scholars on forestry estimate this percent as low as 29 percent. This shows that deforestation has taken place at an alarnling rate in Nepal. Forest ecosystems have developed over long periods of time and get adapted to certain climatic and other... is of the opinion that agricultural productivity is directly related to the quality and quantity of wild vegetation. If the wild vegetation continues to deteriorate, fewer It is the rule, not the exception, that in most of the central and southern Kamali zone...

Uprety, Laya Prasad

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

Howe, Gregg A. (East Lansing, MI); Itoh, Aya (Tsuruoka, JP)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

469

EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOEs Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would be used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA includes a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis.

470

Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

471

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has been conducting Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research since the early 1990s. NATURES studies have looked at a variety of mechanisms to enhance production of wild-like salmonids from hatcheries. The goal of NATURES research is to develop fish culture techniques that enable hatcheries to produce salmon with more wild-like characteristics and increased postrelease survival. The development of such techniques is called for in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This document is the draft report for the Supplemental Fish Quality Contract DE-AI79-91BP20651 Over the history of the project, the effects of seminatural raceway habitats, automated underwater feeders, exercise current velocities, live food diets, and predator avoidance training have been investigated. The findings of these studies are reported in an earlier contract report (Maynard et al. 1996a). The current report focuses on research that has been conducted between 1999 and 2002. This includes studies on the effect of exercise on salmon and steelhead trout, effects of predator avoid training, integration of NATUES protocols into production hatcheries, and the study of social behavior of steelhead grown in enriched and conventional environments. Traditionally, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are reared in barren concrete raceways that lack natural substrate, in-stream structure, or overhead cover. The fish are fed in an unnatural manner with artificial feeds mechanically or hand broadcast across the water surface. This traditional approach has increased the egg-to-smolt survival of hatchery-reared fish by an order of magnitude over that experienced by wild-reared salmon. However, once hatchery-reared fish are released into the wild their smolt-to-adult survival is usually much lower than wild-reared salmon. The reduced postrelease survival of hatchery-reared fish may stem from differences in their behavior and morphology compared to wild-reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still meeting their adult mitigation goals.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

472

SMSlingshot: An Expert Amateur DIY Case Study Patrick Tobias Fischer, Eva Hornecker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SMSlingshot: An Expert Amateur DIY Case Study Patrick Tobias Fischer, Eva Hornecker University contributed to the success of the urban intervention. The design process of this `product' has many DIY of being an amateur! Author Keywords Design Process, Creative Process, DIY in the wild. ACM Classification

Hornecker, Eva

473

Molecular Biology of the Cell Vol. 3, 1199-1213, November 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the glp-1 protein (10 epidermal growth factor [EGF]-like and 3 LNG repeats extracellularly and 6 cdcl, all four missense mutations in one phenotypic class map to the N-terminal EGF-like repeats and all six al., 1987). Based on these loss-of-func- tion defects, it has been proposed that wild-type glp-1

Maine, Eleanor

474

University of Missouri-Columbia The College of Arts and Science Winter 2005 a student's unique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the fungus -- they take wing, using up scant energy reserves when they should be holed up until warmer rarely bite humans, though vampire bats feed on the blood of cattle, horses, deer and other wild mammals derived from vampire-bat saliva is used to treat human heart-disease patients and stroke victims. Bats

Glaser, Rainer

475

FranklinAvenue SouthDepysterStreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grille F10 Pita Pit F11 Bu alo Wild Wings F12 College Creamery F13 Euro Gyro F14 College Coneys F15 Taco (one way tra c) foottraconlyfoottraconly SouthWaterStreetNorthWaterStreet Red listings, see map

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

476

he Northwest Power Planning Council and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas Edison invented the phonograph and 12 years before Portland would have elec- tric street lights Scien- tific Group in 1996, the National Research Council, also in 1996, and the National Fish Hatchery harvest is being recon- sidered in light of issues such as genetic impacts on wild stocks and the capacity

477

Evaluation of genetically modified potatoes against the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA; 4First Potato Dynamics (FPD), 19 Oxford Street is very unlikely (Khalil et al., 1987), researchers usually experiment with crosses between wild potato of resistance against the potato tuber moth (Lagnaoui et al., 2001). This is disappointing in the light

Douches, David S.

478

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY College of Arts and Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/01 University of Delaware, Department of History Lecture Series, May 2001 A Widespread and Understandable Activism," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, (December, 1988). "We Can Hold an Atomic Bomb Exhibit (July 18, 2003) (My title was "Still Wild About Harry?") "The 1945 Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki

Lansky, Joshua

479

A closer look at FATS.... According to the Dietary Guidelines, your fat intake should be kept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Bandettini, Peter A.

480

An important part of a healthy diet is eating fiber-rich foods. This handout will explain what fiber is, where it's found, and how to increase the amount of fiber in your diet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wild cherry noxious" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Tullos, Desiree

482

Operations Manual for the McCormick Grist Mill I. History of the McCormick Mill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

483

CHOLESTEROL FRIENDS & ENEMIES Lowering your cholesterol is a large part of improving heart health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

O'Toole, Alice J.

484

Ris Energy Report 5 Wind 2 In the past 20 years wind energy has proved itself as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the technology base exists; both are responsive and the prices are falling. The energy is clean and the fuelRisø Energy Report 5 Wind 2 6.1 Status In the past 20 years wind energy has proved itself of market incentives is apparent both from these two markets and also from the wild oscillatory behaviour

485

Vol. 153, No. 1JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, Jan. 1983, p. 45-56 0021-9193/83/010045-12$02.00/0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Certain Multicopy Hybrid nif Plasmids GERARD E. RIEDEL,12t* SUSAN E. BROWN,1 AND FREDERICK M. AUSUBEL, we have observed that certain hybrid nif plasmids drastically inhibit the expression of the chromosomal nif genes of Klebsiella pneumonia. Wild-type (Nif) K. pneumoniae strains that acquire certain

Ausubel, Frederick M.

486

Texas A&M University Association of Former Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Soil and Crop Sciences 1986 John R. Gold, Associate Professor, Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Wayne T, Soil and Crop Sciences Frank M. Hons, Associate Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences James R. Wild, Assistant Professor, Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences Joanne R. Lupton, Associate Professor, Animal

487

VARUN: Discovering Extensible Motifs under Saturation Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of motifs in biosequences is frequently torn between the rigidity of the model on one hand and the abundance of candidates on the other hand. In particular, motifs that include wild cards or don't cares escalate exponentially ... Keywords: Computational genomics, pattern discovery, data mining, motif, protein sequence, protein family.

Alberto Apostolico; Matteo Comin; Laxmi Parida

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-00625145,version1- #12;II Dedicated: To my parents and my family in Iran To my wife Maryam and my children conservation genetic and his willingness to travel around Iran sampling wild and domestic sheep for the study Weinberg and Amjad Tahir Virk for their help during the field sampling in Iran, Azerbaijan, Turkey

Prevedouros, Panos D.

489

Chloroplast DNA Variation Confirms a Single Origin of Domesticated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity. This result led them to conclude that these lines do, in fact, trace back to a single origin of single vs. multiple origins of sunflower domestication based on patterns of cpDNA variation in wild loci per lane on an automated DNA sequencer, PCR products were labeled by including a fluorescently

Burke, John M.

490

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps,Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseiller, Tom; Cotter, Michael (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Rotary Screw Traps, Snorkel Surveys, and Steelhead Redd Surveys, 2008-2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCRFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program from March through November of 2008. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 16,782 wild salmonids were PIT tagged during the study period. Of this, 3,961(23.6%) were wild Oncorhynchus mykiss, 6,987 (41.6%) were wild spring run O. tshawytscha, and 5,591 (33.3%) were identified as wild O. tshawytscha of unknown run. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 40.3% at the upper (Rkm 11.0) trap and 7.8% for the lower (Rkm 2.0) trap. These efficiencies were pooled for emigrant O. tshawytscha and O. mykiss. The MCRFRO conducted effectiveness monitoring snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the winter period and 30 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2008 as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. The 2008 steelhead spawning grounds surveys were conducted weekly in the main Entiat River from rkm 1.1 to 44.2. A total of 222 steelhead redds were identified over the period from February 28 to June 16 2008 with April being the peak spawning month. Approximately 80% of the steelhead redds were located downstream of the rkm 26.

Nelle, R.D.; Desgroseillier, Tom; Cotter, Michael [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

493

The adoption and use of 'BABBLE': a field study of chat in the workplace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way to gain a principled understanding of computer-mediated communication (CMC) use in the wild is to consider the properties of the communication medium, the usage practices, and the social context in which practices are situated. We describe the ...

Erin Bradner; Wendy A. Kellogg; Thomas Erickson

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

BLAINE LIBRARY READING LIST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for her friends. Henry, Marguerite. Misty of Chincoteague Misty begins her life as a wild descendant is adopted by the loving Beebe family. This is the first of several stories about Misty. This author has to be? Shang, Wendy. The Great Wall of Lucy Wu Lucy Wu loves her friends and playing basketball. She

Pritchard, Jonathan

495

62 Projects to Make with a Dead Computer: And Other Discarded Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer hacking takes on a whole new meaning when you're going at it with a screwdriver and hammer: announcing the most wildly inventive, eco-friendly craft book on repurposing everyday objects since Generation T. Except in this case the raw material ...

Randy Sarafan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Raw material sources for the long-chain omega-3 market:Trends and sustainability. Part 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific and popular press is awash in headlines and articles depicting the impending collapse of the global wild fisheries. Headlines such as "Oceans in Peril," "Ocean Life Fading, What Can Be Done?" "The Fishing Catastrophe and What We Can Do About

497

In this project, researchers de-veloped alternative feeds for two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high-quality poultry by-products, concentrated corn protein, Spirulina and chicken liver meal (for, such as soy, canola oil and poultry fat, to further reduce industry's reliance on wild species. In the project of chicken meal, Spirulina and corn could be used as a substi- tute for fishmeal. In a series of experiments

Tryon, Michael D.

498

QuarterlyCouncil > In this issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

updates its long-term plan for meeting growth in demand.The power plant that became Langley Gulch has been of helping to tame the wild child of the energy world, wind power. The Langley Gulch Power Plant will help system.The plant is capable of producing enough power for about 208,000 homes. At a dedication ceremony

499

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- organisms, bark or ambrosia beetles, and woody host tissue: an annotated bibliography, 1956­1974. USDA and ambrosia beetles. In: Wilding N, Collins NM, Ham- mond PM, Webber JF, eds. Insect-fungus interactions origins of ambrosia fungi. Mycologia 88:596­601. De Beer ZW, Harrington TC, Vismer HF, Wingfield BD

Arnold, Jonathan

500

Modeling Avena fatua seedling emergence dynamics: An artificial neural network approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Avena fatua is an invasive weed of the semiarid region of Argentina. Seedling emergence patterns are very irregular along the season showing a great year-to-year variability mainly due to a highly unpredictable precipitation regime. Non-linear regression ... Keywords: Emergence prediction, Hydrothermal-time, Non-linear regression, Semiarid region, Wild oat

Guillermo R. Chantre; AnBal M. Blanco; Mariela V. Lodovichi; Alberto J. Bandoni; Mario R. Sabbatini; Ricardo L. LPez; Mario R. Vigna; RamN GigN

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z