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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Remediation of Occupied Commercial Property Subject to Widespread Radium-226 Contamination - Confidential Client in the South-West of England - 12570  

SciTech Connect

AMEC was contacted by a company that managed commercial office space in 2010. High Rn- 222 measurements had been observed throughout the facility and the landlord had been advised to commission a radiological survey of the site. The site had been purchased by the client in the 1990's. Initial desk studies found that the building had operated for around 50 years as a compass factory. Non-intrusive investigation identified widespread Ra-226 contamination. Ra-226 was found in the fabric of the building, in attic spaces, buried under floor boards and underlying car parks. Intrusive investigation was undertaken to estimate volume(s) of waste, waste categories, activity concentrations and the total inventory of radioactive materials on site. This work identified the presence of 180 GBq of Ra-226 on site. A programme of work is currently underway to remediate the site tackling areas posing the greatest risk to site occupants as a priority. We have worked closely with Regulators, our client, and tenants, to decontaminate the fabric of the building whilst areas of the building remain occupied. The radiological risk, from irradiation, ingestion and inhalation (of Ra-226 and Rn- 222) has been assessed before, during and after intervention to minimise the risks to site occupants. Tenants were moved from areas of unacceptable radiological risk to areas unaffected by the presence of radioactive materials. Rn-222 mitigation measures were installed during the remedial operations to minimise the hazard from Rn-222 that was liberated as a result of decontamination activities. Decontamination techniques were required to be sympathetic to the building as the ageing structure was in danger of collapse during several phases of work. The first phase of remediation is now complete and the decontaminated building is being returned for use as office space. The radiological risks have been significantly reduced and, in areas where decontamination was not possible (e.g. due to concerns over the structural integrity of the building), mitigation measures have been installed. (authors)

Sinclair, Philip [AMEC, UK (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations set statewide ambient air quality standards for various contaminants. The state code follows the regulations set forth in the National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality...

3

Sandia National Laboratories: Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructu...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECResearch & CapabilitiesCapabilitiesWidespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of H2FIRST Project Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of...

4

Contaminant Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contaminant sources include almost every component in the manufacturing process: people, materials, processing equipment, and manufacturing environments. People can generate contaminating particles, gases, conden...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread and global environmental pollution issue from recovery and refining of crude oil and the ubiquitous use of hydrocarbons in industrial processes and applications. ...

Cunningham, Colin John

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ambient intelligence: A survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article we survey ambient intelligence (AmI), including its applications, some of the technologies it uses, and its social and ethical implications. The applications include AmI at home, care of the elderly, healthcare, commerce, and business, ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, agents, assisted living, multiagent systems, social and ethical issues

Fariba Sadri

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Scrubbing of contaminants from contaminated air streams with aerogel materials with optional photocatalytic destruction  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a method for separating a vaporous or gaseous contaminant from an air stream contaminated therewith. This method includes the steps of: (a) passing said contaminated air into a contact zone in which is disposed an aerogel material capable of selecting adsorbing said contaminant from air and therein contacting said contaminated air with an aerogel material; and (b) withdrawing from said zone, air depleted of said contaminant. For present purposes, "contaminant" means a material not naturally occurring in ambient air and/or a material naturally occurring in air but present at a concentration above that found in ambient air. Thus, the present invention scrubs (or treats) air for the purpose of returning it to its ambient composition. Also disclosed herein is a process for the photocatalytic destruction of contaminants from an air stream wherein the contaminated air stream is passed into a control cell or contact zone in which is disposed a photocatalytic aerogel and exposing said aerogel to ultraviolet (UV) radiation for photocatalytically destroying the adsorbed contaminant, and withdrawing from said cell an exhaust air stream depleted in said contaminant.

Attia, Yosry A. (221 Oakland Park Ave., Columbus, OH 43214)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Case study for correction of a widespread cadmium soil contamination problem using local funds  

SciTech Connect

A Pennsylvania Community had been land spreading liquid sewage sludge since 1964. The Community had also been giving away sludge dried on sand beds to all comers during the same period. The Community economy includes a large light bulb manufacturing facility. Recurring digester problems and yellow coloration of the sewage prompted an investigation and it was determined that the problem was mainly cadmium sulfide being discharged by the light bulb manufacturing facility. In 1976, USDA officials were invited in to assess the problem. The Community was advised to discontinue sludge applications on certain farms and to lime the land used. The light bulb manufacturer was instructed to abate the discharge of cadmium. The Community advised the farmers where heavy sludge application was made to lime their lands and discontinued using those sites. The land application program continued, with the feeling that the problem had been corrected.

Logan, T.J.; Cassler, D.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed Drivers (ECOWILL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed Drivers (ECOWILL) Agency/Company /Organization: Austrian Energy Agency Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ecodrive.org/ The ECOWILL project aims to reduce carbon emissions by up to 8 Mt until 2015 by boosting the application of eco-driving across Europe. The project will roll out training programs for licensed drivers in 13 European countries. ECOWILL also promotes the education of eco-driving for learner drivers. This website provides information about eco-driving, including country-specific activities.

10

Ambiental PV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambiental PV Ambiental PV Jump to: navigation, search Name Ambiental PV Place Bahia, Brazil Zip 40140-380 Sector Carbon Product Bahia-based carbon consultancy firm. References Ambiental PV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ambiental PV is a company located in Bahia, Brazil . References ↑ "Ambiental PV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ambiental_PV&oldid=342095" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 186306960

11

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supporting an association between am- bient air pollution and cardiovascular health, much re- mains health effects of ambient air pollution in Atlanta being undertaken by this Emory investi- gative teamORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Emergency Department Visits Kristi Busico

Mulholland, James A.

12

Acceptance criteria for risks of disasters with widespread effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses special issues that arise in engineering decision-making for engineering projects that involve a risk of potentially disastrous outcomes with widespread effects. For such projects, the costs, risks and benefits may spread beyond the jurisdiction of the relevant regulatory authorities, and the dispersion of the costs, risks and benefits may limit the accountability and liability of the decision-makers. The paper briefly reviews the conventional methods for determination of risk acceptance criteria, and it includes a critical review of 'societal risk' criteria based on FN curves for risks involving potentially disastrous outcomes. The paper discusses the limitations of conventional engineering risk acceptance criteria and identifies additional factors that must be considered for rational risk-informed decision-making whenever there is a risk of a disastrous outcome.

Stuart G. Reid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

14

Mental Models of Ambient Systems: A Modular Research Felix Schmitt, Jrg Cassens, Martin Christof Kindsmller, and Michael Herczeg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mental Models of Ambient Systems: A Modular Research Framework Felix Schmitt, Jörg Cassens, Martin which we intend to test empirically. A modular framework for implementing and assessing situation most widespread use in embedded platforms. Washing machines, refrigerators, television sets, alarm

Lübeck, Universität zu

15

Historic contamination along Oakland Inner Harbor  

SciTech Connect

As part of the ongoing remedial investigations (RI) at the Navy`s fleet and Industrial Supply Center, Oakland (FISCO)-Alameda Facility/Alameda Annex (the facility), FISC Oakland, and NAS Alameda, the presence of widespread historic chemical contaminants along the interface between the fill material and the former marshland deposits has been discovered. The historic contaminants are believed to have accumulated within the marshland areas prior to the filling activities along the Oakland Inner Harbor. The historic contaminants consist of heavy petroleum hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), apparently generated by the former industries in the area. Three solid waste management units (SWMUs) and eight areas of concern ( AOCs) were identified at the facility. Three SWMUs and 1 AOC were recommended for site investigations as high-priority.

Bird, J.C. [Versar, Inc. Alameda, CA (United States); Shafer, D.L. [PRC Environmental Management, Inc,. Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Contaminant-Generation Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last chapter, the areas where contaminants are generated were discussed. Knowing the location of contaminant generation is helpful in controlling that contamination, but understanding the mechanisms is ...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental screening of future gasoline additives : computational tools to estimate chemical partitioning and forecast widespread groundwater contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) application of Raoult's law for the same set of systems. An approach was developed which relates the empirical LSER solute polarity parameter, pi2Ĥ, to two more fundamental quantities: a polarizability term and a ...

Arey, J. Samuel (Jeremy Samuel), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

20

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Contamination Control Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many high-technology products currently manufactured are affected adversely if contamination is deposited in or on the product during manufacture or use. Contamination can be defined as any condition, material, p...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Eberhart, C.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL`s emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

Williams, C.H. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Eberhart, C.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Covert World of Fish Biofluorescence: A Phylogenetically Widespread and Phenotypically Variable Phenomenon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Here we show that biofluorescence is not only phylogenetically widespread, but is also phenotypically variable across both cartilaginous and bony fishes, highlighting its evolutionary history and the possibility for discovery of numerous novel...

Sparks, John S.; Schelly, Robert C.; Smith, William Leo; Davis, Matthew P.; Tchernov, Dan; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Gruber, David F.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Surface and Volume Contamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Will there be volume contamination/activation guides as well as updated contamination guides? The only guidance being developed for volumetric contamination is a Technical Standard for accelerator facilities. However, a revised version of ANSI N13.12-1999 is expected in the future and it will be assessed to determine its acceptability for use as a pre-approved authorized limit. It is noted that ANSI N13.12-1999 is only applicable to personal property not structures.

29

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. OCarroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Bioremediation of contaminated sediments  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in bottom sediments have historically been considered to have minimal environmental impact because they are buried, sorbed or electrostatically bound to clay particles, or incorporated into humus. Physical and chemical conditions such as alkalinity, pH, and redox of the sediments also play a part in sequestering contaminants. As long as the sediments are undisturbed, the contaminants are considered stabilized and not an immediate environmental problem. Resuspension of bottom sediments makes contaminants more available for dispersal into the marine environment. Events that can cause resuspension include storm surges, construction activity, and dredging. During resuspension, sediment particles move from an anaerobic to aerobic environment, changing their redox characteristics, and allowing the indigenous aerobic bacteria to grow and utilize certain classes of contaminants as energy sources. The contaminants are also more available for use because the mixing energy imparted to the particles during resuspension enhances mass transfer, allowing contaminants to enter the aqueous phase more rapidly. The contaminants targeted in this research are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of contaminant commonly found in bottom sediments near highly industrialized areas. PAH sources include fossil fuel combustion and petroleum spills. Previous research has shown that PAHs can be biodegraded. Size and structure, i.e., number and configuration of condensed rings, can affect compound disappearance. The focus of this research was to examine the relationship between resuspension and biodegradation of PAHs in lab scale slurry reactors. The rate and extent of contaminant release from the sediments into an uncontaminated water column was determined. Oxygen demand of initially anaerobic sediments were investigated. Then rate and extent of phenanthrene biodegradation was examined.

Hughes, J.B.; Jee, V.; Ward, C.H. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Jump to: navigation, search Name SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Agency/Company /Organization Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Video, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.actualidadambiental UN Region Caribbean, Central America, South America References SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental[1] SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Screenshot "SPDA current environmental journalism is a service of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) , which seeks to inform about the latest news and events related to the environment in Peru and the world in search of greater awareness and action for preservation of our planet. On this site you can also obtain and use for free videos, high resolution photos and the

33

Screening-level approach for estimating contaminant export from tributaries  

SciTech Connect

The in-place pollutant export model (IPX) is a screening-level model for estimating contaminant export from tributaries with contaminated sediments to receiving waterbodies. IPX is a modified version of the USEPA`s WASP4 modeling framework. IPX synthesizes sediment transport processes for sediment aging, decreased sediment resuspendability with increasing age, and resuspension of freshly deposited sediments as a function of water velocity, into an expanded WASP4 contaminant transport and fate chassis while retaining the computational flexibility of the original framework. These process descriptions are needed to accurately simulate contaminant transport and substantially improve the framework for application to tributary systems subject to significant deposition and resuspension events. The potential for applying IPX is broad; water quality impairments attributable to contaminated sediments are widespread due to discharges from industry, agriculture, and mining and ore processing. IPX has been successfully applied to the upper and lower Fox River in Wisconsin, and the Buffalo and Oswego Rivers in New York, all impaired by contaminated sediments.

Velleux, M. [Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison, WI (United States); Gailani, J. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Endicott, D. [EPA Large Lakes Research Station, Grosse Ile, MI (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Microbial Activity during Biodegradation and its Effects on Groundwater Velocity in a Contaminated Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers (BTEX) (Yerushalmi et al., 1999; Landmeyer and Bradley 2003). Such passive methods rely on the ambient groundwater velocity to deliver contaminants to the reactive zone. Biostimulation techniques operate... Microbial Activity during Biodegradation and its Effects on Groundwater Velocity in a Contaminated Aquifer by Copyright 2008 Peter Curtis Schillig B.S. (Dept. Hons), Ohio University, 2005 Submitted to the Department...

Schillig, Peter C.

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

It seems size does matter in the brain. Even the smallest stroke can cause widespread damage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health It seems size does matter in the brain. Even the smallest stroke can cause widespread damage by blocking blood vessels called arterioles, stopping blood from reaching capillaries deeper in the brain the blockage. Block several and you can knock out entire brain regions as the damage travels even in areas

Kleinfeld, David

37

Hydrothermal dolomites in SW Sardinia (Italy): evidence for a widespread late-Variscan fluid flow event  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal dolomites in SW Sardinia (Italy): evidence for a widespread late-Variscan fluid flow, the Cambrian carbonates underwent ductile deformation and greenschist facies metamorphism. The same is true-temperature metamorphic rocks within the overlying nappes. It is assumed that a late-Variscan hydrothermal event, which

Boni, Maria

38

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13265 Widespread decline of Congo rainforest greenness in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13265 Widespread decline of Congo rainforest greenness in the past decade independent sensors over the Congo basin. This decline in vegeta- tion greenness, particularlyinthenorthern regionssuchas the Congo basin10,11 . Thisstudy uses Enhanced Vegetation Index(EVI)15 dataderived from

Zhou, Liming

39

Focal Brain Lesions to Critical Locations Cause Widespread Disruption of the Modular Organization of the Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focal Brain Lesions to Critical Locations Cause Widespread Disruption of the Modular Organization of the Brain Caterina Gratton*, Emi M. Nomura*, Fernando Pérez, and Mark DEsposito Abstract Although it is generally assumed that brain damage pre- dominantly affects only the function of the damaged region, here we

40

First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Observations of SO2 from the Satellite Suomi NPP OMPS: Widespread Air Pollution Events over author: Kai Yang, Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, Code 614, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA. (Kai.Yang-1@nasa.gov) 1 Department of Atmospheric

Dickerson, Russell R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Personnel and Contamination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Everyone concerned with contamination control dreams of the day when automation will remove the need for employees to actually handle the wafers. This wish arises from the fact that humans are such a major factor...

M. Kozicki; S. Hoenig; P. Robinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modeling for Airborne Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from ambient air could compensate for all carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Such capture would, for example, make it possible to use liquid, carbon-based fuels in cars or airplane...

K.S. Lackner

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Scenario-Based design of ambient intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper scenario-based design approach for development of Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is described. Design of any concept is based on communication between different stakeholders. Furthermore design of these concepts should be grounded heavily to ...

Veikko Ikonen; Marketta Niemel; Eija Kaasinen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence is a vision of the future information society stemming from the convergence of ubiquitous computing, ubiquitous communication and intelligent user-friendly interfaces. Beyond the possible ben...

Michael Friedewald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

MAS.963 Ambient Intelligence, Spring 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course focuses on Ambient Intelligence, and how it envisions a world where people are surrounded by intelligent and intuitive interfaces embedded in the everyday objects around them. These interfaces recognize and ...

Maes, Patricia

47

Gua para a Sustentabilidade Ambiental na UDC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;Guía para a Sustentabilidade Ambiental na UDC #12;Redacción Dolores Árias Vázquez Juan Introdución 23 Indicadores de sustentabilidade 27 O contorno natural e humanizado 35 Caracterización dos Ambientalización curricular 101 Outros servizos da udC relacionados coa sustentabilidade 105 O medio ambiente

Fraguela, Basilio B.

48

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

49

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ambient Hydro Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambient Hydro Ltd Ambient Hydro Ltd Place Corsham, United Kingdom Zip SN13 9TZ Sector Hydro, Services Product Ambient Hydro Ltd develops small Hydroelectric projects. It also offers a range of technical and financial consultancy services. Coordinates 51.431505°, -2.187229° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.431505,"lon":-2.187229,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

Subsurface Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Trace gas contaminant control in a space station atmosphere using adsorption  

SciTech Connect

Trace contaminants enter spacecraft atmospheres through offgassing of spacecraft materials and as products of crew metabolism. The consequences of fire or accidental release of toxic vapors from onboard systems is also a crew safety concern. The purpose of this work was to determine how these contaminants could be limited to safe concentrations in the atmosphere of the proposed space station. Contaminant source models were developed from spacecraft material offgassing and human metabolic production rate measurements. Contaminants were represented with a simplified model of 30 compounds by grouping similar species together. A trace contaminant control process, which consists of chemisorption of ammonia on phosphoric acid-impregnated activated carbon, ambient temperature catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, catalytic conversion of the sulfur in hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans to elemental sulfur, and adsorption of the other contaminants in a regenerable activated carbon adsorber, was proposed. Trace contaminant adsorption rate and equilibrium equations were derived. Various adsorbents were evaluated to determine the optimum sorbents for this application. Removal system performance limits were established, and optimum design ranges for process parameters were developed. Trace gas contaminants can be limited to safe concentrations by the process proposed under normal conditions using as little as 1 Kg/man-year of ammonia chemisorbent. The most likely accidental contaminant releases can be removed in {approximately}20 hours using frequent adsorber regenerations.

Winter, J.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Purifying contaminated water  

SciTech Connect

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible loose contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

New cost structure approach in green buildings : cost-benefit analysis for widespread acceptance and long-term practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the concepts of sustainable building have been widely accepted in the market, there are unavoidable challenges toward widespread acceptance and long-term practice. Crossing green building development, there is ...

Wang, Zhiyong, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

sub-ambient-membrane | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Project No.: DE-FE0004278FE0013163 American Air Liquide, Inc. will develop a system for CO2 capture based on sub-ambient temperature...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

62

Smart Lighting: LED Implementation and Ambient Communication Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Lighting: LED Implementation and Ambient Communication Applications by Nicholas Adrian Galano............................................................................................................................................1 LED Implementation..........................................................................................................................2 LED Energy Usage

Agogino, Alice M.

63

Ambient Control Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Control Systems Control Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ambient Control Systems Name Ambient Control Systems Address 1810 Gillespie Way Place El Cajon, California Zip 92020 Sector Solar Product Solar energy device with a computerized energy management Website http://www.ambientalert.com/ma Coordinates 32.8193566°, -116.981232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8193566,"lon":-116.981232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air quality-a Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHHE; January 2006 7 Topics Air, Ambient (Outdoor) Air, Indoor Disasters Lead... pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in...

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air monitoring Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHHE; January 2006 7 Topics Air, Ambient (Outdoor) Air, Indoor Disasters Lead... pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in...

67

Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in Stochastic Receiving Media quality standards, for in- stance SO2 emissions are capped under Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments while ambient SO2 concentrations are limited under National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS

Silver, Whendee

68

Clean air act and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clean air act and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Ozone: Sources/Environmental Effects Particulates (PM): Sources/Environmental Effects #12;National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards for pollutants considered

Weber, Rodney

69

Adsorption and desorption of contaminants  

SciTech Connect

The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL`s are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry.

Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B. [Envirogen, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions  

SciTech Connect

Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L{sub adp}) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L{sub s}). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L{sub adp} values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m{sup 2}) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m{sup 2}) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m{sup 2} luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to the image L{sub adp} value of 12 cd/m{sup 2}. Results from the first study demonstrated that observer true positive and false positive detection rates and true positive detection times were considerably better while viewing foregrounds at 12 and 20 cd/m{sup 2} than at the other foreground luminance levels. Results from the second study revealed that under increased room illuminance, the average true positive detection rate improved a statistically significant amount from 39.3% to 55.6% at 5 cd/m{sup 2} foreground luminance. Additionally, the true positive rate increased from 46.4% to 56.6% at 35 cd/m{sup 2} foreground luminance, and decreased slightly from 90.2% to 87.5% at 12 cd/m{sup 2} foreground luminance. False positive rates at all foreground luminance levels remained approximately constant with increased ambient lighting. Furthermore, under increased room illuminance, true positive detection times declined at every foreground luminance level, with the most considerable decrease (approximately 500 ms) at the 5 cd/m{sup 2} foreground luminance. The first study suggests that L{sub adp} of typical mammograms lies between 12 and 20 cd/m{sup 2}, leading to an optimum reading room illuminance of approximately 50-80 lux. Findings from the second study provide psychophysical evidence that ambient lighting may be increased to a level within this range, potentially improving radiologist comfort, without deleterious effects on diagnostic performance.

Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Delong, David M.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan [Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Eizo Nanao Technologies, Inc., Cypress, California 90630 (United States); Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Standards for Contamination Control Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of standards and specifications used for contamination control is to establish controls and definitions that will allow satisfactory cleanroom construction and good product fabrication within cleanr...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Can fracking contaminate drinking water?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tiny cracks link deep shale gas reservoirs to shallow aquifers, but they may not be to blame for reports of contaminated drinking water

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Protections: Sediment Control = Contaminant Retention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sediment Control Protections: Sediment Control Contaminant Retention LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect...

74

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

75

Infrasonic ambient ocean noise: Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean ambient noise were made at three widely separated deep?water bottom locations in the N. E. Pacific at eight frequencies in the range from 2.520.0 Hz for 40 consecutive days. Concurrent data on wind speed and wave height were collected. Analysis indicates that the spectrum level of infrasonicnoise is linearly related to the log of the wind speed above a threshold level. There is evidence that the noise can be directly associated with the wind rather than through the surface waves it produces. [Work supported by ONR.

Rudolph H. Nichols

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Contamination and solid state welds.  

SciTech Connect

Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

Mills, Bernice E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sustainable Transportation: Accelerating Widespread Adoption of Energy Efficient Vehicles & Fuels (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

While energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously slash oil consumption and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, a truly sustainable solution will require more than just putting drivers behind the wheels of new fuel-efficient cars. As the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) accelerates widespread adoption of high-performance, low-emission, energy-efficient passenger and freight vehicles, as well as alternative fuels and related infrastructure. Researchers collaborate closely with industry, government, and research partners, using a whole-systems approach to design better batteries, drivetrains, and engines, as well as thermal management, energy storage, power electronic, climate control, alternative fuel, combustion, and emission systems. NREL's sustainable transportation research, development, and deployment (RD&D) efforts are not limited to vehicles, roads, and fueling stations. The lab also explores ways to save energy and reduce GHGs by integrating transportation technology advancements with renewable energy generation, power grids and building systems, urban planning and policy, and fleet operations.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Contaminants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to contaminants. At NREL, we are researching system-derived contaminants and hydrogen fuel quality. Air contaminants are of interest as well. NREL also participates in the U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WIDESPREAD METHANOL EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC CENTER: THE ROLE OF COSMIC RAYS  

SciTech Connect

We report the discovery of a widespread population of collisionally excited methanol J = 4{sub -1} to 3{sub 0} E sources at 36.2 GHz from the inner 66' Multiplication-Sign 18' (160 Multiplication-Sign 43 pc) of the Galactic center. This spectral feature was imaged with a spectral resolution of 16.6 km s{sup -1} taken from 41 channels of a Very Large Array continuum survey of the Galactic center region. The revelation of 356 methanol sources, most of which are maser candidates, suggests a large abundance of methanol in the gas phase in the Galactic center region. There is also spatial and kinematic correlation between SiO (2-1) and CH{sub 3}OH emission from four Galactic center clouds: the +50 and +20 km s{sup -1} clouds and G0.13-0.13 and G0.25 + 0.01. The enhanced abundance of methanol is accounted for in terms of induced photodesorption by cosmic rays as they travel through a molecular core, collide, dissociate, ionize, and excite Lyman Werner transitions of H{sub 2}. A time-dependent chemical model in which cosmic rays drive the chemistry of the gas predicts CH{sub 3}OH abundance of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -7} on a chemical timescale of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years. The average methanol abundance produced by the release of methanol from grain surfaces is consistent with the available data.

Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Royster, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cotton, W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Viti, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower St. London, WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Wardle, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gaseous, Chemical, and Other Contaminant Descriptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most contamination control technology considers generalized and often unidentified particulate material as the major contaminant, but there are many situations in which gases, chemical films, microbiological m...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical ExaminerCoroner...

84

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and

85

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

86

Slabo del curso de Ciencia y Medio Ambiente.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ciencia y medio ambiente es un curso de formacin tericoprctico, orientado a estudiantes de la especialidad de Ingeniera en Sistemas Computacionales. El propsito de la (more)

[No author

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ambient Corporation's response to NBP RFI: Communications Requirements...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy Ambient Corporation's response to NBP RFI: Communications Requirements More...

88

Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

all of the EGR - Intake and TDC charge-gas (ambient) temperature increases. - Shortens ignition delay (prevents low combustion) - Temperature also inherently affects soot...

89

Arauna Energia e Gest o Ambiental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01420-002 Product: Brazilian based project developer and PDD consultant company. References: Arauna Energia e Gesto Ambiental1 This article is a stub....

90

Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis Pertaining To Biofuel Process Development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mass spectrometry (MS) has undergone a revolution with the introduction of a new group of desorption/ionization (DI) techniques known collectively as Ambient Ionization mass spectrometry. (more)

Dendukuri, Sushma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Particulate Contaminant Descriptions and Definitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particulate contaminants can be either solid or liquid. Many of these materials were originally suspended in air or in a process fluid; others derive from nearby sources, such as activities of personnel working i...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fire in a contaminated area  

SciTech Connect

This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Environmental restoration and waste management: An introduction. Student edition; Restauracion ambiental y administracion de residuos nucleares: Introduccion; Edicion estudiantil  

SciTech Connect

For more than 40 years, the United States has produced nuclear weapons. These production activities generated both radioactive and hazardous waste and often contaminated the environment. For many years, the public was unaware of the problem and unable to do anything about it. All of this has changed. In response to recent public outcry, the former Secretary of Energy, Retired Admiral James D. Watkins, established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The creation of EM was the first step toward correcting contamination problems from the past 40 years In this booklet, we at DOE, through the efforts of the students at Oak Hills High School of Cincinnati, Ohio, will introduce you to EM and encourage your involvement in this major program within the Department of Energy. [Espanol] Durante mas de 40 anos, los Estados Unidos fabricaron armamentos nucleares. Esta produccion genero residuos radiactivos y peligrosos y, en muchos casos, contaminaron el medio ambiente. Durante mucho tiempo, el publico norteamericano no tenia conocimiento de este problema y no pudo hacer nada para solucionarlo. Todo esto ha cambiado. Respondiendo a crecientes protestas publicas, el ex Secretario de Energia Almirante James D. Watkins, establecio en noviembre de 1989 la Subsecretaria de Administracion Ambiental. La creacion de esta Subsecretaria fue el primer paso que dio el Departamento de Energia para corregir los problemas de contaminacion ambiental de los ultimos 40 anos. En esta publicacion, los que trabajamos en el Departamento de Energia con la ayuda de los estudiantes de la Escuela Secundaria de Oak Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio, te introduciermos a la administracion ambiental y alentamos tu participacion en este programa de fundamental importancia en el Departamento de Energia.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

95

Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants. 2 figs.

Schabron, J.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ambient Atmosphere Ion Thruster (AAIT) Proof-of-Concept Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exit velocity, vout,i (from energy conservation) ­ Open grid area, Aopen (from AAIT design) T = mini (AIAA-2006-4650) · Designed for electrostatic acceleration of ambient ions with two biased grids ­ Uses screen grid and accelerator grid to create electric field and accelerate ambient ions · Use on

Walker, Mitchell

97

DoMAIns: Domain-based modeling for Ambient Intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence and Smart Home Automation systems are currently emerging as feasible and ready to exploit solutions to support more intelligent features inside future and current homes. Thanks to increased availability of off-the-shelf components ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Domotic plant, Home Automation, Intelligent Domotic Environment, Modeling, State diagrams

Dario Bonino; Fulvio Corno

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

GUA DA SUSTENTABILIDADE ENERXA VICERREITORA DE INFRAESTRUTURAS E XESTIN AMBIENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GUÍA DA SUSTENTABILIDADE ­ ENERXÍA VICERREITORÍA DE INFRAESTRUTURAS E XESTI?N AMBIENTAL -A UDC ven enerxética non quedando atrás na carreira da persecución da sustentabilidade ambiental, económica e social

Fraguela, Basilio B.

99

Extracting Key Factors to Design Applications in Ambient Intelligence Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an ambient intelligence environment, the design of applications influences the users behavior heavily. The purpose of this paper is to provide key factors considered necessary in developing those applications. We developed four applications applied ... Keywords: ambient feedback, persuasive technology, behavior modification, emotional engagement

Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation submits the following comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in hopes that their contribution can highlight and further the understanding of the DOE on the key role that integrated communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation More Documents & Publications Comments of Tendril Networks Inc Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2001

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info Start Date 11/30/1995 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average: 110 ug/m3; 30-day average: 90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean: 60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing

102

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebración de los 20 años de justicia ambiental pasados y futuros. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 More Documents & Publications SE HAN FINALIZADO LOS PREPARATIVOS PARA LA CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE JUSTICIA MEDIOAMBIENTAL Y PROGRAMA DE FORMACIÓN 2013 2013 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish)

103

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils Starting in the 1970s, federal regulatory control and eventual elimination of lead-based "anti-knock" additives in gasoline decreased the level of airborne Pb in the USA by two orders-of-magnitude [1]. Blood lead levels of the USA figure 1 Figure 1. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Ambient airborne particulate matter captured on filters of woven silica fiber (large strips) and TeflonTM (round). Clean fiber filter at bottom for comparison. Take a deep breath? population decreased correspondingly [2,3]. Despite this dramatic improvement in both exposure risk and body burden of Pb, the sources and health threat of the low levels of lead in our "unleaded" air remain topics

104

Human Enzymes Involved in the Metabolic Activation of the Environmental Contaminant 3-Nitrobenzanthrone: Evidence for Reductive Activation by Human NADPH:Cytochrome P450 Reductase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1068-1073, 1997. 2 IARC, Diesel and Gasoline Engine Exhausts and Some Nitroarenes...1994. 4 Farmer P. B. Diesel fuel and exhaust emissions...traffic-exposed workers and a general population sample. Int...contaminant found in diesel exhaust and ambient air...

Volker M. Arlt; Marie Stiborova; Alan Hewer; Heinz H. Schmeiser; and David H. Phillips

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

107

Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Q&A on "Widespread Decline of Congo Rainforest Greenness in the Past Decade" Published Online by Nature on April 23, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Q&A on "Widespread Decline of Congo Rainforest Greenness in the Past Decade" Published Online of this research? We found a widespread decline in satellite-measured vegetation greenness in the Congo rainforest and repeatedly monitoring vast remote regions such as the Congo basin where in situ observations are very limited

Zhou, Liming

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient condition effects Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P b in a:P : P... Secure Safe Ambients Michele Bugliesi Universita "Ca' Foscari", Venice michele... Ambients (SSA) are a typed variant of Safe Ambients 9, whose type...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient sound measurements Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary of CHI '98, April 18-23, 1998, 1998 ACM 1 ambientROOM: Integrating Ambient Media Summary: of the weather outside from ambient cues such as light, temperature, sound,...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air toxics Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

112

Development of an ambient lighting monitoring system for radiological image viewing application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient lighting plays a very important role in radiological image viewing environment. Excessive room ambient lighting (or illuminance) degrades image contrast, introducing veiling glare, diffuse reflectivity...

Ahmad Azlan Che; K. H. Ng; N. F. Mohd. Nasir

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient pressure estimation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at ambient pressure. That is confirmed from the transition temperature TN vs pressure phase... was observed at ambient pressure 6. Along with the data indicating relatively...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente termoneutro dos Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Algs, 42 SL 1495 Algs , +351 1 4120772... Filipareis@yahoo.com Susana B. SANTOS Eng do Ambiente, Direco Geral de Energia, Diviso de Energia e... Ambiente...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental caso cundinamarca Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stesso insieme di Summary: residui organici animali atmosfera ambiente En. chimica Luce solare terreno O2 12;12;Quantum genetics... si adatta all'ambiente circostante per...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental dos recursos Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Sciences 17 MAESTRA EN DESARROLLO Y AMBIENTE Objetivo del programa Summary: recursos naturales renovables 3 Poltica y legislacin ambiental 3 Fundamentos de...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient high temperature Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metabolism in relation to ambient temperature in mice Summary: to compensate for elevated heat loss, while at high ambient temperatures metabolic rates should be low to avoid......

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente controlado para Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

y su realizacin. 9 La Secretara de Medio Ambiente, Recursos Naturales y Pesca... PEMEX y con la colaboracin de la Agencia para la Proteccin Ambiental (EPA, por sus...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient particulate matter Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ambient particulate matter Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Statistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter Summary: Ambient Air Quality Standards...

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air exposures Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

source-specific population exposure to ambient urban air... -specific exposure to ambient air pollution for an entire urbanpopulation at a fine geographical scale. Byarea, total......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient laboratory conditions Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 8 Ambient Noise Tomography in the Western US using Data from the EarthScopeUSArray Transportable Array Summary: 1 Ambient Noise Tomography in...

122

UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project In a collaborative effort between ChemImage Biothreat, LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project will acquire the ability to discern between chemical/biological threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. The project will focus on potential background interferences, specifically from the ambient backgrounds collected at NETL-supported ambient air collection facilities. Potential substrate interferences such as pollen, insecticides and industrial PM will be addressed. Using Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) and fluorescence chemical imaging, a background - void of pathogen spores - will be collected and compared to known pathogens. Interactions causing possible false positives will be identified and studied. This study would systematically identify potential problems and provide a baseline of ambient particulates found in the mid-eastern United States .

124

Enhancing Amine-Supported Materials for Ambient Air Capture ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhancing Amine-Supported Materials for Ambient Air Capture Previous Next List Julian P. Sculley, Hong-Cai Zhou, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 51, 12660-12661 (2012) DOI: 10.1002...

125

Interoperable Semantic & Syntactic Service Matching for Ambient Computing Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For service discovery protocols (SDP), one of the main functions of service-oriented architectures (SOA this purpose, the Service- Oriented Architecture (SOA) computing paradigm is particularly appropriate environments. Keywords: Service-oriented ambient computing, service discovery, matching and ranking

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Legal safeguards for privacy and data protection in ambient intelligence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To get the maximum benefit from ambient intelligence (AmI), we need to anticipate and react to possible drawbacks and threats emerging from the new technologies in order to devise appropriate safeguards. The SWAM...

Paul De Hert; Serge Gutwirth; Anna Moscibroda

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Street media : ambient messages in an urban space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient street media are the media of our everyday lives in cities. Manifested in bits and fragments on the surfaces of the streetscape, these media often escape our notice - tuned out as visual clutter or dismissed as ...

Murthy, Rekha (Rekha S.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIN 2014 La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebracin de los 20 aos de justicia ambiental pasados y...

129

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

130

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...RESEARCH VOL.35 Food Additives and Contaminants argument...substance that caused removal of the cranberries...consideration was given to the removal of Tween 60 as a food additive. The compound has...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Emerging chemical contaminants in water and wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminants in water and wastewater' compiled and edited by Michael...contaminants in water and wastewater Michael R. Templeton 1...activated sludge process in wastewater treatment, whereby the pollutants...the impact on agricultural recycling. Disinfection by-products...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

133

Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment: contamination pathways Environmental Engineering Division Surname _____________________Name____________________ Job Environmental Engineering Division (SEED) Department of Civil Engineering University of Salerno Via Ponte don

Costagliola, Gennaro

135

Webinar: NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database Webinar: NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database Below is the text version of the webinar titled "NREL's Fuel Cell Contaminant Database,"...

136

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

137

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

138

Review of soil contamination guidance  

SciTech Connect

A review of existing and proposed radioactive soil contamination standards and guidance was conducted for United Nuclear Corporation (UNC), Office of Surplus Facilities Management. Information was obtained from both government agencies and other sources during a literature survey. The more applicable standards were reviewed, evaluated, and summarized. Information pertaining to soil contamination for both facility operation and facility decommissioning was obtained from a variety of sources. These sources included: the Code of Federal Regulations, regulatory guides, the Federal Register, topical reports written by various government agencies, topical reports written by national laboratories, and publications from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It was difficult to directly compare the standards and guidance obtained from these sources since each was intended for a specific situation and different units or bases were used. However, most of the information reviewed was consistent with the philosophy of maintaining exposures at levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

Mueller, M.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: Be easy to apply Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity Not be hazardous in final applied form Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient vibration tests Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tests Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient vibration tests...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient vibration test Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient vibration test...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air pollution Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pollution Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient air pollution...

144

Increasing subterranean mobilization of organic contaminants and petroleum by aqueous thermal oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/partial oxidation of organics at the site of the organics constrained in an subsurface reservoir produces surfactants that can form an oil/water emulsion that is effectively removed from an underground formation. The removal of the oil/water emulsions is particularly useful in several applications, e.g., soil contaminant remediation and enhanced oil recovery operations. A portion of the constrained organics react in heated reservoir water with injected steam containing dissolved oxygen gas at ambient reservoir conditions to produce such surfactants.

Leif, Roald N. (San Francisco, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Eaker, Craig (Alta Loma, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Los Alamos racquetball contamination incident  

SciTech Connect

Several employees of the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility were found to have low levels of radioactivity on their hands and clothing when they arrived for work one morning. The initial concern was that the stringent contamination or material controls at the facility had failed, and that one or more of the employees had either accidentally or intentionally removed plutonium from the Laboratory premises. Fortunately, however, an investigation revealed that the source of the radioactivity was radon daughters electrostatically collected upon the surface of the racquetball and transferred by physical contact to the employees during an early morning racquetball game. This paper describes the events leading to the discovery of this phenomenon. 1 figure.

McAtee, J.L.; Stafford, R.G.; Dowdy, E.J.; Prestwood, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Characterization of CdZnTe ambient temperature detectors  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of interest has been generated in the use of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for ambient temperature detection of radionuclides. The addition of zinc to CdTe provides several benefits that enhance the materials operational characteristics at ambient temperature. Recent movement in the industry is to produce larger volume detectors using CdZnTe without much known about the effects of larger geometry on performance. The purpose of this study is to get an idea of the relationship of detector performance to both area and thickness variations.

Lavietes, A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Guia para a Avaliao do Risco Ambiental de Organismos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paulo - ILSI Brasil 2012 #12;#12;Guia para a Avaliação do Risco Ambiental de Organismos Geneticamente Modificados #12;APOIO: © 2012 ILSI Brasil - International Life Sciences Institute do Brasil ILSI BRASIL INTERNATIONAL LIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE DO BRASIL Rua Hungria, 664 - conj.113 01455-904 - São Paulo - SP - Brasil

Parrott, Wayne

150

Ambient Sampling/Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Applications and Current Trends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

drugs of abuse ... We felt that because ambient techniques are still young, fundamental studies are still critically needed to understand the range of applications that can be enabled by their use. ... The detection of counterfeit drugs is of particular interest since it is a growing issue in developing countries and over the Internet. ...

Glenn A. Harris; Asiri S. Galhena; Facundo M. Fernndez

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Introduzione Matlab Carla Guerrini 1 Introduzione all'ambiente  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Introduzione Matlab Carla Guerrini 1 Introduzione all'ambiente Matlab Introduzione Matlab Carla. Pareschi, Matlab concetti e progetti, Apogeo ed. · Tutorials e programmi disponibili in rete: http:// www.dti.supsi.ch/~bucher/matlab.pdf http://www.dm.unibo.it/ /~guerrini/html/matlab.html http:// www.dm.unibo.it/ /~guerrini

Guerrini, Carla

152

Inter-organization cooperation for ambient assisted living  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last years we have witnessed to a substantial increase on the number of people in need of care services, especially among the elderly, a phenomenon related to population ageing. However, this is becoming not exclusive of the elderly, as diseases ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Inter-organization cooperation, e-Health, monitoring, simulation

Paulo Novais; Ricardo Costa; Davide Carneiro; Jos Neves

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Powering Wireless Sensor Nodes with Ambient Temperature Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.25 ambient temperature change. Author Keywords Sensing, Thermal energy harvesting, battery-free sensors. ACM to consider power harvesting as a potential solution. In this paper, we present a thermal power harvester in battery technology. Power harvesting provides an alternative solution for developing sensors that can last

Manchak, John

154

Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

Robert J. Mellors

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Monitoria para FIS1012 Aspectos Fsicos para o Conforto Ambiental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoria para FIS1012 Aspectos Físicos para o Conforto Ambiental (disciplina do currículo de das cartas de recomendação encontram-se em: http://www.fis.puc-rio.br/formularios.php os documentos podem ser entregues impressos na sala L 652 ou enviados eletronicamente para monitoria@fis.puc-rio.br Os

Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

156

Distributed interface bits: dynamic dialogue composition from ambient computing resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses a particular issue in the context of disappearing computing, namely, user mobility. Mobile users may carry with them a variety of wireless gadgets while being immersed in a physical environment encompassing numerous computing devices. ... Keywords: Abstract dialogue elements, Adaptive interaction, Ambient dialogues, Dynamic user interface composition, Wearable interfaces

Anthony Savidis; Constantine Stephanidis

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Visible Light Communications (VLC) for Ambient Assisted Living  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of high efficacy light emitting diode directional lamps as a key component in focal lighting, new possibilities emerge for re-designing the smart home scenario. A smart home scenario is characterized by enabled intelligent interworking ... Keywords: Ambient lighting, High connectivity, LED, Low rate, PD, VLC

Ambuj Kumar, Albena Mihovska, Sofoklis Kyriazakos, Ramjee Prasad

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A...

159

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humiditylevels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring insites to determine how economizers affect humidity control.

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

Eberhart, Craig

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Contamination by chlorinated pesticides, \\{PCBs\\} and \\{PBDEs\\} in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis) in western South Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chlorinated pesticides, \\{PCBs\\} and \\{PBDEs\\} were analysed in nine blubber samples of Atlantic spotted dolphins, Stenella frontalis, incidentally captured during fishing operations in southern and southeastern Brazil between 2005 and 2007. The majority of compounds analysed were detected, suggesting widespread contamination over the region. Although the samples came from a location far from main coastal industrial areas, the results revealed an influence from such sources. Therefore, levels of \\{PCBs\\} (77423659ngg?1lipid wt.) and \\{PBDEs\\} (231326ngg?1lipid wt.) detected seem to be related to the movement of individuals throughout near-shore and offshore waters. The sample from a lactating female exhibited a lower level of contamination and a distinct pattern, indicating selective transfer favouring less lipophilic compounds.

Juliana Leonel; Satie Taniguchi; Dalton K. Sasaki; Mauro J. Cascaes; Patrick S. Dias; Silvina Botta; Marcos C. de O. Santos; Rosalinda C. Montone

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

SciTech Connect

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

164

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Health Risks: Seafood Contamination, Harmful Algal Blooms and Polluted Beaches Seafood in shell- fish such as oysters, and accumula- tion of heavy metals, contaminants or biotoxins in seafood respiratory symptoms in people visiting beaches, marine mammal die-offs, shellfish closures, and seafood

167

Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, mechanisms, and expected levels of oxygen and nitrogen contamination during gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc indicating the importance of dec9mposition of SiOz into silicon monoxide and oxygen are presented, indicating

Eagar, Thomas W.

168

Use of thermophilic bacteria for bioremediation of petroleum contaminants  

SciTech Connect

Several strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 60--80 C. This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria for both in situ and ex situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminants. In a series of batch experiments, bacterial growth was observed using a computer image analyzer following a recently developed technique. These experiments showed clearly that the growth rate is enhanced in the presence of crude oil. This is coupled with a rapid degradation of the crude oil. These bacteria were found to be ideal for breaking down long-chain organic molecules at a temperature of 40 C, which is the typical ambient temperature of the Persian Gulf region. The same strains of bacteria are also capable of surviving in the presence of the saline environment that can prevail in both sea water and reservoir connate water. This observation prompted further investigation into the applicability of the bacteria in microbial enhanced oil recovery. In the United Arab Emirates, the reservoirs are typically at a temperature of around 85 C. Finally, the performance of the bacteria is tested in a newly developed bioreactor that uses continuous aeration through a transverse slotted pipe. This reactor also uses mixing without damaging the filamentous bacteria. In this process, the mechanisms of bioremediation are identified.

Al-Maghrabi, I.M.A.; Bin Aqil, A.O.; Chaalal, O. [United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Islam, M.R. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Ambient/Task Lighting Low Ambient/Task Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for low ambient/task lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits The low ambient/task lighting strategy improves the visual environment by adding controllable task fixtures that provide light directly where needed for a given task, while reducing the overhead (ambient) light level. Occupancy sensors can also be incorporated into the system. Application Low ambient/task lighting is applicable in most building categories. Key Factors for Deployment Low ambient/task lighting is suitable for most office spaces, including both cubicle and private office space environments, and should be

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambientes costeiros tropicais Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ambientes costeiros tropicais Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 coleo explorando o ensino o brasil e o meio ambiente antrtico Summary: coleo explorando o ensino 10 volume o brasil e...

171

Effect of ambient light on electronically displayed medical images as measured by luminance-discrimination thresholds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ambient light on linearization of gray scales was studied in two experiments by measuring brightness-discrimination thresholds for stimuli as a function of ambient-light...

Rogers, Diane C; Pizer, Stephen M; Johnston, R Eugene

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

THE DEVELOPMENT OF NICKEL-FREE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS FOR AMBIENT AND CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STEELS FOR AMBIENT AND CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS Glen T.U. C. Berkeley, "The Cryogenic Properties of Fe-Mn and Fe-STEELS FOR AMBIENT AND CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS Glen T.

Haddick, Glen T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental considerando inovacoes Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

le linee di tendenza e successivamente importa i dati in ambiente... in ambiente Matlab sia in ambi- ente Excel e conduci l'indagine sul comportamento di questi ... Source:...

174

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

175

Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on soil and litter invertebrates and heterotrophic process  

SciTech Connect

One of the initial stages in ecological risk assessments for hazardous waste sites is the screening of contaminants to determine which of them are worthy of further consideration as {open_quotes}contaminants of potential concern.{close_quotes} This process is termed {open_quotes}contaminant screening.{close_quotes} It is performed by comparing measured ambient concentrations of chemicals to benchmark concentrations. Currently, no standard benchmark concentrations exist for assessing contaminants in soil with respect to their toxicity to soil- and litter-dwelling invertebrates, including earthworms, other micro- and macroinvertebrates, or heterotrophic bacteria and fungi. This report presents a standard method for deriving benchmarks for this purpose, sets of data concerning effects of chemicals in soil on invertebrates and soil microbial processes, and benchmarks for chemicals potentially associated with United States Department of Energy sites. In addition, literature describing the experiments from which data were drawn for benchmark derivation. Chemicals that are found in soil at concentrations exceeding both the benchmarks and the background concentration for the soil type should be considered contaminants of potential concern.

Will, M.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative ambient illumination Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 6 Painting surface characteristics Pierre Poulin Alain Fournier Summary: illumination model using ambient, diffuse and specular...

177

AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This interim report summarizes detailed findings and conclusions drawn from evaluations of data obtained from the operation of ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. A summary of the sampling activities, sample analyses and the correlation and interpretation of data acquired from February 1999 through March of 2001 are reported. Mass and speciated data from urban and rural sources are compared and seasonal variations in PM{sub 2.5} distribution are also examined. Correlations between meteorological parameters and total PM{sub 2.5} mass are also presented.

Unknown

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This interim report summarizes detailed findings and conclusions drawn from evaluations of data obtained from the operation of ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. A summary of the sampling activities, sample analyses and the correlation and interpretation of data acquired from February 1999 through March of 2001 are reported. Mass and speciated data from urban and rural sources are compared and seasonal variations in PM{sub 2.5} distribution are also examined. Correlations between meteorological parameters and total PM{sub 2.5} mass are also presented.

Unknown

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Stress protein induction in speckled trout exposed to contaminants in the natural environment  

SciTech Connect

The induction of contaminant-specific stress proteins in estuarine organisms inhabiting chemical contaminated sites appears to contribute to pollution tolerance in these populations. In this study, the authors examined (1) stress protein induction speckled trout (Cynoscion nebulosus) exposed to petroleum and petrochemical pollutants in Galveston Bay, and (2) the relationship between stress protein responses and other physiological biomarkers of stress. Mature speckled trout were collected alive by gill net at a reference site north of the Texas City Dike and two contaminated sites, one in the Texas City Channel in lower Galveston Bay adjacent to a large number of petrochemical plants, and the other in Tabbs Bay, an oilfield produced water discharge area in upper Galveston Bay. Tissue samples were dissected from a total of 45 fish and frozen immediately on dry ice. Stress proteins were identified in liver, kidney, gill and gonad tissues using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were quantified by imaging densitometry. Stress proteins ranging in size from 13 to 80 kDa were found to be elevated in liver gill and ovary of speckled trout collected from the two contaminated sites, compared to those from the reference site. In addition, the stress protein profiles of tissues from fish collected at Tabbs Bay differed markedly from the Texas City Channel fish, suggesting that both the type of contaminant exposure and the ambient environmental conditions may affect stress protein induction. The stress protein results were compared to other physiological and reproductive biomarkers measured in these fish in an effort to determine possible long-term effects of pollutants on estuarine fish populations.

Howard, C.L.; Whitt, K.R.; Arndt, L.M. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Crnica: "A horta na cidade" (Primavera Ambiental 2013)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crónica: "A horta na cidade" (Primavera Ambiental 2013) O pasado mércores 10 de abril tivo lugar na con ADEGA. A actividade que leva por título "A horta na cidade" consistiu nunha conferencia a cargo de, Isabel Barrio explicounos os pros e contras dos diferentes tipos de hortas urbanas, dende as máis básicas

Fraguela, Basilio B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion S. S. Harilal,a Beau O in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithographic light source. An ambient gas that is transparent to 13.5 nm and deceleration of plume species, the addition of ambient gas leads to other events such as double peak formation

Tillack, Mark

182

Nanogenerator as an active sensor for vortex capture and ambient wind-velocity detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mechanical (wind, water flow, vibration, friction and body movement) energies are common in the ambientNanogenerator as an active sensor for vortex capture and ambient wind-velocity detection Rui Zhang principle, ambient wind-speed measurements with the NG are demonstrated. Due to the simple structure, high

Wang, Zhong L.

183

Monitoring a Building Using Deconvolution Interferometry. II: Ambient-Vibration Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring a Building Using Deconvolution Interferometry. II: Ambient- Vibration Analysis by Nori interferometry to ambient-vibration data, instead of using earthquake data, to monitor a building. The time continuity of ambient vibrations is useful for temporal monitoring. We show that, because multiple sources

Snieder, Roel

184

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Pasteurization of naturally contaminated water with solar energy.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...naturally contaminated water with solar energy. D A Ciochetti R H Metcalf A solar...investigate the potential of using solar energy to pasteurize naturally contaminated...naturally contaminated water with solar energy. | A solar box cooker (SBC...

D A Ciochetti; R H Metcalf

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Removal of Contaminants from Soils by Electric Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CONTAMINANTS FROM GROUNDWATER, GROUND WATER MONITORING AND REMEDIATION 6 : 85 ( 1986 ). SEGALL...electrode pairs placed in the ground. The contaminants in a liquid...be classified as ubiquitous ground-water contaminants (7). These...

Ronald F. Probstein; R. Edwin Hicks

1993-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Abstract--A widespread application of impedance control in dual-arm robotic systems is still a challenging problem. One of limitations is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- A widespread application of impedance control in dual- arm robotic systems is still provides efficient and flexible algorithms and tools which considerably facilitate future dual-arm robot and users for this new class of robotic systems. The main advantages and benefits of dual arm-robots over

189

Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower Turbines Background One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S. is the provision of adequate fish passage at projects. Mortality of downstream migrating fish, particularly as a result of passing through hydropower

190

Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect

A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

Shinn, J.H.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

192

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

193

Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

August 21, 2012, Contamination Incident at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accident Investigation of the August 21, 2012, Contamination...

194

Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment. Abstract: The accessibility of precipitated, intragrain U(VI) in a...

195

Computation of structural flexibility for bridge health monitoring using ambient modal data  

SciTech Connect

Issues surrounding the use of ambient vibration modes for the location of structural damage via dynamically measured flexibility are examined. Several methods for obtaining the required mass- normalized dynamic mode shapes from ambient modal data are implemented and compared. The method are applied to data from a series of ambient modal tests on an actual highway bridge. Results indicate that for the damage case examined, the flexibility from the ambient mode shapes gave a better indication of damage than the flexibility from the forced-vibration mode shapes. This improved performance is attributed to the higher excitation load levels that occur during the ambient test.

Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions  

SciTech Connect

The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state Li4+xTi5O12/LiPON/LixV2O5 cell and examine in situ the chemistry of Li-O2 reaction products on LixV2O5 as a function of applied voltage under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and near ambient-pressure of oxygen using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS). Oxygen reduction and evolution reactions take place on the surface of the mixed electronic and Li+ ionic conductor, LixV2O5, which eliminate parasitic reactions between oxygen reduction/evolution reaction intermediates and aprotic electrolytes used in Li-O2 batteries reported to date. Under UHV, reversible lithium intercalation and de-intercalation from LixV2O5 was noted, where the changes in the vanadium valence state revealed from XPS in this study were comparable to that reported previously from Li/LixV2O5 thin film batteries. In presence of oxygen near ambient pressure, the LixV2O5 surface was covered gradually by the reaction product of oxygen reduction, namely lithium peroxide (Li2O2) (approximately 1-2 unit cells) upon discharge. Interestingly, the LixV2O5 surface became re-exposed upon charging, and the oxidation of Li2O2 began at much lower overpotentials (~240 mV) than the charge overpotentials of Li-O2 cells (~1000 mV) with aprotic electrolytes, which can be attributed to subnanometer-thick Li2O2 with surfaces free of contaminants such as carbonate species. Our study provides first evidence of reversible lithium peroxide formation and decomposition in situ on an oxide surface using a solid-state cell, and new insights into the reaction mechanism of Li-O2 chemistry.

Lu, Yi-chun [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Crumlin, Ethan [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Harding, Jonathon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liu, Zhi [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Shao-Horn, Yang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day...

Bokelmann, Annamarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Re-Emergence of Emerging Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incredibly, these companies are exempt from scrutiny under the Safe Drinking Water Act by congressional edict in 2005, even though fracking wells penetrate through drinking water aquifers. ... Faulty well casings may allow direct contamination of aquifer units with these chemicals. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lewis, B.A. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Guide to treatment technology for contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

This document is a guide for the screening of alternative treatment technologies for contaminated soils. The contents of this guide are organized into: 1. Introduction, II. Utilizing the table, III. Tables: Contamination Versus Technology, TV. Contaminant Waste Groups, and V. References. The four Contaminations Versus Technology tables are designed to identify the effectiveness and/or potential applicability of technologies to some or all compounds within specific waste groups. The tables also present limitations and special use considerations for the particular treatment technology. The phase of development of the technology is also included in the table. The phases are: Available, Innovative, and Emerging technologies. The technologies presented in this guide are organized according to the method of treatment. The four (4) treatment methods are Biological, Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal, and Chemical/Physical Treatment. There are several processing methods; some are well developed and proven, and others are in the development stage.

Tran, H.; Aylward, R.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cross-Contamination of Crops in Horticulture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Like cross-contamination, coexistence is not new to horticulture. However, the advent of GM crops ... very far, whereas canola-rapeseed pollen is light and can travel long distances. There is...

Prof. Dane Scott

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

GIS Techniques for Mapping Groundwater Contamination Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The groundwater contamination risk map of a samplealluvial area was produced by using the IlwisGeographical Information System (GIS) to construct andto overlay thematic maps. The risk map has beenderived from the...

Daniela Ducci

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment of Remedial Actions for Contaminated Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the investigation in the field of remedial actions on contaminated land, an appropriate concept ... site, an evaluation of the existing alternative remedial techniques is necessary. The comparative evaluat...

Th. Neteler; H. L. Jessberger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Contaminated Aquatic Ecosystems Restoration: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use Decision Analysis methods to rank intervention strategies after contamination by radionuclides of an aquatic ecosystem. We assume certainty since the validation of models used to quantify impacts of cou...

E. Gallego; S. Ros-Insua; A. Mateos; D. Ros Insua

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A petroleum contaminated soil bioremediation facility  

SciTech Connect

The amount of petroleum contaminated soil (PCS) at the Savannah River site (SRS) that has been identified, excavated and is currently in storage has increased several fold during the last few years. Several factors have contributed to this problem: (1) South Carolina Department of Health ad Environmental control (SCDHEC) lowered the sanitary landfill maximum concentration for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the soil from 500 to 100 parts per million (ppm), (2) removal and replacement of underground storage tanks at several sites, (3) most recently SCDHEC disallowed aeration for treatment of contaminated soil, and (4) discovery of several very large contaminated areas of soil associated with leaking underground storage tanks (LUST), leaking pipes, disposal areas, and spills. Thus, SRS has an urgent need to remediate large quantities of contaminated soil that are currently stockpiled and the anticipated contaminated soils to be generated from accidental spills. As long as we utilize petroleum based compounds at the site, we will continue to generate contaminated soil that will require remediation.

Lombard, K.; Hazen, T.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Factors impacting contaminant body burdens and contaminant effects at different trophic levels in an estuarine ecosystem.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Organic contaminants continue to enter coastal ecosystems, creating stress for animals that inhabit these areas. A variety of factors such as land use, climate, and (more)

Hopper, Tiffany L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering during Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford subsurface has become contaminated with highly alkaline, radioactive waste generated as a result of weapons production. The radioactive brine was stored in underground storage tanks, a number of which developed leaks and contaminated the surrounding subsurface. The high pH and ionic strength of these wastes has been predicted to accelerate the degree of soil weathering to produce new mineral phases--cancrinite and sodalite among the most abundant. Previous work has demonstrated that Cs and Sr, which along with I represent the most radioactive components in the waste, are sequestered by these neo-formed solids. The present work is aimed at assessing the stability of these neo-formed solids, with special emphasis on the degree of Cs, Sr and I release under ambient (neutral pH, low ionic strength) conditions expected to return to the Hanford area after the caustic radioactive brine waste is removed.

Carl I. Steefel; Aaron Thompson; Jon Chorover

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Toxicological benchmarks for potential contaminants of concern for effects on soil and litter invertebrates and heterotrophic process  

SciTech Connect

An important step in ecological risk assessments is screening the chemicals occur-ring on a site for contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by comparing reported ambient concentrations to a set of toxicological benchmarks. Multiple endpoints for assessing risks posed by soil-borne contaminants to organisms directly impacted by them have been established. This report presents benchmarks for soil invertebrates and microbial processes and addresses only chemicals found at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. No benchmarks for pesticides are presented. After discussing methods, this report presents the results of the literature review and benchmark derivation for toxicity to earthworms (Sect. 3), heterotrophic microbes and their processes (Sect. 4), and other invertebrates (Sect. 5). The final sections compare the benchmarks to other criteria and background and draw conclusions concerning the utility of the benchmarks.

Will, M.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Air Quality Database and Analytical Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. with Ohio University and Texas A&M University - Kingsville as subcontractors, will develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust computer application for NETL to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. Efforts will be made to include, to the greatest extent possible, ambient air data collected by other agencies in the upper Ohio River valley region, such as U.S. EPA, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP), West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WV-DEP), Ohio EPA, and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). Although emphasis will be placed on data collected in the upper Ohio River valley region, the computer application developed under this Agreement will be designed, to the greatest extent possible, to access data collected at NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring sites outside the region, such as sites operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the Great Smoky Mountains (under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI26-98FT40406) and by Southern Research Institute in North Birmingham, AL (under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40770). The data base and analytical tool development effort will also be coordinated, to the greatest extent possible, with similar tools being developed for use by U.S. EPA. This will ensure that the database and analytical tools produced under this Agreement will be readily accessible to a wide variety of stakeholders.

211

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions The water molecule, H2O, has deceptively simple structure, but contains all the prerequisites for building complexity. The oxygen atom has a greater affinity for electrons and pulls them away from the hydrogens making them slightly positive. On the back side of molecule oxygen has a lone pair - electrons that do not assist in binding the hydrogens in the molecule, but to which the hydrogens of another water molecule can be attracted to form a so-called hydrogen bond (H-bond). Hydrogen bond is much weaker than the bonding inside water molecule, but it is still strong enough with the possibility to make from one up to four H-bonds per water molecule. The network connected by H-bonds between water molecules makes liquid water so special compared to other normal liquids with about 66 anomalies, e.g. density maximum at 4 °C and large heat capacity. The anomalies of water become extreme in the supercooled region (below freezing point), whilst they are also present at ambient conditions where most of waters' physical, chemical and biological processes of importance occur. Water at ambient conditions has traditionally been considered as a homogeneous distribution of near- tetrahedral H-bonded structures with thermal fluctuations increasing with temperature. This picture has been challenged by recent studies based on x-ray Raman (XRS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), suggesting two distinct local structures with tetrahedral as a minority and highly H-bond distorted asymmetrical as the majority. In particular, the proposed predominant asymmetrical structure has caused intense debate in the last years.

212

Modal parameter extraction from large operating structures using ambient excitation  

SciTech Connect

A technique called the Natural Excitation Technique or has been developed to response extract response parameters from large operational structure when subjected to random and unmeasured forces such as wind, road noise, aerodynamics, or waves. Six applications of NExT to ambient excitation testing and NExT analysis are surveyed in this paper with a minimum of technical detail. In the first application, NExT was applied to a controlled-yaw Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). By controlling the yaw degree of freedom an important class of rotating coordinate system effects are reduced. A new shape extraction procedure was applied to this data set with good results. The second application was to a free-yaw HAWT. The complexity of the response has prompted further analytical studies and the development of a specialized visualization package. The third application of NExT was to a parked three-bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in which traditional modal testing could not excite all modes of interest. The shape extraction process used cross-correlation functions directly in a time-domain shape-fitting routine. The fourth application was to ground transportation systems. Ongoing work to improve driver and passenger comfort in tractor-trailer vehicles and to refine automobile body and tire models will use NExT. NExT has been used to process ambient vibration data for Finite Element Model correlation and is being used to study Structural Health Monitoring with ambient excitation. Shape fitting was performed using amplitude and phase information taken directly from the cross-spectra. The final application is to an offshore structure. This work is on-going, however initial studies have found a high-modal density, high noise content, and sparse data set.

James, G.H. III; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Breaking wind waves as a source of ambient noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model for the prediction of ambient noise level due to collective oscillations of air bubbles under breaking wind waves is presented. The model uses a budget of the energy flux from the breaking waves to quantify acoustic power radiation by a bubble cloud. A shift of the noise spectra to lower frequency due to collective bubble oscillation is assumed. The model derives good estimates of the magnitude slope and frequency range of the noise spectra using the wind speed or height of breaking waves.

Pavlo Tkalich; Eng Soon Chan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Autocatalytic water dissociation on Cu(110) at near ambient conditions  

SciTech Connect

Autocatalytic dissociation of water on the Cu(110) metal surface is demonstrated based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies carried out in-situ under near ambient conditions of water vapor pressure (1 Torr) and temperature (275-520 K). The autocatalytic reaction is explained as the result of the strong hydrogen-bond in the H{sub 2}O-OH complex of the dissociated final state, which lowers the water dissociation barrier according to the Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relations. A simple chemical bonding picture is presented which predicts autocatalytic water dissociation to be a general phenomenon on metal surfaces.

Mulleregan, Alice; Andersson, Klas; Ketteler, Guido; Bluhm, Hendrik; Yamamoto, Susumu; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Salmeron, Miquel; Nilsson, Anders

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Washing of field weathered crude oil contaminated soil with an environmentally compatible surfactant, alkyl polyglucoside  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathered crude oil contaminated soils (COCSs), which are much more difficult to remediate than those freshly contaminated, are widespread especially at the sites of oil fields and industries. Surfactant enhanced ex situ soil washing could be used to remediate COCSs, but surfactant toxicity becomes one of the major concerns. In this study, a class of green surfactants, alkyl polyglucosides (APGs), were tested in washing the field weathered COCS with relatively high oil concentration (123mgg?1 dry soil) from Jilin Oilfield, Northeastern China. APG1214, characterized with longer alkyl chain, was more effective than APG0810 in crude oil removal. Adding inorganic sodium salts into APG1214 solution further improved the crude oil removal efficiency (CORE). Washing parameters (temperature, washing time, agitation speed and solution/soil ratio) were investigated and further optimized integratedly with an orthogonal design. At the optimum conditions, the CORE reached 97%. GC/MS analysis showed that the proportion of small n-alkanes (C16C23) in residual crude oil gradually increased, which was helpful to interpret the oil removal mechanism. Moreover, eminent effect on removal of large n-alkanes was achieved from the synergy between APG1214 and inorganic salts, which was opposite to the effect when they were added separately. This study demonstrated a promising way to remediate COCS with ecologically compatible surfactant and provided guidelines for its practical application.

Mei Han; Guodong Ji; Jinren Ni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

218

Wind dependence of deep ocean ambient noise at low frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of experiments has been carried out using a vertical line array to measure low?frequency ambient noise at deep ocean sites in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Data in the band from 13 to 300 Hz were processed to obtain the array response directed vertically upward in order to study the noise due to local winds. The results indicate that there are two regimes of behavior depending on the wind speed v with the transition occurring at the onset of wave breaking v?10 kn. The noise level (NL) for a specific wind noise process was related to a power n of the wind speed according to the relationship NL=B+20n?log?v and the model parameters were obtained by fitting the data. The average value over the band was n=0.3 for wind speeds wind?generated noise was determined over the low?frequency band for wind speeds from 1030 kn. The values are consistent with those of a recent analysis of available noise data [Kewley e t a l. Low?frequency wind?generated ambient noise source levels J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 8 8 18941902 (1990)] and the model provides good agreement with wind noise measurements obtained with omni hydrophones in the southern oceans.

N. R. Chapman; J. W. Cornish

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Toward Distinguishing Woodsmoke and Diesel Exhaust in Ambient Particulate Matter  

SciTech Connect

Particulate matter (PM) from biomass burning and diesel exhaust has distinct X-ray spectroscopic, carbon specific signatures, which can be employed for source apportionment. Characterization of the functional groups of a wide selection of PM samples (woodsmoke, diesel soot, urban air PM) was carried out using the soft X-ray spectroscopy capabilities at the synchrotron radiation sources in Berkeley (ALS) and Brookhaven (NSLS). The spectra reveal that diesel exhaust particulate (DEP) matter is made up from a semigraphitic solid core and soluble organic matter, predominantly with carboxylic functional groups. Woodsmoke PM has no or a less prevalent, graphitic signature, instead it contains carbon-hydroxyl groups. Using these features to apportion the carbonaceous PM in ambient samples we estimate that the relative contribution of DEP to ambient PM in an urban area such as Lexington, KY and St. Louis, MO is 7% and 13.5%, respectively. These values are comparable to dispersion modeling data from nonurban and urban areas in California, and with elemental carbon measurements in urban locations such as Boston, MA, Rochester, NY, and Washington, DC.

Braun,A.; Huggins, F.; Kubatova, A.; Wirick, S.; Maricq, M.; Mun, B.; McDonald, J.; Kelly, K.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Measurement of the ambient in relocateable modular classrooms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ambient in a classroom consists of noises internal to the classroom (e.g. HVAC lighting IT equipment refrigerators and fish tank pumps) and noises external to the classroom (e.g. street traffic aircraft children in the playground and adjacent classroomnoise). Currently ANSI S12.60 Classroom Acoustics requires that the A?weighted ambient level unoccupied be less than 35 dB at the noisiest position in the classroom. A basic reasonable procedure to implement the required measurements has been developed and tested. The authors find that the procedures developed can be readily used by inexperience but technically oriented individuals. The procedure separates the measurement of internal and external noises into two measurements typically at different positions. Because the two noises are variable unrelated in position and uncorrelated in time it does not make sense to combine them in any fashion. Rather in the procedure to be recommended by WG 68 the two measurements are to be reported and evaluated separately against the 35 dB criterion. Other notable changes are expansion of the measurement hours to include busy traffic periods (high environmental noise periods) prior to and after school and on Saturdays and implementation of HVAC duty cycles to better estimate a typical A?weighted hourly equivalent level from HVAC equipment (the subject of a companion paper).

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

In this paper we describe work being conducting to better understand the design of ambient information. We define  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information System, Framework, Public Ambient Display ACM Classification Keywords H5.m. Information interfaces

Connelly, Kay

222

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

224

coleo explorando o ensino o brasil e o meio ambiente antrtico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coleção explorando o ensino 10 volume o brasil e o meio ambiente antártico #12;#12;coleção explorando o ensino volume 10 ensino fundamental e ensino médio o brasil e o meio ambiente antártico #12 Dados Internacionais de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP) O Brasil e o meio ambiente antártico : ensino

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente solo-semente por Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

el medio ambiente. Igualmente ocurre con los agentes biocidas orgnicos... del tipo triclosan, altamente txicos y contaminantes. Liberacin de iones por parte de las...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental por derramamento Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

el medio ambiente. Igualmente ocurre con los agentes biocidas orgnicos... del tipo triclosan, altamente txicos y contaminantes. Liberacin de iones por parte de las...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental por centelleo Sample Search Results  

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el medio ambiente. Igualmente ocurre con los agentes biocidas orgnicos... del tipo triclosan, altamente txicos y contaminantes. Liberacin de iones por parte de las...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental por bacillus Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

el medio ambiente. Igualmente ocurre con los agentes biocidas orgnicos... del tipo triclosan, altamente txicos y contaminantes. Liberacin de iones por parte de las...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental na costa Sample Search Results  

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for Systems and Robotics, Lisboa Collection: Engineering 3 coleo explorando o ensino o brasil e o meio ambiente antrtico Summary: Dados Internacionais de Catalogao na...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente tabuleiros costeiros Sample Search...  

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ambiente, na restinga do Parque Estadual da Serra do Tabuleiro, Santa Catarina, Sul do Brasil. 2. Materiais... RESTINGA DO PARQUE ESTADUAL DA SERRA DO TABULEIRO, SANTA CATARINA....

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental das atividades Sample Search...  

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4 Sistemas de Gerncia de Workflows: Caractersticas, Distribuio e Luiz Antnio M. Pereira Summary: ;8 ambiente operacional e colocao das vrias atividades nas...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient pressure sensitivity Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and spoilage organisms while keeping Summary: of the pressure (Figure 2). Both pure water and most moist foods subjected to a 600 MPa treatment at ambient... viruses appear...

233

Personal and Ambient Air Pollution is Associated with Increased Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Children with Asthma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ambient air pollution and respiratory health in schoolEnvironmental Health Perspectives Air pollution and F ENO inEnvironmental Health Perspectives Air pollution and F ENO in

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - areas gestao ambiental Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPERATRIZ TASSINARI CFH 12 EDUCACAO AMBIENTAL COM BASE EM... GESTAO DE RESIDUOS E HORTA ORGANICA NO LAR RECANTO DO CARINHO - FLORIANOPOLIS ANTONIO AUGUSTO ALVES... PILOTO DA...

235

Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and elevated temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the present investigation is to characterise cyclic deformation behaviour and plasticity-induced martensite formation of metastable austenitic stainless steels at ambient and elevated temperatures, ...

Th. Nebel; D. Eifler

236

Effect of ambient conditions and fuel properties on homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practical application of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion must demonstrate robust responses to variations in environmental conditions. This work examines the impact of ambient conditions and fuel ...

Andreae, Morgan M. (Morgan MacKenzie)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient fine particulate Sample Search...  

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about Clean Transportation projects at the North Carolina Solar Center Summary: or maintenance areas for national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone andor fine...

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente responsabilidade social Sample...  

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ambiente responsabilidade social Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEONTOLOGA EMPRESARIAL PRIMER TRIMESTRE CURSO ACADMICO 2010-2011 Summary: equilibrar las finalidades de la empresa...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient polycyclic aromatic Sample Search...  

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Adducts in Mothers Summary: . Exposure to genotoxins present in ambient air in Bangkok, Thailand: particle associated polycyclic aromatic... DNA Damage from Polycyclic Aromatic...

240

Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente una alternativa Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ambiental ha creado la necesidad de elegir una fuente de energa con bajas emisiones de . Por... , otorgando una alternativa viable de transportacin. A pesar que el...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental da escola Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

d'Igualada 7 Igualada Inspecci de Materials i... i Medi Ambient: Integraci d'Energies Renovables a l'Arquitectura ... Source: Politcnica de Catalunya, Universitat -...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental institucionalizada actos Sample...  

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ambiente PABLO MUNERA BRUIN Tecnologa Source: Escolano, Francisco - Departamento de Ciencia de la Computacin e Inteligencia Artificial, Universitat d'Alacant Collection:...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental qualification analisis Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

una prova orale. La prova scritta... nella discussione di esercizi svolti in ambiente Matlab. 1. Un mese prima della data prevista per l Source: Guerrini, Carla - Dipartimento di...

245

Personal and Ambient Air Pollution is Associated with Increased Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Children with Asthma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994. Nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide: Method 6014. In:Molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide induced epithelialEC, OC), and 24-hr nitrogen dioxide. Ambient exposures

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Uma arquitetura de software neuro-reativa para sistemas de automao do ambiente construdo.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Esta tese prope uma arquitetura de software neuro-reativa para sistemas de automao do ambiente construdo. O objetivo facilitar o desenvolvimento, a manuteno e a (more)

lvaro Messias Bigonha Tibiri

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient noise levels Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tome 51, FBvrier 1990 Summary: aisdlAcoustique1990 A TECHNIQUE TO ESTIMATE THE THREE DIMENSIONAL DIRECTIONALITY OF UNDERSEA AMBIENT NOISE R... the three dimensional character...

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient temperature secondary Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

constant over a wide range of ambient temperatures. Heat lost... heat production, Q heat loss, C conductance, Tb ... Source: Jodice, Patrick - Department of Forestry and...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient stable quantitative Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equations. In this paper an ambient agent ... Source: Treur, Jan - Department of Artificial Intelligence, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Collection: Computer Technologies and...

250

Quantitative hydrogen analysis of zircaloy-4 in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with ambient helium gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This experiment was carried out to address the need for overcoming the difficulties encountered in hydrogen analysis by means of plasma emission spectroscopy in atmospheric ambient...

Ramli, Muliadi; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Niki, Hideaki; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On; Pardede, Marincan; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Davy Putra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient particle pollution Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is proposed to address critical issues relating to the public health impacts of ambient air pollution... . The overarching theme of the Center is a focus on characterizing...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient particle-bound pollution Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is proposed to address critical issues relating to the public health impacts of ambient air pollution... . The overarching theme of the Center is a focus on characterizing...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient particulate matterpm10 Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particulate matterpm10 Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Statistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter Summary: Ambient Air Quality Standards...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient pollutant particles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is proposed to address critical issues relating to the public health impacts of ambient air pollution... . The overarching theme of the Center is a focus on characterizing...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient particulate matter-induced Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particulate matter-induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Statistical Issues in the Study of Air Pollution Involving Airborne Particulate Matter Summary: Ambient Air Quality Standards...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente uma proposta Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uma vez que estejam presentes em uma teoria, tudo Summary: em um ambiente consistente (neste caso, pelo acrescimo de consistente-A como uma hipotese adicional......

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - altas temperaturas ambientes Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Physics 34 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: ambiente en los sustratos de alimentacin del Pinzn azul. Para...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ultrafine particles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 5 Kendrick et al. 1 THE IMPACT OF BICYCLE LANE CHARACTERISTICS ON BICYCLISTS'1 Summary: ). Number concentrations in ambient air...

259

Characterization of ambient air pollution for stochastic health models  

SciTech Connect

This research is an analysis of various measures of ambient air pollution useful in cross-sectional epidemiological investigations and rick assessments. The Chestnut Ridge area health effects investigation, which includes a cross-sectional study of respiratory symptoms in young children, is used as a case study. Four large coal-fired electric generating power plants are the dominant pollution sources in this area of western Pennsylvania. The air pollution data base includes four years of sulfur dioxide and five years of total suspended particulate concentrations at seventeen monitors. Some 70 different characterizations of pollution are constructed and tested. These include pollutant concentrations at various percentiles and averaging times, exceedence measures which show the amount of time a specified threshold concentration is exceeded, and several dosage measures which transform non-linear dose-response relationships onto pollutant concentrations.

Batterman, S.A.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Whistler Modes with Wave Magnetic Fields Exceeding the Ambient Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

R. L. Stenzel; J. M. Urrutia; K. D. Strohmaier

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Application of Waves for Remediation of Contaminated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrodynamics, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia, and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pearlstone Center was designed mainly to provide a qualitative assessment (i.e., changes in pressure due to the propagating wave domestic and/or industrial spills, and contamination due to the mishandling of oil products. Restoration

Gross, Amit

263

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...as a result of the manufacturing process used; an example...Specifi cations of food additives are of immense significance...use of DES as a food additive for cattle. I am unable...occupational hazards from manufacturing these materials even...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis  

SciTech Connect

In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

Veatch, B.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Review Paper/ Biodegradation in Contaminated Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in the treatment of ground water contamination, particularly for hydrocarbons (for reviews, see Christensen et al of biologically reactive compounds in ground water has been an area of intense study in recent decades. Much through an engineering approach. Many ground water scientists have used geochemical methods, targeting

266

Transuranic Contamination in Sediment and Groundwater at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A review of transuranic radionuclide contamination in sediments and groundwater at the DOEs Hanford Site was conducted. The review focused primarily on plutonium-239/240 and americium-241; however, other transuranic nuclides were discussed as well, including neptunium-237, plutonium-238, and plutonium-241. The scope of the review included liquid process wastes intentionally disposed to constructed waste disposal facilities such as trenches and cribs, burial grounds, and unplanned releases to the ground surface. The review did not include liquid wastes disposed to tanks or solid wastes disposed to burial grounds. It is estimated that over 11,800 Ci of plutonium-239, 28,700 Ci of americium-241, and 55 Ci of neptunium-237 have been disposed as liquid waste to the near surface environment at the Hanford Site. Despite the very large quantities of transuranic contaminants disposed to the vadose zone at Hanford, only minuscule amounts have entered the groundwater. Currently, no wells onsite exceed the DOE derived concentration guide for plutonium-239/240 (30 pCi/L) or any other transuranic contaminant in filtered samples. The DOE derived concentration guide was exceeded by a small fraction in unfiltered samples from one well (299-E28-23) in recent years (35.4 and 40.4 pCi/L in FY 2006). The primary reason that disposal of these large quantities of transuranic radionuclides directly to the vadose zone at the Hanford Site has not resulted in widespread groundwater contamination is that under the typical oxidizing and neutral to slightly alkaline pH conditions of the Hanford vadose zone, transuranic radionuclides (plutonium and americium in particular) have a very low solubility and high affinity for surface adsorption to mineral surfaces common within the Hanford vadose zone. Other important factors are the fact that the vadose zone is typically very thick (hundreds of feet) and the net infiltration rate is very low due to the desert climate. In some cases where transuranic radionuclides have been co-disposed with acidic liquid waste, transport through the vadose zone for considerable distances has occurred. For example, at the 216-Z-9 Crib, plutonium-239 and americium-241 have moved to depths in excess of 36 m (118 ft) bgs. Acidic conditions increase the solubility of these contaminants and reduce adsorption to mineral surfaces. Subsequent neutralization of the acidity by naturally occurring calcite in the vadose zone (particularly in the Cold Creek unit) appears to have effectively stopped further migration. The vast majority of transuranic contaminants disposed to the vadose zone on the Hanford Site (10,200 Ci [86%] of plutonium-239; 27,900 Ci [97%] of americium-241; and 41.8 Ci [78%] of neptunium-237) were disposed in sites within the PFP Closure Zone. This closure zone is located within the 200 West Area (see Figures 1.1 and 3.1). Other closure zones with notably high quantities of transuranic contaminant disposal include the T Farm Zone with 408 Ci (3.5%) plutonium-239, the PUREX Zone with 330 Ci (2.8%) plutonium-239, 200-W Ponds Zone with 324 Ci (2.8%) plutonium-239, B Farm Zone with 183 Ci (1.6%) plutonium-239, and the REDOX Zone with 164 Ci (1.4%) plutonium 239. Characterization studies for most of the sites reviewed in the document are generally limited. The most prevalent characterization methods used were geophysical logging methods. Characterization of a number of sites included laboratory analysis of borehole sediment samples specifically for radionuclides and other contaminants, and geologic and hydrologic properties. In some instances, more detailed research level studies were conducted. Results of these studies were summarized in the document.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

The new ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy instrument at MAX-lab  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The new instrument for ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at the Swedish synchrotron radiation facility MAX IV Laboratory is presented. The instrument is based on the use of a retractable and exchangeable high-pressure cell, which implies that ultrahigh-vacuum conditions are retained in the analysis chamber and that dual ambient pressure and ultrahigh-vacuum use is possible.

Schnadt, J.

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

INTRODUCTION Energy harvesting is the transformation of ambient energy present in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Energy harvesting is the transformation of ambient energy present in the environment into electrical energy. This energy is derived from different external sources such as solar power, thermal energy, wind energy, salinity gradient and kinetic energy. Harvesting energy from ambient vibration has

Sóbester, András

269

Physical properties of ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with condensed phase diffusion rates that are fast enough to maintain equilibrium with the gas phase [Pankow on small sample sizes with little intercomparison across ambient samples, and only a few studies [Virtanen et al., 2010; Vaden et al., 2011] compared laboratory and ambient samples. An investigation

Nizkorodov, Sergey

270

Sensor9k: A testbed for designing and experimenting with WSN-based ambient intelligence applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence systems are typically characterized by the use of pervasive equipment for monitoring and modifying the environment according to users' needs, and to globally defined constraints. Our work describes the implementation of a testbed ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Energy efficiency, Probabilistic reasoning, Wireless sensor and actuator networks

Alessandra De Paola; Salvatore Gaglio; Giuseppe Lo Re; Marco Ortolani

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

UNCERTAINTY CALIBRATION OF LARGE-ORDER MODELS OF BRIDGES USING AMBIENT VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCERTAINTY CALIBRATION OF LARGE-ORDER MODELS OF BRIDGES USING AMBIENT VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS frequencies and mode shapes based on ambient vibration measurements collected from a wireless mobile measuring, such as modal frequencies, modal damping ratios and mode shapes, through vibration measurements, as well

Boyer, Edmond

272

Ambient noise seismic imaging Journal: McGraw Hill 2008 Yearbook of Science & Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ForReview Ambient noise seismic imaging Journal: McGraw Hill 2008 Yearbook of Science & Technology List of Authors: Ritzwoller, Michael Keywords: ambient noise, seismology, seismic tomography, Rayleigh wave, Love wave, surface wave Abstract: A recent innovation in seismic imaging based on using long time

Ritzwolle, Mike

273

Abstract--This paper presents ambient mechanical vibrations as an alternative source for energy harvesting, especially  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--This paper presents ambient mechanical vibrations as an alternative source for energy harvesting, especially beneficial where alternatives such as light, wind, biomass and thermal energy are limited, e.g., powering underground sensors. Transduction of ambient kinetic energy, e.g., the vibrations

Kumar, Ratnesh

274

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

275

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba...

277

Microsoft Word - NGNP_Contamination Control Report-050108 FINAL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94 NGNP-NHS 50-CC Contamination Control 8 of 101 NGNP-Contamination Control Report-050108.doc 2008 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1-1...

278

Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

279

Chemistry of Metal Contaminants in Water Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Metal Contaminants in Water Chemistry of Metal Contaminants in Water BylaskaZinc.jpg A plot of difference electron density of a Zn2++6H2O250H2O system from AIMDMM...

280

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

282

DTECTEUR DE CONTAMINATION RADIOACTIVE Par M. BRIRE et J. WEILL,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

623. D?TECTEUR DE CONTAMINATION RADIOACTIVE Par M. BRI?RE et J. WEILL, Division des Constructions rapidement sur leurs mains, chaussures et vêtements toute trace de contamination. Le principe utilisé permet'utilisation. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM. TOME 14, NOVEMBRE 1953, , Le détecteur de contamination

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

284

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

285

Ambient noise levels and reverberation times in Mississippi school rooms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nine elementary school classrooms at three Mississippi public schools were selected at random for noise and reverberation time measures to monitor voluntary compliance with ANSI standard S12.60-2002 (Acoustical Performance Criteria Design Requirements and Guidelines for Schools). One-hour equivalent dBA noise levels and reverberation times (T60) were measured with SpectraPLUS Version 5.0 software. Measures were taken on separate days at each school in unoccupied classrooms with the HVAC system operating. For ambient noise measures an Audix TR40 omnidirectional microphone was placed in a 12 inch stand on a student's desk near the middle of the room and oriented toward the teacher's desk at a 45 degree angle. For the reverberation time measure a 400 watt loudspeaker (Yamaha BR15M) was placed on the teacher's desk about 3 meters from the microphone. Results showed that noise levels varied from 28 dBA to 51 dBA with broad spectra containing peaks at 120 Hz and harmonics. Five of nine classrooms had noise levels that exceeded the ANSI recommended level of 35 dBA. Reverberation times varied from .21 to .62 seconds; only one classroom exceeded the recommended minimal reverberation time of .6 seconds. Acoustical modifications to reduce noise levels and reverberation times will be addressed.

Edward L. Goshorn; Brett E. Kemker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ambient noise levels and reverberation times in Mississippi school rooms.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nine elementary schoolclassrooms at three Mississippi public schools were selected at random for noise and reverberation time measures to monitor voluntary compliance with ANSI standard S12.60?2002 (Acoustical Performance Criteria Design Requirements and Guidelines for Schools). 1?h equivalent dBAnoise levels and reverberation times (T60) were measured with SPECTRAPLUS Version 5.0 software.Measures were taken on separate days at each school in unoccupied classrooms with the HVAC system operating. For ambient noisemeasures an Audix TR40 omnidirectional microphone was placed in a 12 in. stand on a students desk near the middle of the room and oriented toward the teachers desk at a 45 deg angle. For the reverberation time measure a 400 W loudspeaker (Yamaha BR15M) was placed on the teachers desk about 3 m from the microphone. Results showed that noise levels varied from 28 to 51 dBA with broad spectra containing peaks at 120 Hz and harmonics. Five of nine classrooms had noise levels that exceeded the ANSI recommended level of 35 dBA. Reverberation times varied from 0.21 to 0.62 s; only one classroom exceeded the recommended minimal reverberation time of 0.6 s. Acoustical modifications to reduce noise levels and reverberation times will be addressed.

Edward L. Goshorn; Megan N. Lucus; Brett E. Kemker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Depth dependence of ambient noise in the northeastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Omnidirectional ambient noise levels were measured at two deep?water locations in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.Hydrophones were positioned throughout the water column at depths ranging from about 200 m below the surface to about 150 m above the sea bottom. Analyses of the data over the frequencies from 15 to 800 Hz show that at low frequencies the noise levels decrease with increasing depth. The decrease with depth is greater below the critical depth than it is in the sound channel. These low?frequency noise levels and their depth dependence are independent of the wind speed. At higher frequencies the noise levels and the depth dependence are controlled by the wind?generated noise. At low wind speeds there is a decrease in levels below the critical depth but above this depth both increases and decreases in levels with depth were noted. At these high frequencies during high wind speeds the noise levels not only rise but also fill the water column to the extent that there is little decrease in level with increasing depth even for the region below the critical depth.

Gerald B. Morris

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

289

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Speaker(s): Mathew MacLeod Date: June 29, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Chemical products pervade modern society, and furnish unprecedented wealth and comfort to citizens of countries with industrialized economies. Demand for products such as pesticides, industrial chemicals, flame-retardants and additives for consumer products requires large scale production and distribution of these chemicals, and they are inevitably released into the environment. Responsible management of chemicals therefore requires a quantitative understanding of amounts released, how the chemicals partition and travel in the environment, and how they might expose and thus adversely affect human and ecological populations. This

290

Task 15 -- Remediation of organically contaminated soil using hot/liquid (subcritical) water. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This activity involves a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies are being performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal are also being performed. Liquid water is normally considered to be too polar a solvent to be effective for removal of organic contaminants from contaminated soils and sludges. However, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that the polarity of liquid water can be changed from that of a very polar solvent at ambient conditions to that of an organic solvent (e.g., ethanol or acetonitrile) by simply raising the temperature. The EERC has exploited this unique property of liquid water to obtain highly selective extractions of polar (at lower temperatures) to nonpolar (at 200 to 250 C) organics from contaminated soils and sludges. Only moderate pressures (a maximum of about 45 atm at 250 C and lower pressures at lower temperatures) are required. With this procedure, all detectable hazardous organics were removed from the sludge, thus making the remaining material (about 99% of the original mass) a nonhazardous material. The present understanding of hot/liquid water extraction for the removal of hazardous organics from contaminated soils and sludges is being used to develop the engineering parameters needed to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the remediation technology. Progress during the report period is summarized.

Hawthorne, S.B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

292

Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, C.G.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Chronic effects of ambient air pollution on respiratory morbidities among Chinese children: a cross-sectional study in Hong Kong  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chronic health effects from exposure to ambient air pollution are still unclear. This study primarily aims ... the relationship between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and respiratory morbidities ...

Yang Gao; Emily YY Chan; Liping Li; Patrick WC Lau; Tze Wai Wong

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A Policy Management System for Ambient Networks K. Jean and A. Galis, {kjean, agalis}@ee.ucl.ac.uk,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Policy Management System for Ambient Networks K. Jean and A. Galis, {kjean, agalis of Ambient Networks necessitate a new dynamic, distributed policy management system. Existing policy management systems do not provide the required support for mobility, dynamicity and heterogeneity

Haddadi, Hamed

295

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

PIANO DI RIQUALIFICAZIONE AMBIENTALE E PAESAGGISTICA DEL TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) ­ BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA Impianto di costruito negli anni '70 per lo

Columbia University

297

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambient air quality standards and health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Colin P. Duffy; Richard. Letz; Theodore W. Tibbitts; Benjamin G. Ferris

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Influence of Increased Ambient Lighting on Mass Detection in Mammograms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rationale and Objectives Recent research has provided evidence that in reading rooms equipped with liquid crystal displays (LCDs), a measured increase of ambient lighting may improve clinicians' detection performance. In agreement with this research, the American College of Radiology (ACR) has recommended a moderate increase of ambient lighting in mammography reading rooms. This study was designed to examine the effect of a controlled increase of ambient lighting in mammography reading rooms on the diagnostic performance of breast imaging radiologists. Materials and Methods Four breast imaging radiologists read 86 mammograms (43 containing subtle cancerous masses and 43 normal) under low (E = 1 lux) and elevated (E = 50 lux) ambient lighting levels on a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicinecalibrated, medical-grade LCD. Radiologists were asked to identify cancerous masses and to rate their detection confidence. Observer areas under the curve (AUCs) were calculated using a receiver-operating characteristic analysis of fully paired results. Additionally, average observer selection times under both ambient lighting levels were determined. Results Average radiologist \\{AUCs\\} decreased with elevated ambient lighting (0.78 0.03 to 0.72 0.04). Observer performance differences, however, were of the same order of magnitude as interobserver variability and were not statistically significant. Average selection times under increased ambient lighting remained constant or decreased, with the greatest decrease occurring for false-positive (20.4 18.9 to 14.4 9.6 seconds) and true-positive (18.0 13.8 to 12.9 9.4 seconds) selections. Conclusion The results agree with those of previous studies in that observer performance differences under a controlled increase of ambient lighting are not statistically significant. On the basis of these findings and ACR guidelines, a moderate increase of ambient lighting in mammography reading rooms is still suggested, but further research with additional cases and observers should be considered.

Benjamin J. Pollard; Ehsan Samei; Amarpreet S. Chawla; Jay Baker; Sujata Ghate; Connie Kim; Mary S. Soo; Noriyuki Hashimoto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

302

When Must EPA Set Ambient Air Quality Standards - Looking Back at NRDC v. Train  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

re- specting control of lead or other air pollutant" (citingcontrol the pollutant 5 7 and-si- multaneously with the issuance of the criteria-propose primary and secondary ambient air

Oren, Craig N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Electron yield soft X-ray photoabsorption spectroscopy under normal ambient-pressure conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soft X-ray photoabsorption spectroscopy under normal ambient-pressure conditions using electron yield detection was demonstrated. This technique provided unambiguous photoabsorption data for hydrated transition-metal compounds and identified the different chemical states of cobalt ions.

Tamenori, Y.

2013-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Some Applications of Meteorology to Underwater Ambient Noise Studies in Block Island Sound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbulent atmospheric boundary?layer theory is applied to wind observations made over a shallow?water embayment to explain variations in ambient noise levels. Broad?band ambient?noise data for sea states up to 3 obtained at a fixed receiving site are presented for a shallow water acoustic test range in Block IslandSound. Hourly wind?speed averages are analyzed by means of spectra and covariance functions in order to compare the frequency composition of the acoustic and meteorological data. The power spectrum computed from the record of ambient noise pressure level as a function of time has significant peaks centered on frequencies of 0.04 and 0.10. Similar peaks at the corresponding frequencies are present in the spectra of wind speeds. The results of this experiment suggest that for wind speed fluctuations of less than 0.33 nonlinear effects of the wind are relatively unimportant in the generation of ambient noise.

Llyod C. Huff; Robert G. Williams

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Single- and few-layer graphene by ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on nickel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process is used to fabricate graphene based films consisting of one to several graphene layers across their area. Polycrystalline Ni thin films are used and the graphene ...

Reina Ceeco, Alfonso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient urban levels Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that seven major sources of ambient PM10 were urban fugitive dust, crustal soil, coal combustion, secondary... diameter of 10 m or less) exceeded the level II of...

307

Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis...

Jinling Chi; Bo Wang; Shijie Zhang; Yunhan Xiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente para planejamento Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

para a construo de modelos... a anlise de modos de falhas, suas causas e efeitos: FMEA, FMECA, etc. 10) Ambientes para a construo de... IEC, 1995b. SANT'ANNA, N. Um...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental territorio urbano Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magistrale Sede isc. Sede alt. Voto laurea Data nascita 1 783078 I-INGEGNERIA CIVILE MI CO 110 26091989 Summary: -INGEGNERIA PER L'AMBIENTE E IL TERRITORIO MI 110 06081988...

310

Joint inversion of receiver function and ambient noise based on Bayesian theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we present a method for the joint inversion of receiver function and ambient noise based on Bayesian inverse theory (Tarantola, 1987, 2005). The nonlinear inversion method of the complex spectrum ratio of ...

van der Hilst, Robert D.

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient magnetic field Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient magnetic field Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Astrophysical Journal, 623:L89L92, 2005 April 20 2005....

312

Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles Heather. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 2. Theory and method of seismic interferometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4.2. Seismic interferometry across the Scottish Highlands

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - ao meio ambiente Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meio ambiente Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Retirado de http:www.cfbio.gov.brlegislacao.php em 05052011. RESOLUO N 213, DE 20 DE MARO DE 2010. Summary: , percias,...

314

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant on urbanof the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambientof the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient

Wang, Yungang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

When Must EPA Set Ambient Air Quality Standards - Looking Back at NRDC v. Train  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See National Ambi- ent Air Quality Standards for Lead, 73I: Can EPA Revive It Air Quality Standards, 29 ENVnL. L.and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards for Lead, 43

Oren, Craig N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiente web para Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web para Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambiente web para Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ajudando Professores a Fazer seu Dever de...

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air pollution--comparison Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient air pollution--comparison Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IV. Summary of Core Environmental...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient nitrogen dioxide Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: ambient nitrogen dioxide Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Grant Ideas Possible air pollutants to study: SO2, H2S, NO2, NH3, CO, CO2,...

319

A LANDSCAPE POTENTIAL CHARACTERIZATION: SPATIAL TEMPLATE OF PEDESTRIAN AMBIENT FIELDS WITHIN THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A LANDSCAPE POTENTIAL CHARACTERIZATION: SPATIAL TEMPLATE OF PEDESTRIAN AMBIENT FIELDS WITHIN delineate ambiences with identifiable characteristics, thus characterizing landscape perception-sensorial planning and design process. Keywords Landscape analysis, open spaces, isovist, sensory Digital Terrain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambiental em uma Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences 16 Um MetaAmbiente para Suporte a Construo Sistemtica de Sergio Crespo , Carlos Jos P. de Lucena, and A. v. Staa Summary: frameworks, pois estes possuem tambm uma...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbonate Leaching of Uranium from Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium (U) was successfully removed from contaminated soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site near Fernald, Ohio. ... The concentrations of uranium and other metals in the effluent were analyzed using a Varian Liberty 200 inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer (ICP-AES) or a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA). ... When 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was added prior to the carbonate solution, no increase in the removal of uranium was detected (data not shown) due to effervescence with heating, liberating carbon dioxide, and thus preventing uniform distribution of H2O2. ...

C. F. V. Mason; W. R. J. R. Turney; B. M. Thomson; N. Lu; P. A. Longmire; C. J. Chisholm-Brause

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Long Length Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the maintenance requirements of the Long Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) trailers and provide a basis for the maintenance frequencies selected. This document is applicable to the LLCE Receiver trailer and Transport trailer assembled by Mobilized Systems Inc. (MSI). Equipment used in conjunction with, or in support of, these trailers is not included. This document does not provide the maintenance requirements for checkout and startup of the equipment following the extended lay-up status which began in the mid 1990s. These requirements will be specified in other documentation.

ESVELT, C.A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A three-dimensional numerical model of dry convection in an ambient wind field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of the ambient wind field on convection. Nost of the numerical results are shown to correspond to empirical observations, while some results are unexpected but reasonable. Nechanical and thermal energy equations have been developed... to investigate the effects on convection of an The citations on the following pages follow the tyl of th J* J of ~At * h ' f ambient wind with a vertical shear He also examined the energy interactions between convective flow and nean flows. There were many...

Burgeson, John Carl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

The effects of an ambient salinity gradient on the dilution of dense brine jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECTS OF AN AMBIENT SALINITY GRADIENT ON THE DILUTION OF DENSE BRINE JETS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE MCCULLOUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering THE EFFECTS OF AN AMBIENT SALINITY GRADIENT ON THE DILUTION OF DENSE BRINE JETS A Thesis by GARY NAYNE MCCULLOUGH Approved as to style and content by: Robert E. Randall (Chair of Committee...

McCullough, Gary Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Economizer control assembly for regulating the volume flow of outdoor ambient air  

SciTech Connect

An economizer assembly is disclosed wherein a sliding door is utilized for covering an outdoor ambient air opening allowing outdoor ambient air flow into a space to be conditioned. A motor shaft arrangement connected via a rotating drive rod is utilized to slidably displace the door to any position necessary to effectively regulate air flow. The utilization of this economizer control arrangement with a rooftop type air conditioning unit is further disclosed.

Michaels, D.D. Jr.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Decreasing aqueous mercury concentrations to achieve safe levels in fish: examining the water-fish relationship in two point-source contaminated streams  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) and White Oak Creek (WOC) are two mercury-contaminated streams located on the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. East Fork Poplar Creek is the larger and more contaminated of the two, with average aqueous mercury (Hg) concentrations exceeding those in reference streams by several hundred-fold. Remedial actions over the past 20 years have decreased aqueous Hg concentrations in EFPC by 85 %. Fish fillet concentrations, however, have not responded to this decrease in aqueous Hg and remain above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency s ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) of 0.3 mg/kg. The lack of correlation between aqueous and fish tissue Hg concentrations in this creek has led to questions regarding the usefulness of target aqueous Hg concentrations and strategies for future remediation efforts. White Oak Creek has a similar contamination history but aqueous Hg concentrations in WOC are an order of magnitude lower than in EFPC. Despite the lower aqueous Hg concentrations, fish fillet concentrations in WOC have also been above the AWQC, making the most recent aqueous Hg target of 200 ng/L in EFPC seem unlikely to result in an effective decrease in fillet Hg concentrations. Recent monitoring efforts in WOC, however, suggest an aqueous total Hg threshold above which Hg bioaccumulation in fish may not respond. This new information could be useful in guiding remedial actions in EFPC and in other point-source contaminated streams.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Valentine, Charles S [ORNL; Gregory, Scott M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Treatability of PCB-contaminated soils with quicklime (CaO)  

SciTech Connect

The possibility that quicklime (calcium oxide, CaO) can destroy PCBs has received much attention over the past year. Observations at an EPA remediation site, where lime-containing kiln dusts were used for interim stabilization of PCB-containing wastes prompted the EPA to sponsor a small research project to investigate quicklime-PCB interactions. That study reported decreases in PCB content in synthetic, PCB-spiked soil following the application of quicklime and heat. META Environmental, Inc., as a contractor to EPRI, recently completed research designed to evaluate the effectiveness of quicklime for treating PCBs in soil and sand matrices under several reaction conditions, and to examine the underlying dechlorination chemistry involved, if any. Experiments were run with PCB-spiked sand and with actual PCB-contaminated soil. A variety of experimental conditions were employed including tests in open and closed containers, at ambient and elevated temperatures, and over a range of one hour to four days. Granular quicklime, fly ash, and kiln dust were all tested for reaction with PCBs. Early experiments showed that a mixture of sand/quicklime/water at 1:3:1.5 by weight, placed in an insulated container reached a maximum temperature of 216[degree]C. Treatability experiments were subsequently run under controlled heat at room temperature, at 80[degree]C, and at 200[degree]C (following the initial temperature increase which occurs when water is added to quicklime). Little or no loss of PCBs was observed in open or closed containers at ambient or at 800[degree]C over any period of time studied. A significant decrease of PCBs levels was observed only in the high temperature experiments (above 200[degree]C), however the fate of the PCBs in those experiments was not determined. The conditions and the results of the PCB treatment tests are presented in this report, as well as recommendations for further studies.

Mauro, D.; Taylor, B.B. (Meta Environmental, Inc., Watertown, MA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sustainable Transportation: Accelerating Widespread Adoption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing & Integration Facility (VTIF). Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 26770-C. Electric vehicles at a VTIF charging station connected to a solar microgrid. Photo by Dennis...

330

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

331

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

332

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

333

Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.

Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Characterization of a soil contaminated by oilfield brine  

SciTech Connect

Brine contamination of soil is a common environmental problem associated with the onshore production of oil and gas. A site of extensive contamination in Oklahoma has been characterized using conductimetry, direct potentiometry (pH- and chloride-selective electrodes), and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}) to determine the extent of the contamination and the efficacy of various remediation technologies.

Al-Mutairi, K.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TREATMENT OF ORGANIC-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT...-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS Research Director J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic contaminants...

Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

337

T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trucking of the contaminated sediments to another location. Relevant works Hinton, T. G., D. I. Kaplan, A. S. Knox and R. Sharitz. 2005. Phytoremediation potential of native...

338

Impacts of Ethanol in Gasoline on Subsurface Contamination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing use of ethanol as a gasoline additive has raised concerns over the potential impacts ethanol might have on groundwater contamination. In North America, (more)

Freitas, Juliana Gardenalli de

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hedgehog(tm) Water Contaminant Removal System - Energy Innovation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recirculating treatment system reduces the levels of contaminants in water storage tanks. A recirculation pump continually sends water though a treatment in order to reduce...

340

Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing. 2 figures.

Donaldson, T.L.; Wilson, J.H.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largely in the Ukraine and Switzerland, this work has concentrated on the role of resuspension in the contamination of agricultural plants. Whereas other researchers have shown...

342

Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems  

SciTech Connect

An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

Underwood, Richard Paul (Allentown, PA); Makitka, III, Alexander (Hatfield, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microscopic Reactive Diffusion of Uranium in the Contaminated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States. Abstract: Microscopic and spectroscopic analysis of uranium-contaminated sediment cores beneath the BX waste tank farm at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford...

345

Water contamination and colloidal stability of motor oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water contamination of motor oils during storage and use in low- ... of additives worsens the performance properties of the motor oils.

S. V. Korneev; V. M. Dudkin; A. V. Kolunin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

C l x C l x contaminant concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxins 41 legacy Pesticides (dieldrin, ddt, and chlordane) 47 summary Points 49 references 51 contaminants in sport fish, such as dioxins and organochlorine pesticides, the advice is driven

347

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Submitted to Risk Management of Contaminated Sediments -International Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Venice International University, Island of San Servolo, Venice, Italy Contaminated Sediments) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been investigating

Brookhaven National Laboratory

349

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

350

Quantifying environmental risk of groundwater contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Doctor of Philosophy%%%Water quality guidelines (WQGs) present concentrations of contaminants that are designed to be protective of aquatic ecosystems. In Australia, guidance for assessment of (more)

Hunt, James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

352

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

353

Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4  

SciTech Connect

The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Variational Ising Classifier (VIC) algorithm for coherently contaminated data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Variational Ising Classifier (VIC) algorithm for coherently contaminated data Oliver Williams) in test images which have not explicitly been encountered in training data. The Variational Ising-dimension, for image contours [5], the Variational Ising Classi- fier (VIC) models contamination explicitly as switches

Martin, Ralph R.

355

Capture zone design for a contaminated shallow unconfined aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the early 1950's to 1987. The extent of the ground water contamination has impacted City of Austin properties, private residential areas, and is migrating towards the Colorado River to the South. A capture zone is proposed to stop the contaminants...

Cann, Eric Roy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dispersion of nuclear contamination through a granitic medium having densely spaced fracturesThe Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Anna M that takes the relevant time scales of the ow and the nuclear decay. 1 Introduction We formulate a model

Douglas Jr., Jim

358

Electron Microbeam Investigation of Uranium-Contaminated Soils from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Electron Microbeam Investigation of Uranium-Contaminated Soils from Oak Ridge, TN, USA J O Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, Department of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 East 10th Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 Two samples of uranium-contaminated soil from the Department of Energy

Zhu, Chen

359

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

360

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ORISE: Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose coefficients for 38 radionuclides based on NCRP Wound Model and ICRP biokinetic models This report is intended to assist health physics and medical staff in more rapidly assessing the potential dosimetric consequences of a contaminated wound. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the International Commission on Radiological Protection element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Examples are also provided on using the dose coefficients to generate derived reference

362

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for detecting organic contaminants in water supplies. A sampling unit is employed which includes a housing having at least one opening therein and a tubular member positioned within the housing having a central passageway surrounded by a side wall. The side wall is made of a composition designed to absorb the contaminants. In use, the sampling unit is immersed in a water supply. The water supply contacts the tubular member through the opening in the housing, with any contaminants being absorbed into the side wall of the tubular member. A carrier gas is then passed through the central passageway of the tubular member. The contaminants will diffuse out of the side wall and into the central passageway where they will subsequently combine with the carrier gas, thereby yielding a gaseous product. The gaseous product is then analyzed to determine the amount and type of contaminants therein.

Dooley, Kirk J. (Shelley, ID); Barrie, Scott L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Buttner, William J. (White Bear Lake, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

365

Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Patroon Creek Contamination Migration Investigation  

SciTech Connect

Shaw performed a Site Investigation (SI) for sediment within the Unnamed Tributary of the Patroon Creek, a section of the Patroon Creek, and the Three Mile Reservoir as part of the overall contract with the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to remediate the Colonie Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Site. The Unnamed Tributary formerly flowed through the former Patroon Lake, which was located on the main site property and was used as a landfill for radiological and chemical wastes. The objective of the investigation was to determine the absence/presence of radioactive contamination within the three Areas of Concern (AOC). In order to accomplish this objective, Shaw assembled a team to produce a Technical Memorandum that provided an in-depth understanding of the environmental conditions related to the Patroon Creek. Upon completion and analysis of the Technical Memorandum, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was constructed and a Technical Planning Program (TPP) was held to develop a Sediment Investigation Work Plan and Sediment Investigation Sampling and Analysis Plan. A total of 32 sample locations were analyzed using on-site direct gamma scans with a Pancake Geiger-Mueller (PGM) instrument for screening purposes and samples were analyzed at on-site and off-site laboratories. The highest interval from each core scan was selected for on-site analysis utilizing a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Eight of these samples were sent off-site for gamma/alpha spectroscopy confirmation. The data collected during the SI indicated that the U-238 cleanup criterion was exceeded in sediment samples collected from two locations within the Unnamed Tributary but not in downstream sections of Patroon Creek or Three Mile Reservoir. Future actions for impacted sediment in the Unnamed Tributary will be further evaluated. Concentrations of U-238 and Th-232 in all other off-site sediment samples collected from the Unnamed Tributary, Patroon Creek, and the Three Mile Reservoir indicate that no further action is required in these areas. The data was also compared to ecological screening criteria. None of the contaminants of concern (U-238, Th-232, and U-235) had concentrations exceeding the screening values. The evaluation indicates no adverse impacts to ecological receptors. (authors)

Dufek, K.; Zafran, A. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Colonie FUSRAP Site, 1130 Central Avenue, Colonie, New York 12205 (United States); Moore, J.T. [United States Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1811, New York, NY 10278-0090 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A combined droplet train and ambient pressure photoemission spectrometer for the investigation of liquid/vapor interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined droplet train and ambient pressure photoemissionspectroscopy/droplet train apparatus for investigating thethis instrument a liquid droplet train with typical droplet

Starr, David E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ambient-atmosphere glow discharge for determination of elemental concentration in solutions in a high-throughput or transient fashion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient atmosphere glow discharge spectrometer is disclosed having a capillary, two electrodes and a means for recording the atomic emissions.

Webb, Michael R. (Somerville, MA); Hieftje, Gary M. (Bloomington, IN); Andrade, Francisco (Leeds, GB)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Process for treating waste water having low concentrations of metallic contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating waste water having a low level of metallic contaminants by reducing the toxicity level of metallic contaminants to an acceptable level and subsequently discharging the treated waste water into the environment without removing the treated contaminants.

Looney, Brian B; Millings, Margaret R; Nichols, Ralph L; Payne, William L

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Comparison and Verification of Bacterial Water Quality Indicator Measurement Methods Using Ambient Coastal Water Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 30 laboratories routinely monitor water along southern California's beaches for bacterial indicators of fecal contamination. Data from these efforts frequently are combined and compared even though t...

John F. Griffith; Larissa A. Aumand

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Urban Air Quality Management: Detecting and Improving Indoor Ambient Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current air pollution management and air quality control are primarily focused on outdoor and ... which act as public spaces, contaminated indoor air could be public health hazards. In Singapore ... spend a subst...

T. L. Tan; Gissella B. Lebron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

374

Effect of Coal Gas Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Gas Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operation. Effect of Coal Gas Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operation. Abstract: The operation of solid oxide fuel cells...

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha contaminated wastes Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and solid radioactively contaminated wastes in unlined... that uses electrical power to heat and melt contaminated soil, fusing the ... Source: Pint, Bruce A. - Materials...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - adriatic seafood contamination Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

adriatic seafood contamination Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adriatic seafood contamination Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U.S....

377

An electron microscopy study of wear in polysilicon microelectromechanical systems in ambient air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Silicon; MEMS; Wear; Electron microscopy 1An electron microscopy study of wear in polysilicon microelectromechanical systems in ambient air D.H. Alsem a,b,c,, E.A. Stach d , M.T. Dugger e , M. Enachescu b , R.O. Ritchie a,b a Department of Materials

Ritchie, Robert

378

Ambient ion distributions in Saturns magnetosphere near Titan during a non-Voyager type interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V and 2.9 keV. Both species had a thermal speed of 200 km/s. The flow speed of the am- bient plasma with Titan?s atmosphere and ionosphere rather than a strong intrinsic magnetic field. This observed plasmaAmbient ion distributions in Saturn?s magnetosphere near Titan during a non-Voyager type

California at Berkeley, University of

379

Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded...

Irshad, Hammad

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Silicatitania aerogel monoliths with large pore volume and surface area by ambient pressure drying  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient pressure drying has been carried out for the synthesis of silicatitania aerogel monoliths. The prepared aerogels show densities in the range 0.340.38g/cm3. The surface area and pore volume of these mix...

P. R. Aravind; P. Shajesh; P. Mukundan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OASiS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Ambient-Aware Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OASiS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Ambient-Aware Sensor Networks Xenofon Koutsoukos, Manish of a service-oriented architecture for wireless sensor networks. 1 Introduction Wireless sensor networks (WSNs by multiple clients exercising different functionalities. A service-oriented architecture (SOA) offers

Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

382

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A systematic approach to occupancy modeling in ambient sensor-rich buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With ever-rising energy demand and diminishing sources of inexpensive energy resources, energy conservation has become an increasingly important topic. Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are considered to be a prime target ... Keywords: Building energy conservation, ambient sensing, building energy simulation, intelligent buildings, occupancy modeling

Zheng Yang, Nan Li, Burcin Becerik-Gerber, Michael Orosz

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Nonvisual effects of led coloured ambient lighting on well-being and cardiac reactivity: preliminary findings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined the immediate nonvisual effects of ambient lighting colours and illuminance on momentary wellbeing and physiology during daytime. As reported in recent literature, the effects of lighting extend beyond comfort and safety issues. Illuminance ... Keywords: LED, cardiac reactivity, colour lighting, illuminance, nonvisual effects, well-being

Michel Varkevisser; Roy J. E. M. Raymann; David V. Keyson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Biomass, Flavonol Levels and Sensory Characteristics of Allium cultivars Grown Hydroponically at Ambient and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

04ICES-136 Biomass, Flavonol Levels and Sensory Characteristics of Allium cultivars Grown growth chambers to evaluate the effect of elevated CO2 (1200 ppm) versus ambient CO2 (400 ppm) on biomass planting (dap). Regardless of cultivar or dap, plants grown at elevated CO2 had greater biomass

Paré, Paul W.

386

Synthesis of Graphene Films by Rapid Heating and Quenching at Ambient Pressures and Their Electrochemical Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ion battery 1. INTRODUCTION Atomically thin two-dimensional honeycomb lattice structure of graphene and itsSynthesis of Graphene Films by Rapid Heating and Quenching at Ambient Pressures, Michigan 48109, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We study the process of graphene growth

Zhong, Zhaohui

387

Confidence Intervals Estimation in the Identification of Electromechanical Modes from Ambient Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from ambient data resulting from random load switching throughout the day in power systems effectiveness in reducing the number of trials, which would be beneficial for on-line power system monitoring-- Power system oscillations, modal analysis, power system monitoring, system identification, prediction

Cañizares, Claudio A.

388

Speech analysis for Ambient Assisted Living : technical and user design of a vocal order system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= "Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), Home Automation, Audio Analysis, Vocal Order, Safety and Comfort", } hal: Principles and Design, Fei Hu (Ed.) (2013) 607-638" #12;the access to the whole home automation system, communication with the outside world, home automation system interrupting a person's activity. The experiment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Ambient variation-tolerant and inter components aware thermal management for mobile system on chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the package including cover, display and battery are measuredAmbient variation-tolerant and inter components aware thermal management for mobile system on chips:josephz@qti.qualcomm.com Abstract-- In this work we measure and study two key aspects of the thermal behavior of smartphones: 1

Simunic, Tajana

390

Ambient pH signaling influences phosphate transport in Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is related to PalF of Aspergillus nidulans, which is one component of an ambient pH signaling pathway that is conserved among fungi. A deletion mutant for the PacC homolog, another component of the same pathway, phenocopies par-1, demonstrating that a defect...

Kennedy, Patrick Wade

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting (WSN-HEAP) Survey and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting (WSN-HEAP) ­ Survey and Challenges networks (WSNs) research has pre- dominantly assumed the use of a portable and limited energy source, viz. batteries, to power sensors. Without energy, a sensor is essentially useless and cannot contribute

Shihada, Basem

392

High-Efficiency Dry Reforming of Biomethane Directly Using Pulsed Electric Discharge at Ambient Condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Efficiency Dry Reforming of Biomethane Directly Using Pulsed Electric Discharge at Ambient Condition ... Biomethane is produced by the fermentation of biomass-derived organic waste, such as waste from stock breeding. ... From the viewpoint of better energy use, biomethane, which is a kind of biomass, is an efficient energy source. ...

Yasushi Sekine; Junya Yamadera; Shigeru Kado; Masahiko Matsukata; Eiichi Kikuchi

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ambient-Processed Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Individual Pre-Encapsulation of Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient-Processed Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Individual PreVersity of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4, Canada, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, UniVersity of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4, Canada Received February 24

394

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

SciTech Connect

Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

Fleischhauer, H.L.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Can ambient persuasive technology persuade unconsciously?: using subliminal feedback to influence energy consumption ratings of household appliances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we explore a fundamental characteristic of Ambient Persuasive Technology: Can it persuade the user without receiving the user's conscious attention? In a task consisting of 90 trials, participants had to indicate which of three household ... Keywords: ambient persuasive technology, energy conservation behavior, human-technology interaction, persuasion, social feedback, subliminal feedback

Jaap Ham; Cees Midden; Femke Beute

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Title Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6097E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wang, Yungang, Jiaoyan Huang, Philip K. Hopke, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, Mark J. Utell, and Thomas M. Holsen Journal Chemosphere Volume 92 Issue 4 Pagination 360-367 Date Published 07/2013 Abstract In the spring of 2008, a 260MWe coal-fired power plant (CFPP) located in Rochester, New York was closed over a 4 month period. Using a 2-years data record, the impacts of the shutdown of the CFPP on nearby ambient concentrations of three Hg species were quantified. The arithmetic average ambient concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate mercury (PBM) during December 2007-November 2009 were 1.6ng/m3, 5.1pg/m3, and 8.9pg/m3, respectively. The median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM significantly decreased by 12%, 73%, and 50% after the CFPP closed (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v4.1) identified six factors including O3-rich, traffic, gas phase oxidation, wood combustion, nucleation, and CFPP. When the CFPP was closed, median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM apportioned to the CFPP factor significantly decreased by 25%, 74%, and 67%, respectively, compared to those measured when the CFPP was still in operation (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis showed the greatest reduction in all three Hg species was associated with northwesterly winds pointing toward the CFPP. These changes were clearly attributable to the closure of the CFPP.

398

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

399

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical Equipment Removal Project located north of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes drain and dispose of PCB contaminated oil from two bushings, and decontaminate one· bushing and rack, break apart PCB contaminated concrete and excavate PCB contaminated soil at Pinnacle Peak Substation. Western will be use existing access roads and vehicles such as cranes, backhoes, dozers, bucket trucks, crew trucks and pickup trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. This work is necessary to maintain the safety and reliability of the bulk electrical system. The project is located in Maricopa County, Arizona. The attached map shows the

400

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

402

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

403

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

404

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S, and Flegal AR 2008. Mercury in the San Francisco Estuary.may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in Sancontaminants such as ele- mental mercury and cyanide used in

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Detection of contaminants using a MEMS FAIMS sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting the presence of contaminants in water is a critical mission, but thorough testing often requires extensive time at a remote facility. A MEMS implementation of a FAIMS (High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility ...

Carr, Kristin (Kristin Malia)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A Stakeholders Perspective on Contaminated Land Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NICOLE, the Network for the management of Industrially Contaminated Land in Europe is a leading forum on this matter in Europe, promoting co-operation between industry, academia and service providers. NICOLEs...

Lida Schelwald- Van der Kley; Johan de Fraye

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Chemical and radiochemical characterization of depleted uranium in contaminated soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results of chemical and radiochemical characterization and fractionation of depleted uranium in soils contaminated during the Balkan conflict ... the paper. Alpha-spectrometric analysis of used depleted

M. B. Radenkovi?; A. B. Kandi?; I. S. Vukana?

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Geotechnical properties of oil-contaminated Kuwaiti sand  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of oil-contaminated sands resulted from exploded oil wells, burning oil fires, the destruction of oil storage tanks, and the formation of oil lakes in Kuwait at the end of the Gulf War. An extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to determine the geotechnical characteristics of this material. Testing included basic properties, compaction and permeability tests, and triaxial and consolidation tests on clean and contaminated sand at the same relative density. Contaminated specimens were prepared by mixing the sand with oil in the amount of 6% by weight or less to match field conditions. The influence of the type of oil, and relative density was also investigated by direct shear tests. The results indicated a small reduction in strength and permeability and an increase in compressibility due to contamination. The preferred method of disposal of this material is to use it as a stabilizing material for other projects such as road construction.

Al-Sanad, H.A.; Eid, W.K.; Ismael, N.F. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

USE OF APATITE FOR CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater at many Federal and civilian industrial sites is often contaminated with toxic metals at levels that present a potential concern to regulatory agencies. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has some unique problems associated with radionuclides (primarily uranium), but metal contaminants most likely drive risk-based cleanup decisions, from the perspective of human health, in groundwater at DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Sites include lead (Pb), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), selenium (Se), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Thus, the regulatory ''drivers'' for toxic metals in contaminated soils/groundwaters are very comparable for Federal and civilian industrial sites, and most sites have more than one metal above regulatory action limits. Thus improving the performance of remedial technologies for metal-contaminated groundwater will have ''dual use'' (Federal and civilian) benefit.

Dr. William D. Bostick

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Particle Contamination on a Thermal Flying-Height Control Slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle contamination on a slider in a hard disk drive (HDD) affects the HDDs reliability. With the introduction of the thermal flying-height control (TFC) slider, the temperature in the headdisk interface (HD...

Nan Liu; David B. Bogy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies.

Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...orientation of the ancient Greeks that the gods will inevitably punish those who transgress...conservation and contamination: invisible particles as a plausible mechanism. Dev. Psychol...preschool child's conception of invisible particles in the context of dissolving. Dev. Psychol...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Simple Method for Killing Halophilic Bacteria in Contaminated Solar Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...growth and also to sterilize solar salt. Two samples of solar salt, contaminated with red...it had a much lower buffering capacity than the used salt, presumably...economical method of freeing solar salt from halophilic bacteria...

D. J. Kushner; G. Masson; N. E. Gibbons

1965-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Scale-dependent desorption of uranium from contaminated subsurface...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to investigate the scale-dependent desorption of uranyl U(VI) from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford...

416

Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

73 Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records of Atmospherically Deposited Contaminants 8.1. Catchment the Water Column...............................................79 8.3 Water Column to Bottom Sediment Transfer......................................80 #12;Chapter 8: Modelling Sediment Records... 74 8

Short, Daniel

417

Depleted uranium internal contamination: Carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis in vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research 1 May 2005...Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res, Volume 46, 2005 Depleted uranium internal contamination...Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res, Volume 46, 2005] 2080 Depleted uranium is a heavy metal...

Alexandra C. Miller; Mike Stewart; Rafael Rivas; Robert Merlot; and Paul Lison

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Depleted uranium mobility and fractionation in contaminated soil (Southern Serbia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the Balkan conflict in 1999, soil in contaminated areas was enriched in depleted uranium (DU) isotopic signature, relative to the in-situ natural uranium present. After the military activities, most...

Mirjana B. Radenkovi?; Svjetlana A. Cupa?

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Rapid and Robust Detection Methods for Poison and Microbial Contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time on-site monitoring of analytes is currently in high demand for food contamination, water, medicines, and ingestible household products that were never tested appropriately. Here we introduce chemical methods for ...

Lu, Peter J.

420

An integrated treatment methodology for PCB-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposed coupling two different treatment technologies, chemical dehalogenation using potassium polyethylene glycol (KPEG) and bioremediation, to optimize the destruction and detoxification of PCB-contaminated soil. Changes in toxicity...

Garcia, Shannon S

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Dose assessment for radioactive contamination of a child  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dose assessments produced using the computer code MCNP are important to simulate events that are difficult to recreate experimentally. An emergency scenario involving whole-body skin contamination is one example of such an event. For these scenarios...

Kowalczik, Jeffrey Aaron

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Innovative Remediation Technology for Contaminated Military Sites: A Canadian Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel and innovative technology has been developed in Canada to clean-up soil contaminated with a wide range of organic pollutants, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated phenols, phthala...

Igor J. Marvan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Salmonella contamination during production of domestic and imported canaloupe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, 8 cantaloupe farms and packing sheds from the United States (U.S.) and Mexico were sampled to evaluate cantaloupe contamination with Salmonella and Escherichia coli during production and processing. Samples collected from external...

Uribe, Imelda Mercado

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Alternatives Generation Analysis Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System Storage  

SciTech Connect

The long length contaminated equipment was designed and built to aid in the remote removal and transport of highly radioactive, contaminated equipment from various locations in the tank farms to disposal. The equipment has been stored in an open lay-down yard area, exposed to the elements for the past year and a half. The possible alternatives available to provide shelter for the equipment are investigated.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

Treatment options for tank farms long-length contaminated equipment  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated a variety of treatment and disposal technologies for mixed waste (MW) meeting the following criteria: 1. Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank System (tank farms) equipment and other debris; 2. length greater than 12 feet; and contaminated with listed MW from the tank farms. This waste stream, commonly referred to as tank farms long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE), poses a unique and costly set of challenges during all phases of the waste management lifecycle.

Josephson, W.S.

1995-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

427

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Bioremediation of Hydrophobic Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some investigators have reported increased rates of PAH biodegradation in the presence of surfactant micelles because of enhanced contaminant solubilization (9?11), but others have reported inhibitory effects of surfactants on biodegradation (12?14). ... Alternatively, in pump-and-treat or soil washing type remediation processes, PMUA particles could be applied (in a manner similar to the use of surfactant micelles) to enhance the rate of removal of hydrophobic contaminants. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Claude Cohen; Leonard W. Lion

2004-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES  

SciTech Connect

Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Uraniferous Phosphates: Resource, Security Risk, or Contaminant  

SciTech Connect

The escalation of the price of uranium (U) yellow cake (summer high = $130/0.454 kg (lb) has called into question the continuing availability of sufficient stockpiles and ores to process. As was developed during the years following World War II, the establishment and maintenance of a strategic inventory is a reasonable consideration for today. Therefore, it becomes critical to look at potential secondary resources beyond the classical ore suites now being utilized. The most economically viable future secondary source seems to be the byproducts of the beneficiation of phosphoric acids derived from phosphate ores. Phosphorous (P) is an essential nutrient for plants; its deficiency can result in highly restrictive limitations in crop productivity. Acidic soils in tropical and subtropical regions of the world are often P deficient with high P-sorption (fixation) capacities. To correct this deficiency, efficient water-soluble P fertilizers are required. The use of raw phosphate rocks not only adds phosphate but also its contained contaminants, including uranium to the treated land. Another immediate difficulty is phosphogypsum, the standard byproduct of simple extraction. It, for practical purposes, has been selectively classified as TENORM by regulators. The imposition of these standards presents major current and future disposal and re-utilization problems. Therefore, establishing an economically viable system that allows for uranium byproduct extraction from phosphoric acids is desirable. Such a system would be dependent on yellow cake base price stability, reserve estimates, political conditions, nation-state commitment, and dependence on nuclear energy. The accumulation of yellow cake from the additional extraction process provides a valuable commodity and allows the end acid to be a more environmentally acceptable product. The phosphogypsum already accumulated, as well as that which is in process, will not make a viable component for a radiation disposal devise (RDD). Concern for weapon proliferation by rogue nation states from the byproduct production of yellowcake is an unlikely scenario. To extract the fissile U-235 (0.07%) isotope from the yellowcake (99.3%) requires the erection of a costly major gaseous diffusion or a cascading centrifuge facility. Such a facility would be extremely difficult to mask. Therefore, from a diminished security risk and positive economic and environmental viewpoints, the utilization of a phosphoric acid beneficiation process extracting uranium is desirable. (authors)

LeMone, D.V.; Goodell, Ph.C. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, Texas (United States); Gibbs, S.G. [U. T. Houston School of Public Health, El Paso, Texas (United States); Winston, J.W. [Medical Physicist, Radiological Physics, Inc., El Paso, Texas (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Subsurface and Plant Contamination During Natural Attenuation and Phytoremediation of Silt Loam Contaminated with Chlorinated Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Root establishment of perennial ryegrass (L. Perenne) in diesel contaminated subsurface soil layers. Environ. Pollut. 145...15226510903353120 USEPA. 1996a. Clean up the nations waste sites: Markets and technology trends. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency...

Changhwan Cho; Soyoung Park; Kijune Sung

433

Environmental Response Team Standard Operating Procedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilution of Contaminants ·· Small Closed Body of WaterSmall Closed Body of Water ·· Pond or Flooded QuarryPond or FloodedEnvironmental Response Team Standard Operating Procedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations for Contaminated Water Diving OperationsProcedures for Contaminated Water Diving Operations AAUS March 2010 Meeting

Sura, Philip

434

Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of contamination during subsequent sediment resuspension events, suggesting that deposition­resuspension cycles

435

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

Contaminants in Used Lubricating Oils and Their Fate during Distillation/Hydrotreatment Re-Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contaminants in Used Lubricating Oils and Their Fate during Distillation/Hydrotreatment Re-Refining ...

Dennis W. Brinkman; John R. Dickson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

438

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM  

SciTech Connect

The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

LLOYD, E.R.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Uranium contamination of the Aral Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Located in an endorrheic basin, the Aral Sea is mainly fed by water from two large rivers, the Syrdarya and the Amudarya. As a result, contaminants in dissolved and suspended form discharged by the rivers are accumulating in the lake. The northern Small Aral water contained 37g l?1uranium and water in the western basin of the Large Aral up to 141g l?1uranium in 2002, 2004 and 2006. The present day uranium concentrations in Aral Sea water mainly originate from the Syrdarya River due to uranium mining and tailings in the river watershed, and have been elevated up to 5 times compared to the pre-desiccation times by the ongoing desiccation in the western basin of the Large Aral. Current data indicate that groundwater does not seem to contribute much to the uranium budget. The uranium concentration in the lake is controlled by internal lake processes. Due to the high ionic strength of the Aral Sea water uranium is kept soluble. 238U/Cl?mass ratios range from 5.88 to 6.15g g?1in the Small Aral and from 3.00 to 3.32g g?1in the Large Aral. Based on the238U/Cl?mass ratios, a removal rate of 8% uranium from the water column inventory to the sediments has been estimated for anoxic waters, and it ranges between 2% and 5% in oxic waters, over periods of time without mixing. Most of the uranium removal seems to occur by co-precipitation with calcite and gypsum both in anoxic and oxic waters. According to simulations with PHREEQC, uraninite precipitation contributes little to the removal from anoxic Aral Sea water. In most of the sampled locations, water column removal of uranium matches the sediment inventory. Based on budget calculations, the future development of uranium load in the Aral Sea has been estimated for different scenarios. If the Syrdarya River discharge is below or in balance with the loss by evaporation, the uranium concentration in the Small Aral will increase from 37 g l1to 55g l?1in 20years time. When the river discharge is larger than loss by evaporation, present-day uranium concentration in the lake may be kept at the current level or even decrease slightly. From the ecotoxicological point of view, an increase in Syrdarya River discharge as the major water source will be crucial for the water quality of the Small Aral, despite its high uranium load. However, as it is intended to restore fishery in the Small Aral, accumulation of uranium in fish has to be monitored. Since the western basin of the Large Aral received no Syrdarya River water since 2005, and may become disconnected from the eastern basin, the slightly higher observed uranium removal from anoxic waters may result in a decrease in uranium concentrations in the western basin by 20% in 20years time.

Jana Friedrich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that <0.5 ppm sulfur can be achieved. Removal of HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Influences of ambient air speed and internal heat load on the performance of solar chimney in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar chimney is a combination of solar assisted stack and wind driven ventilation where air in the solar chimney expands under heating from solar irradiance and being relatively lighter, rises out from the chimney outlets, drawing the cooler air into the building through the fenestrations. This pull effect is complemented further by the push effect from the outdoor ambient wind. The study of solar chimney system within the zero energy building in tropical Singapore aims to determine the effects of ambient air speed and internal heat load on the thermal environment of the solar chimney ducts and classrooms interior. Experimental and computational results show that high ambient air speed greater than 2.00m/s improves the air speed within the solar chimney ducts; both low and high ambient air speeds are found to improve the classrooms interior air speed. However, the significance of ambient air speed drops when solar irradiance is greater than 700W/m2. Furthermore, under the tropical weather conditions of high solar irradiance and low ambient air speed, cross ventilation performs better compared to solar chimney; hence, solar chimney is recommended to be employed under zero ambient air speed. Lastly, results show that the influences of internal heat load on the air temperature and speed within solar chimney ducts as well as classrooms interior are limited.

Alex Yong Kwang Tan; Nyuk Hien Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Argonne CNM News: Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Silver nanowires SEM image of randomly assembled silver nanowires and low-resolution TEM image (inset) of a cross-sectional sample of an individual nanowire. Scale bar represents 500 nm SIlver nanowire with fivefold symmetry Schematic drawing of a silver nanowire with fivefold symmetry. Cross-section of individual silver nanowire High-resolution TEM image of a cross-sectional sample of an individual silver nanowire. Scale bar represents 5 nm. A stable non-face-centered-cubic phase in noble metal nanoparticles has been reported for this first time by researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (Nanophotonics & NanoBio Interfaces Groups) working with colleagues at the Advanced Photon Source and Electron Microscopy

445

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Morton Lippmann Date: May 17, 1997 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Most scientific studies that are relevant to the setting of the NAAQS were not designed or performed with that specific application in mind, resulting in bits and pieces of the overall puzzle. Despite these limitations, the particulate matter (PM) and O3 literature reviews and analyses in the recently issued EPA Criteria documents and staff papers are the best prepared and most comprehensive ever available to an EPA Administrator as a basis for NAAQS decisions. This seminar will discuss the scientific basis

446

Measurement of concrete E-modulus evolution since casting: A novel method based on ambient vibration  

SciTech Connect

The use of ambient vibration tests to characterize the evolution of E-modulus of concrete right after casting is investigated in this paper. A new methodology is proposed, which starts by casting a concrete cylindrical beam inside a hollow acrylic formwork. This beam is then placed horizontally, simply supported at both extremities, and vertical accelerations resulting from ambient vibration are measured at mid-span. Processing these mid-span acceleration time series using power spectral density functions allows a continuous identification of the first flexural frequency of vibration of the composite beam, which in turn is correlated with the evolutive E-modulus of concrete since casting. Together with experiments conducted with the proposed methodology, a complementary validation campaign for concrete E-modulus determination was undertaken by static loading tests performed on the composite beam, as well as by standard compressive tests of concrete cylinders of the same batch loaded at different ages.

Azenha, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.azenha@civil.uminho.p [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); ISISE - Institute for Sustainability and Innovation in Structural Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Escola de Engenharia, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Magalhaes, Filipe [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Rui [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Cunha, Alvaro [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Western Airborne Contaminant Assessment Project (WACAP): An Interdisciplinary Evaluation of the Impacts of Airborne Contaminants in Western U.S. National Parks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Western Airborne Contaminant Assessment Project (WACAP): An Interdisciplinary Evaluation of the Impacts of Airborne Contaminants in Western U.S. National Parks ... U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado ...

Dixon H. Landers; Staci Massey Simonich; Daniel Jaffe; Linda Geiser; Donald H. Campbell; Adam Schwindt; Carl Schreck; Michael Kent; Will Hafner; Howard E. Taylor; Kimberly Hageman; Sascha Usenko; Luke Ackerman; Jill Schrlau; Neil Rose; Tamara Blett; Marilyn Morrison Erway

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Title Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Rosseler, Olivier, Mohamad Sleiman, Nahuel V. Montesinos, Andrey Shavorskiy, Valerie Keller, Nicolas Keller, Marta I. Litter, Hendrik Bluhm, Miquel Salmeron, and Hugo Destaillats Journal J. Phys. Chem. Lett. Volume 4 Start Page 536 Issue 3 Pagination 536-541 Date Published 01/2013 Abstract Self-cleaning surfaces containing TiO2 nanoparticles have been postulated to efficiently remove NOx from the atmosphere. However, UV irradiation of NOx adsorbed on TiO2 also was shown to form harmful gas-phase byproducts such as HONO and N2O that may limit their depolluting potential. Ambient pressure XPS was used to study surface and gas-phase species formed during adsorption of NO2 on TiO2 and subsequent UV irradiation at λ = 365 nm. It is shown here that NO3-, adsorbed on TiO2 as a byproduct of NO2 disproportionation, was quantitatively converted to surface NO2 and other reduced nitrogenated species under UV irradiation in the absence of moisture. When water vapor was present, a faster NO3- conversion occurred, leading to a net loss of surface-bound nitrogenated species. Strongly adsorbed NO3- in the vicinity of coadsorbed K+ cations was stable under UV light, leading to an efficient capture of nitrogenated compounds.

449

Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is in line with previous findings of high ambient PM2.5 exposure from biofuel burning(47, 48) and in addition to PM2.5 exposure from household air pollution. ... Cao, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q.; Chen, B.; Kan, H.Fine particulate matter constituents and cardiopulmonary mortality in a heavily polluted Chinese city Environ. ... Lahore, Pakistan is an emerging megacity that is heavily polluted with high levels of particle air pollution. ...

Sajeev Philip; Randall V. Martin; Aaron van Donkelaar; Jason Wai-Ho Lo; Yuxuan Wang; Dan Chen; Lin Zhang; Prasad S. Kasibhatla; Siwen Wang; Qiang Zhang; Zifeng Lu; David G. Streets; Shabtai Bittman; Douglas J. Macdonald

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Use of passive sampling devices to determine soil contaminant concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The effective remediation of contaminated sites requires accurate identification of chemical distributions. A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDs) can provide a thorough site assessment. We have been pursuing their application in terrestrial systems and have found that they increase the ease and speed of analysis, decrease solvent usage and overall cost, and minimize the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a higher sampling frequency than is generally the case using traditional methods. PSDs have been used in the field in soils of varying physical properties and have been successful in estimating soil concentrations ranging from 1 {mu}g/kg (parts per billion) to greater than 200 mg/kg (parts per million). They were also helpful in identifying hot spots within the sites. Passive sampling devices show extreme promise as an analytical tool to rapidly characterize contaminant distributions in soil. There are substantial time and cost savings in laboratory personnel and supplies. By selectively excluding common interferences that require sample cleanup, PSDs can be retrieved from the field and processed rapidly (one technician can process approximately 90 PSDs in an 8-h work day). The results of our studies indicate that PSDs can be used to accurately estimate soil contaminant concentrations and provide lower detection limits. Further, time and cost savings will allow a more thorough and detailed characterization of contaminant distributions. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, K.A. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States); [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Hooper, M.J. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States); Weisskopf, C.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

453

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

454

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

455

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

456

RESRAD Computer Code - Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deployed Deployed Widely Used and Maintained Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division - RESRAD Program RESRAD codes are used at more than 300 sites since its first release in 1989. Page 1 of 2 Argonne National Laboratory Multiple States & Sites Illinois RESRAD Computer Code - Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites Challenge The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989. The RESRAD code has been updated since then to improve the models within the codes, to operate on new computer platforms, to use new state of science radiation dose and risk factors, and to calculate cleanup criteria ("Authorized Limits") for radioactively contaminated sites. A series of similar codes have been developed to address radiation dose, risk, and cleanup criteria

457

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

Evaluation of Recent Trailer Contamination and Supersack Integrity Issues  

SciTech Connect

During the period from fiscal year (FY) 2009 to FY 2011, there were a total of 21 incidents involving radioactively contaminated shipment trailers and 9 contaminated waste packages received at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). During this time period, the EnergySolutions (ES) Clive, Utah, disposal facility had a total of 18 similar incidents involving trailer and package contamination issues. As a result of the increased occurrence of such incidents, DOE Environmental Management Headquarters (EM/HQ) Waste Management organization (EM-30) requested that the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) conduct a detailed review of these incidents and report back to EM-30 regarding the results of this review, including providing any recommendations formulated as a result of the evaluation of current site practices involving handling and management of radioactive material and waste shipments.

Gordon, S.

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

459

Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to fuel Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to fuel shortages, water pollution By Louise Lerner * August 11, 2009 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - The lonely, weed-choked roadsides along America's highways may turn out to be an unexpected solution to two of the biggest issues facing the U.S. today-potential fuel shortages and water pollution. In a new study, environmental scientists Cristina Negri and Gayathri Gopalakrishnan of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory considered a new idea: using contaminated and unused land to grow crops for biofuel. Negri and Gopalakrishnan knew that hardy, inedible plants like switchgrass or poplar trees grow quickly and need far less attention than conventional biofuel crops like corn-and it turns out they may also purify water and

462

Categorical Exclusion 4596: High Contamination Area (HCA) Cleanup Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detennination Form Detennination Form PropQsed Action Tit!~: High Contamination Area (HCA) C!e;;Jnup Project (4596) Pro~ram or Field Offif.s: Y-12 Site OffiCe Locmion(s) (City/CountvLState): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Prot?Oscd Action Description: PAGE 02/04 l,:·:~:.s:~.t?)fuiW6v:: ~ 4fB~ir:::8~1 The proposed action is to disposition the materiels and equipment stored in a radiological high contamination area (HCA). This area is paved and fenced with no roof or shelter. Tile HCA was used as an accumulation area for rad contaminated materials and equipment from operations. Categorical Exclusion(s) Avoli!¢l: 81.3- ~outine maintenance For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulnti011s regaruing categorical exclusions, including the full text of each

463

Mercury contaminated sediment sitesAn evaluation of remedial options  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ? Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ? Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ? Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ? Mathematical models can be used to help us understand the chemistry and processes.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Petroleum contaminated ground-water: Remediation using activated carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground-water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products during extraction and processing operations is a serious and a growing environmental problem in Nigeria. Consequently, a study of the use of activated carbon (AC) in the clean up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination to a more acceptable level. In the experiments described, crude-oil contamination of ground water was simulated under laboratory conditions using ground-water samples collected from existing hand-dug wells at Eagle Island, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Different masses of the absorbent (i.e., activated carbon) were then added to the samples of ground water. The so treated water samples were left to equilibrate for 7 days, after which the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contents of the samples were measured. Adsorption isotherms were derived for the two forms of activated carbon used, namely granular activated-carbon (GAC) and powdered activated-carbon (PAC). Results of the TPH analyses showed that activated carbon is an excellent means for the stripping-off of the contaminant: there were decreases in contaminant concentration from an initial concentration of 9304.70mg/l to average final concentrations of 361.00 and 12.37mg/l, that is, 96% and 99.9% resulting from the same amounts of GAC and PAC applications respectively. The results of this study revealed that the powdered form of AC would be very effective in the remediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated ground water and its use is therefore recommended.

M.J. Ayotamuno; R.B. Kogbara; S.O.T. Ogaji; S.D. Probert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

M. Soto et al. 2007. Uso sustentbel do territorio no campus de Elvia. I Congreso Internacional de Educacin Ambiental dos Pases Lusfonos e Galicia, 24-27 de Setembro, Santiago de Compostela.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustentabilidade ambiental e social. O uso do espazo (o medio físico) é un dos factores que precisa dunha urxente ambiental, sustentabilidade ANTECEDENTES E OBXECT

Fraguela, Basilio B.

466

Analysis of Zinc 65 Contamination after Vacuum Thermal Process  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive contamination with a gamma energy emission consistent with {sup 65}Zn was detected in a glovebox following a vacuum thermal process. The contaminated components were removed from the glovebox and subjected to examination. Selected analytical techniques were used to determine the nature of the precursor material, i.e., oxide or metallic, the relative transferability of the deposit and its nature. The deposit was determined to be borne from natural zinc and was further determined to be deposited as a metallic material from vapor.

Korinko, Paul S.; Tosten, Michael H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Numerical simulation of contaminant flow in a wool scour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wool scouring is the process of washing dirty wool after shearing. Our model numerically simulates contaminant movement in a wool scour bowl using the advectiondispersion equation. This is the first wool scour model to give time-dependent results and to model the transport of contaminants within a single scour bowl. Our aim is to gain a better understanding of the operating parameters that will produce efficient scouring. Investigating the effects of varying the parameters reveals simple, interesting relationships that give insight into the dynamics of a scour bowl.

J.F. Caunce; S.I. Barry; G.N. Mercer; T.R. Marchant

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

469

Management of Aflatoxin Contaminated Maize in Tamaulipas, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management of Aflatoxin Contaminated Maize in Tamaulipas, Mexico ... Maize is the staple food of the Mexicans, and Tamaulipas is an important producer and suffered a strong AF contamination in this cereal for several years, 440?000 tons just in 1991, both at field and at storage places. ... The Mexican Government has spent around 2 million U.S. dollars yearly to develop the Aflatoxin in Maize Detection Program of the State of Tamaulipas, where all the maize crop of this State was analyzed, around 20?000 AF chemical analysis every year (Juan et al., 1995). ...

Magda Carvajal; Gustavo Arroyo

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

470

Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for gas purification comprising (a) obtaining a feed gas stream containing one or more contaminants selected from the group consisting of volatile metal oxy-hydroxides, volatile metal oxides, and volatile silicon hydroxide; (b) contacting the feed gas stream with a reactive solid material in a guard bed and reacting at least a portion of the contaminants with the reactive solid material to form a solid reaction product in the guard bed; and (c) withdrawing from the guard bed a purified gas stream.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Miller, Christopher Francis (Macungie, PA)

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

471

Surface contamination effects on resistance of gold nanowires  

SciTech Connect

Gold nanowires were patterned with e-beam lithography and fabricated with a gold film deposited by e-beam evaporation. The resistances of these wires were measured and found to be nonlinear with respect to surface area/volume. With x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, carbon and oxygen contaminants in the forms of C, C-O-C, and C=O were found adsorbed on the gold surface. This contamination adsorbed on the surface may lead to increased resistance of nanowires.

Lilley, Carmen M.; Huang, Qiaojian [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 W. Taylor Street (MC 251), Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

Temporally and Spatially Resolved Air Pollution in Georgia Using Fused Ambient Monitor Data and Chemical Transport Model Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Health data geo-coded with residential coordinates are being used to investigate the relationship between ambient air quality and pediatric emergency department visits in ... period 20002010. Two types of ambien...

Sheila A. Sororian; Heather A. Holmes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg & Christian Hogrefe &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change, ambient ozone, and health in 50 US cities Michelle L. Bell & Richard Goldberg Haven, CT 06511, USA e-mail: michelle.bell@yale.edu R. Goldberg Center for Climate Systems Research emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs),

474

Number of Nevi and Early-Life Ambient UV Exposure Are Associated with BRAF-Mutant Melanoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Epidemiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Departments of 5 Pathology and...regarding their risk factors. Ambient solar UV exposures were estimated using...increased number of melanocytic nevi, solar UV exposure, including high levels...

Nancy E. Thomas; Sharon N. Edmiston; Audrey Alexander; Robert C. Millikan; Pamela A. Groben; Honglin Hao; Dawn Tolbert; Marianne Berwick; Klaus Busam; Colin B. Begg; Dianne Mattingly; David W. Ollila; Chiu Kit Tse; Amanda Hummer; Julia Lee-Taylor; and Kathleen Conway

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence; David Wright, Serge Gutwirth, Michael Friedewald, Elena Vildjiounaite, Yves Punic (eds)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European term Ambient Intelligence (AmI)or equivalently ubiquitous and pervasive computing (US) or ubiquitous networking (Japan)reflects a vision of the future of ICT in which intelligence is embedded in...

Neelke Doorn

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators has been measured deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN in Italy with a total exposure 3197 kg x h. Monte Carlo simulation, time-amplitude and pulse-shape analyses of the data have been applied to estimate the radioactive contamination of the ZnWO4 samples. One of the ZnWO4 crystals has also been tested by ultra-low background gamma spectrometry. The radioactive contaminations of the ZnWO4 samples do not exceed 0.002 -- 0.8 mBq/kg (depending on the radionuclide), the total alpha activity is in the range: 0.2 - 2 mBq/kg. Particular radioactivity, beta active 65Zn and alpha active 180W, has been detected. The effect of the re-crystallization on the radiopurity of the ZnWO4 crystal has been studied. The radioactive contamination of samples of the ceramic details of the set-ups used in the crystals growth has been checked by low background gamma spectrometry. A project scheme on further improvement of the radiopurity level of the ZnWO4 crystal scintillators is briefly addressed.

P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; A. M. Dubovik; S. d'Angelo; E. N. Galashov; B. V. Grinyov; A. Incicchitti; V. V. Kobychev; M. Laubenstein; L. L. Nagornaya; F. Nozzoli; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; O. G. Polischuk; D. Prosperi; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; I. A. Tupitsyna; Ya. V. Vasiliev; Yu. Ya. Vostretsov

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

477

Radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators has been measured deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN in Italy with a total exposure 3197 kg x h. Monte Carlo simulation, time-amplitude and pulse-shape analyses of the data have been applied to estimate the radioactive contamination of the ZnWO4 samples. One of the ZnWO4 crystals has also been tested by ultra-low background gamma spectrometry. The radioactive contaminations of the ZnWO4 samples do not exceed 0.002 ?? 0.8 mBq/kg (depending on the radionuclide), the total alpha activity is in the range: 0.2 - 2 mBq/kg. Particular radioactivity, beta active 65Zn and alpha active 180W, has been detected. The effect of the re-crystallization on the radiopurity of the ZnWO4 crystal has been studied. The radioactive contamination of samples of the ceramic details of the set-ups used in the crystals growth has been checked by low background gamma spectrometry. A project scheme on further improvement of the radiopur...

Belli, P; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Dubovik, A M; d'Angelo, S; Galashov, E N; Grinyov, B V; Incicchitti, A; Kobychev, V V; Laubenstein, M; Nagornaya, L L; Nozzoli, F; Poda, D V; Podviyanuk, R B; Polischuk, O G; Prosperi, D; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Tupitsyna, I A; Vasiliev, Ya V; Vostretsov, Yu Ya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Numerical simulation of contaminant flow in a wool scour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wool scouring is the process of washing dirty wool after shearing. Our model numerically simulates contaminant movement in a wool scour bowl using the advection-dispersion equation. This is the first wool scour model to give time-dependent results and ... Keywords: Finite differences, Numerical simulation, Wool scouring

J. F. Caunce; S. I. Barry; G. N. Mercer; T. R. Marchant

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

'Hot lab' to be closed over contamination fears  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... BOWING to growing community concern over toxic contamination, and citing changing business needs, the Rocketdyne Division of the Rockwell International Corporation has decided it will shut down a nuclear laboratory ... change in federal government emphasis away from the liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, in which Rocketdyne had done specialized contract work, towards light-water reactors.

Robert Buderi

1989-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

480

Disinfection of Contaminated Water by Using Solar Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...times in the continuous solar disinfection unit for...and processed in the solar disinfection unit at...comments. Funding for this project was provided in part...Water disinfection by solar radiation. Assessment...contaminated water with solar energy. Appl. Environ. Microbiol...

Laurie F. Caslake; Daniel J. Connolly; Vilas Menon; Catriona M. Duncanson; Ricardo Rojas; Javad Tavakoli

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab Jeffrey W. Lynn,a* Ying Chen a neutron scattering measurement is a contribution to the background, especially in inelastic measurements of having N2 in the sample environment system during elastic neutron scattering measurements on a single

Lynn, Jeffrey W.

482

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Current models and assessment methods of sediment-water distribution predominantly rely

Gobas, Frank

483

Apis mellifera semen: bacterial contamination and susceptibility to antibiotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apis mellifera semen: bacterial contamination and susceptibility to antibiotics Cecilia Irene ­ The aims of this study were to identify the bacterial genera and species present in semen of Apis mellifera in sperm samples diluted in buffer with antibiotic was similar to that of pure semen. Apis mellifera

484

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differentials at the electrodes. Water is also pumped into the soil via the injection well and out of the groundChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei meters under the ground) has been proposed by McMillan-McGee Corp. The process can be described

Lapin, Sergey

485

Identification of 300 Area Contaminants of Potential Concern for Soil  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the process used to identify source area contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) in support of the 300 Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan. This report also establishes the exclusion criteria applicable for 300 Area use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the COPCs.

R.W. Ovink

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

486

Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

DOE Issues Request for Information on Hydrogen Contamination Detectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a request for information seeking feedback from interested stakeholders on existing and potential hydrogen contamination detectors and related factors such as performance characteristics, system integration requirements, costs, deployment guidance, and R&D needs.

488

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Simulation of contaminated sediment transport in White Oak Creek basin  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a systematic approach to management of the contaminated sediments in the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary contaminant of concern is radioactive cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which binds to soil and sediment particles. The key components in the approach include an intensive sampling and monitoring system for flood events; modeling of hydrological processes, sediment transport, and contaminant flux movement; and a decision framework with a detailed human health risk analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling of watershed rainfall-runoff and contaminated sediment transport during flooding periods using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- Fortran (HSPF) model. Because a large number of parameters are required in HSPF modeling, the major effort in the modeling process is the calibration of model parameters to make simulation results and measured values agree as closely as possible. An optimization model incorporating the concepts of an expert system was developed to improve calibration results and efficiency. Over a five-year simulation period, the simulated flows match the observed values well. Simulated total amount of sediment loads at various locations during storms match with the observed values within a factor of 1.5. Simulated annual releases of {sup 137}Cs off-site locations match the data within a factor of 2 for the five-year period. The comprehensive modeling approach can provide a valuable tool for decision makers to quantitatively analyze sediment erosion, deposition, and transport; exposure risk related to radionuclides in contaminated sediment; and various management strategies.

Bao, Y.; Clapp, R.B.; Brenkert, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moore, T.D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fontaine, T.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

Dust resuspension as a contaminant source and transport pathway  

SciTech Connect

Numerous environmental contaminants sorb to dust particles or exist as particles, including metals, hydrophobic organic compounds, asbestos, pollens, and microbial pathogens. Wind resuspension of dust and other particulate matter provides a dust source for the atmosphere and a contaminant transport pathway. Not only do these materials pose a risk to human health, but also, resuspended dust particles are believed to play a role in global climate change and chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The conditions under which contaminated sites are vulnerable to wind resuspension are not generally known, as the basic physics of the problem are poorly understood. Field data show tremendous variability. Conventional dust flux models assume that dust resuspension occurs only for high winds and then only temporarily, with a transient dust flux occurring only when the bed is first exposed to the high wind. The surface is then assumed to stabilize such that no further dust moves until the surface is disturbed or a higher wind occurs. Recent wind tunnel experiments demonstrate that surfaces yield continuous steady dust fluxes under steady wind conditions well beyond the initial high transient flux, even when no erosion is visible and the velocity is below the predicted threshold velocity for movement. This average steady-state dust flux increases with average wind speed. Ongoing work is investigating the influence of air relative humidity on these processes. Contaminant resuspension models capture trends only and fail to predict sporadic high flux events that may control doses. Successful modeling of contaminant resuspension will depend on development of better dust flux predictions. Risk analyses require better predictive modeling, necessitating a deeper understanding of the underlying phenomena.

Loosmore, G.A,; Hunt, J.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Effects of dietary phosphorus and high ambient temperature on egg shell quality in hens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF DIETARY PHOSPHORUS AND HIG11 AMB1ENT TEMPERATURE ON EGG SHELL QUALITY IN HENS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER ANTHONY BAI1EEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A@I University in Partial fuI. fillme ~t of the requirement... for the degree of F1ASTER OF SCIENCE May 19 79 Major Subject: Poultry Science EFFECTS OF DIETARY PHOSPHORUS AND HIGH AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON EGG SHELL QUALITY IN HENS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER ANTHONY BAILEY Approved as to style and content by; ( hairm...

Bailey, Christopher Anthony

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy harvesting for remote sensing and transmitting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing electrical energy to an electrical device wherein the electrical energy is originally generated from temperature differences in an environment having a first and a second temperature region. A thermoelectric device having a first side and a second side wherein the first side is in communication with a means for transmitting ambient thermal energy collected or rejected in the first temperature region and the second side is in communication with the second temperature region thereby producing a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric device and in turn generating an electrical current.

DeSteese, John G

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

493

Generation of Hydroxyl Radicals from Ambient Fine Particles in a Surrogate Lung Fluid Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we report the amounts of OH produced from ambient fine particles (PM2.5) collected in northern California and extracted in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid (SLF). ... Transition metals played the dominant role in OH production: on average (?), the addition of desferoxamine (a chelator that prevents metals from forming OH) to the SLF removed (90 5) % of OH generation. ... Furthermore, based on the concentrations of Fe in the PM2.5 SLF extracts, and the measured yield of OH as a function of Fe concentration, dissolved iron can account for the majority of OH produced in most of our PM2.5 extracts. ...

Edgar Vidrio; Chin H. Phuah; Ann M. Dillner; Cort Anastasio

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

Patterned graphene functionalization via mask-free scanning of micro-plasma jet under ambient condition  

SciTech Connect

In this work, a mask-free method is introduced for patterned nitrogen doping of graphene using a micro-plasma jet under ambient condition. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra indicate that nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the graphene lattice with the two-dimensional spatial distribution precisely controlled in the range of mm down to 10??m. Since the chemistry of the micro-plasma jet can be controlled by the choice of the gas mixture, this direct writing process with micro-plasma jet can be a versatile approach for patterned functionalization of graphene with high spatial resolution. This could have promising applications in graphene-based electronics.

Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao, E-mail: ensiyu@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wu, Shu-Qun; Lu, Xin-Pei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wu, Yue [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

495

Low frequency deep ocean ambient noise trend in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concern about effects of anthropogenic noise on marine life has stimulated new studies to establish present-day oceannoise levels and compare them to noise levels from previous times. This paper reports on the trend in low-frequency (10400 Hz) ambient noise levels and presents measurements made using a calibrated multi-element volume array at deep ocean sites in the Northeast Pacific from 1978 to 1986. The experiments provided spectral noise levels as well as horizontal and vertical noise directionality. The data presented here provide evidence that the trend derived from 1960s data extended to around 1980 but has since continued at a lower rate.

N. Ross Chapman; Andrea Price

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

SciTech Connect

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Forensic Application of Microbiological Culture Analysis To Identify Mail Intentionally Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contamination issues before handling such materials. The contamination...suitability of PPE materials for use with dried...established. FIG. 1. Diagram of the negative...SBA plates during handling of exposed mail (see Materials and Methods for...

Douglas J. Beecher

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Contamination from a Coal Tar Processing Chemical Industry: Investigations and Remedial Actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the major cases of soil contamination in The Netherlands is presented: the site of a coal tar processing chemical industry and its surroundings. The environmental contamination, with PAHs in particular, i...

Martien W. F. Yland

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Estimating the exposure to first receivers from a contaminated victim of a radiological dispersal device detonation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The threat of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) detonation arouses the concern of contaminated victims of all ages. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose to a uniformly contaminated five-year old male. It also explores...

Phillips, Holly Anne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial from groundwater monitoring wells located within and around an aquifer contaminated with landfill. In this landfill leachate application, the weighted SOM assembles the microbial community data from monitoring

Vermont, University of