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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Second order ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This text attempts to describe an imagined future of ambient intelligence. It assumes that one day most of the current issues within ambient intelligence will be solved and that a second order ambient intelligence will be formulated, one with new research ... Keywords: Critique of ambient intelligence, adaptive systems, animal machine interaction, critical futurism, long-term behavior, second order ambient intelligence, temporal design

Marc Böhlen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

PAHs underfoot: contaminated dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement is widespread in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported in 2005 that runoff from parking lots treated with coal-tar-based sealcoat was a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to streams in Austin, Texas. Here we present new data from nine U.S. cities that show nationwide patterns in concentrations of {Sigma}PAHs associated with sealcoat. Dust was swept from parking lots in six cities in the central and eastern U.S., where coal-tar-based sealcoat dominates use, and three cities in the western U.S., where asphalt-based sealcoat dominates use. For six central and eastern cities, median SPAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are 2200 and 27 mg/kg, respectively. For three western cities, median SPAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are similar and very low (2.1 and 0.8 mg/kg, respectively). Lakes in the central and eastern cities where pavement was sampled have bottom sediments with higher PAH concentrations than do those in the western cities relative to degree of urbanization. Bottom-sediment PAH assemblages are similar to those of sealcoated pavement dust regionally, implicating coal-tar-based sealcoat as a PAH source to the central and eastern lakes. Concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene in dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement and adjacent soils greatly exceed generic soil screening levels, suggesting that research on human-health risk is warranted. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Peter C. Van Metre; Barbara J. Mahler; Jennifer T. Wilson [U.S. Geological Survey, Austin, TX (USA)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed Drivers (ECOWILL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed Drivers (ECOWILL) Agency/Company /Organization: Austrian Energy Agency Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ecodrive.org/ The ECOWILL project aims to reduce carbon emissions by up to 8 Mt until 2015 by boosting the application of eco-driving across Europe. The project will roll out training programs for licensed drivers in 13 European countries. ECOWILL also promotes the education of eco-driving for learner drivers. This website provides information about eco-driving, including country-specific activities.

4

Ambiental PV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambiental PV Ambiental PV Jump to: navigation, search Name Ambiental PV Place Bahia, Brazil Zip 40140-380 Sector Carbon Product Bahia-based carbon consultancy firm. References Ambiental PV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ambiental PV is a company located in Bahia, Brazil . References ↑ "Ambiental PV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ambiental_PV&oldid=342095" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 186306960

5

Imaging with ambient noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees [Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ambient Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Place Newton, Massachusetts Zip 24580 Product Ambient develops open standards-based technologies for creating smart grid communication platforms and technologies. References...

7

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

8

System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Isotopic ratio method for determining uranium contamination  

SciTech Connect

The presence of high concentrations of uranium in the subsurface can be attributed either to contamination from uranium processing activities or to naturally occurring uranium. A mathematical method has been employed to evaluate the isotope ratios from subsurface soils at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (RFP) and demonstrates conclusively that the soil contains uranium from a natural source and has not been contaminated with enriched uranium resulting from RFP releases. This paper describes the method used in this determination which has widespread application in site characterizations and can be adapted to other radioisotopes used in manufacturing industries. The determination of radioisotope source can lead to a reduction of the remediation effort.

Miles, R.E.; Sieben, A.K.

1994-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

11

Environmental screening of future gasoline additives : computational tools to estimate chemical partitioning and forecast widespread groundwater contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) application of Raoult's law for the same set of systems. An approach was developed which relates the empirical LSER solute polarity parameter, pi2Ĥ, to two more fundamental quantities: a polarizability term and a ...

Arey, J. Samuel (Jeremy Samuel), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Resources Process Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Information on process contaminants(3-MCPD). Reference list included. Resources Process Contaminants 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants dete

13

Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General information on process contaminants(3-MCPD). Reference list included. Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants deter

14

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

15

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Moments of ambient Doppler spectra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author studied the first four moments (center of mass, standard deviation, skew, and kurtosis) of the Doppler spectra in ambient regions of LLNL-Hughes real aperture radar data collected during WCSEX91--92. The goal was to correlate trends in the moments with wind velocity and direction. Although the center of mass appears to increase when the wind is blowing into the radar antenna, no other conclusions have been drawn from the higher order moments.

Lehman, S.K.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

Review: Ambient intelligence: Technologies, applications, and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient intelligence is an emerging discipline that brings intelligence to our everyday environments and makes those environments sensitive to us. Ambient intelligence (AmI) research builds upon advances in sensors and sensor networks, pervasive computing, ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Artificial intelligence, Context awareness, Decision making, Privacy, Sensors

Diane J. Cook; Juan C. Augusto; Vikramaditya R. Jakkula

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site ...

Scott E. Giangrande; Edward P. Luke; Pavlos Kollias

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Water Vapor Transport Paths and Accumulation during Widespread Snowfall Events in Northeastern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to identify the distinct characteristics of water vapor transport (WVT) and its role in supplying moisture for widespread snowfall (WS) events in northeastern China (NEC). Fifty WS events in NEC were selected based on cumulative ...

Bo Sun; Huijun Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Inexpensive technologies enabling widespread utilization of image-predicated cell sorting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most mature, widespread sorting technology, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), offers high throughput and sorts predicated on a wide range of phenotypes that can be conveyed through average cellular fluorescence ...

Kova?, Joseph (Joseph R.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An Assessment of Aircraft-Generated Contamination on In Situ Trace Gas Measurements: Determinations from Empirical Data Acquired Aloft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are reported from an experiment conducted aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft to determine whether cabin air vented upstream of investigator's inlets had potentially contaminated ambient air samples obtained aboard the aircraft during ...

S. A. Vay; B. E. Anderson; K. L. Thornhill; C. H. Hudgins

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Desiccant contamination in desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a desiccant contamination experiment and the impact of the obtained silica gel degradation data on the performance of a desiccant cooling system. A test apparatus was used to thermally cycle several desiccant samples and expose them to ambient'' humid air or contaminated'' humid air. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke. The exposed desiccant samples were removed after 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 months of exposure and their moisture capacities were measured. The silica get samples thermally cycled with ambient air showed a 5% to 30% to 70% of their moisture capacity. Using the obtained degradation data in a system, the impact of desiccant degradation on the performance of a desiccant cooling cycle was estimated. Depending on the degree of desiccant degradation, the decrease in thermal coefficient of performance (COP) and cooling capacity of the system was 10% to 35%. It was found that the COP and the cooling capacity of a system after desiccant degradation can be improved by increasing the rotational speed of the dehumidifier. This indicates that a simple engineering solution may exist to alleviate some type of degradations. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Pesaran, A.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Resources for Process Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information regarding 3-MCPD esters and a reference list by topic. Resources for Process Contaminants 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants de

24

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.

25

Thermoelectric Ambient Energy Harvester - Energy Innovation Portal  

A novel thermoelectric generator (TEG) design by PNNL allows the conversion of ambient thermal energy into electric power for a variety of low-power uses. These ...

26

Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

Schuresko, Daniel D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Jump to: navigation, search Name SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Agency/Company /Organization Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Video, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.actualidadambiental UN Region Caribbean, Central America, South America References SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental[1] SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Screenshot "SPDA current environmental journalism is a service of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) , which seeks to inform about the latest news and events related to the environment in Peru and the world in search of greater awareness and action for preservation of our planet. On this site you can also obtain and use for free videos, high resolution photos and the

28

The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Many people in the Indian region still live in rural areas where domestic energy consumption largely large-scale subsidence and cloud free conditions. Unless international control measures are taken, air1 The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia J. Lelieveld1

Dickerson, Russell R.

29

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tritium Surface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Glovebox wipe surveys were conducted to correlate surface tritium contamination with atmospheric tritium levels. Surface contamination was examined as a function of tritium concentration and of tritium form, HT/T2 and HTO. The relationship between atmospheric HTO concentration and cleanup time was also investigated.

Sienkiewicz, Charles J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

35

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

36

Modeling for Airborne Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Modeling for Airborne Contamination (referred to from now on as ''this report'') is to provide a documented methodology, along with supporting information, for estimating the release, transport, and assessment of dose to workers from airborne radioactive contaminants within the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface during the pre-closure period. Specifically, this report provides engineers and scientists with methodologies for estimating how concentrations of contaminants might be distributed in the air and on the drift surfaces if released from waste packages inside the repository. This report also provides dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways used to derive doses to potentially exposed subsurface workers. The scope of this report is limited to radiological contaminants (particulate, volatile and gaseous) resulting from waste package leaks (if any) and surface contamination and their transport processes. Neutron activation of air, dust in the air and the rock walls of the drift during the preclosure time is not considered within the scope of this report. Any neutrons causing such activation are not themselves considered to be ''contaminants'' released from the waste package. This report: (1) Documents mathematical models and model parameters for evaluating airborne contaminant transport within the MGR subsurface; and (2) Provides tables of dose conversion factors for inhalation, air submersion, and ground exposure pathways for important radionuclides. The dose conversion factors for air submersion and ground exposure pathways are further limited to drift diameters of 7.62 m and 5.5 m, corresponding to the main and emplacement drifts, respectively. If the final repository design significantly deviates from these drift dimensions, the results in this report may require revision. The dose conversion factors are further derived by using concrete of sufficient thickness to simulate the drift walls. The gamma-ray scattering properties of concrete are sufficiently similar to those of the host rock and proposed insert material; use of concrete will have no significant impact on the conclusions. The information in this report is presented primarily for use in performing pre-closure radiological safety evaluations of radiological contaminants, but it may also be used to develop strategies for contaminant leak detection and monitoring in the MGR. Included in this report are the methods for determining the source terms and release fractions, and mathematical models and model parameters for contaminant transport and distribution within the repository. Various particle behavior mechanisms that affect the transport of contaminant are included. These particle behavior mechanisms include diffusion, settling, resuspension, agglomeration and other deposition mechanisms.

F.R. Faillace; Y. Yuan

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Winterscape and ambient video: an intermedia border zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Ambient Video" is an emergent media form that operates in an intermedia border zone, sharing the aesthetics of cinema, video, painting, and fine art photography. Winterscape is an ambient video work that incorporates these directions. Like any ambient ... Keywords: ambient video, cinema, experimental film, moving image, poetics, post-production, video, video art, visual effects

Jim Bizzocchi

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In particular, the invention relates to remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by the injection of nutrients to stimulate growth of pollutant-degrading microorganisms. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling regional end user price/cost relationships in a widespread interconnected power system  

SciTech Connect

A combined programming and regression modeling approach is developed to analyze regional retail price/cost relationships for a widespread interconnected power system characterized by low population density and uniform (regulated) retail tariffs. The programming model is designed to calculate on the hour the delivered cost of electricity from 5 thermal power stations and one pumped storage hydrostation to end users in 8 distribution regions. A simultaneous equation regression model then analyses the link between retail prices charged end users, regional demand and supply characteristics, industry financial objectives and departures from economically efficient pricing. The electricity supply industry in Queensland Australia is used as a framework.

Tamaschke, R.; Docwra, G.; Stillman, R. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ambient Hydro Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambient Hydro Ltd Ambient Hydro Ltd Place Corsham, United Kingdom Zip SN13 9TZ Sector Hydro, Services Product Ambient Hydro Ltd develops small Hydroelectric projects. It also offers a range of technical and financial consultancy services. Coordinates 51.431505°, -2.187229° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.431505,"lon":-2.187229,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HTO Contamination on Polymeric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Yasunori Iwai; Kazuhiro Kobayashi; Toshihiko Yamanishi

42

The ambient wood journals: replaying the experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Wood project aims to facilitate a learning experience using an adaptive infrastructure in an outdoor environment. This involves sensor technology, virtual world orchestration, and a wide range of devices ranging from hand-held computers to ... Keywords: adaptive infrastructure, consolidation, record and replay, storytelling

Mark J. Weal; Danius T. Michaelides; Mark K. Thompson; David C. DeRoure

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Visual calibration and correction for ambient illumination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications require that an image will appear the same regardless of where or how it is displayed. However, the conditions in which an image is displayed can adversely affect its appearance. Computer monitor screens not only emit light, but can ... Keywords: Viewing conditions, ambient illumination, contrast correction, device independence, ergonomics, perceptually accurate display, reflections

Kate Devlin; Alan Chalmers; Erik Reinhard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Areawide chemical contamination  

SciTech Connect

Nine case histories illustrate the mounting problems owing to chemical contamination that often extends beyond the workplace into the community. The effects include not only carcinogenesis and teratogenesis, so much in the public's mind, but also severe neurological and gonadal disabilities immediately after exposure. Recognition of causal relationships is often made by astute clinicians. The experience of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in studying Japanese survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki serves as a model for future studies of communities exposed to unusual environmental contamination.

Miller, R.W.

1981-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

SOIL DESICCATION TECHNIQUES STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect

Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site where processes and technologies are being developed and tested for use in the on-going effort to remediate mobile contamination in the deep vadose zone, the area deep beneath the surface. Historically, contaminants were discharged to the soil along with significant amounts of water, which continues to drive contaminants deeper in the vadose zone toward groundwater. Soil desiccation is a potential in situ remedial technology well suited for the arid conditions and the thick vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Desiccation techniques could reduce the advance of contaminants by removing the pore water to slow the rate of contaminants movement toward groundwater. Desiccation technologies have the potential to halt or slow the advance of contaminants in unsaturated systems, as well as aid in reduction of contaminants from these same areas. Besides reducing the water flux, desiccation also establishes capillary breaks that would require extensive rewetting to resume pore water transport. More importantly, these techniques have widespread application, whether the need is to isolate radio nuclides or address chemical contaminant issues. Three different desiccation techniques are currently being studied at Hanford.

BENECKE MW; CHRONISTER GB; TRUEX MJ

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Federal policies to promote the widespread utilization of photovoltaic systems. Supplement: review and critique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is intended as a supplement to the two-volume report entitled Federal Policies to Promote the Widespread Utilization of Photovoltaic Systems that was submitted to Congress by the Department of Energy in February and April of 1980. This supplement contains review comments prepared by knowledgeable experts who reviewed early drafts of the Congressional report. Responses to the review comments by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, preparer of the Congressional report, are also included in this supplement. The Congressional report, mandated in the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590), discusses various issues related to promoting the deployment of photovoltaic systems through the Federal Photovoltaic Program. Various program strategies and funding levels are examined.

Smith, J.L.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

52

Correlations between Ambient Noise and the Ocean Surface Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the ambient noise spectrum level N with simultaneous, coincident wind and wave measurements were made from RP FLIP in fall 1991. The measurements were designed to investigate the correlation between the ambient noise and relevant ...

Francis C. Felizardo; W. Kendall Melville

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ambient Control Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Control Systems Control Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ambient Control Systems Name Ambient Control Systems Address 1810 Gillespie Way Place El Cajon, California Zip 92020 Sector Solar Product Solar energy device with a computerized energy management Website http://www.ambientalert.com/ma Coordinates 32.8193566°, -116.981232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8193566,"lon":-116.981232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ambient social tv: drawing people into a shared experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine how ambient displays can augment social television. Social TV 2 is an interactive television solution that incorporates two ambient displays to convey to participants an aggregate view of their friends' current TV-watching status. Social TV ... Keywords: ambient displays, field trial, interactive television, social presence awareness, social television

Gunnar Harboe; Crysta J. Metcalf; Frank Bentley; Joe Tullio; Noel Massey; Guy Romano

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

O estudo de impacto ambiental e sua complexidade jurídico-administrativa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O Estudo de Impacto Ambiental (EIA) como instrumento da Política Nacional do Meio Ambiente, é imprescindível para a gestão pública ambiental. Contudo, são inúmeras as… (more)

Andréia Ponciano de Moraes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Purifying contaminated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Contamination control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A contamination control device for use in a gas-insulated transmission bus consisting of a cylindrical center conductor coaxially mounted within a grounded cylindrical enclosure. The contamination control device is electrically connected to the interior surface of the grounded outer shell and positioned along an axial line at the lowest vertical position thereon. The contamination control device comprises an elongated metallic member having a generally curved cross-section in a first plane perpendicular to the axis of the bus and having an arcuate cross-section in a second plane lying along the axis of the bus. Each opposed end of the metallic member and its opposing sides are tapered to form a pair of generally converging and downward sloping surfaces to trap randomly moving conductive particles in the relatively field-free region between the metallic member and the interior surface of the grounded outer shell. The device may have projecting legs to enable the device to be spot welded to the interior of the grounded housing. The control device provides a high capture probability and prevents subsequent release of the charged particles after the capture thereof.

Clark, Robert M. (Ligonier, PA); Cronin, John C. (Greensburg, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Modeling Ambient Air Quality In The Detroit-Windsor Airshed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial variability of airborne contaminants in an international airshed was investigated using geostatistics and air dispersion modeling. Analyses were conducted on contaminant species measured… (more)

Molaroni, Shannon Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at the country level. An estimate of the current {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} scenario (defined by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30-year loan life, $6{sub 1994}/W system cost, and $4{sub 1994}/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. Several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption are modeled. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3{sub 1994}/W, rooftop systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the U.S. by 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4-kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 170 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Industrial Wireless Sensors: A User's Perspective on the Impact of Standards on Wide-spread Deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of wireless sensing technologies in industrial instrumentation will undoubtedly become more important in the years ahead. . Deployment of such instrumentation in an industrial setting with its heightened security and robustness criteria hinges on user acceptance of verified performance as well as meeting cost requirements. Today, industrial users face many choices when specifying a wireless sensor network, including radio performance, battery life, interoperability, security, and standards compliance. The potential market for industrial wireless sensors is literally millions of wireless instruments and it is imperative that accurate information for applying the technology to real-world applications be available to the end-user so that they can make informed deployment decisions. The majority of industrial wireless automation designs now being deployed or being considered for deployment are based on three different standards . The HART Communications Foundation s WirelessHART (IEC 62591), the International Society of Automation s ISA100.11a, and the offering from the Industrial Wireless Alliance of China known as WIA-PA (IEC 62601). Aside from these industrial automation standards, users must also be cognizant of the underlying wireless network standards IEEE 802.11, IEEE 802.15.4, and IEEE 802.15.3a and their interactions with the three principal industrial automation protocols mentioned previously. The crucial questions being asked by end users revolve around sensor network performance, interoperability, reliability, and security. This paper will discuss potential wireless sensor applications in power plants, barriers to the acceptance of wireless technology, concerns related to standards, and provide an end user prospective on the issues affecting wide-spread deployment of wireless sensors. Finally, the authors conclude with a discussion of a recommended path forward including how standards organizations can better facilitate end user decision making and how end users can locate and use objective information for decision making.

Taft, Cyrus W. [Taft Engineering, Inc.; Manges, Wayne W [ORNL; Sorge, John N [Southern Company Services, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Bioaugmentation with engineered endophytic bacteria improves contaminant fate in phytoremediation  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation of volatile organic contaminants often proves not ideal because plants and their rhizosphere microbes only partially degrade these compounds. Consequently, plants undergo evapotranspiration that contaminates the ambient air and, thus, undermines the merits of phytoremediation. Under laboratory conditions, endophytic bacteria equipped with the appropriate degradation pathways can improve in plant degradation of volatile organic contaminants. However, several obstacles must be overcome before engineered endophytes will be successful in field-scale phytoremediation projects. Here we report the first in situ inoculation of poplar trees, growing on a TCE-contaminated site, with the TCE-degrading strain Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE. In situ bioaugmentation with strain W619-TCE reduced TCE evapotranspiration by 90% under field conditions. This encouraging result was achieved after the establishment and enrichment of P. putida W619-TCE as a poplar root endophyte and by further horizontal gene transfer of TCE metabolic activity to members of the poplar's endogenous endophytic population. Since P. putida W619-TCE was engineered via horizontal gene transfer, its deliberate release is not restricted under European genetically modified organisms (GMO) regulations.

Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Artois, T.; Smeets, K.; Taghavi, S.; Newman, L.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Emission Standards for Contaminants (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations list emissions standards for various contaminants, and contain special requirements for anaerobic lagoons. These regulations also describe alternative emissions limits, which may...

67

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and

68

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

69

Re:Cycle - a Generative Ambient Video Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigating the Database. DVD-video. Cambridge MA: MITnetworked and more ubiquitous. Video screens are steadily [with the nature of the ambient video experience, and can be

Bizzocchi, Jim; Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Quan, Brian; Suzuki, Wakiko; Bagheri, Majid; Riecke, Bernhard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

71

Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente AIMA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Invests in projects that aim to generate energy from biodegradable residues and waste. References Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente (AIMA)1 LinkedIn Connections...

72

Spectral analysis of ambient weather patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Fourier spectral analysis of ambient weather data, consisting of global and direct solar radiation, dry and wet bulb temperatures, and wind speed, is given. By analyzing the heating and cooling seasons independently, seasonal variations are isolated and a cleaner spectrum emerges. This represents an improvement over previous work in this area, in which data for the entire year were analyzed together. As a demonstration of the efficacy of this method, synthetic data constructed with a small number of parameters are used in typical simulations, and the results are compared with those obtained with the original data. A spectral characterization of fluctuations around the moving average is given, and the changes in the fluctuation from season to season are examined.

Anderson, J.V.; Subbarao, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ambient-pressure silica aerogel films  

SciTech Connect

Very highly porous (aerogel) silica films with refractive index in the range 1.006--1.05 (equivalent porosity 98.5--88%) were prepared by an ambient-pressure process. It was shown earlier using in situ ellipsometric imaging that the high porosity of these films was mainly attributable to the dilation or `springback` of the film during the final stage of drying. This finding was irrefutably reconfirmed by visually observing a `springback` of >500% using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Ellipsometry and ESEM also established the near cent per cent reversibility of aerogel film deformation during solvent intake and drying. Film thickness profile measurements (near the drying line) for the aerogel, xerogel and pure solvent cases are presented from imaging ellipsometry. The thickness of these films (crack-free) were controlled in the range 0.1-3.5 {mu}m independent of refractive index.

Prakash, S.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurd, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

75

Mental models of ambient systems: a modular research framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines our current research program in the fields of ambient intelligence and context-aware computing and the tools we are building to accomplish this research program. From a discussion of our conception of mental models in the domain of ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, context awareness, mental models

Felix Schmitt; Jörg Cassens; Martin Christof Kindsmüller; Michael Herczeg

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Generating Ambient Behaviors in Computer Role-Playing Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computer games use custom scripts to control the ambient behaviors of nonplayercharacters. As a result, story authors mustwrite computer code for the game world'shundreds or thousands of NPCs. Creating entertaining, nonrepetitive NPC behaviors without ... Keywords: ambient behavior, nonplayer character, intelligent agents, scripting language, generative pattern, collaborative behavior, computer games

Maria Cutumisu; Duane Szafron; Jonathan Schaeffer; Matthew McNaughton; Thomas Roy; Curtis Onuczko; Mike Carbonaro

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Learning patterns in ambient intelligence environments: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is essential for environments that aim at helping people in their daily life that they have some sort of Ambient Intelligence. Learning the preferences and habits of users then becomes an important step in allowing a system to provide such personalized ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Intelligent environments, Machine learning techniques, Pattern learning

Asier Aztiria; Alberto Izaguirre; Juan Carlos Augusto

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Extracting Key Factors to Design Applications in Ambient Intelligence Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an ambient intelligence environment, the design of applications influences the users behavior heavily. The purpose of this paper is to provide key factors considered necessary in developing those applications. We developed four applications applied ... Keywords: ambient feedback, persuasive technology, behavior modification, emotional engagement

Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The DFKI competence center for ambient assisted living  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area ... Keywords: ambient assisted living, intelligent environments, living labs

Jochen Frey; Christoph Stahl; Thomas Röfer; Bernd Krieg-Brückner; Jan Alexandersson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ambient intelligence technologies in support of shipping markets' operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intelligent Maritime Environment (i-MARE) framework and technological platform we introduce in our paper conceptualize an innovative, collaborative and context-aware network business model for cargo shipping. The i-MARE framework considers ambient-intelligence ... Keywords: Agent technology, Ambient intelligence, Cargo shipping operations, Enterprise modelling, Web semantics

Maria A. Lambrou; Kay Endre Fjørtoft; Efstathios D. Sykas; Nikitas Nikitakos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

Robin M. Stewart

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebración de los 20 años de justicia ambiental pasados y futuros. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 More Documents & Publications SE HAN FINALIZADO LOS PREPARATIVOS PARA LA CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE JUSTICIA MEDIOAMBIENTAL Y PROGRAMA DE FORMACIÓN 2013 2013 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish)

83

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation submits the following comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in hopes that their contribution can highlight and further the understanding of the DOE on the key role that integrated communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation More Documents & Publications Comments of Tendril Networks Inc Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2001

84

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info Start Date 11/30/1995 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average: 110 ug/m3; 30-day average: 90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean: 60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing

85

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study Title Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study Publication Type...

86

Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at the Nevada Test Site, INS-O-06-02 Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at...

87

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project In a collaborative effort between ChemImage Biothreat, LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project will acquire the ability to discern between chemical/biological threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. The project will focus on potential background interferences, specifically from the ambient backgrounds collected at NETL-supported ambient air collection facilities. Potential substrate interferences such as pollen, insecticides and industrial PM will be addressed. Using Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) and fluorescence chemical imaging, a background - void of pathogen spores - will be collected and compared to known pathogens. Interactions causing possible false positives will be identified and studied. This study would systematically identify potential problems and provide a baseline of ambient particulates found in the mid-eastern United States .

88

Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the water-soluble organic car- bon (WSOC) components of ambient aerosol particles into hydrophilic and Weber [2006]. In the XAD-8 method, the WSOC components that penetrate the column are hydro- philic

Weber, Rodney

89

Ambient pressure synthesis of nanostructured tungsten oxide crystalline films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures ...

H. X. Zhang; B. Q. Yang; P. X. Feng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Street media : ambient messages in an urban space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient street media are the media of our everyday lives in cities. Manifested in bits and fragments on the surfaces of the streetscape, these media often escape our notice - tuned out as visual clutter or dismissed as ...

Murthy, Rekha (Rekha S.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Space and Time Scales in Ambient Ozone Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the characteristic space and time scales in time series of ambient ozone data. The authors discuss the need and a methodology for cleanly separating the various scales of motion embedded in ozone time series data, namely, ...

S. T. Rao; I. G. Zurbenko; R. Neagu; P. S. Porter; J. Y. Ku; R. F. Henry

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils Starting in the 1970s, federal regulatory control and eventual elimination of lead-based "anti-knock" additives in gasoline decreased the level of airborne Pb in the USA by two orders-of-magnitude [1]. Blood lead levels of the USA figure 1 Figure 1. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Ambient airborne particulate matter captured on filters of woven silica fiber (large strips) and TeflonTM (round). Clean fiber filter at bottom for comparison. Take a deep breath? population decreased correspondingly [2,3]. Despite this dramatic improvement in both exposure risk and body burden of Pb, the sources and health threat of the low levels of lead in our "unleaded" air remain topics

94

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

95

TV as a human interface for Ambient Intelligence environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges that Ambient Intelligent (AmI) faces is the provision of a usable interaction concept to its users, especially for those with less technical background. In this paper, we describe a new approach to integrate interactive services ... Keywords: information service, human interface, ambient intelligence environments, usable interaction concept, interactive services, television set, home environment, natural human computer interface, elderly people, graphical user interfaces, TV remote control, voice interaction, videoconference

Gorka Epelde; Xabier Valencia; Julio Abascal; Unai Diaz; Ingo Zinnikus; Christian Husodo-Schulz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

97

Convection-Permitting Simulations of the Environment Supporting Widespread Turbulence within the Upper-Level Outflow of a Mesoscale Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread moderate turbulence was recorded on three specially equipped commercial airline flights over northern Kansas near the northern edge of the extensive cirrus anvil of a nocturnal mesoscale convective system (MCS) on 17 June 2005. A ...

Stanley B. Trier; Robert D. Sharman

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Sidelobe Contamination in Bistatic Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of sidelobe contamination in a bistatic network is explored. The McGill bistatic network consists of one S-band Doppler radar and two low-gain passive receivers at remote sites. Operational experience with the bistatic network ...

Ramón de Elía; Isztar Zawadzki

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method for refining contaminated iridium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

Heshmatpour, Bahman (Waltham, MA); Heestand, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fast track article: Designing an extensible architecture for Personalized Ambient Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient displays provide us with information in the background of our awareness. However, as each user has individual wishes and needs of how, which and when information is presented, the acceptance of ambient displays is low. In this paper we introduce ... Keywords: Ambient display, Ambient fixture, Notification system, Peripheral display, Ubiquitous computing

Jan-Patrick Elsholz; Guido de Melo; Marc Hermann; Michael Weber

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Widespread underprovision on Reddit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many online communities ask their members to do work for the good of everyone on the site. On social voting sites like Reddit, this means that users judge a stream of incoming links by voting them up or down. The links with the most up-votes bubble up ... Keywords: free riding, reddit, social navigation, underprovision, voting

Eric Gilbert

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Texas Water Resources: Vulnerability from Contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical models of flow and transport are commonly applied for the sustainable management of water resources and for the selection of appropriate remediation techniques. However, these numerical models are not always accurate due to uncertain parameters and the disparity of scales across which observations are made, hydrological processes occur, and modeling is conducted. The modeling framework becomes further complex because hydrologic processes are coupled with chemical and biological processes. This dissertation focuses on the most widespread contaminants of surface and ground water, which are E. coli and nitrate, respectively. Therefore, this research investigates the linkages between bio-chemical and hydrologic processes for E. coli transport, explores the spatio-temporal variability of nitrate, quantifies uncertainty, and develops models for both E. coli and nitrate transport that better characterize these biogeochemical linkages. A probabilistic framework in the form of Bayesian Neural Networks (BNN) was used to estimate E. coli loads in surface streams and was compared with a conventional model LOADEST. This probabilistic framework is crucial when water quality data are scarce, and most models require a large number of mechanistic parameters to estimate E. coli concentrations. Results indicate that BNN provides better characterization of E. coli at higher loadings. Results also provide the physical, chemical, and biological factors that are critical in the estimation of E. coli concentrations in Plum Creek, Texas. To explore model parameters that control the transport of E. coli in the groundwater (GW) and surface water systems, research was conducted in Lake Granbury, Texas. Results highlight the importance of flow regimes and seasonal variability on E. coli transport. To explore the spatio-temporal variability of nitrate across the Trinity and Ogallala aquifers in Texas, an entropy-based method and a numerical study were employed. Results indicate that the overall mean nitrate-N has declined from 1940 to 2008 in the Trinity Aquifer as opposed to an increase in the Ogallala Aquifer. The numerical study results demonstrate the effect of different factors like GW pumping, flow parameters, hydrogeology of the site at multiple spatial scales. To quantify the uncertainty of nitrate transport in GW, an ensemble Kalman filter was used in combination with the MODFLOW-MT3DMS models. Results indicate that the EnKF notably improves the estimation of nitrate-N concentrations in GW. A conceptual modeling framework with deterministic physical processes and stochastic bio-chemical processes was devised to independently model E. coli and nitrate transport in the subsurface. Results indicate that model structural uncertainty provides useful insights to modeling E. coli and nitrate transport.

Dwivedi, Dipankar

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils According to 20 NMAC 9.1.704 704. REQUIRED), or other applicable statutes. Page 1 of 1Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils 4

105

Regulatory Resources for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory information and references for 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )process contaminants. Regulatory Resources for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certifi

106

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

107

Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Natural Contamination from the Mancos...

108

Measurements and Standards for Contaminants in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements and Standards for Contaminants in Environmental Samples. ... Kelly, WR, Long, SE, and Seiber, JR, Standard Reference Materials ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

110

Google Earth Tour: How Contaminants Got There  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Google Earth Tour: How Contaminants Got There Click here to load the tour...then click the play button below...

111

CLEANING OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATED OCCUPATIONAL CLOTHING  

SciTech Connect

The soiling and contamination of work clothing and ways of removing this contamination are discussed. Means of disinfection, washing tests with radioactive-contaminated cotton clothing, construction of the laundry, and cleaning protective clothing of plastic and other materials with the help of washing methods and polyphosphates are described. (M.C.G.)

Siewert, G.; Schikora, Th.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

113

Contaminated Outdoor High Voltage Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external insulation of power lines and outdoor substations is a weak point in transmission systems. The insulation is particularly susceptible to failure if proper attention has not been given to its design, condition monitoring, and maintenance. In regions with high contamination levels, regular maintenance and the application of palliative measures can be critical to ensure that the system meets its outage performance targets. This can involve pure maintenance measures such as cleaning the insulato...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

114

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Increasing subterranean mobilization of organic contaminants and petroleum by aqueous thermal oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/partial oxidation of organics at the site of the organics constrained in an subsurface reservoir produces surfactants that can form an oil/water emulsion that is effectively removed from an underground formation. The removal of the oil/water emulsions is particularly useful in several applications, e.g., soil contaminant remediation and enhanced oil recovery operations. A portion of the constrained organics react in heated reservoir water with injected steam containing dissolved oxygen gas at ambient reservoir conditions to produce such surfactants.

Leif, Roald N. (San Francisco, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Eaker, Craig (Alta Loma, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ambient functionality in MIMOSA from technology to services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MIcrosystems platform for MObile Services and Applications (MIMOSA) is an European Integrated Project in the Information Society Technology (IST) priority. The goal of MIMOSA is to make Ambient Intelligence (AmI) a reality by developing a mobile-phone ...

Pascal Ancey

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovács; S. Kopácsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ambient intelligence as enabling technology for modern business paradigms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays the competition among companies, joined to the environmental protection rules, is so compelling that they should not only be on the top of technology in they area, but also run their business according to life-long models. The emphasis on the ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Extended product, Knowledge-based systems, Maintenance, Product lifecycle management, Service engineering

S. Kopácsi; G. Kovács; A. Anufriev; R. Michelini

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The role of ambient intelligence in future lighting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LED-based lighting systems have introduced radically new possibilities in the area of artificial lighting. Being physically small the LED can be positioned or embedded into luminaires, materials and even the very fabric of a building or environment. ... Keywords: LED, ambient intelligence, lighting, user interaction

Dzmitry Aliakseyeu; Jon Mason; Bernt Meerbeek; Harm van Essen; Serge Offermans

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Turning Homes into Low-Cost Ambient Assisted Living Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today motion recognition has become more popular in areas like health care. In real-time environments, the amount of information and data required to compute the user's motion is substantial, while the time to collect and process this information are ... Keywords: Ambient Assistant Living (AAL), Depth Image, Kinect Skeletal Data, Motion, Motion Recognition System

Alexiei Dingli; Daniel Attard; Ruben Mamo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Doffing Procedures for Firefighters' Contaminated Turnout Gear: Documentation for Videotape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firefighting in an area contaminated by radioactive materials can result in contaminated clothing that requires careful handling. This report documents a videotape that provides simple how-to procedures for doffing contaminated or potentially contaminated firefighter turnout gear.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Seismic Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites (Interim Report)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites” Roland GrittoImaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites” over the first

Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Lane

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Environmental geochemistry of radioactive contamination.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report attempts to describe the geochemical foundations of the behavior of radionuclides in the environment. The information is obtained and applied in three interacting spheres of inquiry and analysis: (1) experimental studies and theoretical calculations, (2) field studies of contaminated and natural analog sites and (3) model predictions of radionuclide behavior in remediation and waste disposal. Analyses of the risks from radioactive contamination require estimation of the rates of release and dispersion of the radionuclides through potential exposure pathways. These processes are controlled by solubility, speciation, sorption, and colloidal transport, which are strong functions of the compositions of the groundwater and geomedia as well as the atomic structure of the radionuclides. The chemistry of the fission products is relatively simple compared to the actinides. Because of their relatively short half-lives, fission products account for a large fraction of the radioactivity in nuclear waste for the first several hundred years but do not represent a long-term hazard in the environment. The chemistry of the longer-lived actinides is complex; however, some trends in their behavior can be described. Actinide elements of a given oxidation state have either similar or systematically varying chemical properties due to similarities in ionic size, coordination number, valence, and electron structure. In dilute aqueous systems at neutral to basic pH, the dominant actinide species are hydroxy- and carbonato-complexes, and the solubility-limiting solid phases are commonly oxides, hydroxides or carbonates. In general, actinide sorption will decrease in the presence of ligands that complex with the radionuclide; sorption of the (IV) species of actinides (Np, Pu, U) is generally greater than of the (V) species. The geochemistry of key radionuclides in three different environments is described in this report. These include: (1) low ionic strength reducing waters from crystalline rocks at nuclear waste research sites in Sweden; (2) oxic water from the J-13 well at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a proposed repository for high level nuclear waste (HLW) in tuffaceous rocks; and (3) reference brines associated with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The transport behaviors of radionuclides associated with the Chernobyl reactor accident and the Oklo Natural Reactor are described. These examples span wide temporal and spatial scales and include the rapid geochemical and physical processes important to nuclear reactor accidents or industrial discharges as well as the slower processes important to the geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Application of geochemical information to remediating or assessing the risk posed by radioactive contamination is the final subject of this report. After radioactive source terms have been removed, large volumes of soil and water with low but potentially hazardous levels of contamination may remain. For poorly-sorbing radionuclides, capture of contaminated water and removal of radionuclides may be possible using permeable reactive barriers and bioremediation. For strongly sorbing radionuclides, contaminant plumes will move very slowly. Through a combination of monitoring, regulations and modeling, it may be possible to have confidence that they will not be a hazard to current or future populations. Abstraction of the hydrogeochemical properties of real systems into simple models is required for probabilistic risk assessment. Simplifications in solubility and sorption models used in performance assessment calculations for the WIPP and the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain are briefly described.

Bryan, Charles R.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10{sup -6} torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non-volatile components. Equilibrium is lost, and the surface builds up a layer of carbon-based gunk.

Viet Nguyen-Tuong; Lawrence Doolittle

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-deriv

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

L.A. Johnson, Jr.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Ambient/Task Lighting Low Ambient/Task Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for low ambient/task lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits The low ambient/task lighting strategy improves the visual environment by adding controllable task fixtures that provide light directly where needed for a given task, while reducing the overhead (ambient) light level. Occupancy sensors can also be incorporated into the system. Application Low ambient/task lighting is applicable in most building categories. Key Factors for Deployment Low ambient/task lighting is suitable for most office spaces, including both cubicle and private office space environments, and should be

134

TQL: a query language for semistructured data based on the ambient logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ambient logic is a modal logic that was proposed for the description of the structural and computational properties of distributed and mobile computation. The structural part of the ambient logic is, essentially, a logic of labelled trees, hence ...

Luca Cardelli; Giorgio Ghelli

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

136

Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions  

SciTech Connect

We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Process for reducing radioactive contamination in phosphogypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of two crystallization stages for reducing radioactive contamination of phosphogypsum is disclosed. In the process anhydrite crystals are obtained through dehydration of the radiation containing phosphogypsum in strong sulfuric acid; a portion of the anhydrite crystals containing the radioactive contamination is converted to substantially radiation free gypsum by crystallizing out on a large solids concentration of radiation free gypsum seed crystals; and coarse radiation free gypsum crystals are separated from small anhydrite crystal relics containing substantially all of the radioactive contamination.

Gaynor, J.C.; Palmer, J.W.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Identification of dynamic properties from ambient vibration measurements  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the dynamic behavior of structures under normal dynamic loads as well as extreme loads such as those caused by seismic events or high winds, it is desirable to measure the dynamic properties (resonant frequencies, mode shapes and modal damping) of these structures. The cross-correlation function between two response measurements made on an ambiently excited structure is shown to have the same form as the system`s impulse response function. Therefore, standard time-domain curve-fitting procedures such as the complex exponential method, which are typically applied to impulse response functions, can now be applied to the cross-correlation functions to estimate the resonant frequencies and modal damping of the structure. A direct comparison of resonant frequencies identified by curve-fitting the cross-correlation functions, using traffic excitation as the ambient vibration source, and modal properties identified by standard forced vibration testing of a highway bridge, after traffic was removed, showed a maximum discrepancy of 3.63%. Similar comparisons for the average modal damping values identified by the two methods showed a 9.82% difference. This experimental verification implies that the proposed method of analyzing ambient vibration data has the potential to accurately assess the dynamic properties of large structures subjected to seismic excitations and small structures that are tested on a shake table.

Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

Eberhart, Craig

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C....

144

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Investigation Report Plutonium Contamination in the Zero Power Physics Reactor Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, November 8, 2011 January 2012 Disclaimer...

145

Dismantling an alpha-contaminated facility  

SciTech Connect

The difficult task of removing large pieces of highly contaminated equipment from an obsolete plutonium-239 facility was completed in a seven-month operation that included structural alteration of the process building. Detailed job planning, job execution and contamination control were major factors in accomplishing the task. (auth)

Caldwell, R.D.; Harper, R.M.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

CONTAMINATION CONTROL AT THE HANFORD LAUNDRY  

SciTech Connect

The laundry operation consists of a decontamination laundry, non- regulated laundry service, and a central mask cleaning station. Control of radioactive contamination is accomplished by presorting at the point of use, minimizing handling of contaminated articles, and the discharge of waste effluents under controlled conditions. Procedures are described in detail. (C.H.)

Linderoth, C.E.; Little, G.A.

1962-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent concerns regarding environmental contamination have necessitated the development of appropriate technologies to assess the presence and mobility of metals in soil and estimate possible ways to decrease the level of soil metal contamination. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that may be used to cleanup contaminated soils. Successful application of phytoremediation, however, depends upon various factors that must be carefully investigated and properly considered for specific site conditions. To efficiently affect the metal removal from contaminated soils we used the ability of plants to accumulate different metals and agricultural practices to improve soil quality and enhance plant biomass. Pot experiments were conducted to study metal transport through bulk soil to the rhizosphere and stimulate transfer of the metals to be more available for plants' form. The aim of the experimental study was also to find fertilizers that could enhance uptake of metals and their removal from contaminated soil.

Shtangeeva, I.; Laiho, J.V-P.; Kahelin, H.; Gobran, G.R.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions The water molecule, H2O, has deceptively simple structure, but contains all the prerequisites for building complexity. The oxygen atom has a greater affinity for electrons and pulls them away from the hydrogens making them slightly positive. On the back side of molecule oxygen has a lone pair - electrons that do not assist in binding the hydrogens in the molecule, but to which the hydrogens of another water molecule can be attracted to form a so-called hydrogen bond (H-bond). Hydrogen bond is much weaker than the bonding inside water molecule, but it is still strong enough with the possibility to make from one up to four H-bonds per water molecule. The network connected by H-bonds between water molecules makes liquid water so special compared to other normal liquids with about 66 anomalies, e.g. density maximum at 4 °C and large heat capacity. The anomalies of water become extreme in the supercooled region (below freezing point), whilst they are also present at ambient conditions where most of waters' physical, chemical and biological processes of importance occur. Water at ambient conditions has traditionally been considered as a homogeneous distribution of near- tetrahedral H-bonded structures with thermal fluctuations increasing with temperature. This picture has been challenged by recent studies based on x-ray Raman (XRS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), suggesting two distinct local structures with tetrahedral as a minority and highly H-bond distorted asymmetrical as the majority. In particular, the proposed predominant asymmetrical structure has caused intense debate in the last years.

154

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Air Quality Database and Analytical Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. with Ohio University and Texas A&M University - Kingsville as subcontractors, will develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust computer application for NETL to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. Efforts will be made to include, to the greatest extent possible, ambient air data collected by other agencies in the upper Ohio River valley region, such as U.S. EPA, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP), West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WV-DEP), Ohio EPA, and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). Although emphasis will be placed on data collected in the upper Ohio River valley region, the computer application developed under this Agreement will be designed, to the greatest extent possible, to access data collected at NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring sites outside the region, such as sites operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the Great Smoky Mountains (under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI26-98FT40406) and by Southern Research Institute in North Birmingham, AL (under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40770). The data base and analytical tool development effort will also be coordinated, to the greatest extent possible, with similar tools being developed for use by U.S. EPA. This will ensure that the database and analytical tools produced under this Agreement will be readily accessible to a wide variety of stakeholders.

155

Modal parameter extraction from large operating structures using ambient excitation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique called the Natural Excitation Technique or has been developed to response extract response parameters from large operational structure when subjected to random and unmeasured forces such as wind, road noise, aerodynamics, or waves. Six applications of NExT to ambient excitation testing and NExT analysis are surveyed in this paper with a minimum of technical detail. In the first application, NExT was applied to a controlled-yaw Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). By controlling the yaw degree of freedom an important class of rotating coordinate system effects are reduced. A new shape extraction procedure was applied to this data set with good results. The second application was to a free-yaw HAWT. The complexity of the response has prompted further analytical studies and the development of a specialized visualization package. The third application of NExT was to a parked three-bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in which traditional modal testing could not excite all modes of interest. The shape extraction process used cross-correlation functions directly in a time-domain shape-fitting routine. The fourth application was to ground transportation systems. Ongoing work to improve driver and passenger comfort in tractor-trailer vehicles and to refine automobile body and tire models will use NExT. NExT has been used to process ambient vibration data for Finite Element Model correlation and is being used to study Structural Health Monitoring with ambient excitation. Shape fitting was performed using amplitude and phase information taken directly from the cross-spectra. The final application is to an offshore structure. This work is on-going, however initial studies have found a high-modal density, high noise content, and sparse data set.

James, G.H. III; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of the enclosure overspray examined by AFM also demonstrated the presence of agglomerates for the Au QDs. The AFM system was not able to resolve individual QDs as was the STEM. Chemical fingerprinting of the QDs with STEM/EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) was performed for the Cd-Se surface deposition, but not the aerosol. Both STEM and AFM background characterization by morphology and chemical fingerprinting were performed throughout the laboratory for a period of about one year. Outdoor sources were primarily biological, combustion fume, salt and other crustal particles. Indoor sources were primarily paper/clothing fibers, spray-on insulation fragments, fiber glass, and human skin cells.

Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based on Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based On Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels: FY 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Management’s Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, CAU 370, suggest that radioactive material may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Although DRI initially looked at the CAU 370 site, given that it could not be confirmed that migration of contamination into the channel was natural, an alternate study site was selected at CAU 550. Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radioactivity may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). Figure 1 shows the results of a low-elevation aerial survey (Colton, 1999) in Area 8. The numbered markers in Figure 1 identify ground zero for three safety experiments conducted in 1958 [Oberon (number 1), Ceres (number 2), and Titania (number 4)] and a weapons effects test conducted in 1964, Mudpack (number 3). This survey suggests contaminants may be migrating down the ephemeral channels that traverse CAU 550. Note particularly the lobe of higher concentration extending southeastward at the south end of the high concentration area marked as number 3 in Figure 1. CAU 550 in Area 8 of the NNSS was selected for the study because the aerial survey indicates that a channel mapped on the United States Geological Survey topographic map of the area traverses the south end of the area of surface contamination; this channel lies south of the point marked number 3 in Figure 1, and anecdotal information indicates that sediment has been deposited on the road bordering the southeast boundary of the CAU from an adjacent channel (Traynor, J, personal communication, 2011). Because contamination is particularly close to the boundary of CAU 550, Smoky CA, it is important to know if contaminants are moving, what meteorological conditions result in movement of contaminated soils, and what particle size fractions associated with contamination are involved. Closure plans are being developed for the CAUs on the NNSS. The closure plans may include post-closure monitoring for possible release of radioactive contaminants. Determining the potential for transport of contaminated soils under ambient climatic conditions will facilitate an appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring program.

Julianne J. Miller, Steve A. Mizell, Greg McCurdy, and Scott A. Campbell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides.

Imrich, K.J.; Leader, D.R.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

164

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

165

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

166

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site...

167

Remediation of Uranium-Contaminated Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The shallow alluvial aquifer at Fry Canyon, Utah, is contaminated with up to 17 mgL uranium leached from processed tailings at an ore upgrader processing plant that was operated...

168

The Effects of Contamination on HVDC Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is currently documenting the various issues that should be considered when converting existing AC lines to high voltage DC (HVDC) lines. One issue that has not yet been dealt with properly is the selection of external DC insulation with respect to contamination. Since the beginning of overhead power transmission, it has been recognized that the performance of external insulation is adversely affected when the insulating surface is contaminated with airborne deposits such as marine salt or industrial...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

170

METHOD FOR REMOVING CONTAMINATION FROM PRECIPITATES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation process is presented for the recovery and purification of plutonium. When plutonium, in the tetravalent state, is carried on a bismuth phosphate precipitate, amounts of centain of the fission products are carried along with the plutonium. The improvement consists in washing such fission product contaminated preeipitates with an aqueous solution of ammonium hydrogen fluoride. since this solution has been found to be uniquely effective in washing fission production contamination from the bismuth phosphate precipitate.

Stahl, G.W.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ambiente di test per sistemi integrati basati su enterprise service bus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il SIASA Enterprise Manager Testing Tool è stato realizzato col compito primario di creare un ambiente di test atto a verificare la robustezza ed il… (more)

Bedini, Riccardo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A territorialização da produção de biodiesel no Brasil: energia e ordem ambiental internacional.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente trabalho tem por intento principal evidenciar relação entre a produção brasileira de biodiesel e seus motivadores gerados na ordem ambiental internacional. Esta ordem… (more)

Douglas Rodrigues Torres

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Climatic Model for the Prediction of Percentile Statistics for Ambient Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability density function (pdf) for ambient temperature is predicted from daily maximum and daily minimum temperature and sunshine, data by means of a climatic model.

Aleck J. Hunter

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

175

X-ray radiography measurements of diesel spray structure at engine-like ambient density.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray radiography has been used to examine the dependence of the near-nozzle fuel distribution of diesel sprays on injection pressure and ambient density. Measurements of sprays from two nozzles with different geometries, one extensively hydroground and the other largely non-hydroground, have been obtained to show how nozzles of different geometries respond to changes in ambient density and rail pressure. The spray penetration near the nozzle demonstrates little dependence on ambient density but a strong dependence on rail pressure. Comparison of these results with standard correlations in the literature show that, in the near-nozzle region examined in this study, the penetration is expected to show little dependence on ambient density. The spray width becomes much larger for both nozzles as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position by the square root of the density ratio between the fuel and the ambient gas accounts for the trends in spray width with ambient density for both nozzles. The radiography data can also be examined to determine the relative trends in the steady-state, mass-averaged axial velocity of the spray. The velocity decays more rapidly with axial distance as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position also accounts for the trend of velocity decay with ambient pressure.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y.-J.; Im, K.-S.; Wang, J.; Livermore Software Technology Corp.; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

X-ray radiography measurements of diesel spray structure at engine-like ambient density,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray radiography has been used to examine the dependence of the near-nozzle fuel distribution of diesel sprays on injection pressure and ambient density. Measurements of sprays from two nozzles with different geometries, one extensively hydroground and the other largely non-hydroground, have been obtained to show how nozzles of different geometries respond to changes in ambient density and rail pressure. The spray penetration near the nozzle demonstrates little dependence on ambient density but a strong dependence on rail pressure. Comparison of these results with standard correlations in the literature show that, in the near-nozzle region examined in this study, the penetration is expected to show little dependence on ambient density. The spray width becomes much larger for both nozzles as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position by the square root of the density ratio between the fuel and the ambient gas accounts for the trends in spray width with ambient density for both nozzles. The radiography data can also be examined to determine the relative trends in the steady-state, mass-averaged axial velocity of the spray. The velocity decays more rapidly with axial distance as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position also accounts for the trend of velocity decay with ambient pressure.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y.-J.; Im, K.-S.; Wang, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper addresses the real-time use of ambient wet bulb temperature measurements in the optimization of building air conditioning system control as a means to… (more)

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on superactivated carbons (by following detailed doping and activation conditions given in our publications, e.g., Ref. 12), the storage capacities are increased two-fold (doubled) while slightly more than doubled by Ru doping. The bridging technique remains highly empirical and sample-to-sample consistency is difficult to achieve; however, significant enhancements by spillover can be achieved if the synthesis and pretreatment are done properly. Pitfalls in sample syntheses for both metal doped and bridged sorbents are pointed out in the report; deviations from the synthesis and pretreatment conditions will lead to diminished or no spillover effects. Due to the high bulk densities of zeolites, metal doped zeolites are shown to be most promising for achieving high volumetric storage capacities by spillover. Kinetics of both spillover and reverse spillover (i.e., desorption) at ambient temperature are also studied. This report summarizes the progress made in the project.

Yang , Ralph T.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

179

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants, Water and Human Health: New Lessons from Alligators. Purpose: Many chemicals introduced into the environment ...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of multiple ecogenomics methods for determining ecosystem function in uranium-contaminated environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to attenuate nletal and radionuclide contamination.problem of metal and radionuclide contamination of soil and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

183

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overall objective of this project was to develop a technology platform for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system at elevated temperatures (500-1,000 F) and gasifier pressures to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants, including H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCl, Hg, and As. This technology development effort involved progressive development and testing of sorbent/catalytic materials and associated processes through laboratory, bench, pilot, and demonstration testing phases, coupled with a comprehensive systems analysis at various stages of development. The development of the regenerable RTI-3 desulfurization sorbent - a highly attrition-resistant, supported ZnO-based material - was the key discovery in this project. RTI-3's high attrition resistance, coupled with its high reactivity, effectively allowed its application in a high-velocity transport reactor system. Production of the RTI-3 sorbent was successfully scaled up to an 8,000-lb batch by Sued-Chemie. In October 2005, RTI obtained U.S Patent 6,951,635 to protect the RTI-3 sorbent technology and won the 2004 R&D 100 Award for development of this material. The RTI-3 sorbent formed the basis for the development of the High-Temperature Desulfurization System (HTDS), a dual-loop transport reactor system for removing the reduced sulfur species from syngas. An 83-foot-tall, pilot HTDS unit was constructed and commissioned first at ChevronTexaco's gasification site and later at Eastman's gasification plant. At Eastman, the HTDS technology was successfully operated with coal-derived syngas for a total of 3,017 hrs over a 12-month period and consistently reduced the sulfur level to <10 ppmv. The sorbent attrition rate averaged {approx}31 lb/MM lb of circulation. To complement the HTDS technology, which extracts the sulfur from syngas as SO{sub 2}, RTI developed the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP, operating at high pressure and high temperature, uses a small slipstream of syngas to catalytically reduce the SO{sub 2} produced in the warm syngas desulfurization process to elemental sulfur. To demonstrate this process at Eastman, RTI constructed and commissioned a skid-mounted pilot DSRP unit. During its 117-h operation, the DSRP system achieved 90% to 98% removal of the inlet sulfur. The DSRP catalyst proved very robust, demonstrating consistent reaction rates in multiple experiments over a 3-year period. Sorbent materials for removing trace NH{sub 3}, Hg, and As impurities from syngas at high temperature and high pressure were developed and tested with real syngas. A Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} sorbent for removal of CO{sub 2} from syngas at high temperature was also developed and tested. The Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} material demonstrates excellent CO{sub 2} removal, but its regeneration was found to be technically challenging. Additionally, reverse-selective polymer membrane materials were investigated for the bulk removal of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from syngas. These materials exhibited adequate separation at ambient conditions for these acid gases. Field testing of these membrane modules with real syngas demonstrated potential use for acid-gas separation from syngas. The HTDS/DSRP technologies are estimated to have a significant economic advantage over conventional gas cleanup technologies such as Selexol{trademark} and Rectisol. From a number of system studies, use of HTDS/DSRP is expected to give a 2-3 percentage point increase in the overall IGCC thermal efficiency and a significant reduction in capital cost. Thus, there is significant economic incentive for adaptation of these warm gas cleanup technologies due to significantly increased thermal efficiency and reduction in capital and operating costs. RTI and Eastman are currently in discussions with a number of companies to commercialize this technology.

B. S. Turk; R. P. Gupta; S. Gangwal; L. G. Toy; J. R. Albritton; G. Henningsen; P. Presler-Jur; J. Trembly

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

Virtual assistant: an artificial agent for enhancing content acquisition: how ambient media elicit information from humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel framework "Virtual Assistant" for enhancing content potentially procured by ambient media. The Virtual Assistant is an artificial agent simulating a human assistant shown in TV programs and prompts users to provide feedback ... Keywords: ambient media, artificial agent, content acquisition

Motoyuki Ozeki; Shunichi Maeda; Kanako Obata; Yuichi Nakamura

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Task-ambient office lighting. Final report, October 1979-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

A method is discussed for converting uniform office lighting systems to task-ambient lighting systems. The method requires only the use of a light meter and a mirror. A correlation between the method and equivalent sphere illumination is shown. Several examples of offices converted from uniform lighting to task-ambient lighting are discussed.

Pierpoint, W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DomoML: an integrating devices framework for ambient intelligence solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within an ambient intelligence context, this paper presents an approach to Human Home Interaction through the adoption of the DomoML web service based framework. This framework consists of a suite of XML based languages aiming to describe and interconnect ... Keywords: DomoML, REST, ambient intelligence, devices as services, human home interaction, integration, ontology, web services

Lorenzo Sommaruga; Tiziana Formilli; Nicola Rizzo

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Knowledge representation and case-based reasoning in a knowledge management system for ambient intelligence products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the theoretical background and realization of a KM system for the technically advanced customer and product support in the Ambient Intelligence (AmI) domain. Current products include more and more elements of AmI. AmI area is still ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, case-based reasoning, customer support system, diagnostics system, knowledge management system, knowledge representation

Ljubisa Urosevic; Sandor Kopacsi; Dragan Stokic; Ana Rita Campos; Geza Bognar

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ambient Assisted Living and Care in The Netherlands: The Voice of the User  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology can assist older adults to remain living in the community. Within the realm of information and communication technologies, smart homes are drifting toward the concept of ambient assisted living (AAL). AAL-systems are more responsive to user ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Assistive Technology, Needs, Older Adults, Smart Homes, User Perspectives

J. van Hoof; E. J. M. Wouters; H. R. Marston; B. Vanrumste; R. A. Overdiep

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A review on vision techniques applied to Human Behaviour Analysis for Ambient-Assisted Living  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Behaviour Analysis (HBA) is more and more being of interest for computer vision and artificial intelligence researchers. Its main application areas, like Video Surveillance and Ambient-Assisted Living (AAL), have been in great demand in recent ... Keywords: Action recognition, Activities of daily living (ADLs), Activity recognition, Ambient-Assisted Living, Computer vision, Human behaviour, Motion analysis

Alexandros André Chaaraoui; Pau Climent-Pérez; Francisco Flórez-Revuelta

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

Weston, Ken

191

Linking ecosystem scale vegetation change to shifts in carbon and water cycling: the consequences of widespread piñon mortality in the Southwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality. Piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, were extremely vulnerable to this drought. An abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) across 1.5 million ha triggered rapid and extensive changes in the structure of PJ woodlands with potentially large, yet unknown, consequences for ecosystem services and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate system. Given the spatial extent of PJ woodlands (3rd largest biome in the US) and climatic predictions of increased frequency and intensity of drought in the region, it is crucial to understand the consequences of these disturbances on regional carbon and energy dynamics, biogeochemical processes and atmospheric CO2. The overall objective of our research was to quantify what impact widespread mortality of piñon trees has for carbon and water cycling in PJ woodlands. Our specific objectives for this proposal were: 1) Quantify the carbon, water and energy exchange trajectory after mortality in PJ woodlands; 2) Determine the mechanisms controlling the response and recovery of ecosystem production and respiration processes following large-scale piñon mortality; 3) Use the relationships we measure between ecosystem structure and function PJ woodlands recover from mortality to scale the results of our study up to the regional scale.

Litvak, Marcy Ellen [University of New Mexico

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

193

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

195

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Melioration of the radiocesium contaminated land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method is described of radiocesium fixation in soils contaminated by this radionuclide. To immobilize radiocesium, the soil surface is treated with aqueous hexacyanoferrate solution of alkaline metals. It has been experimentally shown that application of K4 [Fe(CN)6]{\\bullet}3H2O at a rate of 1,3g/kg soil reduces the fraction of exchangeable 137Cs 100-fold (100 times). The method is effective for the plots where contamination is concentrated in the top 1 - 2 cm soil layer.

I. E. Epifanova; E. G. Tertyshnik

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

198

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

199

Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization  

SciTech Connect

Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68º latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent regulations on NO, emissions are promoting the use of lean premix (LPM) combustion for industrial gas turbines. LPM combustors avoid locally stoichiometric combustion by premixing fuel and the air upstream of the reaction region, thereby eliminating the high temperatures that produce thermal NO.. Unfortunately, this style of combustor is prone to combustion oscillation. Significant pressure fluctuations can occur when variations in heat release periodically couple pressure to acoustic modes in the combustion chamber. These oscillations must be controlled because resulting vibration can shorten the life of engine hardware. Laboratory and engine field testing have shown that instability regimes can vary with environmental conditions. These observations prompted this study of the effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability. Tests are conducted on a sub-scale combustor burning natural gas, propane, and some hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixtures. A premix, swirl-stabilized fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines is used. Experimental and numerical results describe how stability regions may shift as inlet air temperature, humidity, and fuel composition are altered. Results appear to indicate that shifting instability instability regimes are primarily caused by changes in reaction rate.

Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States); Robey, E.H. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

Estimation of Radionuclide Content in Contaminated Laundry  

SciTech Connect

Radioactively contaminated laundry is normally sent off site for processing. Laundry is defined as radiologically contaminated anti-cs and respirators. This laundry is shipped as "limited quantity," in accordance with 49CFR173.421. This requires that 95% of the radionuclides shipped are characterized and quantified. In addition, the total quantity must be 10(-3) below the A2 limits specified in 49CFR173. In any facility evaluated, the most conservative (highest activity) waste stream was used as the source term. If a new waste stream is established for a facility, its normalized activity should be compared to the evaluated waste stream to ensure the limits are not exceeded. This article documents a method used for estimating the radionuclide content in contaminated laundry. The maximum values were compared to 49CFR173. Itwas determined that if the contaminated laundry/respirators are shipped in an Interstate Nuclear Services (INS), L-59, limited quantity shipping container and the highest contact radiation level on any side, as measured with an ion chamber, does not exceed 0.5 mR h(-1), the container complies with the requirements of 49CFR173 and could be shipped "limited quantity" from any of the facilities evaluated.

Schrader, Bradley J

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A 50 year comparison of ambient ocean noise near San Clemente Island: A bathymetrically complex coastal region off Southern California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?1993?. “Wind dependence of deep ocean ambient noise at lowS. M. ?2006?. “Increases in deep ocean ambient noise in theResearch Council ?2003?. Ocean Noise and Marine Mammals ?Na-

McDonald, Mark A; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M; Ross, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ultra low head ambient pressure hydroturbine. Technical report, fiscal year one, fourth quarter ending June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the testing and design of a model for a ultra head ambient pressure hydroturbine.

NONE

1998-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

Post, R.F.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Challenges for Widespread Renewables Deployment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biogas Geothermal Solar Biomass Biomass (Co-Fired) Wind © 2009 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. 9 Key Issues for Further Study ...

207

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

208

Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Analysis of Contaminant Rebound in Ground Water in Extraction Wells at the Tuba City,...

209

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

Single- and few-layer graphene by ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on nickel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process is used to fabricate graphene based films consisting of one to several graphene layers across their area. Polycrystalline Ni thin films are used and the graphene ...

Reina Ceeco, Alfonso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling Ambient Carbon Monoxide Trends to Evaluate Mobile Source Emissions Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression models have been used with poor success to detect the effect of emission control programs in ambient concentration measurements of carbon monoxide. An advanced CO regression model is developed whose form is based on an understanding of ...

Robin L. Dennis; Mary W. Downton

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Effect of Ambient Stratification and Moisture on the Motion of Atmospheric Undular Bores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical model is used to examine the effects of ambient stratification on the behavior of an atmospheric undular bore. It is shown that stratification reduces the amplitude of the disturbance at low levels by allowing energy to propagate ...

N. Andrew Crook

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Influence of Bubbles on Ambient Noise in the Ocean at High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of ambient noise in the ocean at high wind speeds reveal significant departures in spectral shape from previously reported values at lower wind speeds. The observations were made in open ocean conditions in Queen Charlotte Sound, ...

David M. Farmer; David D. Lemon

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An open distributed framework for adaptive user interaction in ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Challenges of handling user interaction in Ambient Intelligence environments are manifold. The systems installed in these environments are highly distributed with dynamic configurations in terms of integrated devices and installed applications. Context-awareness, ...

Mohammad-Reza Tazari

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effetti del compost sulla biodiversita in impianti di wildflowers in ambiente urbano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Con l’avvento dell’industrializzazione, a partire da metà ottocento, molte persone legate all’ambiente rurale, abbandono le campagne per dirigersi verso i centri città. Nascevano le prime… (more)

FAVERO, STEFANO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Yungang Wang 1 , Jiaoyan Huang 2,a , Philip K. Hopke 3,* , Oliver V. Rattigan 4 , David C....

218

A Triple-Path Denuder Instrument for Ambient Particulate Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field instrument for sampling sulfate and nitrate particulate matter in a controlled chemical environment has been constructed and field tested. The instrument contains HNO3 and NH3 denuders and an ambient air path, all connected by manifold to ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Bryan J. Johnson; Robert J. Hammer

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

Sparks, Donald L.

220

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Fate and Exposure Modeling of Environmental Contaminants Speaker(s): Mathew MacLeod Date: June 29, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Chemical products pervade modern society, and furnish unprecedented wealth and comfort to citizens of countries with industrialized economies. Demand for products such as pesticides, industrial chemicals, flame-retardants and additives for consumer products requires large scale production and distribution of these chemicals, and they are inevitably released into the environment. Responsible management of chemicals therefore requires a quantitative understanding of amounts released, how the chemicals partition and travel in the environment, and how they might expose and thus adversely affect human and ecological populations. This

222

Determination of mobile source emission fraction using ambient field measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted a series of experiments in 1995 to quantify emission rates of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and speciated nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from in-use vehicles in several highway tunnels. This report describes a parallel effort in which ambient hydrocarbon samples were collected by DRI at several sites in the Boston and Los Angeles areas to determine the mobile source emissions contributed to total ambient NMHC using receptor modeling.

Fujita, E.M.; Lu, Z.; Sheetz, L.; Harshfield, G.; Zielinska, B.

1997-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

224

Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

Rick Demmer

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, C.G.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

Francis, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to one half inch. Decontamination efforts were so successful the balance of the buildings could be demolished using conventional methods. The shavers helped keep the project on schedule while the vacuum system eliminated the potential for contaminants becoming airborne.

Mullen, Lisa K. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

230

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

231

New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership Role of IEST in Shaping Future Research and Practices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

updated.. WG–CC902: MIL-HDBK-406: Contamination Controland Clean Work Stations; MIL-HDBK-407: Contamination Control

Xu, Tengfang; Eudy, Jane; Berndt, Charles

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

BIOREMEDIATION OF URANIUM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND WASTES.  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (i) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (ii) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na released into solution are removed, thus reducing the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

FRANCIS,A.J.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Recovery of Mercury From Contaminated Liquid Wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Base Contract program emphasized the manufacture and testing of superior sorbents for mercury removal, testing of the sorption process at a DOE site, and determination of the regeneration conditions in the laboratory. During this project, ADA Technologies, Inc. demonstrated the following key elements of a successful regenerable mercury sorption process: (1) sorbents that have a high capacity for dissolved, ionic mercury; (2) removal of ionic mercury at greater than 99% efficiency; and (3) thermal regeneration of the spent sorbent. ADA's process is based on the highly efficient and selective sorption of mercury by noble metals. Contaminated liquid flows through two packed columns that contain microporous sorbent particles on which a noble metal has been finely dispersed. A third column is held in reserve. When the sorbent is loaded with mercury to the point of breakthrough at the outlet of the second column, the first column is taken off-line and the flow of contaminated liquid is switched to the second and third columns. The spent column is regenerated by heating. A small flow of purge gas carries the desorbed mercury to a capture unit where the liquid mercury is recovered. Laboratory-scale tests with mercuric chloride solutions demonstrated the sorbents' ability to remove mercury from contaminated wastewater. Isotherms on surrogate wastes from DOE's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee showed greater than 99.9% mercury removal. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests on actual Y-12 Plant wastes were also successful. Mercury concentrations were reduced to less than 1 ppt from a starting concentration of 1,000 ppt. The treatment objective was 50 ppt. The sorption unit showed 10 ppt discharge after six months. Laboratory-scale tests demonstrated the feasibility of sorbent regeneration. Results show that sorption behavior is not affected after four cycles.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

THE DESIGN OF A RADIOACTIVITY CONTAMINATION METER  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the design and performance of a portable instrument for measurement of radiation from small quantities of radioactive contamination. The device weighs 4 lb 2 oz, operates on a single flashlight battery for 200 hr, and operates at low temperatures with the proper battery. The most novel feature is a clockworkdriven chopper for a-c. The circuit includes cold cathode tubes and a halogen-quenched G-M tube. Reliability was emphasized in the design. (T.R.H.)

Goulding, F.S.

1954-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

Decreasing aqueous mercury concentrations to achieve safe levels in fish: examining the water-fish relationship in two point-source contaminated streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) and White Oak Creek (WOC) are two mercury-contaminated streams located on the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. East Fork Poplar Creek is the larger and more contaminated of the two, with average aqueous mercury (Hg) concentrations exceeding those in reference streams by several hundred-fold. Remedial actions over the past 20 years have decreased aqueous Hg concentrations in EFPC by 85 %. Fish fillet concentrations, however, have not responded to this decrease in aqueous Hg and remain above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency s ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) of 0.3 mg/kg. The lack of correlation between aqueous and fish tissue Hg concentrations in this creek has led to questions regarding the usefulness of target aqueous Hg concentrations and strategies for future remediation efforts. White Oak Creek has a similar contamination history but aqueous Hg concentrations in WOC are an order of magnitude lower than in EFPC. Despite the lower aqueous Hg concentrations, fish fillet concentrations in WOC have also been above the AWQC, making the most recent aqueous Hg target of 200 ng/L in EFPC seem unlikely to result in an effective decrease in fillet Hg concentrations. Recent monitoring efforts in WOC, however, suggest an aqueous total Hg threshold above which Hg bioaccumulation in fish may not respond. This new information could be useful in guiding remedial actions in EFPC and in other point-source contaminated streams.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Valentine, Charles S [ORNL; Gregory, Scott M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Time-resolved shadowgraphic study of femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures  

SciTech Connect

Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures between 1 atm and 4 x 10{sup -4} Pa is investigated using a femtosecond time-resolved shadowgraphic method. It is observed that as the ambient air pressure decreases, the contact front becomes more and more distinct for a certain pressure range, demonstrating that the confinement effect of the ambient air to the ablated target material can play a critically important role in the laser ablation process. It is also found that the concentric and semicircular stripe pattern, which results from the diffraction of the probe beam by the expanding plume of a specific material state and is typically observed in the shadowgraphs for 1-2 ns delay time, gradually blurs and disappears while the ambient air pressure decreases from 1 atm to 7000 Pa. If a prepulse or a relatively large pulse pedestal exists before the main pulse, however, the stripe pattern can still be observed even though the ambient air pressure is 5 x 10{sup -4} Pa. It is thus inferred that what contributes to the formation of the unique stripe pattern is a mixture of the ejected target material and ionized background gas induced by the femtosecond laser ablation.

Wu Zehua; Zhu Xiaonong; Zhang Nan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

HISTORY OF MERCURY USE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Between 1950 and 1963 approximately 11 million kilograms of mercury (Hg) were used at the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 NSC) for lithium isotope separation processes. About 3% of the Hg was lost to the air, soil and rock under facilities, and East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) which originates in the plant site. Smaller amounts of Hg were used at other Oak Ridge facilities with similar results. Although the primary Hg discharges from Y-12 NSC stopped in 1963, small amounts of Hg continue to be released into the creek from point sources and diffuse contaminated soil and groundwater sources within Y-12 NSC. Mercury concentration in EFPC has decreased 85% from not, vert, similar2000 ng/L in the 1980s. In general, methylmercury concentrations in water and in fish have not declined in response to improvements in water quality and exhibit trends of increasing concentration in some cases.Mercury discharges from an industrial plant have created a legacy contamination problem exhibiting complex and at times counter-intuitive patterns in Hg cycling.

Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Need for a contamination control textbook  

SciTech Connect

Since the authors have become associated with contamination control technology they have repeatedly found themselves searching for technical information that was either never documented and therefore never reached a technical journal or was too specific to appear in a technical article. On countless occasions they have found other workers frustrated over the same lack of concise and up to date information in the relatively broad and interdisciplinary field of surface science, surface cleaning, and clean room operation and design. It is for these reasons that the authors wish to suggest formally that those engineers, chemists, technicians, and surface scientists working in this field collectively create a textbook that they may use as their first reference and teaching book. The text of this paper suggests a topical outline for a book and gives examples of the kinds of information that it should contain and the types of questions it should address. Included is an extensive bibliography recently collected showing the diversity of disciplines that those working in contamination control must be knowledgeable of and the variety of publications and journals in which these reports and articles are generally found.

Stowers, I.F.; Patton, H.G.; Guntrum, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

In-situ remediation system for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume is described. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 refs., 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like.

Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC); Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Kaback, Dawn S. (Aiken, SC)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

244

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

245

Microscopic characterization of radionuclide contaminated soils to assist remediation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of optical, scanning, and analytical electron microscopies have been used to describe the nature of radionuclide contamination at several sites. These investigations were conducted to provide information for remediation efforts. This technique has been used successfully with uranium-contaminated soils from Fernald, OH, and Portsmouth, OH, thorium-contaminated soil from a plant in Tennessee, plutonium-contamination sand from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and incinerator ash from Los Alamos, NM. Selecting the most suitable method for cleaning a particular site is difficult if the nature of the contamination is not understood. Microscopic characterization allows the most appropriate method to be selected for removing the contamination and can show the effect a particular method is having on the soil. A method of sample preparation has been developed that allows direct comparison of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, enabling characterization of TEM samples to be more representative of the bulk sample.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for Primary lithium/air batteries operated in Ambient Enviroment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection and optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for ambient operations of lithium/air batteries has been studied. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between lithium anode and water during discharge process. It is critical to make the electrolytes with high polarity so that it can reduce wetting and flooding of carbon based air electrode and lead to improved battery performance. For ambient operations, the viscosity, ionic conductivity, and oxygen solubility of the electrolyte are less important than the polarity of organic solvents once the electrolyte has reasonable viscosity, conductivity, and oxygen solubility. It has been found that PC/EC mixture is the best solvent system and LiTFSI is the most feasible salt for ambient operations of Li/air batteries. Battery performance is not very sensitive to PC/EC ratio or salt concentration.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

Detection of contamination of municipal water distribution systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the detection of contaminates of a fluid in a conduit. The conduit is part of a fluid distribution system. A chemical or biological sensor array is connected to the conduit. The sensor array produces an acoustic signal burst in the fluid upon detection of contaminates in the fluid. A supervisory control system connected to the fluid and operatively connected to the fluid distribution system signals the fluid distribution system upon detection of contaminates in the fluid.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing.

Donaldson, Terrence L. (Lenior City, TN); Wilson, James H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Recovery from Mercury Contamination in the Second Songhua River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. , & Rubin, J. R. (2005). Mercury levels and relationshipsJ. , et al. (1999). Mercury in contaminated coastalEnvironmental costs of mercury pollution. Science of the

Zhang, Z. S.; Sun, X. J.; Wang, Q. C.; Zheng, D. M.; Zheng, N.; Lv, X. G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell System Contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Contaminants Material Screening Data NREL designed this interactive material selector tool to help fuel cell developers and material suppliers explore the results...

252

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and...

253

Ellipsometric Measurement of Contamination in an Oil Pumped uhv System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determinations have been made of oil contamination on a surface in an oil pumped uhv system for DC702 and DC705 oil

R. M. Rollason; R. W. Fane; W. E. J. Neal

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

255

Bioremediation of Diesel Contaminated Soil Using Spent Mushroom Compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting has been shown to be an effective bioremediation technique for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. In this research, spent mushroom compost (SMC), a sustainable,… (more)

Eramo, Alessia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory considered a new idea: using contaminated and unused land to grow crops for biofuel. Negri and Gopalakrishnan knew that hardy, inedible plants like switchgrass or poplar...

257

The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Institute www.hnei.hawaii.edu The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Richard Rocheleau Trent Molter William Collins Silvia Wessel Hawaii...

258

T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knox and R. Sharitz. 2005. Phytoremediation potential of native trees in a uranium and thorium contaminated wetland. J. Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chem. 264:417-422. Whicker, F....

259

Method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants in aqueous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for destroying organic contaminants, such as trichloroethylene, in aqueous liquids, such as groundwater, utilizing steam stripping integrated with biodegradation. The contaminated aqueous liquid is fed into a steam stripper causing the volatilization of essentially all of the organic contaminants and a portion of the aqueous liquid. The majority of the aqueous liquid is discharged from the steam stripper. The volatilized vapors are then condensed to the liquid phase and introduced into a bioreactor. The bioreactor contains methanotrophic microorganisms which convert the organic contaminants into mainly carbon dioxide. The effluent from the bioreactor is then recycled back to the steam stripper for further processing. 2 figures.

Donaldson, T.L.; Wilson, J.H.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

260

2011 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Recycling of Contaminated ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Removal of contaminants such as the coat and organic materials- applied for protection and appearance- are the tail that wags the recycling dog. Successful ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

Underwood, Richard Paul (Allentown, PA); Makitka, III, Alexander (Hatfield, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium window surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined.

Gmur, N.F.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assessment of heavy metal contamination of roadside soils in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2008 ... heavy metals was found using factor analysis. Keywords Heavy metals Á Roadside soils Á. Transportation period Á Contamination index Á.

264

Effect of System Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquid-based contaminants derived from structural plastics and assembly aid materials (lubricant, grease, adhesive, seal). A minor part of our efforts is focused on an in situ...

265

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

266

NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Map of U.S. Map of Potential Limbo Land Sites for Consideration for Renewable Energy Technology Development. Enlarge image NREL's...

267

Análise política, econômica e ambiental da nova política energética européia: um enfoque sobre a indústria brasileira de bioetanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O estudo proposto tem como objetivo conduzir uma análise política, ambiental e econômica da nova política energética européia em relação à indústria brasileira do bioetanol.… (more)

Luana Ladu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various urban sulfate aerosol production mechanisms.radius of an evaporating aerosol droplet in which oxidationEnvironment THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR:

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

271

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

272

Cleaning oil contaminated beaches with chemicals  

SciTech Connect

Oil-dispersing chemicals were treated for cleaning persistent-type crude oil from experimentally contaminated New Jersey coastal beaches and were found to be generally ineffective. Although they completely cleaned the surface of the oiled sand, they removed little of the total oil. Instead they caused the oil to penetrate more deeply into the underlying sand, thereby compounding the pollution problem by expanding the zone of pollution, complicating any subsequent mechanical removal and, possibly, causing the oil to persist longer. Chemical treatment failed to induce quicksand or cause perceptible erosion of beach sand. A decrease in the cohesiveness of the sand was observed, but this also occurred in the presence of oil alone and could not be attributed to the presence of chemical.

1969-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

Gensheimer, Robert James, III

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Characterization of Ambient Ozone Levels in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient ozone data collected at two sites in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) are summarized and compared with data from an urban and a low-elevation rural site. The ozone climatology in the park is found to be similar to that of ...

Stephen F. Mueller

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Ambient dependence of the phase of nanowires grown by annealing brass  

SciTech Connect

The growth of oxide nanowires has been studied by the annealing of brass (Cu 65%, Zn 35%) at different annealing temperatures and in different ambient. The annealing temperature was varied from 400 deg. C to 650 deg. C. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results showed that the temperature has a significant effect on the density and size of the nanowires. The annealing temperature of 600 deg. C was found to be optimum for the growth of nanowires. The growth at 600 deg. C was observed in two ambient-air and moist nitrogen. Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) results on Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) showed that with changing the ambient from air to moist nitrogen, the phase of the nanowires changed from Zn doped CuO to Cu doped ZnO. This result can be of significance importance as it suggests the use of ambient for the tuning of phase of oxide nanowires and in turn for the tuning of their physical properties.

Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Deb, S. K. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced technology, Indore-452013 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

277

On the role of experiencelab in professional domain ambient intelligence research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept development for professional domain AmI solutions involves different stakeholders than those for consumer products, and puts different requirements on experience test methods and facilities. Philips ExperienceLab facility for experience research ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, experience research, healing environments, user-centered research

Evert Van Loenen; Richard Van De Sluis; Boris De Ruyter; Emile Aarts

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Oxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ronmental impact. Present technology uses steam reforming to produce synthesis gas which is converted into enhance- ment of the carbon balance of methane conversion by reforming with CO2 in order to "recycleOxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature

Mallinson, Richard

279

On gravity currents in stratified ambients V. K. Birman and E. Meiburga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On gravity currents in stratified ambients V. K. Birman and E. Meiburga Department of Mechanical August 2007 Detailed numerical simulations were conducted of gravity currents released from a lock of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2756553 I. INTRODUCTION Gravity currents represent a ubiquitous phenomenon

Meiburg, Eckart H.

280

Market Potential for Ambient Assisted Living Technology: The Case of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environment is an integration of stand-alone assistive technologies, with elements of smart homes, and telehealth services. Successful development of this emerging technology will promote the ability for older people ... Keywords: aging-in-place, gerontechnology, health monitoring, smart homes

Robert Savage; Yongjie Yon; Michael Campo; Ashleigh Wilson; Ravin Kahlon; Andrew Sixsmith

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Employing description logics in Ambient Intelligence for modeling and reasoning about complex situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence systems need to represent information about their environment and recognize relevant situations to perform appropriate actions proactively and autonomously. The context information gathered by these systems comes with imperfections ... Keywords: OWL DL, Situation-awareness, description logics, modeling context information, reasoning services

Thomas Springer; Anni-Yasmin Turhan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ris Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 Risø Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures, but it can be stored as a gas, a liquid or a solid. In the case of solid storage, the hydrogen exists as a chemical. Compared to fossil fuels such as gasoline, hydrogen has a very obvious shortfall in the amount of energy

283

Capacitive sensor-based hand gesture recognition in ambient intelligence scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Input devices based on arrays of capacitive proximity sensors allow the tracking of a user's hands in three dimensions. They can be hidden behind materials such as wood, wool or plastics without limiting their functionality, making them ideal for application ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, capacitive proximity sensors, gesture recognition, input devices, smart environments, user interfaces

Andreas Braun, Tim Dutz, Felix Kamieth

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Distributed web-based management framework for ambient reconfigurable services in the intelligent environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing and emerging technologies in the areas of mobile computing, wireless communications/ networking, sensor and control devices, context awareness, user interfaces, etc., provide the ground for the support of human activities in a certain space. ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, context awareness, intelligent environment, service management

V. Stavroulaki; K. Demestichas; E. Adamopoulou; P. Demestichas

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

aWESoME: A web service middleware for ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a Web Service Middleware infrastructure for Ambient Intelligence environments, named aWESoME. aWESoME is a vital part of the Smart IHU project, a large-scale Smart University deployment. The purpose of the proposed middleware within ... Keywords: Real-time and embedded systems, Ubiquitous computing, Web services, Wireless sensor networks

Thanos G. Stavropoulos; Konstantinos Gottis; Dimitris Vrakas; Ioannis Vlahavas

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An Evaluation of the WOTAN Technique of Inferring Oceanic Winds from Underwater Ambient Sound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of the WOTAN technique to estimate oceanic winds from underwater ambient sound is thoroughly evaluated. Anemometer winds and sound spectrum levels at 11 frequencies in the range 3–25 kHz from the FASINEX Experiment are used to ...

Svein Vagle; William G. Large; David M. Farmer

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Opportunistic routing in wireless sensor networks powered by ambient energy harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption is an important issue in the design of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) which typically rely on portable energy sources like batteries for power. Recent advances in ambient energy harvesting technologies have made it possible for sensor ... Keywords: Energy harvesting, Opportunistic routing, Wireless sensor networks

Zhi Ang Eu; Hwee-Pink Tan; Winston K. G. Seah

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ambient kitchen: designing situated services using a high fidelity prototyping environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Kitchen is a high fidelity prototype for exploring the design of pervasive computing algorithms and applications for everyday environments. The environment integrates data projectors, cameras, RFID tags and readers, object mounted accelerometers, ... Keywords: kitchen tasks, multi-modal prompting, people with dementia, pervasive computing, prompting, sensor networks assistance in daily activities, ubiquitous computing

Patrick Olivier; Guangyou Xu; Andrew Monk; Jesse Hoey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Anti-counterfeiting, key distribution, and key storage in an ambient world via physical unclonable functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtually all applications which provide or require a security service need a secret key. In an ambient world, where (potentially) sensitive information is continually being gathered about us, it is critical that those keys be both securely deployed ... Keywords: Fuzzy extractor, Helper data algorithm, Intrinsic PUF, Key distribution, LC-PUFs, Physical unclonable functions, SRAMs, Sensor nodes

Jorge Guajardo; Boris Škori?; Pim Tuyls; Sandeep S. Kumar; Thijs Bel; Antoon H. Blom; Geert-Jan Schrijen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran (Minneapolis, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R&D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved.

Winter, M.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment  

SciTech Connect

At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R&D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage < 10{sup -7} cc/seconds at 2500 psia. The bell jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved.

Winter, M.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Investigation of contamination bearing algae in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Recent discussions in the group have given rise to the problem of determining whether the beta contamination found in the Columbia River is carried by the algae which are found in the retention basin. The algae accumulate in the basin and apparently remain there longer than the retained water, and thus may be contaminated to a greater extent than the water itself.

Paas, H.J.

1947-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

Methods to quantify contamination effects on silica gel samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study to establish methods for measuring sorption degradation of contaminated solid desiccants and determining the identity and nature of the contaminants. A literature search was conducted to determine how contaminants affect the sorption properties of silica gel and advanced solid desiccant materials; the search yielded 73 papers. Silica gel was chosen for the contamination study; nine samples from various batches and suppliers were tested. Methods were established (1) to measure the degradation of desiccant adsorption capacity caused by regeneration processes and/or exposure to contaminants and (2) to determine the nature of these contaminants. Sorption measurements on a limited number of fresh silica gel samples showed that the water adsorption capacity varied about +-10%. The silica gel sample regenerated with electric heaters exhibited a maximum capacity degradation of 7%. Silica gel samples processed in other ways lost between 20% and 47% capacity, depending on the age and cycle of regeneration. The contaminants found were silicon, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Contamination can degrade the water sorption capacity of desiccants.

Pesaran, A.A.; Thomas, T.M.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A transportable fluorescence imagining system for detecting fecal contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feces are the primary source of many pathogenic organisms that can potentially contaminate agricultural commodities. Feces generally contain chlorophyll a and related compounds due to ingestion of plant materials. Fluorescent responses of these compounds ... Keywords: Fecal contamination, Fluorescence, Food safety, Multispectral imaging

Alan M. Lefcourt; Moon S. Kim; Yud-Ren Chen

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Guide for Characterization of Sites Contaminated with Energetic Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the remediation of federal facility sites contaminated with explosives or radioactive wastes. EPA/625/R-93 be contaminated by EM: · Firing ranges - Small-arms ranges - Artillery ranges - Anti-tank ranges - Tank/013. EPA Method (1994) Nitroaromatics and nitramines by HPLC. In Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste

298

Toxicology and Risk Assessment for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toxicology and Risk Assessment references for 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )or process contaminants. Toxicology and Risk Assessment for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs apri

299

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers by Tom Myers Abstract Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential and preferential flow through fractures--could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale

300

ORISE: Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose coefficients for 38 radionuclides based on NCRP Wound Model and ICRP biokinetic models This report is intended to assist health physics and medical staff in more rapidly assessing the potential dosimetric consequences of a contaminated wound. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the International Commission on Radiological Protection element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Examples are also provided on using the dose coefficients to generate derived reference

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

302

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

303

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

304

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Between 1950 and 1970 the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant generated transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste, which was buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This waste must now be retrieved and sent to a permanent disposal site. During retrieval the main contaminates to be controlled are compounds of plutonium and americium. Since these substances are small sized, and extremely mobile, airborne concentrations must be kept to a minimum to effectively eliminate personnel uptake during retrieval operations. This report describes an invention that relates to a system to control contamination due to TRU airborne particles and was developed consisting of an outer containment building, an inner containment area, a dust suppression system including an electrostatic contaminate capture subsystem, a contamination control system including a moisture control subsystem, a rapid monitoring subsystem, and a lifting and moving system including recovery and repackaging subsystems, and a lifting and moving system including recovery and repackaging subsystems.

Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Feldman, E.M.; Scott, D.W.; Mullen, C.K.; Meyer, L.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fall 1998 200 East area biological vector contamination report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the investigation into the cause of the spread of radioactive contamination in September and October 1998 at the Hanford Site's 200 East Area and its subsequent spread to the City of Richland Landfill; identify the source of the contamination; and present corrective actions. The focus and thrust of managing the incident was based on the need to accomplish the following, listed in order of importance: (1) protect the health and safety of the Site workers and the public; (2) contain and control the spread of contamination; (3) identify the source of contamination and the pathways for its spread; and (4) identify the causal factors enabling the contamination.

CONNELL, D.J.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Yimin (Urbana, IL); Kahn, Zakia (Palatine, IL); Man, Malcolm (Vancouver, CA)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Title Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6097E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wang, Yungang, Jiaoyan Huang, Philip K. Hopke, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, Mark J. Utell, and Thomas M. Holsen Journal Chemosphere Volume 92 Issue 4 Pagination 360-367 Date Published 07/2013 Abstract In the spring of 2008, a 260MWe coal-fired power plant (CFPP) located in Rochester, New York was closed over a 4 month period. Using a 2-years data record, the impacts of the shutdown of the CFPP on nearby ambient concentrations of three Hg species were quantified. The arithmetic average ambient concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate mercury (PBM) during December 2007-November 2009 were 1.6ng/m3, 5.1pg/m3, and 8.9pg/m3, respectively. The median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM significantly decreased by 12%, 73%, and 50% after the CFPP closed (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v4.1) identified six factors including O3-rich, traffic, gas phase oxidation, wood combustion, nucleation, and CFPP. When the CFPP was closed, median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM apportioned to the CFPP factor significantly decreased by 25%, 74%, and 67%, respectively, compared to those measured when the CFPP was still in operation (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis showed the greatest reduction in all three Hg species was associated with northwesterly winds pointing toward the CFPP. These changes were clearly attributable to the closure of the CFPP.

309

Exploring early evaluation techniques of ambient health promoting devices in home environments of senior citizens living independently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, our goal is to explore different early evaluation techniques and their effectiveness for designing better ambient health- promoting devices for the elderly. One cannot assess the complete impact of these devices without full implementation ... Keywords: Wizard of Oz, ambient technology, early evaluation methods, health monitoring devices, senior citizens, storyboarding, technology probe

Rajasee Rege; Heekyoung Jung; William Hazelwood; Greg Orlov; Kay Connelly; Kalpana Shankar

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Transuranic contaminated waste functional definition and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine the problem(s) of TRU waste classification and to document the development of an easy-to-apply standard(s) to determine whether or not this waste package should be emplaced in a geologic repository for final disposition. Transuranic wastes are especially significant because they have long half-lives and some are rather radiotoxic. Transuranic radionuclides are primarily produced by single or multiple neutron capture by U-238 in fuel elements during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Reprocessing of spent fuel elements attempts to remove plutonium, but since the separation is not complete, the resulting high-activity liquids still contain some plutonium as well as other transuranics. Likewise, transuranic contamination of low-activity wastes also occurs when the transuranic materials are handled or processed, which is primarily at federal facilities involved in R and D and nuclear weapons production. Transuranics are persistent in the environment and, as a general rule, are strongly retained by soils. They are not easily transported through most food chains, although some reconcentration does take place in the aquatic food chain. They pose no special biological hazard to humans upon ingestion because they are weakly absorbed from the gastrointestional tract. A greater hazard results from inhalation since they behave like normal dust and fractionate accordingly.

Kniazewycz, B.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Assessment of hot gas contaminant control  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

EVALUATION OF A METHOD USING COLLOIDAL GAS APHRONS TO REMEDIATE METALS-CONTAMINATED MINE DRAINAGE WATERS  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted in which three selected metals-contaminated mine drainage water samples were treated by chemical precipitation followed by flotation using colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs) to concentrate the precipitates. Drainage water samples used in the experiments were collected from an abandoned turn-of-the-century copper mine in south-central Wyoming, an inactive gold mine in Colorado's historic Clear Creek mining district, and a relatively modern gold mine near Rapid City, South Dakota. The copper mine drainage sample was nearly neutral (pH 6.5) while the two gold mine samples were quite acidic (pH {approx}2.5). Metals concentrations ranged from a few mg/L for the copper mine drainage to several thousand mg/L for the sample from South Dakota. CGAs are emulsions of micrometer-sized soap bubbles generated in a surfactant solution. In flotation processes the CGA microbubbles provide a huge interfacial surface area and cause minimal turbulence as they rise through the liquid. CGA flotation can provide an inexpensive alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). The CGA bubbles are similar in size to the bubbles typical of DAF. However, CGAs are generated at ambient pressure, eliminating the need for compressors and thus reducing energy, capital, and maintenance costs associated with DAF systems. The experiments involved precipitation of dissolved metals as either hydroxides or sulfides followed by flotation. The CGAs were prepared using a number of different surfactants. Chemical precipitation followed by CGA flotation reduced contaminant metals concentrations by more than 90% for the copper mine drainage and the Colorado gold mine drainage. Contaminant metals were concentrated into a filterable sludge, representing less than 10% of the original volume. CGA flotation of the highly contaminated drainage sample from South Dakota was ineffective. All of the various surfactants used in this study generated a large sludge volume and none provided a significant concentration factor with this sample. For the two samples where CGA flotation was effective, the separation was very rapid and the concentrate volume was reduced when compared to gravity separation under similar conditions. Effective separations were achieved with very low chemical dosages and low residence times, suggesting the possibility of economic viability for processes based on this concept. The CGA flotation experiments described in the following report were conducted to provide preliminary data with which to assess the technical feasibility of using the method for remediation of metals-contaminated mine drainage waters. The experiments were conducted using common, low-cost, precipitating reagents and CGA prepared from several surfactants. Results were evaluated in terms of metals concentration reduction, reagent consumption, and concentrate volume. The results of these preliminary experiments indicate that CGA flotation may be a useful tool for the treatment of some types of mine drainage.

R. Williams Grimes

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Comparing statistical tests for detecting soil contamination greater than background  

SciTech Connect

The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) recently issued a report that provides guidance on statistical issues regarding investigation and cleanup of soil and groundwater contamination under the Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. Included in the report are procedures for determining a background-based cleanup standard and for conducting a 3-step statistical test procedure to decide if a site is contaminated greater than the background standard. The guidance specifies that the State test should only be used if the background and site data are lognormally distributed. The guidance in WSDE allows for using alternative tests on a site-specific basis if prior approval is obtained from WSDE. This report presents the results of a Monte Carlo computer simulation study conducted to evaluate the performance of the State test and several alternative tests for various contamination scenarios (background and site data distributions). The primary test performance criteria are (1) the probability the test will indicate that a contaminated site is indeed contaminated, and (2) the probability that the test will indicate an uncontaminated site is contaminated. The simulation study was conducted assuming the background concentrations were from lognormal or Weibull distributions. The site data were drawn from distributions selected to represent various contamination scenarios. The statistical tests studied are the State test, t test, Satterthwaite`s t test, five distribution-free tests, and several tandem tests (wherein two or more tests are conducted using the same data set).

Hardin, J.W.; Gilbert, R.O.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Comparison of Near-field and Far-field Air Monitoring of Plutonium-contaminated Soils from the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Operation Roller Coaster, a series of nuclear material dispersal experiments, resulted in three areas (Clean Slates 1, 2, and 3) of widespread surface soil plutonium (Pu) contamination on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), located 225 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The State's Division of Environmental Protection raised concerns that dispersal of airborne Pu particles from the sites could result in undetected deposition further downwind that the background monitoring stations. Air monitoring data from different distances from the Clean Slate sites but during the same period of time were compared. From the available data, there is no indication that airborne PM10 particles are being transported to the farther distance,however, the data are statistically insufficient to conclude whether there is a difference in transport of respirable Pu particles to the closer verses the farther sites from the Clean Slate sites.

John L. Bowen; David S. Shafer

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

SciTech Connect

Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mercury Contamination in the Northeastern United States: Science-Based Decision Making About Fish Consumption .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mercury contamination poses a known threat to human health, yet the degree of contamination and resulting human exposure remains unknown in many regions. Assessments of… (more)

Shayler, Hannah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Comparison of Popular Remedial Technologies for Petroleum Contaminated Soils from Leaking Underground Storage Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. Bioremediation of Petroleum Contaminated Sites. BocaApplied Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons. Columbus:Eve. 1998. Remediation of Petroleum Contaminated Soils. Boca

Kujat, Jonathon D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

In Situ Experiment and Modelling of RC-Structure Using Ambient Vibration and Timoshenko Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, several experiments were reported using ambient vibration surveys in buildings to estimate the modal parameters of buildings. Their modal properties are full of relevant information concerning its dynamic behaviour in its elastic domain. The main scope of this paper is to determine relevant, though simple, beam modelling whose validity could be easily checked with experimental data. In this study, we recorded ambient vibrations in 3 buildings in Grenoble selected because of their vertical structural homogeneity. First, a set of recordings was done using a 18 channels digital acquisition system (CityShark) connected to six 3C Lennartz 5s sensors. We used the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique to extract the modal parameters of these buildings. Second, it is shown in the following that the experimental quasi-elastic behaviour of such structure can be reduced to the behaviour of a vertical continuous Timoshenko beam. A parametric study of this beam shows that a bijective relation exists bet...

Michel, Clotaire; Guéguen, Philippe; Boutin, Claude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Argonne CNM News: Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Silver nanowires SEM image of randomly assembled silver nanowires and low-resolution TEM image (inset) of a cross-sectional sample of an individual nanowire. Scale bar represents 500 nm SIlver nanowire with fivefold symmetry Schematic drawing of a silver nanowire with fivefold symmetry. Cross-section of individual silver nanowire High-resolution TEM image of a cross-sectional sample of an individual silver nanowire. Scale bar represents 5 nm. A stable non-face-centered-cubic phase in noble metal nanoparticles has been reported for this first time by researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (Nanophotonics & NanoBio Interfaces Groups) working with colleagues at the Advanced Photon Source and Electron Microscopy

322

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Morton Lippmann Date: May 17, 1997 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Most scientific studies that are relevant to the setting of the NAAQS were not designed or performed with that specific application in mind, resulting in bits and pieces of the overall puzzle. Despite these limitations, the particulate matter (PM) and O3 literature reviews and analyses in the recently issued EPA Criteria documents and staff papers are the best prepared and most comprehensive ever available to an EPA Administrator as a basis for NAAQS decisions. This seminar will discuss the scientific basis

323

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Title Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Rosseler, Olivier, Mohamad Sleiman, Nahuel V. Montesinos, Andrey Shavorskiy, Valerie Keller, Nicolas Keller, Marta I. Litter, Hendrik Bluhm, Miquel Salmeron, and Hugo Destaillats Journal J. Phys. Chem. Lett. Volume 4 Start Page 536 Issue 3 Pagination 536-541 Date Published 01/2013 Abstract Self-cleaning surfaces containing TiO2 nanoparticles have been postulated to efficiently remove NOx from the atmosphere. However, UV irradiation of NOx adsorbed on TiO2 also was shown to form harmful gas-phase byproducts such as HONO and N2O that may limit their depolluting potential. Ambient pressure XPS was used to study surface and gas-phase species formed during adsorption of NO2 on TiO2 and subsequent UV irradiation at λ = 365 nm. It is shown here that NO3-, adsorbed on TiO2 as a byproduct of NO2 disproportionation, was quantitatively converted to surface NO2 and other reduced nitrogenated species under UV irradiation in the absence of moisture. When water vapor was present, a faster NO3- conversion occurred, leading to a net loss of surface-bound nitrogenated species. Strongly adsorbed NO3- in the vicinity of coadsorbed K+ cations was stable under UV light, leading to an efficient capture of nitrogenated compounds.

325

Adsorption near ambient temperatures of methane, carbon tetrafluoride, and sulfur hexafluoride on commercial activated carbons  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption isotherms for CH{sub 4}, CF{sub 4}, and SF{sub 6} are measured at three or four temperatures near ambient on three commercial activated carbons. The data are reduced using a virial-type equation of adsorption. Using this equation, isosteric heats of adsorption are calculated. It is shown that this fundamental thermodynamic quantity provides a basis for differentiating between the carbons` micropore structures.

Jagiello, J.; Bandosz, T.J.; Putyera, K.; Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded probes for sampling at higher speeds and omni-directional inlets for low speed ambient sampling. The two systems operate at 780 L/min and 90 L/min. Another system was designed and tested for medium speed ambient sampling. This unit will be used as a reference sampler for speed ranges from zero to 20.12 m/s. This system consists of a Sierra-Andersen SA-246 inlet for sampling at speeds up-to 6.71 m/s (15 mph) and a shrouded probe operating at variable flow rate for sampling in speed range of 6.71 m/s and 20.12 m/s. An aircraft-borne shrouded probe was also tested at wind speeds as high as 50 m/s in an upgraded high speed wind tunnel.

Irshad, Hammad

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Projected compliance with the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the State of Maryland had no available ambient Federal Reference Method data on particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) but did have annual ambient data for particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM10) at twenty-four sites. The PM10 data was analyzed in conjunction with local annual and seasonal ZIP code-level emission inventories and with speciated PM2.5 data from four nearby monitors in the IMPROVE network (located in the national parks and wilderness areas) in an effort to predict annual average and seasonal high PM2.5 concentrations at the twenty-four PM10 monitor sites operated from 1992 to 1996. All seasonal high concentrations were predicted to be below the 24-hour PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at the sites operated in Maryland between 1992 and 1996. A geographic analysis of the emission inventories was also performed to evaluate the impact of PM2.5 emissions from Maryland`s power plants on fourteen monitor locations that were predicted to have a reading exceeding the annual NAAQS for any year.

Walsh, K.; Gardner, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

329

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S, and Flegal AR 2008. Mercury in the San Francisco Estuary.may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in Sancontaminants such as ele- mental mercury and cyanide used in

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

Jannik, G.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

Clark, E.A.

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

334

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion for Pinnacle Peak Substation PCB contaminated Electrical Equipment Removal Project located north of Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes drain and dispose of PCB contaminated oil from two bushings, and decontaminate one· bushing and rack, break apart PCB contaminated concrete and excavate PCB contaminated soil at Pinnacle Peak Substation. Western will be use existing access roads and vehicles such as cranes, backhoes, dozers, bucket trucks, crew trucks and pickup trucks to bring personnel and equipment to the work area. This work is necessary to maintain the safety and reliability of the bulk electrical system. The project is located in Maricopa County, Arizona. The attached map shows the

335

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

336

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

337

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

338

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites – 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

339

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites – 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides DOE Program/Project Managers, senior management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and remedial approaches...

340

Presentations and Papers on Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentations and papers 3-MCPD EFL, ILSI World Conference on Oilseed Processing, Fats & Oils Processing, Biofuels & Applications Presentations and Papers on Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid anal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Influence of Ground Clutter Contamination on Polarimetric Radar Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of ground clutter contamination on the estimation of polarimetric radar parameters, horizontal reflectivity (Zh), differential reflectivity (Zdr), correlation coefficient (?h?), and differential propagation phase (dp) was examined. ...

Katja Friedrich; Urs Germann; Pierre Tabary

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may 2010 Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in SanCA 94025 Abstract The hydraulic gold-mining process usedsediment created by hydraulic gold mining in the Sierra

Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Rapid and Robust Detection Methods for Poison and Microbial Contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time on-site monitoring of analytes is currently in high demand for food contamination, water, medicines, and ingestible household products that were never tested appropriately. Here we introduce chemical methods for ...

Lu, Peter J.

344

Mechanisms of metal release from contaminated coastal sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of trace metals in contaminated coastal sediments is poorly understood, yet critical for effective coastal management. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and quantify the mechanisms leading to the release ...

Kalnejais, Linda H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Contaminant Fate and Transport in North America: From Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contaminant Fate and Transport in North America: From Emission to Human Exposure Speaker(s): Mathew MacLeod Date: March 1, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

346

Effect of water contamination on aging of hydraulic oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A. Rozenberg, Influence of Lubricating Oils on Reliability and Life of ... Oil samples were contaminated with water by mixing with 0.I, 0.5 ... The reserve of antioxi-.

347

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

348

Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies.

Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fuzzy one-class classification model using contamination neighborhoods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuzzy classification model is studied in the paper. It is based on the contaminated (robust) model which produces fuzzy expected risk measures characterizing classification errors. Optimal classification parameters of the models are derived by minimizing ...

Lev V. Utkin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision analysis (DDA) (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). This new model includes the uncertainty in the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithology and hydraulic conductivity from the 1999 model as well as the uncertainty in the other flow and transport parameters from the 2000 DDA model. Additionally, the new model focuses on a much smaller region than was included in the earlier models, that is, the subsurface within the UC-1 land withdrawal area where the 1999 model predicted radionuclide transport will occur over the next 1,000 years. The purpose of this unclassified document is to present the modifications to the CNTA groundwater flow and transport model, to present the methodology used to calculate contaminant boundaries, and to present the Safe Drinking Water Act and risk-derived contaminant boundaries for the Faultless underground nuclear test CAU.

Greg Pohll; Karl Pohlmann; Jeff Daniels; Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A multilayer groundwater sampler for characterizing contaminant plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes activities related to the design and initial demonstration of a passive multilayer groundwater sampling system. The apparatus consists of remotely controlled cylinders filled with deionized water which are connected in tandem. Vertical fine structure of contaminants are easily defined. Using the apparatus in several wells may lead to three dimensional depictions of groundwater contamination, thereby providing the information necessary for site characterization and remediation.

Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

A multilayer groundwater sampler for characterizing contaminant plumes. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes activities related to the design and initial demonstration of a passive multilayer groundwater sampling system. The apparatus consists of remotely controlled cylinders filled with deionized water which are connected in tandem. Vertical fine structure of contaminants are easily defined. Using the apparatus in several wells may lead to three dimensional depictions of groundwater contamination, thereby providing the information necessary for site characterization and remediation.

Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

Phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater: lessons from the field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of plants and associated microorganisms to remove, contain, inactivate, or degrade harmful environmental contaminants (generally termed phytoremediation) and to revitalize contaminated sites is gaining more and more attention. In this review, prerequisites for a successful remediation will be discussed. The performance of phytoremediation as an environmental remediation technology indeed depends on several factors including the extent of soil contamination, the availability and accessibility of contaminants for rhizosphere microorganisms and uptake into roots (bioavailability), and the ability of the plant and its associated microorganisms to intercept, absorb, accumulate, and/or degrade the contaminants. The main aim is to provide an overview of existing field experience in Europe concerning the use of plants and their associated microorganisms whether or not combined with amendments for the revitalization or remediation of contaminated soils and undeep groundwater. Contaminations with trace elements (except radionuclides) and organics will be considered. Because remediation with transgenic organisms is largely untested in the field, this topic is not covered in this review. Brief attention will be paid to the economical aspects, use, and processing of the biomass. It is clear that in spite of a growing public and commercial interest and the success of several pilot studies and field scale applications more fundamental research still is needed to better exploit the metabolic diversity of the plants themselves, but also to better understand the complex interactions between contaminants, soil, plant roots, and microorganisms (bacteria and mycorrhiza) in the rhizosphere. Further, more data are still needed to quantify the underlying economics, as a support for public acceptance and last but not least to convince policy makers and stakeholders (who are not very familiar with such techniques).

Vangronsveld, J.; van der Lelie, D.; Herzig, R.; Weyens, N.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, K.; Ruttens, A.; Thewys, T.; Vassilev, A.; Meers, E.; Nehnevajova, E.; Mench, M.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Handbook of Remedial Alternatives for MGP Sites with Contaminated Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated sediment management is a rapidly developing and maturing field of environmental engineering, with an expansive set of publicly available documents in the scientific and engineering literature. This Handbook of Remedial Alternatives for MGP Sites with Contaminated Sediments provides a compendium of the state-of-the-practice from the literature, and augments it with practical case-study experience from the field. It is intended to provide MGP site-managers with a single source document for eva...

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Mullen, C.K.; Scott, D.W.; Feldman, E.M.; Meyer, L.C.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Management of Contaminated Autologous Grafts in Plastic Surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Contamination of autologous grafts unfortunately occurs in plastic surgery, but the literature provides no guidance for management of such incidents. Methods: American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery members were asked to complete an online survey that asked about the number and causes of graft contaminations experienced, how surgeons dealt with the problem, the clinical outcomes, and patient disclosure. Results: Nineteen hundred surgeons were asked to participate in the survey, and 223 responded. Of these, 70 % had experienced at least 1 graft contamination incident, with 26 % experiencing 4 or more. The most frequently reported reason for graft contamination was a graft falling on the floor (reported by 75%). Nearly two thirds of the contaminated grafts related to craniofacial procedures. Ninety-four percent of grafts were managed with decontamination and completion of the operation. The most common method of decontamination was washing with povidone-iodine, but this practice is contrary to recommendations in the literature. Only 3 surgeons (1.9%) said a clinical infection developed following decontaminated graft use. Patients were not informed in 60 % of graft contamination incidents. The survey results and review of the literature led

Robert F. Centeno; A Ankit R. Desai; Marla E. Watson; Ma C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day test period. The soil treatments in this study included: (1) the Bacillus sp., (2) the existing indigenous microorganisms, and (3) a sterile control. The disappearance of TNT, as measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was compared to the reduction in mutagenic activity of hexane:acetone solvent extracts, as measured in the Salmonella/microsome assay with the histidine requiring TA98 tester strain. The results indicated a similar TNT removal rate in all three treatments. The TNT in the microbial treatments started at approximately 47[]13 mg g[] soil. By day 360, this concentration was reduced to 28[]10 mg g soil in the Bacillus sp the indigenous microbial treatment. The sterile control treatment and 26[]8 mg g[] which was reduced to 22[]2 started with a day 0 TNT concentration of 31[]6 mg g [] day 360. This represented a disappearance of between 30-40% of the g [] y original TNT in all three treatments. The reduction in mutagenicity, as indicated by weighted activity calculations, differed between the microbial treatments and the sterile control. A 50-60% reduction was observed in the microbial treatments. In the boxes treated with the addition of the Bacillus sp. the weighted activity at a dose of 16 :g/plate started at 49[]13 net revenants per microgram solvent extract on microgram after 360 days. The solvent extracts from soil treated with indigenous microorganisms went from a weighted activity of 47[]15 net revenants per microgram on day 0 to 17[]5 on day 360. The sterile control did not reduce mutagenicity by any appreciable amount. The day 0 weighted activity was measured to be 44[]11 net revenants per microgram solvent extract and on day 360 it was 50[]1 . The TNT concentrations in the sterile control samples were lowest throughout the study however, the mutagenicity was highest.

Bokelmann, Annamarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Uraniferous Phosphates: Resource, Security Risk, or Contaminant  

SciTech Connect

The escalation of the price of uranium (U) yellow cake (summer high = $130/0.454 kg (lb) has called into question the continuing availability of sufficient stockpiles and ores to process. As was developed during the years following World War II, the establishment and maintenance of a strategic inventory is a reasonable consideration for today. Therefore, it becomes critical to look at potential secondary resources beyond the classical ore suites now being utilized. The most economically viable future secondary source seems to be the byproducts of the beneficiation of phosphoric acids derived from phosphate ores. Phosphorous (P) is an essential nutrient for plants; its deficiency can result in highly restrictive limitations in crop productivity. Acidic soils in tropical and subtropical regions of the world are often P deficient with high P-sorption (fixation) capacities. To correct this deficiency, efficient water-soluble P fertilizers are required. The use of raw phosphate rocks not only adds phosphate but also its contained contaminants, including uranium to the treated land. Another immediate difficulty is phosphogypsum, the standard byproduct of simple extraction. It, for practical purposes, has been selectively classified as TENORM by regulators. The imposition of these standards presents major current and future disposal and re-utilization problems. Therefore, establishing an economically viable system that allows for uranium byproduct extraction from phosphoric acids is desirable. Such a system would be dependent on yellow cake base price stability, reserve estimates, political conditions, nation-state commitment, and dependence on nuclear energy. The accumulation of yellow cake from the additional extraction process provides a valuable commodity and allows the end acid to be a more environmentally acceptable product. The phosphogypsum already accumulated, as well as that which is in process, will not make a viable component for a radiation disposal devise (RDD). Concern for weapon proliferation by rogue nation states from the byproduct production of yellowcake is an unlikely scenario. To extract the fissile U-235 (0.07%) isotope from the yellowcake (99.3%) requires the erection of a costly major gaseous diffusion or a cascading centrifuge facility. Such a facility would be extremely difficult to mask. Therefore, from a diminished security risk and positive economic and environmental viewpoints, the utilization of a phosphoric acid beneficiation process extracting uranium is desirable. (authors)

LeMone, D.V.; Goodell, Ph.C. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, Texas (United States); Gibbs, S.G. [U. T. Houston School of Public Health, El Paso, Texas (United States); Winston, J.W. [Medical Physicist, Radiological Physics, Inc., El Paso, Texas (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Noise in the Arctic Ocean,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol.for sound speed in the oceans,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol. 70,Pritchard, R. S. , “Arctic Ocean Background Noise Caused by

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Real-time automatic interpolation of ambient gamma dose rates from the Dutch radioactivity monitoring network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of radiological accidents and monitoring the spread of the contamination is of great importance. Following the Chernobyl accident many European countries have installed monitoring networks to perform this task. Real-time availability of automatically ... Keywords: Automatic interpolation, Interoperability, Kriging, Monitoring networks, Web services

Paul H. Hiemstra; Edzer J. Pebesma; Chris J. W. Twenhöfel; Gerard B. M. Heuvelink

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Straw Compost and Bioremediated Soil as Inocula for the Bioremediation of Chlorophenol-Contaminated Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straw compost and bioremediated soil as inocula for the bioremediation of chlorophenol-contaminated soil.

M M Laine; K S Jorgensen; M. Minna; Laine; Kirsten S. Jørgensen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

366

Challenges of the Global Water Shortage: Contamination of Water Resources by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISPOSAL GEOGENIC CONTAMINANTS #12;Sources: Mining and smelting Anaconda smelter BP-ARCO repository Clark

Mark, Pinsky

367

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES FOR GASEOUS CONTAMINANTS CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning the syngas from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system to meet the tolerance limits for contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, COS, NH{sub 3}, HCN, HCl, and alkali for fuel cell and chemical production applications. RTI's approach is to develop a modular system that (1) removes reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removes hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface area material; and (3) removes NH{sub 3} with acidic adsorbents. RTI is working with MEDAL, Inc., and North Carolina State University (NCSU) to develop polymer membrane technology for bulk removal of H{sub 2}S from syngas. These membranes are being engineered to remove the acid gas components (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O) from syngas by focusing on the ''solubility selectivity'' of the novel polymer compositions. The desirable components of the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) are maintained at high-pressure conditions as a non-permeate stream while the impurities are transported across the membrane to the low pressure side. RTI tested commercially available and novel materials from MEDAL using a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) permeation apparatus. H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} selectivities >30 were achieved, although there was a strong negative dependence with temperature. MEDAL believes that all the polymer compositions tested so far can be prepared as hollow fiber membrane modules using the existing manufacturing technology. For fuel cell and chemical applications, additional sulfur removal (beyond that achievable with the membranes) is required. To overcome limitations of conventional ZnO pellets, RTI is testing a monolith with a thin coating of high surface area zinc-oxide based materials. Alternatively, a regenerable sorbent developed by DOE/NETL (RVS-1) is being evaluated for this application. A multi-cycle test of 2-in. (5-cm) diameter monolith samples demonstrated that <0.5 ppm sulfur can be achieved. Removal of HCl vapors is being accomplished by low-cost materials that combine the known effectiveness of sodium carbonate as an active matrix used with enhanced surface area supports for greater reactivity and capacity at the required operating temperatures. RTI is working with SRI International on this task. Sorbents prepared using diatomaceous earth and sepiolite, impregnated with sodium carbonate achieved steady-state HCl level <100 ppb (target is 10 ppb). Research is continuing to optimize the impregnation and calcination procedures to provide an optimum pore size distribution and other properties. RTI and SRI International have established the feasibility of a process to selectively chemisorb NH3 from syngas on high surface area molecular sieve adsorbents at high temperatures by conducting a series of temperature-programmed reactions at 225 C (437 F). Significant levels of NH{sub 3} were adsorbed on highly acidic adsorbents; the adsorbed NH{sub 3} was subsequently recovered by heating the adsorbent and the regenerated adsorbent was reused. A comprehensive technical and economic evaluation of this modular gas cleaning process was conducted by Nexant to compare capital and operating cost with existing amine based processes. Nexant estimated a total installed cost of $42 million for the RTI process for a 500 MWe IGCC plant based on its current state of development. By comparison, Nexant estimated the installed cost for an equivalent sized plant based on the Rectisol process (which would achieve the same sulfur removal specification) to be $75 million. Thus the RTI process is economically competitive with a state-of-the-art process for syngas cleanup.

B.S. Turk; T. Merkel; A. Lopez-Ortiz; R.P. Gupta; J.W. Portzer; G.N. Krishnan; B.D. Freeman; G.K. Fleming

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

DE FG02-06ER64193: Final Technical Report Nucleation and Precipitation Processes in the Vadose Zone during Contaminant Transport  

SciTech Connect

The report describes results of experiments to synthesize and characterize uranium(VI)-silicates from solutions containing dissolved U(VI), Si, Na, and nitrate as a function of solution pH and Si:U ratio under ambient conditions. Solids characterization was accomplished by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) analysis. The purpose was to develop a framework for describing the formation of U(VI)-silicate solids that might form in contaminated soils and sediments under oxidizing conditions in the presence of aqueous uranium, and are known to exist naturally in geologic uranium deposits.

Kathryn L. Nagy

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

Model for Electron-Beam-Induced Current Analysis of mc-Si Addressing Defect Contrast Behavior in Heavily Contaminated PV Material: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much work has been done to correlate electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) contrast behavior of extended defects with the character and degree of impurity decoration. However, existing models fail to account for recently observed contrast behavior of defects in heavily contaminated mc-Si PV cells. We have observed large increases in defect contrast with decreasing temperature for all electrically active defects, regardless of their initial contrast signatures at ambient temperature. This negates the usefulness of the existing models in identifying defect character and levels of impurity decoration based on the temperature dependence of the contrast behavior. By considering the interactions of transition metal impurities with the silicon lattice and extended defects, we attempt to provide an explanation for these observations. Our findings will enhance the ability of the PV community to understand and mitigate the effects of these types of defects as the adoption of increasingly lower purity feedstocks for mc-Si PV production continues.

Guthrey, H.; Gorman, B.; Al-Jassim, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Udell, Kent S. (Berkeley, CA); Bruton, Carol J. (Livermore, CA); Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Environmental contaminants in bald eagles in the Columbia River estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eggs, blood, and carcasses of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and fish were collected and breeding success of eagles was monitored in the Columbia River estuary, 1980-87, to determine if contaminants were having an effect on productivity. High levels of dichloro diphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were found in eggs, blood from adults, and 2 eagle carcasses. Detectable levels of DDE and PCB's were found in blood of nestlings indicating they were exposed to these contaminants early in life. Increasing concentrations of DDE and PCB's with age also indicated accumulation of these contaminants. Adult eagles also had higher levels of mercury (Hg) in blood than subadults or young indicating accumulation with age. The high levels of DDE and PCB's were associated with eggshell thinning ([bar x] = 10%) and with productivity ([bar x] = 0.56 young/occupied site) that was lower than that of healthy populations (i.e., [ge]1.00 young/occupied site). DDE and PCB's had a deleterious effect on reproduction of bald eagles in the estuary. The role dioxins play in eagle reproduction remains unclear, but concentrations in eagle eggs were similar to those in laboratory studies on other species where dioxins adversely affected hatchability of eggs. Probable source of these contaminants include dredged river sediments and hydroelectric dams, and the proper management of each may reduce the amount of contaminants released into the Columbia River estuary. 46 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Anthony, R.G.; Garrett, M.G. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States)); Schuler, C.A. (Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, OR (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ecotoxicity literature review of selected Hanford Site contaminants  

SciTech Connect

Available information on the toxicity, food chain transport, and bioconcentration of several Hanford Site contaminants were reviewed. The contaminants included cesium-137, cobalt-60, europium, nitrate, plutonium, strontium-90, technetium, tritium, uranium, and chromium (III and VI). Toxicity and mobility in both aquatic and terrestrial systems were considered. For aquatic systems, considerable information was available on the chemical and/or radiological toxicity of most of the contaminants in invertebrate animals and fish. Little information was available on aquatic macrophyte response to the contaminants. Terrestrial animals such as waterfowl and amphibians that have high exposure potential in aquatic systems were also largely unrepresented in the toxicity literature. The preponderance of toxicity data for terrestrial biota was for laboratory mammals. Bioconcentration factors and transfer coefficients were obtained for primary producers and consumers in representative aquatic and terrestrial systems; however, little data were available for upper trophic level transfer, particularly for terrestrial predators. Food chain transport and toxicity information for the contaminants were generally lacking for desert or sage brush-steppe organisms, particularly plants and reptiles

Driver, C.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Program on Technology Innovation: An Alternate Framework for the Risk Assessment of Ambient Particulate Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on the protection of human health. PM2.5 is currently regulated on a mass concentration basis (particle mass per volume of air), with the standard providing limits on both 24-hour and annual average concentrations. A fundamental tenet of this mass-based approach to regulation is its implicit assumption that all particle components are equally harmful to health. In light of the complexity of t...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy harvesting for remote sensing and transmitting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing electrical energy to an electrical device wherein the electrical energy is originally generated from temperature differences in an environment having a first and a second temperature region. A thermoelectric device having a first side and a second side wherein the first side is in communication with a means for transmitting ambient thermal energy collected or rejected in the first temperature region and the second side is in communication with the second temperature region thereby producing a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric device and in turn generating an electrical current.

DeSteese, John G

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

RESRAD Computer Code - Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deployed Deployed Widely Used and Maintained Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division - RESRAD Program RESRAD codes are used at more than 300 sites since its first release in 1989. Page 1 of 2 Argonne National Laboratory Multiple States & Sites Illinois RESRAD Computer Code - Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites Challenge The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989. The RESRAD code has been updated since then to improve the models within the codes, to operate on new computer platforms, to use new state of science radiation dose and risk factors, and to calculate cleanup criteria ("Authorized Limits") for radioactively contaminated sites. A series of similar codes have been developed to address radiation dose, risk, and cleanup criteria

379

In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to fuel Roadsides, contaminated fields could be unlikely solutions to fuel shortages, water pollution By Louise Lerner * August 11, 2009 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - The lonely, weed-choked roadsides along America's highways may turn out to be an unexpected solution to two of the biggest issues facing the U.S. today-potential fuel shortages and water pollution. In a new study, environmental scientists Cristina Negri and Gayathri Gopalakrishnan of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory considered a new idea: using contaminated and unused land to grow crops for biofuel. Negri and Gopalakrishnan knew that hardy, inedible plants like switchgrass or poplar trees grow quickly and need far less attention than conventional biofuel crops like corn-and it turns out they may also purify water and

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381

Categorical Exclusion 4596: High Contamination Area (HCA) Cleanup Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detennination Form Detennination Form PropQsed Action Tit!~: High Contamination Area (HCA) C!e;;Jnup Project (4596) Pro~ram or Field Offif.s: Y-12 Site OffiCe Locmion(s) (City/CountvLState): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Prot?Oscd Action Description: PAGE 02/04 l,:·:~:.s:~.t?)fuiW6v:: ~ 4fB~ir:::8~1 The proposed action is to disposition the materiels and equipment stored in a radiological high contamination area (HCA). This area is paved and fenced with no roof or shelter. Tile HCA was used as an accumulation area for rad contaminated materials and equipment from operations. Categorical Exclusion(s) Avoli!¢l: 81.3- ~outine maintenance For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulnti011s regaruing categorical exclusions, including the full text of each

382

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

383

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

384

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

385

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

386

Particulate Contamination Within Fusion Devices and Complex (Dusty) Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade, dust particulate contamination has increasingly become an area of concern within the fusion research community. In a burning plasma machine design like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), dust contamination presents problems for diagnostic integration and may contribute to tritium safety issues. Additionally due to ITER design, such dust contamination problems are projected to become of even greater concern due to dust/wall interactions and possible instabilities created within the plasma by such particulates. Since the dynamics of such dust can in general be explained employing a combination of the ion drag, Coulomb force, and ion pre-sheath drifts, recent research in complex (dusty) plasma physics often offers unique insights for this research area. This paper will discuss the possibility of how experimental observations of the dust and plasma parameters within a GEC rf Reference Cell might be employed to diagnose conditions within fusion reactors, hopefully pr...

Creel, J; Kong, J; Hyde, Truell W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluation of Recent Trailer Contamination and Supersack Integrity Issues  

SciTech Connect

During the period from fiscal year (FY) 2009 to FY 2011, there were a total of 21 incidents involving radioactively contaminated shipment trailers and 9 contaminated waste packages received at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). During this time period, the EnergySolutions (ES) Clive, Utah, disposal facility had a total of 18 similar incidents involving trailer and package contamination issues. As a result of the increased occurrence of such incidents, DOE Environmental Management Headquarters (EM/HQ) Waste Management organization (EM-30) requested that the Energy Facility Contractors’ Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) conduct a detailed review of these incidents and report back to EM-30 regarding the results of this review, including providing any recommendations formulated as a result of the evaluation of current site practices involving handling and management of radioactive material and waste shipments.

Gordon, S.

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning  

SciTech Connect

The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Disposal barriers that release contaminants only by molecular diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered barriers can slow the movement of pollutants out of land disposal facilities in several ways. If the advective velocity is low, release will be primarily by molecular diffusion. Attenuation processes also work to slow the transport of many contaminants. Barriers that cause pollutants to be released almost entirely by molecular diffusion represent the best barriers achievable. Use of thick barrier materials will maximize the breakthrough time of contaminants that diffuse through the barrier. Thin barriers with exceedingly low permeabilities will not necessarily outperform thicker, more permeable liners. In fact, if diffusion is the dominant mechanism of release, the thicker, more permeable barrier may actually outperform the thinner barrier with lower permeability.

Daniel, D.E.; Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Area 8 Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively.

Miller Julianne J.,Mizell Steve A.,Nikolich George,Campbell Scott A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS-bar 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110ng/L) were significantly higher (P<0.05; Wilcoxon rank sum test) than those of samples taken upstream (12+/-15ng/L). Compared to surface water, mean TCC concentrations found in dried, primary sludge obtained from municipal sewage treatment plants in five states were six orders of magnitude greater (19,300+/-7100{mu}g/kg). Several river samples contained a co-contaminant, identified based on its chromatographic retention time, molecular base ion, and MS/MS fragmentation behavior as 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide (DCC; CAS-bar 1219-99-4). In addition to TCC and DCC, municipal sludge contained a second co-contaminant, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorocarbanilide (TetraCC; CAS-bar 4300-43-0). Both newly detected compounds were present as impurities (0.2%{sub w/w} each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC.

Sapkota, Amir [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103 (United States); Heidler, Jochen [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103 (United States); Halden, Rolf U. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103 (United States)]. E-mail: rhalden@jhsph.edu

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field-deployable instrument has been developed that isolates from an ambient aerosol population only those particles that have critical supersaturations, Sc, within a narrow, user-specified, range. This Differential Critical Supersaturation Separator (DScS) is designed to supply one or more particle size and/or composition analyzers to permit the direct examination of the factors that influence the activation properties of ambient aerosols. The DScS consists of two coupled parallel plate continuous flow thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers housed within a single enclosure. Descriptions of instrument operation, construction and calibration data collected, when pure ammonium sulfate aerosols were injected into the DScS for operation at 0.15%aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopicity of DScS separated aerosol. The dry diameter (Dp*) of particles sampled in the TDMA system as well as the known Sc prescribed in the DScS were combined in a modified version of K�¶hler Theory to make predictions of particle hygroscopicity. These predictions frequently overestimated the measurements. Further analysis of DScS separated aerosols compares the known particle Sc to a predicted particle Sc, providing insight into particle activation efficiency. Overall, the sampled aerosol exhibited properties that indicate they were more efficient at activation than K�¶hler Theory would predict.

Osborn, Robert John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) program. Estimating contaminant losses from components of remediation alternatives for contaminated sediments. Report for March 1991-April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial and municipal point-source discharges and nonpoint source pollution from agricultural and urban areas over many years have contaminated bottom sediments in the rivers, harbors, and nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. Areas in the Great Lakes that remain seriously impaired have been designated as areas of concern (AOCs) under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 1988).

Myers, T.E.; Averette, D.E.; Olin, T.J.; Palermo, M.R.; Reible, D.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Tool For Assessing Contamination Risk in Wellhead Protection Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facility siting and operation restrictions aimed at groundwater protection can potentially affect a wide range of industrial activities located in or near designated Wellhead Protection Areas (WHPAs). This study provides a simple tool -- EPRI's Health Standard Exceedance (HSE) index -- for assessing the potential groundwater contamination risk associated with organic compounds in a WHPA.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )Methodology,Formation,and Mitigation reference papers. Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles cert

402

THE RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND RECOVERY OF CONTAMINATED AREAS  

SciTech Connect

The Civil Effects Test Operation Exercise CEX-57.1 following Operation Plumbbob was carried out to obtain information on decontamination procedures that could be used as radiological countermeasures. The test was conducted on D + 1 and D + 2 days after shot Coulomb C. Data were obtained on reclamation of land areas by scraping with a motorgrader, on fire-hosing and scrubbing a concrete- slab roof, and on fire-hosing a composition roof. In addition, some shielding data were obtained for a small building with 6-in.-thick concrete walls and roof. The conceptual nature of a radiological defense system and the role of decontamination or reclamation in such a system are discussed. Most of the report deals with methods for reducing the observed data to interpretive form because the data were taken within a large contaminated area. The decontamination effectiveness in terms of the fraction of contamination remaining was computed. It is concluded that low levels of contamination at the Nevada Test Site could be utilized to advantage to obtain data on gamma -radiation properties, such as the effects of materials and source geometries on the attenuation of fission-product gamma rays. However, higher levels of fall-out in terms of the fall-out particle mass, are required to obtain useful information and training on decontamination techniques; therefore the use of low levels of contamination to conduct studies in this area is not recommended. (auth)

Miller, C.F.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Identification of 300 Area Contaminants of Potential Concern for Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the process used to identify source area contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) in support of the 300 Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan. This report also establishes the exclusion criteria applicable for 300 Area use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the COPCs.

R.W. Ovink

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

EVALUATION OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED SOIL  

SciTech Connect

Soils contaminated with radionuclides are an environmental concern at most Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Clean up efforts at many of these sites are ongoing using conventional remediation techniques. These remediation techniques are often expensive and may not achieve desired soil volume reduction. Several studies using alternative remediation techniques have been performed on plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site. Results to date exhibit less than encouraging results, but these processes were often not fully optimized, and other approaches are possible. Clemson University and teaming partner Waste Policy Institute, through a cooperative agreement with the National Environmental Technologies Laboratory, are assisting the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in re-evaluating technologies that have the potential of reducing the volume of plutonium contaminated soil. This efforts includes (1) a through literature review and summary of (a) NTS soil characterization and (b) volume reduction treatment technologies applied to plutonium-contaminated NTS soils, (2) an interactive workshop for vendors, representatives from DOE sites and end-users, and (3) bench scale demonstration of applicable vendor technologies at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory.

Hoeffner, S. L.; Navratil, J. D.; Torrao, G.; Smalley, R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site.

Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

Zaromb, S.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Effect of metal Additions on the Hydrogen Uptake of Microporous Carbon at Near-Ambient Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhancing the hydrogen sorption capacity of microporous carbon materials at near-ambient temperature continue to be a challenge and the subject of intense research. Physisorption alone on microporous carbons is not strong enough to provide the desired levels of hydrogen uptake. Modifying carbons with small amounts of metals has been proven effective to increase the amounts adsorbed. However, very different mechanisms may be involved when the promoters are transition metals or alkali metals. In this presentation we compare the effect of additions of palladium and/or alkali metals on the hydrogen uptake of microporous carbons, in an attempt to differentiate between the possible mechanisms leading to enhanced hydrogen capacity and fast kinetics.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Metagenomic and Cultivation-Based Analysis of Novel Microorganisms and Functions in Metal-Contaminated Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium and vanadium-contaminated site, the Old Rifle Mill in Rifle, Colorado, USA. From these enrichments

Yelton, Alexis Pepper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results Srinandini Parthasarathy, Thomas E. McKone, Michael G. Apte Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 29, 2111 Prepared for the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program Legal Notice The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a national laboratory of the DOE managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the Sponsor and pursuant to an M&O Contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Neither the

412

Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria Argonne cleans contaminated Kansas site by feeding bacteria By Jared Sagoff * October 8, 2010 Tweet EmailPrint When cleaning the bathroom, we usually consider bacteria the enemy. However, a new study conducted by environmental scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has demonstrated a way to enlist bacteria in the fight to cleanse some of the country's most intractably polluted locations. Last year, a team of Argonne scientists led by Lorraine LaFreniere injected iron microparticles underneath fields long-polluted with carbon tetrachloride near Centralia, Kansas. The researchers coated the microparticles with organic material, which served as bait for bacteria that created the conditions necessary to safely convert the toxic chemical

413

Undergraduate Research at Jefferson Lab - Analysis of Contamination Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compton Scattering Chamber Compton Scattering Chamber Previous Project (Compton Scattering Chamber) Undergraduate Research Main Index Next Project (Non-linear Multidimensional Optimization) Non-linear Multidimensional Optimization Analysis of Contamination Levels of Jefferson Laboratory SRF Clean Room Facilities during Power Outage Using FE-SEM/EDX Studies of Copper Coupons Student: Kaitlyn M. Fields School: College of William and Mary Mentored By: Ari D. Palczewski and Charles E. Reece Superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerating cavities at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility support high surface electric and magnetic fields with minimal energy dissipation and resistance. The performance of these cavities can be limited by particulate contamination, which can become a source of enhanced field emission. Clean cavity assembly

414

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

415

Reductive dissolution approaches to removal of uranium from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Traditional approaches to uranium recovery from ores have employed oxidation of U(IV) minerals to form the uranyl cation which is subsequently complexed by carbonate or maintained in solution by strong acids. Reductive approaches for uranium decontamination have been limited to removing soluble uranium from solutions by formation of U{sup 4+} which readily hydrolyses and precipitates. As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, we have developed a reductive approach to solubilization of uranium from contaminated soils which employs reduction to destabilize U(VI) solid and sorbed species, and strong chelators for U(IV) to prevent hydrolysis and solubilize the reduced from. This strategy has particular application to sites where the uranium is present primarily as intractable U(VI) phases and where high fractions of the contamination must be removed to meet regulatory requirements.

Brainard, J.R.; Iams, H.D.; Strietelmeier, B.A.; Del-Rio Garcia, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and system.

Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Removal of bird contamination in wind profiler signal spectra.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problem of bird interference with radar performance is as old as radar itself; however, the problem specific to wind profiler operation has not drawn the attention of researchers until the last 5 or 6 years. Since then, the problem has been addressed in many publications and several ways to solve it have been indicated. Recent advances in radar hardware and software made the last generation of profilers much more immune to bird contamination. However, many older profilers are still in use; errors in averaged (hourly) winds due to bird interference may be as high as 15 m/s. The objective of the present study is to develop a practical method to derive mean winds from averaged spectral data of a 915-MHz wind profiler under the condition of bird contamination.

Pekour, M. S.

1998-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Assay Systems for Radionuclide Contamination in Soils  

SciTech Connect

Through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technical Assistance Program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The INL systems integrate detector systems with data acquisition and synthesis software and with global positioning technology to provide a real-time, user-friendly field deployable turn-key system. INL real-time systems are designed to characterize surface soil contamination using methodologies set forth in the Multi-Agency Radiation Surveys and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM provides guidance for planning, implementing, and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys conducted to demonstrate compliance with a dose or risk-based regulation and provides real-time information that is immediately available to field technicians and project management personnel. This paper discusses the history of the development of these systems and describes some of the more recent examples and their applications.

J. R. Giles; L. G. Roybal; M. V. Carpenter; C. P. Oertel; J. A. Roach

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Removal of Dioxin Contamination for Gas Turbine Generator Set Repair  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination projects are typically undertaken in the interest of reducing disposal costs. This goal can be achieved because decontamination concentrates the contaminant into a smaller volume or changes its form so that a lower cost disposal technology becomes available. Less frequently, decontamination adds value back to the fouled structure or contaminated piece of equipment. This removal of dioxins from a gas turbine generator set is one of the latter cases. A multi-million dollar piece of equipment could have been destined for the scrap pile. Instead, an innovative, non-destructive decontamination technology, developed under EPA and DOE demonstration programs has was employed so that the set could repaired and put back into service. The TechXtractchemical decontamination technology reduced surface dioxin / furan concentrations from as high as 24,000 ng / m2 to less than 25 ng / m2 and below detection limits.

Fay, W. S.; Borah, R.E.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

Contaminant Dating and Natural Recovery with Radioisotopes in Sediment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many reasons to conduct dated sediment core investigations. These include the site-specific analysis of sediment accumulation rates, natural and modern contaminant background concentrations, storm water effects, sediment stability, natural recovery, source identification, and recontamination potential. Environmental investigators use a limited number of radioisotopes for sediment dating, including 1) beryllium-7 for sediment deposition during the last year, 2) lead-210 and cesium-137 for sedime...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Title Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3650E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Thomas E. McKone, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Start Page 92 Issue 2 Pagination 92-109 Date Published 04/2011 Keywords resave Abstract Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants were representative of concentrations in residences in the United States. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants are identified as contaminants of concern for chronic health effects in a large fraction of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on robustness of reported concentration data and fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3- butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM2.5. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM2.5, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO2.

422

Dimensioning Guidelines for Applying Insulators in Contaminated Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A particular weakness of outdoor substations is the external insulation. The insulation is particularly susceptible to failure if proper attention has not been given to its design, condition monitoring, and maintenance. In regions characterized by high contamination levels, appropriate dimensioning, regular maintenance, and the application of palliative measures can be critical to ensure that the system meets its outage performance targets. This can involve pure maintenance measures such as ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous and sediment environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six bioremediation methods were tested in laboratory microcosms using field soil and water samples from within the fire-wall area of a petroleum storage tank. This soil had been intermittently contaminated with Bunker C fuel oil and other petroleum materials over an extended period of time. This study focuses on the behavior of the laboratory microcosms designed to simulate the in situ conditions and the six bioremedial methods employed in a related field study. The six treatment methods were: 1) aeration with essential nutrients and indigenous organisms, 2) aeration with essential nutrients and an inoculation from a refinery wastewater treatment facility, 3) aeration with oleophilic fertilizer and indigenous organisms, 4) aeration with essential nutrients and biosurfactant organisms, 5) aeration with nutrients and proprietary organisms, and 6) aeration only. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) analyses and gas chromatographic/mass spectrophotometric (GC-MS) analyses of the petroleum fractions were used to determine if the enhancement methods were more effective than the control in biodegrading the contaminants. Results indicated that there was no significant difference in the petroleum reduction rates among the six treatment methods. The conclusions were that the petroleum was not bioavailable --transfer from soil-to-water was likely the rate controlling factor in this study. Biodegradation rates were significantly slowed by the highly weathered state of the petroleum, and the extreme spatial heterogeneity hindered the sampling and analysis of the petroleum. These conclusions were further supported in a second experiment using only the extracted petroleum contaminant. The extracted petroleum was biodegraded when made available in shake flasks. Three different ,consortia were shown to significantly biodegrade the petroleum contaminant when made bioavailable. These consortia were able to reduce the TPH and many other specific hydrocarbons.

Mills, Marc Allyn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Impact of Contaminated Environment on Insulator Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A particular weakness of outdoor substations is the external insulation. The insulation is particularly susceptible to failure if proper attention has not been given to its design, condition monitoring, and maintenance. In regions characterized by high contamination levels, regular maintenance and the application of palliative measures can be critical to ensure that the system meets its outage performance targets. This can involve pure maintenance measures such as insulator cleaning or performance-enhanc...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effect of solvent on the preparation of ambient pressure-dried SiO2 aerogel films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SiO2 aerogel film has a promising property as intermetal dielectrics (IMD) for its low dielectric constant. However, a stable and porous SiO2 aerogel film was not properly synthesized due to the rapid evaporation of solvent during ... Keywords: SiO2 aerogel film, ambient pressure drying, solvent, spin coating

Sang-Bae Jung; Jung-Ho Kim; Hong-Ryul Kim; Hyung-Ho Park

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

[Wing 1 radiation survey and contamination report]. Final report  

SciTech Connect

We have completed the 5480.11 survey for Wing 1. All area(s)/item(s) requested by the 5480.11 committee have been thoroughly surveyed and documented. Decontamination/disposal of contaminated items has been accomplished. The wing 1 survey was started on 8/13/90 and completed 9/18/90. However, the follow-up surveys were not completed until 2/18/91. We received the final set of smear samples for wing 1 on 1/13/91. A total of 5,495 smears were taken from wing 1 and total of 465 smears were taken during the follow-up surveys. There were a total 122 items found to have fixed contamination and 4 items with smearable contamination in excess of the limits specified in DOE ORDER 5480.11 (AR 3-7). The following area(s)/item(s) were not included in the 5480.11 survey: Hallways, Access panels, Men`s and women`s change rooms, Janitor closets, Wall lockers and item(s) stored in wing 1 hallways and room 1116. If our contract is renewed, we will include those areas in our survey according to your request of April 15, 1991.

Olsen, K.

1991-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

430

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Modeling of contaminant transport in underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study and discuss the impact of contaminants produced from underground coal gasification on groundwater, a coupled seepage-thermodynamics-transport model for underground gasification was developed on the basis of mass and energy conservation and pollutant-transport mechanisms, the mathematical model was solved by the upstream weighted multisell balance method, and the model was calibrated and verified against the experimental site data. The experiment showed that because of the effects of temperature on the surrounding rock of the gasification panel the measured pore-water-pressure was higher than the simulated one; except for in the high temperature zone where the simulation errors of temperature, pore water pressure, and contaminant concentration were relatively high, the simulation values of the overall gasification panel were well fitted with the measured values. As the gasification experiment progressed, the influence range of temperature field expanded, the gradient of groundwater pressure decreased, and the migration velocity of pollutant increased. Eleven months and twenty months after the test, the differences between maximum and minimum water pressure were 2.4 and 1.8 MPa, respectively, and the migration velocities of contaminants were 0.24-0.38 m/d and 0.27-0.46 m/d, respectively. It was concluded that the numerical simulation of the transport process for pollutants from underground coal gasification was valid. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Lanhe Yang; Xing Zhang [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geosciences

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

METHODS OF HANDLING AND LAUNDERING BERYLLIUM-CONTAMINATED GARMENTS  

SciTech Connect

In beryllium industries, it has been the general practice to supply workers with protective clothing. Problems in handling and laundering this clothing were investigated. These problems include: potential hazard to laundry workers and subsequent wearers of the clothing, special laundering techniques, methods to determine the degree of contamination on garments, and determining the most desirable types of garments for the purpose. Four methods to determine the degree of contamination discussed include the shake test, the vacuum test, the rinse test, and the smear test. Assuming conventional laundering procedures have been used, the potential hazard to subsequent wearers of the garment is minimal. Standards for determining adequacy of laundry are suggested. These ar 0.1 mu g Be/cm/sup 2/ as determined by the vacuum test, or 200 mu g Be/garment as determined by the rinse test. Possible hazard to those handling contaminated garments could be significant. This hazard is best controlled simply by use of wet methods. Included in this report is the summary of a survey conducted to determine how these problems are handled in other beryllium industries. (auth)

Cohen, J.J.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Inhibited Release of Mobile Contaminants from Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of contaminant release from Hanford Site tank residual waste have indicated that in some cases certain contaminants of interest (Tc and Cr) exhibit inhibited release. The percentage of Tc that dissolved from residual waste from tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, and 241-C-203 ranged from approximately 6% to 10%. The percent leachable Cr from residual waste from tanks C-103, C 202, and C-203 ranged from approximately 1.1% to 44%. Solid phase characterization results indicate that the recalcitrant forms of these contaminants are associated with iron oxides. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of Tc and Cr in residual waste indicates that these contaminants occur in Fe oxide particles as their lower, less soluble oxidation states [Tc(IV) and Cr(III)]. The form of these contaminants is likely as oxides or hydroxides incorporated within the structure of the Fe oxide. Leaching behavior of U from tank residual waste was studied using deionized water, and CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 saturated solutions as leachants. The release behavior of U from tank residual waste is complex. Initial U concentrations in water and CaCO3 leachants are high due to residual amounts of the highly soluble U mineral cejkaite. As leaching and dilution occur NaUO2PO4 {center_dot} xH2O, Na2U2O7(am) and schoepite (or a similar phase) become the solubility controlling phases for U. In the case of the Ca(OH)2 leachant, U release from tank residual waste is dramatically reduced. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that the solubility of CaUO4(c) controls release of U from residual waste in the Ca(OH)2 leachants. It is assumed the solubility controlling phase is actually a hydrated version of CaUO4 with a variable water content ranging from CaUO4 to CaUO4 {center_dot} (H2O). The critically reviewed value for CaUO4(c) (log KSP0 = 15.94) produced good agreement with our experimental data for the Ca(OH)2 leachates.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Heald, Steve M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

435

Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduction of trichloroethylene (TCE), chromium (VI), and 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by zero valent iron and palladized iron under anaerobic conditions was investigated. Reduction experiments of the contaminants were carried out individually and in combination. All three target contaminants were effectively reduced by both iron (Feo) and palladized iron (Pd/Fe'). However, the rate of reduction by Pd/Fe' was found to be much faster than that by Feo. The reduction of all the contaminants in mixed waste was found to be slower than in the individual experiments, but the difference was most significant in the 2,4-DNT reduction. This observation indicates that there may be a possibility of competition for reactive sites among the contaminants and precipitation resulting from CR(VI) reduction may coat iron surfaces, which may ultimately slow the whole zero valent metals (ZVMS) treatment process in remediating mixed waste sites. The 20 mg/L of CR(VI) was reduced below detection limits in 10 hours by Fe' and in 1.5 hours by the same amount of Pd/Fe' in individual experiment. An initial concentration of 20 mg/L of TCE was reduced below detection limits in 72 hours by Pd/Fe' whereas only 62% of TCE was reduced by the same amount of Fe' in 144 hours in individual experiment. The reaction orders of 1.84 and 2.04 for total TCE loss alone and in mixed waste by Fe' indicates that the reaction mechanisms are complex. The reduction of 72 mg/L of 2,4-DNT proceeded to below detection limits within 3 hours by both Fe' and Pd/Feo. The only product observed in the reduction of 2,4-DNT was 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT). The 2,4-DAT produced accounted for 83-100% and only 42-54% of the initial mass of 2@4.DNT under anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. Since no degradation of 2,4-DAT alone occurred, these results indicate the possibility of other intermediates or products formation under aerobic conditions. Overall, the results demonstrated the potential application of ZVMs in reducing mixed wastes containing both inorganic and organic contaminant interactions before implementing a ZVMs treatment system, which may help in designing a proper remedial system.

Malla, Deepak Babu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Texas Bentonites as Amendments of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Poultry Feed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aflatoxins are toxic organic compounds produced by fungi in grains. Moderately contaminated grains that cannot be used as food are often directed to animal feed. Economically-feasible detoxification measures for contaminated feeds are needed. The objectives of this research were to identify effective bentonites as aflatoxin adsorbents and to evaluate the performance of the clays as aflatoxin amendments in feed for broiler chickens. Five bentonite samples from Gonzales, Texas, USA were collected and analyzed against the published selection criteria for aflatoxin adsorbents: aflatoxin adsorption capacity, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic carbon, particle size distribution, and mineralogical and structural compositions. Two bentonites were identified as potentially good aflatoxin adsorbents based on the analyses. These two bentonites were selected for an in vivo poultry experiment where chickens were fed with aflatoxin-contaminated corn (1400 ppb) to test the detoxification efficacy of the clays. Detailed mineralogy analyses were conducted on these two samples (4TX and 1TX) after size fractionation. Clay 4TX and 1TX contained 87 percent and 65 percent clay, respectively. Smectite was the dominant mineral phase in both clay fractions. Quartz and feldspars were also present in both samples. These minerals are unlikely to cause harmful effects on the chickens. The presence of pyrite and heavy metals in 1TX raised concerns about its use in animal feed. The clays were introduced into feed by mixing the dry bentonite powder with the feed for twelve minutes in a mechanical mixer. The body weight was increased by 21 percent with clay 4TX and 14 percent with clay 1TX in the aflatoxin diet. The concentration of total aflatoxins in liver was reduced by 36 percent with the addition of clays. Liver visual appearance was also improved from pale red to a more reddish color resembling the healthy red liver. All chickens fed clean feed had significantly higher body weights than those fed with highly contaminated feed, suggesting that the clays did not completely eliminate aflatoxin toxicity. The published aflatoxin binder selection criteria were useful for screening bentonites as aflatoxin amendments. The selected bentonites based on the criteria could effectively sequester aflatoxins in vivo. Yet direct mixing of bentonite as dry powder to highly contaminated poultry feed could not eliminate the toxicity of aflatoxins.

Barrientos Velazquez, Ana Luisa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Apparatus for removing oil and other floating contaminants from a moving body of water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent describes a process in which floating contaminants such as oil and solid debris are removed from a moving body of water by employing a skimming system which uses the natural gravitational flow of the water. A boom diagonally positioned across the body of water diverts the floating contaminants over a floating weir and into a retention pond where an underflow weir is used to return contaminant-free water to the moving body of water. The floating weir is ballasted to maintain the contaminant-receiving opening therein slightly below the surface of the water during fluctuations in the water level for skimming the contaminants with minimal water removal.

Strohecker, J.W.

1973-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dissolved dense nonaqueous-phase liquid plumes are persistent, widespread problems in the DOE complex. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) is disappearing from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) by natural attenuation, a finding that saves significant site restoration costs. Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation as a preferred treatment technology requires direct evidence of the processes and rates of the degradation. Our proposal aims to provide that evidence for one such site by testing two hypotheses. First, we believe that realistic values for in situ rates of TCE cometabolism can be obtained by sustaining the putative microorganisms at the low catabolic activities consistent with aquifer conditions. Second, the patterns of functional gene expression evident in these communities under starvation conditions while carrying out TCE cometabolism can be used to diagnose the cometabolic activity in the aquifer itself. Using the cometabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained at this location and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Realistic terms for cometabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE's ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics at other sites, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. Finally, this project aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project  

SciTech Connect

This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effects of Hydrogen Content in Sputtering Ambient on ZnO:A1 Electrical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnO-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films have received increased attention recently because of their potential to reduce production costs compared to those of the prevalent TCO indium tin oxide (ITO). Undoped ZnO and ZnO:Al (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, and 2 wt% Al2O3) polycrystalline films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Controlled incorporation of H2 and O2 in the Ar sputtering ambient was investigated. Though optimal substrate temperature was found to be 200 C for films grown in 100% Ar, the addition of H2 permits improved electrical performance for room-temperature depositions. Temperature-dependent Hall data suggest that ionized impurity and acoustic phonon scattering dominate at high and intermediate carrier concentration levels, respectively, with evidence of temperature-activated transport at the lowest levels. Lightly doped ZnO:Al demonstrates reduced infrared absorption compared to the standard 2 wt%-doped ZnO:Al, which may be beneficial to device performance.

Duenow, J. N.; Gessert, T. A.; Wood, D. M.; Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "widespread ambient contamination" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9 S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Formic Acid Dehydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts at Near-Ambient Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Formic acid (HCOOH) is a convenient hydrogen carrier in fuel cells designed for portable use. Recent studies have shown that HCOOH decomposition is catalyzed with Ru-based complexes in the aqueous phase at near-ambient temperatures. HCOOH decomposition reactions are used frequently to probe the effects of alloying and cluster size and of geometric and electronic factors in catalysis. These studies have concluded that Pt is the most active metal for HCOOH decomposition, at least as large crystallites and extended surfaces. The identity and oxidation state of surface metal atoms influence the relative rates of dehydrogenation (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) and dehydration (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2}O + CO) routes, a selectivity requirement for the synthesis of CO-free H{sub 2} streams for low-temperature fuel cells. Group Ib and Group VIII noble metals catalyze dehydrogenation selectively, while base metals and metal oxides catalyze both routes, either directly or indirectly via subsequent water-gas shift (WGS) reactions.

Ojeda, Manuel; Iglesia, Enrique

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electromechanical Wave Green's Function Estimation from Ambient Electrical Grid Frequency Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many electrical grid transients can be described by the propagation of electromechanical (EM) waves that couple oscillations of power flows over transmission lines and the inertia of synchronous generators. These EM waves can take several forms: large-scale standing waves forming inter-area modes, localized oscillations of single or multi-machine modes, or traveling waves that spread quasi-circularly from major grid disturbances. The propagation speed and damping of these EM waves are potentially a powerful tool for assessing grid stability, e.g. small signal or rotor angle stability, however, EM wave properties have been mostly extracted from post-event analysis of major grid disturbances. Using a small set of data from the FNET sensor network, we show how the spatially resolved Green's function for EM wave propagation can be extracted from ambient frequency noise without the need for a major disturbance. If applied to an entire interconnection, an EM-wave Green's function map will enable a model-independent...

Backhaus, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Characterization studies of actinide contamination on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results that indicates that plutonium and americium contamination of Johnson Atoll soil and sludge from the cleanup plant settling pond is dispersed. The {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu ratio was essentially identical for all analyzed material. Except for one ``hot particle,`` no discrete Pu particles were located in untreated coral soil by SEM even though our sample contained both {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu activity measurable by gammaray spectrometry. Alpha particle spectrometry analysis of sequentially filtered sludge showed small that activity is associated with particles as 0.4 {mu}m in diameter. Thin section analysis revealed that the ``hot particle`` was a fragment of stainless steel with a layer of oxidized Pu, U, and other metals deposited on the outside. This Pu-containing layer was covered with a layer of coral soil that formed on the oxidized Pu/U phase during the process of weathering on JA. Analyses of all samples except the ``hot particle`` with SEM or TEM coupled with EDS did not reveal the presence of any distinct Pu phases, despite measurable activity in these samples. Together, these findings are consistent with the Pu and Am being highly dispersed throughout the contaminated soil and sludge. Direct evidence for association of Pu with coral was observed in the thin section of the ``hot particle.`` A possible mechanism for the dispersal of contamination is that weathering of fragments from the aborted missile leads to complexation of Pu with calcium carbonate followed by adsorption onto the coral soil surface. This process has not led to measurable fractionation of Am from its Pu parent.

Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Gong, Meiling

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Removing gaseous contaminants in {sup 3}He by cryogenic stripping  

SciTech Connect

The Tritium Operations Group at LLNL, Tritium Facility has recently developed a {sup 3}He recovery system to remove argon, xenon, neon, hydrogen, and all other contaminants from the {sup 3}He stream in an Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) experimental apparatus. In this paper the authors will describe in detail the background information, technical requirements, the design approach, and the results of their experimental tests. The authors believe this gas purification system may have other applications as it provides at a reasonable cost an efficient method for purification of gaseous helium.

Benapfl, M.; Biltoft, P.; Coombs, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Tritium Operations Group

1995-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

/sup 238/Pu surface contamination of MHW impact shell assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

/sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ contamination of the grit blasted surface of the primary impact shell assembly (PISA) of the multi-hundred watt isotopic heat source was measured. The study determined the amount and distribution of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ and characterization of its behavior during aging at 1350/sup 0/C. The results concluded that normal decontamination effectively removes the superficial /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ but does not extract the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ which is deep within the grit blasted structure. Subsequent heating results in migration of microcurie amounts of plutonium out of the grit blasted structure.

Schaeffer, D.R.; Johnson, E.W.; Sheehan, W.E.; Fleming, D.L.; Egleston, E.E.

1976-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

448

Plant sentinels and molecular probes that monitor environmental munitions contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants accumulate TNT and similar compounds from soil. Their sessile nature requires that plants adapt to environmental changes by biochemical and molecular means. In principle, it is possible to develop a monitoring capability based on expression of any gene that is activated by specific environmental conditions. The authors have identified plant genes activated upon exposure to TNT. Partial gene sequences allow design of DNA probes that measure TNT-induced gene activity. These will be used to develop sensitive assays that monitor gene expression in plants growing in environments possibly contaminated with explosives.

Jackson, P.J.; DeWitt, J.G.; Hill, K.K.; Kuske, C.R.; Kim, D.Y. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Genomics and Structural Biology Group

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Bead and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bead is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The bead is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing beads is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet beads, and heating and drying the beads. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet beads formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.

Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic process and apparatus for reducing calcium oxide in a molten electrolyte of CaCl{sub 2}-CaF{sub 2} with a graphite anode in which particles or other contamination from the anode is restricted by the use of a porous barrier in the form of a basket surrounding the anode which may be removed from the electrolyte to burn the graphite particles, and wherein the calcium oxide feed is introduced to the anode compartment to increase the oxygen ion concentration at the anode.

Poa, D.S.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Johnson, G.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium contaminated soils from the Fernald Operation Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). A method is described for preparing of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections by ultramicrotomy. By using these thin sections, SEM and TEM images can be compared directly. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Little uranium was associated with clays. The distribution of uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology  

SciTech Connect

Progress in science often follows or parallels the development of new techniques. The optical microscope helped convert medicine and biology from a speculative activity in old times to today's sophisticated scientific disciplines. The telescope changed the study and interpretation of heavens from mythology to science. X-ray diffraction enabled the flourishing of solid state physics and materials science. The technique object of this review, Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy or APPES for short, has also the potential of producing dramatic changes in the study of liquid and solid surfaces, particularly in areas such as atmospheric, environment and catalysis sciences. APPES adds an important missing element to the host of techniques that give fundamental information, i.e., spectroscopy and microscopy, about surfaces in the presence of gases and vapors, as encountered in industrial catalysis and atmospheric environments. APPES brings electron spectroscopy into the realm of techniques that can be used in practical environments. Decades of surface science in ultra high vacuum (UHV) has shown the power of electron spectroscopy in its various manifestations. Their unique property is the extremely short elastic mean free path of electrons as they travel through condensed matter, of the order of a few atomic distances in the energy range from a few eV to a few thousand eV. As a consequence of this the information obtained by analyzing electrons emitted or scattered from a surface refers to the top first few atomic layers, which is what surface science is all about. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and other such techniques have been used for decades and provided some of the most fundamental knowledge about surface crystallography, composition and electronic structure available today. Unfortunately the high interaction cross section of electrons with matter also prevents them from traveling long distances unscattered in gas environments. Above the millibar pressure range this distance is reduced to less that a millimeter, effectively preventing its use in the most relevant environments, usually between millibars and atmospheric pressures. There is therefore a large gap of several orders of magnitude where information about surfaces is scarce because these powerful electron spectroscopies cannot operate. One characteristic of surfaces in ambient pressure environments is that they are covered by dense layers of molecules, even when their binding energy is weak. Water for example is known to form layers several molecules thick at room temperature in humid environments. Metals readily form oxide films several layers thick in oxygen atmospheres. Dense layers of adsorbed molecules can also be produced in ultra high vacuum, often by the simple and expedient method of cooling the sample to cryogenic temperatures. A large amount of data has been obtained in the past in UHV by surface scientists using this method. While this has provided valuable information it begs the question of whether the structures formed in this manner represent equilibrium structures or metastable ones, kinetically trapped due to high activation energies that cannot be overcome at low temperature. From a thermodynamic point of view is interesting to consider the entropic contribution to the Gibbs free energy, which we can call 'the pressure factor', equal to kT.logP. This factor amounts to a sizeable 0.3 eV difference at room temperature between UHV (<10{sup -8} Pascal) and atmospheric pressures. Such change if free energy can definitely result in changes in surface structure and stability. Entire areas of the phase diagram are out of reach due to the pressure gap. Even when cooling is not necessary, many surface treatments and most chemical reactions necessitate the presence of gases at pressures ranging from millibar to bars. What is the structure and chemical nature of the species