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1

Definition: Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wide Area Monitoring, Visualization, & Control Wide area monitoring and visualization requires time synchronized sensors, communications, and information processing that make it possible for the condition of the bulk power system to be observed and understood in real-time so that protective, preventative, or corrective action can be taken.[1] Related Terms Wide area, bes emergency, sustainability, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Functions' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Wide_Area_Monitoring,_Visualization,_%26_Control&oldid=502579

2

Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system  

SciTech Connect

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Wide-area, real-time monitoring and visualization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S.; Dyer, James D.; Martinez Morales, Carlos A.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

A frequency monitoring system development for wide-area power grid protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been recent research activities on GPS-based FNET to prevent wide-area blackouts by monitoring frequency deviation. This paper introduces a system for monitoring regional frequencies in power grid developed as an advanced research project ... Keywords: Frequency monitoring, Power grid protection, Wide-area power grid

Yoon Sang Kim; Junho Ko; Dong-Kwang Shin; Chul-Hwan Kim; Chul-Won Park

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wide area network monitoring system for HEP experiments at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centers. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

Grigoriev, Maxim; /Fermilab; Cottrell, Les; Logg, Connie; /SLAC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Improving monitoring, control and protection of power grid using wide area synchro-phasor measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When disturbances occur in power grid, monitoring, control and protection systems are required to stop the grid degradation, restore it to a normal state, and hence minimize their effects. However, in wide area power grid resulting from large extension ... Keywords: emergency control and optimization systems, phasor measurement units, power system, wide area protection system

Hamid Bentarzi

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Time Stamp Attack on Wide Area Monitoring System in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security becomes an extremely important issue in smart grid. To maintain the steady operation for smart power grid, massive measurement devices must be allocated widely among the power grid. Previous studies are focused on false data injection attack to the smart grid system. In practice, false data injection attack is not easy to implement, since it is not easy to hack the power grid data communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate that a novel time stamp attack is a practical and dangerous attack scheme for smart grid. Since most of measurement devices are equipped with global positioning system (GPS) to provide the time information of measurements, it is highly probable to attack the measurement system by spoofing the GPS. By employing the real measurement data in North American Power Grid, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the time stamp attack on smart grid.

Zhang, Zhenghao; Li, Husheng; Pei, Changxing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

2008 Special Issue: Optimal wide-area monitoring and nonlinear adaptive coordinating neurocontrol of a power system with wind power integration and multiple FACTS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-area coordinating control is becoming an important issue and a challenging problem in the power industry. This paper proposes a novel optimal wide-area coordinating neurocontrol (WACNC), based on wide-area measurements, for a power system with power ... Keywords: Adaptive critic designs, FACTS devices, Particle swarm optimization, Radial basis function network, Wide-area control, Wind power

Wei Qiao; Ganesh K. Venayagamoorthy; Ronald G. Harley

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

11

Wide Area and Distributed Hydrogen Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advances in optical sensors show promise for the development of new wide area monitoring and distributed optical network hydrogen detection systems. Optical hydrogen sensing technologies reviewed here are: 1) open path Raman scattering systems, 2) back scattering from chemically treated solid polymer matrix optical fiber sensor cladding; and 3) shlieren and shearing interferometry imaging. Ultrasonic sensors for hydrogen release detection are also reviewed. The development status of these technologies and their demonstrated results in sensor path length, low hydrogen concentration detection ability, and response times are described and compared to the corresponding status of hydrogen spot sensor network technologies.

Zalosh, Robert G.; Barilo, Nick F.

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DFAS Wide-Area Workflow DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues Mark Shvartzman Sr. Project Manager, CEM, CEA Southern California Edison Presented at the Spring FUPWG Meeting April 20, 2011 What We Are Going to Discuss * Review Delivery Order or Task Order for accounting lines information. * Contact Contracting Officer or Contracting specialist and request Pay DoDAAC and Ext. information * Create Payment Log by ACRN * Start creating Invoice How the WAWF works and how to navigate through: 2 CONTRACT N68711-03-G-4019 DO#0028 Pay Records Bill by CLIN Award $ by CLIN Billed To Date Invoice number Pay Total Balance by CLIN 7500009733 $330,899.11 CLIN 0001AA 674,220.00 674,220.00 7500009733 7500012596 674,220.00 0.00 7500012596 $641,344.69 CLIN 0001AB 325,780.00 298023.8 27,756.20 7500012596 7500015079 325,780.00

14

TCP performance analysis for wide area networks  

SciTech Connect

Even though networks have been getting faster, perceived throughput at the application level has not increased accordingly. In an attempt to identify many of the performance bottlenecks, we collected and analyzed data over a wide area network (WAN) at T3 (45 Mbps) bandwidth. The information gained will assist in designing new protocols and/or algorithms that are consistent with future high- speed requirements.

Chen, H.Y.; Hutchins, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Testi, N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power Title Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar...

16

Definition: Wide Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Related Terms Reliability Coordinator Area, Reliability Coordinator References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up...

17

A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the final project report of award "A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications", given by DOE in 2003 to Vishal Misra at Columbia University.

Vishal Misra

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

An Efficient Sound Source for Wide-Area RAFOS Navigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the expected need for wide-area acoustic navigation for Lagrangian studies of ocean circulation using RAFOS floats, a new and powerful sound source, a resonant pipe projector has been developed. It consists of a free-flooded open steel ...

T. Rossby; J. Ellis; D. C. Webb

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Distributed wide-area traffic management for cloud services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of interactive cloud services depends heavily on which data centers handle client requests, and which wide-area paths carry traffic. While making these decisions, cloud service providers also need to weigh operational considerations like ... Keywords: joint optimization, multi-homed routing, request mapping

Srinivas Narayana; Joe Wenjie Jiang; Jennifer Rexford; Mung Chiang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Traffic flow wide-area surveillance system definition  

SciTech Connect

Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) is a system for assessing the state of traffic flow over a wide area for enhanced traffic control and improved traffic management and planning. The primary purpose of a TFWAS system is to provide a detailed traffic flow description and context description to sophisticated traffic management and control systems being developed or envisioned for the future. A successful TFWAS system must possess the attributes of safety, reconfigurability, reliability, and expandability. The primary safety premise of TFWAS is to ensure that no action or failure of the TFWAS system or its components can result in risk of injury to humans. A wide variety of communication techniques is available for use with TFWAS systems. These communication techniques can be broken down into two categories, landlines and wireless. Currently used and possible future traffic sensing technologies have been examined. Important criteria for selecting TFWAS sensors include sensor capabilities, costs, operational constraints, sensor compatibility with the infrastructure, and extent. TFWAS is a concept that can take advantage of the strengths of different traffic sensing technologies, can readily adapt to newly developed technologies, and can grow with the development of new traffic control strategies. By developing innovative algorithms that will take information from a variety of sensor types and develop descriptions of traffic flows over a wide area, a more comprehensive understanding of the traffic state can be provided to the control system to perform the most reasonable control actions over the entire wide area. The capability of characterizing the state of traffic over an entire region should revolutionize developments in traffic control strategies.

Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.; Abston, R.A.; Carnal, C.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moynihan, P.I. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax  

SciTech Connect

This analysis explores economic impacts that might result from a wide-area release of anthrax. The intent is not to provide a quantitative analysis of such a disaster, but to: 1. Define the general categories of economic impacts that the region should be concerned about; and, 2. Explore what types of private sector businesses or industries, if any, may have the greatest impact on speeding the economic recovery of the region.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Wide-area situation awareness in electric power grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two primary elements of the US energy policy are demand management and efficiency and renewable sources. Major objectives are clean energy transmission and integration, reliable energy transmission, and grid cyber security. Development of the Smart Grid seeks to achieve these goals by lowering energy costs for consumers, achieving energy independence and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Smart Grid is expected to enable real time wide-area situation awareness (SA) for operators. Requirements for wide-area SA have been identified among interoperability standards proposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the National Institute of Standards and Technology to ensure smart-grid functionality. Wide-area SA and enhanced decision support and visualization tools are key elements in the transformation to the Smart Grid. This paper discusses human factors research to promote SA in the electric power grid and the Smart Grid. Topics that will be discussed include the role of human factors in meeting US energy policy goals, the impact and challenges for Smart Grid development, and cyber security challenges.

Greitzer, Frank L.

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Development of Autonomous Magnetometer Rotorcraft For Wide Area Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Large areas across the United States and internationally are potentially contaminated with unexploded ordinance (UXO), with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with (1) near 100% coverage and (2) near 100% detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 to 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys, resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre. In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide highresolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus there is a need for other systems, which can be used for effective data collection. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission in-flight reprioritization).

Mark D. McKay; Matthew O. Anderson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ultra Wide Band RFID Neutron Tags for Nuclear Materials Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Recent advancements in the ultra-wide band Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and solid state pillar type neutron detectors have enabled us to move forward in combining both technologies for advanced neutron monitoring. The LLNL RFID tag is totally passive and will operate indefinitely without the need for batteries. The tag is compact, can be directly mounted on metal, and has high performance in dense and cluttered environments. The LLNL coin-sized pillar solid state neutron detector has achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 20% and neutron/gamma discrimination of 1E5. These performance values are comparable to a fieldable {sup 3}He based detector. In this paper we will discuss features about the two technologies and some potential applications for the advanced safeguarding of nuclear materials.

Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Wang, T

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Monitoring well systems in geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to monitor the injection of spent geothermal fluids at reasonable cost might be greatly improved by use of multiple-completion techniques. Several such techniques, identified through contact with a broad range of experts from the groundwater and petroleum industries, are evaluated relative to application in the typical geologic and hydrologic conditions of the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Three basic monitor well designs are suggested for collection of pressure and temperature data: Single standpipe, multiple standpipe, and closed-system piezometers. A fourth design, monitor well/injection well dual completions, is determined to be inadvisable. Also, while it is recognized that water quality data is equally important, designs to allow water sampling greatly increase costs of construction, and so such designs are not included in this review. The single standpipe piezometer is recommended for use at depths less than 152 m (500 ft); several can be clustered in one area to provide information on vertical flow conditions. At depths greater than 152 m (500 ft), the multiple-completion standpipe and closed-system piezometers are likely to be more cost effective. Unique conditions at each monitor well site may necessitate consideration of the single standpipe piezometer even for deeper completions.

Lofgren, B.E.; O'Rourke, J.; Sterrett, R.; Thackston, J.; Fain, D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

27

Measurements and models of wide area TCP conversations  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes measurements of all the wide area network TCP conversations between the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the rest of the world for the months of November, 1990, and March, 1991. Some 500,000 conversations were recorded, encompassing 11 different major protocols. We look at aggregate characteristics of these conversations, both overall and by TCP protocol (e.g., smtp, ftp), computing the distributions of amount of data transferred, network bandwidth used, conversion lifetimes and conversation interarrival times. Temporal traffic variation is also investigated, showing the variation of number of active conversations and network bandwidth utilization over periods of 24 hours, 7 days and 30 days. Long term variation is also investigated by separately analyzing November and March data (which reveals a 10--20% increase in almost all aggregate traffic characteristics in just four months). We classify each conversation geographically and discover that the connectivity of the conversations were remarkably rich, including traffic to 48 of the 50 states in the US and 23 foreign countries. Finally, we develop a number of models for describing conversations of the various protocols. From these models we can more readily assess how each protocol is used and how the use changes as network utilization grows.

Paxson, V.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

2012 SG Peer Review - Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Scope Develop and demonstrate a wireless network solution for distribution automation, including fault circuit indicators and transformer monitoring, capable of secure...

29

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

30

Wide-area Monitoring and Control of Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effects present in harsh substation environments that affect PMU ... will be examined for measurement performance under distorted power conditions. ...

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Making every bit count in wide-area analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many data sets, such as system logs, are generated from widely distributed locations. Current distributed systems often discard this data because they lack the ability to backhaul it efficiently, or to do anything meaningful with it at the distributed ...

Ariel Rabkin, Matvey Arye, Siddhartha Sen, Vivek Pai, Michael J. Freedman

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Body Area Networks & Pervasive Health Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and also possible integration with existing IT ... monitors and eye pressure sensing systems. ... interference issues, reliability, energy efficiency, and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Regional crop monitoring and discrimination based on simulated ENVISAT ASAR wide swath mode images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper investigates the potential contribution of ENVISAT wide swath (WS) images for discrimination and monitoring of crops at a regional scale. The study was based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired throughout an entire growing ... Keywords: Coarse spatial resolution, Crop discrimination, Crop monitoring, ENVISAT, Synthetic aperture radar, Wide swath-ASAR

X. Blaes; F. Holecz; H. J. C. van Leeuwen; P. Defourny

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

CERTS 2012 Program Review - Real-Time Wide-Area Montoring Tool Based on CELL Method - Yuri Makarov, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/CERTS Internal Program Review DOE/CERTS Internal Program Review Real-Time Wide-Area Monitoring Tool Based on Characteristic Ellipsoid Method (CELL) Yuri Makarov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (E-mail: yuri.makarov@pnnl.gov) June 12-13, 2012 Washington DC 2 Acknowledgements Phil N. Overholt, DOE Jeff E. Dagle, PNNL, CERTS PM Joe H. Eto, LBNL, CERTS PM Jian Ma, Burns & McDonnell, Former Project Lead 3 Project Objectives and Quick Overview  Objective:  Develop a relatively simple, easy-to-implement and easy-to-use tool to monitor, predict and control the dynamic behavior of power systems for wide-area situational awareness, prediction and decision making support for operators  Specific Objectives:  Monitor dynamic behaviors of power systems

35

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Wide-Area Thermal Processing of Light-Emitting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon carbide based materials and devices have been successfully exploited for diverse electronic applications. However, they have not achieved the same success as Si technologies due to higher material cost and higher processing temperatures required for device development. Traditionally, SiC is not considered for optoelectronic applications because it has an indirect bandgap. However, AppliCote Associates, LLC has developed a laser-based doping process which enables light emission in SiC through the creation of embedded p-n junctions. AppliCote laser irradiation of silicon carbide allows two different interaction mechanisms: (1) Laser conversion or induced phase transformation which creates carbon rich regions that have conductive properties. These conductive regions are required for interconnection to the light emitting semiconducting region. (2) Laser doping which injects external dopant atoms into the substrate that introduces deep level transition states that emit light when electrically excited. The current collaboration with AppliCote has focused on the evaluation of ORNL's unique Pulse Thermal Processing (PTP) technique as a replacement for laser processing. Compared to laser processing, Pulse Thermal Processing can deliver similar energy intensities (20-50 kW/cm2) over a much larger area (up to 1,000 cm2) at a lower cost and much higher throughput. The main findings of our investigation; which are significant for the realization of SiC based optoelectronic devices, are as follows: (1) The PTP technique is effective in low thermal budget activation of dopants in SiC similar to the laser technique. The surface electrical conductivity of the SiC samples improved by about three orders of magnitude as a result of PTP processing which is significant for charge injection in the devices; (2) The surface composition of the SiC film can be modified by the PTP technique to create a carbon-rich surface (increased local C:Si ratio from 1:1 to 2.9:1). This is significant as higher thermal and electrical conductivities of the surface layer are critical for a successful development of integrated optoelectronic devices; and (3) PTP provides low thermal budget dopant activation with a controlled depth profile, which can be exploited for high performance device development with selective patterning of the substrate. This project has successfully demonstrated that a low thermal budget annealing technique, such as PTP, is critical to defining the path for low cost electronic devices integrated on glass or polymeric substrates. This project is complimentary to the goals of the Solid State Lighting Program within DOE. It involves new manufacturing techniques for light emitting materials that are potentially much lower cost and energy efficient than existing products. Significant opportunity exists for further exploration of AppliCote's material and device technology in combination with ORNL's PTP technique, modeling, and characterization capabilities.

Duty, C.; Quick, N. (AppliCote Associates, LLC)

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

COOPER, J.R.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Wide-area, Sub-decimetre Positioning for Airborne LiDAR Surveys Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne LiDAR surveys produce high-resolution, very accurate surface elevation models which are used for many applications in surveying and civil engineering, as well as for flood prevention and mitigation, monitoring coastal erosion and land subsidence, etc. The key to producing high quality elevation products is very precise geolocation and orientation (or georeferencing) of the LiDAR instrument at the times when the measurements are made, obtained with a combination of on-board GNSS and inertial sensors. The usual practice is to deploy reference GPS/GNSS land receivers in the area where the aircraft will be flying, and to obtain a precise trajectory by means of the short-baseline differential GNSS technique. This could mean installing and operating receivers at many sites during a flight mission if the area surveyed is a large one. In this paper, an example of an alternative approach will be presented: using as reference receivers those of a sparse network of Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) in New South Wales known as CORSnet-NSW, and a wide-area GNSS technique for obtaining the aircraft trajectory with sub-decimetre accuracy even with baseline lengths of several hundred kilometres. This may be comparable in precision and accuracy to the short-baseline

Oscar L. Colombo; Shane Brunker; Glenn Jones; Volker Janssen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerabilities V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerabilities August 2, 2013 - 2:25am Addthis PROBLEM: Two vulnerabilities have been reported in Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services), which can be exploited by malicious users and malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system. PLATFORM: Versions 5.0.x, 5.1.x, and 5.2.x. ABSTRACT: Cisco Wide Area Application Services (WAAS) when configured as Central Manager (CM), contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on the affected system. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54372 CVE-2013-3443 CVE-2013-3444 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Electrical resistivity may contribute to progress in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and by monitoring changes in the underground resistivity properties in the vicinity of injection due to fracture porosity enhancement. To these ends, we are acquiring a dense grid

42

An evidential fusion architecture for people surveillance in wide open areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new evidential fusion architecture is proposed to build an hybrid artificial intelligent system for people surveillance in wide open areas. Authorized people and intruders are identified and localized thanks to the joint employment of cameras and RFID ...

M. Fornaciari; D. Sottara; A. Prati; P. Mello; R. Cucchiara

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Communication infrastructure planning for wide area measurement systems in power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart grid denotes integration of all elements connected to a power grid with a communication infrastructure. In modern power systems, wide area measurement systems WAMS are such systems that use communication infrastructure to share their data and information. ...

Mohammad Shahraeini; Mohammad Hossein Javidi; Mohammad Sadegh Ghazizadeh

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

45

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area In March, 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy released data recorded from its Aerial Measuring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams. Today, the Department provided the following update on the information gathered by the AMS. This data that was collected and analyzed jointly with the Government of Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). 051311jointdoegojamstraindatafinalv2-110516163951-phpapp01.pptx 050611jointdoegojamsdatav3-110506164802-phpapp02.pptx 042111amsdataapril21v1-110422102404-phpapp02.pptx 041811amsdataapril18v1-110418170107-phpapp02.pptx 040711amsdataapril7v3-110407170243-phpapp02.pptx

46

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New

47

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P was dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were sampled for the first time during third quarter.

Chase, J.A.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Bill Wilborn, NNSA /NFO; Kathryn Knapp, NNSA /NFO; Irene Farnham, N-I; Sam Marutzky, N-I

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 447, as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the State of Nevada, includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the PSA.

None

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing William aggregating and scheduling many resources. Data must be located and staged, cache and network capacity must and non-destructive imaging to supply real-time data to a remote, on-line, airframe structures expert who

52

High-Performance Wide-Area Optical Tracking: The HiBall Tracking System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the early 1980s, the Tracker Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been working on wide-area head tracking for virtual and augmented environments. Our long-term goal has been to achieve the high performance required for ...

Greg Welch; Gary Bishop; Leandra Vicci; Stephen Brumback; Kurtis Keller; D'nardo Colucci

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

UDT: UDP-based data transfer for high-speed wide area networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize our work on the UDT high performance data transport protocol over the past four years. UDT was designed to effectively utilize the rapidly emerging high-speed wide area optical networks. It is built on top of UDP with reliability ... Keywords: Congestion control, Design and implementation, High-speed networks, Transport protocol

Yunhong Gu; Robert L. Grossman

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analysis of the Contention Access Phase of a Reservation MAC Protocol for Wide-Area Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collisions are expensive in terms of latency and wasted bandwidth, (b) the load profiles which are triggeredAnalysis of the Contention Access Phase of a Reservation MAC Protocol for Wide-Area Data Intensive for MAC performance analysis [1], [2], [3], (c) the maximum propagation delay could be potentially very

Roy, Sumit

55

Comparative study of multicast authentication schemes with application to wide-area measurement system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multicasting refers to the transmission of a message to multiple receivers at the same time. To enable authentication of sporadic multicast messages, a conventional digital signature scheme is appropriate. To enable authentication of a multicast data ... Keywords: multicast authentication, multiple-time signature scheme, smart grid, wide-area measurement system

Yee Wei Law, Zheng Gong, Tie Luo, Slaven Marusic, Marimuthu Palaniswami

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Self-Managing Wide-Area Data Streaming Service using Model-based Online Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-latency robust data streaming between the corresponding distributed components. For example, a typical Grid-- Efficient and robust data streaming services are a critical requirement of emerging Grid applications, which for wide-area high-performance distributed computing. As Grid technologies and testbeds mature

Parashar, Manish

57

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have described the experimental details, data analysis and forward modeling for scattered-wave amplitude data recorded during a teleseismic earthquake survey performed in the Valles Caldera in the summer of 1987. Twenty-four high-quality teleseismic events were recorded at numerous sites along a line spanning the ring fracture and at several sites outside of the caldera. References Peter M. Roberts, Keiiti Aki, Michael C. Fehler (1995) A Shallow

58

300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures.

Loll, C.M.

1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The higher penetration of intermittent generation resources (including wind and solar generation) in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) balancing authorities (BAs) raises issue of requiring expensive additional fast grid balancing services in response to additional intermittency and fast up and down power ramps in the electric supply system. The overall goal of the wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) project is to develop the principles, algorithms, market integration rules, a functional design, and a technical specification for an energy storage system to help cope with unexpected rapid changes in renewable generation power output. The resulting system will store excess energy, control dispatchable load and distributed generation, and utilize inter-area exchange of the excess energy between the California ISO and Bonneville Power Administration control areas. A further goal is to provide a cost-benefit analysis and develop a business model for an investment-based practical deployment of such a system. There are two tasks in Phase 2 of the WAEMS project: the flywheel field tests and the battery evaluation. Two final reports, the Wide-area Energy Management System Phase 2 Flywheel Field Tests Final Report and the Wide-area Energy Storage and Management System Battery Storage Evaluation, were written to summarize the results of the two tasks.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

L-Area Reactor - 1993 annual - groundwater monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in L Area: the L-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (four LAC wells), L-Area Research Wells in the southern portion of the area (outside the fence; three LAW wells), the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (four LCO wells), the L-Area Disassembly Basin (two LDB wells), the L-Area Burning/Rubble Pit (four LRP wells), and the L-Area Seepage Basin (four LSB wells). During 1993, tetrachloroethylene was detected above its drinking water standard (DWS) in the LAC, LAW, LCO, and LDB well series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in the LAW, LDB, and LRP series, and tritium was above its DWS in the LAW, LCO, and LSB series. Apparently anomalous elevated levels of the common laboratory contaminant bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were reported during first quarter in one well each in the LAC series and LCO series, and during third quarter in a different LCO well. Extensive radionuclide analyses were performed during 1993 in the LAC, LAW, and LCO well series. No radionuclides other than tritium were reported above DWS or Flag 2 criteria.

Chase, J.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Use of the WECC WAMS in Wide Area Probing Tests for Validation of System Performance & Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2005 and 2006 the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) performed three major tests of western system dynamics. These tests used a Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) based primarily on Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) to determine response to events including the insertion of the 1400-MW Chief Joseph braking resistor, probing signals, and ambient events. Test security was reinforced through real-time analysis of wide area effects, and high-quality data provided dynamic profiles for interarea modes across the entire western interconnection. The tests established that low-level optimized pseudo-random 20-MW probing with the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI) roughly doubles the apparent noise that is natural to the power system, providing sharp dynamic information with negligible interference to system operations. Such probing is an effective alternative to use of the 1400-MW Chief Joseph dynamic brake, and it is under consideration as a standard means for assessing dynamic security.

Hauer, John F.; Mittelstadt, William; Martin, Kenneth E.; Burns, J. W.; Lee, Harry; Pierre, John W.; Trudnowski, Daniel

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/22/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2211 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 42211 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

64

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/18/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41811 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 41811 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

65

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 3/22/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

211 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 32211 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

66

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/4/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

411 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4411 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

67

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4/7/11 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

711 Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area - 4711 This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its...

68

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Guidelines manual for surface monitoring of geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are covered: preliminary investigation, design of monitoring system, and monitoring operations. Included in appendices are: characteristics of geothermal subsidence, guidelines for specifications for monitoring subsidence, instruments for monitoring, formats for data presentation, and statistical analyses. (MHR)

Van Til, C.J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

2012 SG Peer Review - Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor & Faulted Circuit Indicator System for Underground Assets - Jason Wilson, On-Ramp Wireless  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor for Underground Assets Jason Wilson On-Ramp Wireless June 7, 2012 December 2008 Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor for Underground Assets Objective Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY 12 FY12, authorized FY13, requested Out-year(s) $1,046 $580 $39 $0 Technical Scope Develop and demonstrate a wireless network solution for distribution automation, including fault circuit indicators and transformer monitoring, capable of secure and reliable communication with below ground and hard to reach utility assets at a TCO that is commercially viable for utilities to deploy at large scale. Enable utilities throughout the US to improve critical grid reliability metrics including SAIDI. * Conceptual design and trade studies including sensor system interfaces, augmenting FCI with

71

A framework for activity detection in wide-area motion imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-area persistent imaging systems are becoming increasingly cost effective and now large areas of the earth can be imaged at relatively high frame rates (1-2 fps). The efficient exploitation of the large geo-spatial-temporal datasets produced by these systems poses significant technical challenges for image and video analysis and data mining. In recent years there has been significant progress made on stabilization, moving object detection and tracking and automated systems now generate hundreds to thousands of vehicle tracks from raw data, with little human intervention. However, the tracking performance at this scale, is unreliable and average track length is much smaller than the average vehicle route. This is a limiting factor for applications which depend heavily on track identity, i.e. tracking vehicles from their points of origin to their final destination. In this paper we propose and investigate a framework for wide-area motion imagery (W AMI) exploitation that minimizes the dependence on track identity. In its current form this framework takes noisy, incomplete moving object detection tracks as input, and produces a small set of activities (e.g. multi-vehicle meetings) as output. The framework can be used to focus and direct human users and additional computation, and suggests a path towards high-level content extraction by learning from the human-in-the-loop.

Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morrison, Jack D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A study of lustre networking over a 100 gigabit wide area network with 50 milliseconds of latency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the SCinet Research Sandbox at the 2011 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis (SC11), Indiana University utilized a dedicated 100 Gbps wide area network (WAN) link spanning more than 3,500 ... Keywords: i/o benchmarking, lustre, networking, wide area file systems

Scott Michael; Liang Zhen; Robert Henschel; Stephen Simms; Eric Barton; Matthew Link

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health {ampersand} Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a `capture zone` that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater.

Chase, J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evaluation of replacement protocols and modifications to TCP to enhance ASC Wide Area Network performance.  

SciTech Connect

Historically, TCP/IP has been the protocol suite used to transfer data throughout the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) community. However, TCP was developed many years ago for an environment very different from the ASC Wide Area Network (WAN) of today. There have been numerous publications that hint of better performance if modifications were made to the TCP algorithms or a different protocol was used to transfer data across a high bandwidth, high delay WAN. Since Sandia National Laboratories wants to maximize the ASC WAN performance to support the Thor's Hammer supercomputer, there is strong interest in evaluating modifications to the TCP protocol and in evaluating alternatives to TCP, such as SCTP, to determine if they provide improved performance. Therefore, the goal of this project is to test, evaluate, compare, and report protocol technologies that enhance the performance of the ASC WAN.

Romero, Randy L. Jr.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Sandia's Network for Supercomputer `96: Linking Supercomputers in a Wide Area Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advanced networking department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past several years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. At Supercomputing 96, for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combined their Supercomputing 96 activities within a single research booth under the ASCI banner. Sandia provided the network design and coordinated the networking activities within the booth. At Supercomputing 96, Sandia elected: to demonstrate wide area network connected Massively Parallel Processors, to demonstrate the functionality and capability of Sandia's new edge architecture, to demonstrate inter-continental collaboration tools, and to demonstrate ATM video capabilities. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these dem...

Thomas Pratt Luis; Luis G. Martinez; Thomas V. Archuleta

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The High Performance and Wide Area Analysis and Mining of Scientific & Engineering Data  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes our accomplishments and findings and includes recent publications occurring in the final period of this award. One of our research goals was to develop algorithms and services for remote data analysis and distributed data mining which scaled from the commodity internet to high performance networks. When we began the project there was no effective mechanisms to achieve high end to end performance for data intensive applications over wide area, high bandwidth networks. For this reason, we developed algorithms and services for Layers 2,3, and 4 in the simple data web application stack below. We describe our research accomplishments for each of these layers in turn: Layer 4--Data Web Applications; Layer 3--Data Web Services; Layer 2--Network Protocol Services; Layer 1--IP.

Grossman, R.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Barriers to a Wide-Area Trusted Network Early Warning System For Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is apparent that perturbations of the North American electric power grid follow the patterns and characteristics of Self Organized Critical (SOC) systems. Published studies show SOC systems exhibit statistical properties that may result in early warning systems predicting electric power instability and loss of reliability. However, in order for such an early warning system to exist, a trusted wide-area data network must collate information from disparate subsystems and compile that information into homogenous data records for input to a modeling system. This paper explores similarities between widearea trusted computer networks and the needs of a widearea trusted network early warning system for electric power instability. An analysis of commercial equipment used in power stations uncovers disparate access methods and protocols that inhibit interoperability, and yet that problem has been mitigated in computer networking. Recent advances lend hope that wide-area data collection and modeling of electric power system perturbations will be commonplace in the not to distant future. I. Modeling Disturbance Data The electric power grid can be modeled as a complex system of dynamic load and generation balances characterized by two types of stability. Steady-state stability describes the nominal balancing of relatively minor disturbances in load/generation fluctuations caused by normal start-up and shut-down events associated with the millions of appliances and equipment attached to the grid. Constraints on operating parameters nominally voltage levels, current magnitudes and power flows are used to achieve steady-state equilibrium where the generation input is matched to system losses and electrical outputs. Whereas, transient stability describes the power systems ability (or lack thereof) to absorb major disturbances and return to a relatively balanced steadystate. Load shedding, generation shedding, and regional

Paul W. Oman; Jeff Roberts

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Guidelines Manual for Surface Monitoring of GeothermalA07 Final Report GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OFi t a t i o n s o f t h e Manual PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION I

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area- 3/25/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

82

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area- 3/29/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

83

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area-5/6/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

84

Radiation Monitoring Data from Fukushima Area- 5/13/11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This data was recorded from DOE's Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed along with its Consequence Management Response Teams.

85

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the interim status groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area A-AX.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Horton, Duane G.

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Substation-Wide Monitoring Through Applications of Networked Wireless Sensor Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the work performed by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte on an EPRI-sponsored project involving the development of a wireless sensor network for substation monitoring. Wireless sensor networking is an emerging technology, and its application to substation monitoring has substantial economic as well as functional benefits. This report describes the challenges faced, technologies used, design strategies developed, and lessons learned from the various experimen...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park_Area_(Janik_%26_Mclaren,_2010)&oldid=425654"

89

Virtual pan-tilt-zoom for a wide-area-video surveillance system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancements in the CMOS Image Sensor have enabled very high-performance, high resolution imaging systems to be built at relatively low cost. The availability of high-pixel count video imaging systems that can cover a wide ...

Sinn, Richard, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Communication network modeling for simulation of wide area monitoring and control applications in power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis has mainly focused on investigating the effect of communication network on the power system operation. The main objective of this research has been (more)

MUDIYANSELAGE, SARANGA D. EDIRISINGHE DISSANAYAKE TENNAKOON

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Prospects for the introduction of wide area monitoring using environmental sampling for proliferation detection  

SciTech Connect

Abstract paper which would like to be considered for submission to the MARC IX Conference as well as for the future publication in the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry.

Wogman, Ned A.

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1975-1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1975 - 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate thermal regime and potential of the system Notes Three-dimensional Q -1 model of the Coso Hot Springs known geothermal resource area was conducted. To complete the model a regional telemetered network of sixteen stations was operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; deployed a portable Centipede array of 26 three-component stations near the

93

Radiation Portal Monitoring Test Area and Large Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a transformation. In the summer of 2007, work began on the nearly 200,000-square-foot Physical Sciences Facility, equipment and staff displaced from accelerated cleanup of Hanford's 300 Area. This federally financed detection and testing · Borderandinterdiction technology · Materialsdevelopmentand engineering

94

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. There were no constituents which exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. There were also no constituents which were above the SRS Flag 2 criteria in any well at the three sites during second quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1998-2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1998 - 2002 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two recent earthquake sequences near the Coso geothermal field show clear evidence of faulting along conjugate planes. Results from analyzing an earthquake sequence occurring in 1998 are presented and compared with a similar sequence that occurred in 1996. The two sequences followed mainshocks that occurred on 27 November, 1996 and 6 March, 1998. Both mainshocks ruptured approximately colocated regions of the same fault

96

Post-Retrocommissioning HVAC Operations Monitoring Using Enterprise-Wide energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2004, the County of Los Angeles have retrocommissioned over 4 million square feet and additional RCx work is underway. The scope of the HVAC retrocommissioning (RCs) involved systematic investigation of mechanical, electrical and controls components/systems to diagnose and resolve root causes of operational deficiencies. During the implementation phase, new energy efficiency measures were installed, sequence of operations were optimized and functionally tested. System-level benchmark models for HVAC systems were developed based on optimized runs of eQUEST energy models and parametrically integrated into the County owned web-based Enterprise Energy Management Information Systems (EEMIS) with Itron/Silicon Energy EEM Suite backbone for the purpose of monitoring the operations of the HVAC systems. The paper and presentation describes the HVAC RCx process to optimize operations, cost and savings associated with this project and key operational changes to sustain optimized operations without sacrificing tenant comfort.

Amarnani, N.; Roberts, B.; Choy, H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Wireless Sensing, Monitoring and Optimization for Campus-Wide Steam Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize energy delivery within the steam distribution system. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capability. We make real time state assessment on the steam trap health and steam flow estimate of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observing measurements of these sensors with state estimators for system health. Our assessments are based on a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap states and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. We are able to present the steam flow and steam trap status, sensor readings, and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Woodworth, Ken [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwrights Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine models standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Long Valley Caldera Area (Newman, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Andrew V. Newman, Timothy H. Dixon, Noel Gourmelen (2006) A Four-Dimensional Viscoelastic Deformation Model For Long Valley Caldera, California, Between 1995 And 2000 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Newman,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=425656"

100

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Characterization plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Area-Wide Groundwater Program, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This characterization plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) investigation of the Groundwater Operable Unit (GWOU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first iteration of the characterization plan is intended to serve as a strategy document to guide subsequent GWOU remedial investigations. The plan provides a rationale and organization for groundwater data acquisition, monitoring, and remedial actions to be performed during implementation of environmental restoration activities associated with the ORNL GWOU. It is important to note that the characterization plan for the ORNL GWOU is not a prototypical work plan. As such, remedial investigations will be conducted using annual work plans to manage the work activities, and task reports will be used to document the results of the investigations. Sampling and analysis results will be compiled and reported annually with a review of data relative to risk (screening level risk assessment review) for groundwater. This characterization plan outlines the overall strategy for the remedial investigations and defines tasks that are to be conducted during the initial phase of investigation. This plan is presented with the understanding that more specific addenda to the plan will follow.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2012 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2012; 2013a; 2013b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 133.9 millimeters (mm) (5.27 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2012 is 12% below the average of 153.0 mm (6.02 in.), and the 137.6 mm (5.42 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2012 is 11% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

Hudson, David B.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine extent of low velocity body Notes An area showing approximately 0.2-s excess travel time that migrates with changing source azimuth, suggesting that the area is the 'delay shadow' produced by a deep, low-velocity body. Inversion of the relative residual data for three-dimensional velocity structure determines the lateral variations in velocity to a depth of 22.5 km beneath the array. An intense low-velocity body, which coincides with the surface expressions of late Pleistocene rhyolitic volcanism, high heat flow, and hydrothermal activity,

105

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. The only constituent that exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well was lead which was found in wells HSS 3D and PSS 3D. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for selected heavy metals, herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, major ions, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during fourth quarter are the focus of this report.

Chase, J.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2005 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis More detailed analysis of microearthquakes over a longer period of time Notes The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides high-quality microearthquake (MEQ) data that are well suited to investigating temporal variations in structure related to processes within the geothermal reservoir. A preliminary study (Julian, et al. 2003; Julian

108

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy GPO has contracted the University of Nevada Reno Great Basin for Center for Geothermal Research to conduct additional field exploration at HAD. The tasks required by the Navy range from field mapping and water sampling; detailed mapping, to low angle sun photo interpretations, trenching, to 3-D seismic interpretations and modeling. References Michael Lazaro, Chris Page, Andy Tiedeman, Andrew Sabin, Steve Bjornstad, Steve Alm, David Meade, Jeff Shoffner, Kevin Mitchell, Bob Crowder, Greg Halsey (2010) United States Department Of The Navy Geothermal

109

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

Eleven sewage sludge application sites at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were originally the subject of a research program, begun in 1980, using domestic sewage sludge to reclaim borrow pits and to enhance forest productivity at SRS. Currently, the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites are the only remaining active sludge application sites. During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the four monitoring wells at the F-Area site (FSS series) and three monitoring wells at the H-Area site (HSS series) were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, and certain pesticides, herbicides, toxic metals, water quality indicators, and radionuclides. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the SRS flagging criteria.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Analyze seismic data to develop reservoir models that characterize the geothermal system Notes Large-amplitude, secondary arrivals are modeled as scattering anomalies. Polarization and ray tracing methods determine the orientation and location of the scattering body. Two models are proposed for the scatterer: (1) a point scatterer located anywhere in a one-dimensional (1-D), layered velocity model; and (2) a dipping interface between two homogeneous half

112

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2012) 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2011-2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2011 - 2012 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Map hydraulic structure within the field from seismic data Notes 2011: 16 years of seismicity were analyzed to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated since the 1980's. 2012: 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field were relocated using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for

113

Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management system to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The entire project addresses the issue of mitigating additional intermittency and fast ramps that occur at higher penetration of intermittent resources, including wind genera-tion, in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the California Independent Sys-tem Operator (California ISO) control areas. The proposed Wide Area Energy Storage and Management System (WAEMS) will address the additional regulation requirement through the energy exchange between the participating control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and California ISO control centers, the new regulation service will look no different comparing with the traditional regulation resources. The proposed project will benefit the regulation service in these service areas, regardless of the actual degree of penetration of the intermittent resources in the regions. The project develops principles, algorithms, market integration rules, functional de-sign and technical specifications for the WAEMS system. The project is sponsored by BPA and supported in kind by California ISO, Beacon Power Corporation, and the Cali-fornia Energy Commission (CEC).

Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.; Lu, Shuai; Miller, Carl H.; Nyeng, Preben; Ma, Jian; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project -- Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands in an environment characterized by increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project jointly with the two Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) to address these issues in a practical operating environment the western North America power system. The Project draws upon many years of PMA effort and related collaboration among the western utilities, plus an expanding infrastructure that includes regionally involved contractors, universities, and National Laboratories plus linkages to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

Mittelstadt, W.A. [Bonneville Power Administration (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Krause, P.E.; Wilson, R.E. [Western Power Administration (United States); Overholt, P.N. [USDOE (United States); Rizy, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys Notes Different migration procedures were applied to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data. After carefully preprocessing seismic data, the 2-D and 2.5-D pre-stack depth migration of line 109 in the Coso Geothermal Field shows a well defined reflector at about 16,000 ft depth. Compared to the 2-D pre-stack migrated image, the 2.5-D pre-stack migrated image

116

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1983 - 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To study anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust Notes V s and V p wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the

117

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our passive seismic survey revealed a surprisingly high and sustained activity of local seismic events originating within the crust of Kilauea Iki. We recorded about 8000 events in a single day of operation at nail 17 with a seismograph having a peak magnification of 280,000 at 60 Hz (Fig. 10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii

118

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kilauea volcano has high seismicity, most of which is associated with specific fault zones on the volcano and with movement of magma at depth (Koyanagi and Endo, 1971; Koyanagi et al., 1976). Certain groups of earthquakes have been observed at very shallow depths, however, and some of these have been concentrated in a zone that lies near the resistivity anomaly and the center of inflation. The data show that this shallow

119

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project: Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system  

SciTech Connect

In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands, in an environment where increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins all contribute to increased system efficiencies and capacity. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project jointly with the two Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) to address these issues in a practical operating environment--the western North America power system. The Project draws upon many years of PMA effort and related collaboration among the western utilities, plus an expanding infrastructure that includes regionally involved contractors, universities, and National Laboratories plus linkages to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The WAMS project also brings added focus and resources to the evolving Western System Dynamic Information Network, or WesDINet. This is a collective response of the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) member utilities to their shared needs for direct information about power system characteristics, model fidelity, and operational performance. The WAMS project is a key source of the technology and backbone communications needed to make WesDINet a well integrated, cost effective enterprise network demonstrating the role of dynamic information technology in the emerging utility environment.

Mittelstadt, W.A. [USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States); Krause, P.E.; Wilson, R.E. [USDOE Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States); Overholt, P.N. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rizy, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sandia`s network for Supercomputer `96: Linking supercomputers in a wide area Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advanced networking department at Sandia National Laboratories has used the annual Supercomputing conference sponsored by the IEEE and ACM for the past several years as a forum to demonstrate and focus communication and networking developments. At Supercomputing 96, for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory combined their Supercomputing 96 activities within a single research booth under the ASO banner. Sandia provided the network design and coordinated the networking activities within the booth. At Supercomputing 96, Sandia elected: to demonstrate wide area network connected Massively Parallel Processors, to demonstrate the functionality and capability of Sandia`s new edge architecture, to demonstrate inter-continental collaboration tools, and to demonstrate ATM video capabilities. This paper documents those accomplishments, discusses the details of their implementation, and describes how these demonstrations support Sandia`s overall strategies in ATM networking.

Pratt, T.J.; Martinez, L.G.; Vahle, M.O. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum, iron, lead, and manganese, which were above standards and Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1994, were not analyzed this quarter. Second quarter results are similar to results for fourth quarter 1993.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter report 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1994, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in four wells, while manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in three wells.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

K-Area acid/caustic basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum, iron, total organic halogens, and turbidity exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. The upgradient KAC wells contained no elevated constituents.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of an Enterprise-wide Energy Information and Utility Monitoring System in a Major Hotel Chain: The Hyatt Hotels Corporation Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyatt Hotels Corporation is currently implementing an enterprise-wide Energy Information and Utility Monitoring System (UMS). New Horizon Technologies and eComponents Technology have teamed to provide an integrated solution that will ultimately include all Hyatt Hotels in North America. In addition, these 120 Hyatt Hotels participate in a monthly web-based energy benchmarking and hotel engineering reporting system. For hotels with Utility Monitoring Systems (UMS) installed, energy and water consumption data is automatically summarized for the web reports. Hotels without the UMS enter monthly utility data manually on the website. The base UMS at the hotels consists of electric, gas and domestic water consumption and local temperature and relative humidity measurements. The Hyatt UMS is one of the first enterprise-wide systems to include domestic water metering. Many hotels elect to install additional sub-metering for major loads or end uses such as chillers, kitchens and laundries. The local hotel UMS consists of a data acquisition system capable of displaying real-time data that also logs 15-minute interval data. The system transfers interval data daily, to a data center and also transfers interval data hourly, via a Local Area Network, to an on-site workstation with a local database. The local workstation permits users to have real-time alarming capability, access to easy-touse data visualization and analysis tools, and the ability to generate both customized and standard daily and monthly reports. Report writing and utility costing software are used to generate daily and month-to-date cost reports. Bill estimation software uses actual utility rate tariff models to create estimates of utility costs for any custom defined period. Data resident in the Hyatt data center is accessible to the individual hotels using a web-based system. Senior engineers with authorization can access data for all Hyatt Hotels in their regions. The corporate energy director and senior management have access to all data in the Hyatt data center. Browser-based hotel benchmarking data is also available through a similar system with an authorization hierarchy. This paper will describe the design and implementation of the Hyatt UMS in detail, review how the system is currently being used by Hyatt personnel, discuss potential future applications and provide an initial look at UMS system-wide data, including a preliminary return on investment (ROI) analysis.

Burke, B.; McBride, J.; Kimble, K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clear Lake Area Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Figure 4 illustrates seismicity from January of 1969 to June of 1977 (Rapolla and Keller, 1984). During this span, most of the seismicity occurred in the region of the Geysers geothermal field. Additional clustered activity was noted to the north and east of the Collayomi Fault in the Clear Lake region. Curiously, no unusual earthquake activity was noted along the major trend of the Collayomi Fault. Instead, the Collayomi Fault seems to separate two areas of active seismicity. References Catherine K. Skokan (1993) Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States

130

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended March 2010) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes the results from the groundwater monitoring program during fiscal year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 2008 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended February 2008) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes proof of concept monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 447 that were conducted at the site during 2008. This is the second groundwater monitoring report prepared by LM for the PSA

None

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three Wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. Lead presently exceeds the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in two wells from the three sites. As in third quarter 1993, aluminum, iron, and lead were reported in excess of the SRS Flag 2 criteria during first quarter 1994. An elevated concentration of manganese was found in one well at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site during first quarter.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1996-2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1996 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To look at time dependent seismic tomography Notes Local-earthquake tomographic images were calculated for each of the years 1996 - 2004 using arrival times from the U.S. Navy's permanent seismometer network. The results show irregular strengthening with time of the wave-speed ratio V p/V s at shallow depths. The period from 1996 through 2006 was studied, and the results to date using the traditional method show, for a 2-km horizontal grid spacing, an irregular strengthening

137

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, radium-226, radium-228, turbidity, and comprehensive constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in five PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while specific conductance was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

The six monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with the terms of a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During second quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria or turbidity standard are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS in wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin. Aluminum exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Iron and manganese each exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 2, 3, 5, and 6. Lead was elevated above its Flag 2 criterion in well PAC 5, and radium-228 was above its proposed DWS (Flag 2) in wells PAC 3 and 6. Radium-228 results that exceeded nonvolatile beta activities were reported in these and other wells.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

F- and H-area Sewage Sludge Application Sites: Groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum have been the primary nonpermit constituents exceeding standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. Other constituents also have exceeded standards at this site, but only sporadically, and none of those were analyzed second quarter 1993.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1988) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze three-dimensional Vp/Vs variation Notes A tomographic inversion for the 3D variations of the Vp/V s, the ratio of compressional to shear velocity, was performed. Iterative back projection of 2966 shear and compressional wave travel time residuals from local earthquakes recorded on vertical instruments reveals that Vp/Vs is generally high at the surface and decreases systematically to 10 km depth. Near Devil's Kitchen in the Coso Geothermal Area, Vp/Vs values are very low near the surface, consistent with measured values for steam-dominated

146

Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report: Third quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, iron, lead, and manganese are the only permit-required analytes that exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum are the nonpermit constituents exceeding standards. Other constituents have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993  

SciTech Connect

The four monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), the SRS flagging criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are the focus of this report. During fourth quarter 1993, tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells, with activities between 3.8E + 01 and 4.6E + 01 pCi/mL. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance was elevated in well HAC 2, total organic halogens exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2 and 3, and manganese was elevated in wells HAC 3 and 4. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

H-area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During first quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during first quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride and heptachlor epoxide exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1 and 2. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Total organic halogens was elevated in wells HAC 2 and 3. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in wells HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during fourth quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 were similar to tritium levels in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese were elevated in one downgradient well each. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. During 1992, tritium was the only constituent that exceeded the final PDWS. It did so consistently in all four wells during all four quarters, with little variability in activity.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during second quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Specific conductance and total organic halogens were elevated in well HAC 2. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Groundwater flow direction in the water stable beneath the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west during second quarter 1994. During previous quarters, the groundwater flow direction has been consistently to the northwest or the north-northwest. This apparent change in flow direction may be attributed to the lack of water elevations for wells HTF 16 and 17 and the anomalous water elevations for well HAC 2 during second quarter.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2010 results. During 2010, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 10 and August 10, 2010; at UE5PW-2 on March 10, August 10, and August 25, 2010; and at UE5PW-3 on March 31, August 10, and August 25, 2010. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, April 26, August 9, and November 9, 2010. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2010 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During fourth quarter 1992, the FSS wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells. Lead concentrations exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards during fourth quarter 1992, an event that is concurrent with a change in sampling procedures. Tritium is the primary nonpermit constituent that exceeds standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with Module 3, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 87 FSB wells screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison became the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit. Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the second half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} wells. However, several Aquifer Unit 2A wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

Butler, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Decision support system for estimating the technically and economically exploitable renewable energy sources potential in wide areas for connection to high voltage networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decision support information system for estimating the technically and economically exploitable renewable energy sources (RES) potential in wide areas is presented in this paper. The system estimates the RES potential in specific areas, examines ... Keywords: DSS, GIS, biomass, decision support systeoms, distributed generation, geographical information systems, high voltage network, renewable energy estimation, renewable energy forecasting, renewable energy potential, renewable energy sources, small hydro, wind energy, wind power

Michael Psalidas; Demosthenes Agoris; Vassilis Kilias; Kostas Tigas; Panagiotis Stratis; Giannis Vlachos

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. One of the FAC piezometers was scheduled for these analyses but was dry. Analytical results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS in two wells. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in five wells. Iron exceeded standards in four wells, manganese exceeded standards in two wells, and total organic halogens exceeded standards in one well. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The development of large area saturable Bragg reflectors for the generation of widely-tunable ultra-short pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the realization of two photonic devices; 1) semiconductor lasers and 2) large area broadband Saturable Bragg Reflectors (SBRs). Semiconductor lasers explore the use of 3D and 2D quantum confinement ...

Nabanja, Sheila P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radiological Monitoring Equipment For Real-Time Quantification Of Area Contamination In Soils And Facility Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The environmental restoration industry offers several systems that perform scan-type characterization of radiologically contaminated areas. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of field systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyse radiological contamination in surface soils. The base system consists of a detector, such as sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometers, a global positioning system (GPS), and an integrated user-friendly computer interface. This mobile concept was initially developed to provide precertification analyses of soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium at the Fernald Closure Project, near Cincinnati, Ohio. INL has expanded the functionality of this basic system to create a suite of integrated field-deployable analytical systems. Using its engineering and radiation measurement expertise, aided by computer hardware and software support, INL has streamlined the data acquisition and analysis process to provide real-time information presented on wireless screens and in the form of coverage maps immediately available to field technicians. In addition, custom software offers a user-friendly interface with user-selectable alarm levels and automated data quality monitoring functions that validate the data. This system is deployed from various platforms, depending on the nature of the survey. The deployment platforms include a small all-terrain vehicle used to survey large, relatively flat areas, a hand-pushed unit for areas where manoeuvrability is important, an excavator-mounted system used to scan pits and trenches where personnel access is restricted, and backpack- mounted systems to survey rocky shoreline features and other physical settings that preclude vehicle-based deployment. Variants of the base system include sealed proportional counters for measuring actinides (i.e., plutonium-238 and americium-241) in building demolitions, soil areas, roadbeds, and process line routes at the Miamisburg Closure Project near Dayton, Ohio. In addition, INL supports decontamination operations at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

M. V. Carpenter; Jay A. Roach; John R Giles; Lyle G. Roybal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydrogeologic settings of A/M Area: Framework for groundwater transport: Book 6, Appendix B, Time/concentration graphs A/M Area monitoring wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the time/concentration graphs for the Savannah River A/M monitoring wells. This Appendix B is part of the determination of the hydrogeologic setting of the A/M Area as a part of ground water transport studies.

Van Pelt, R.; Lewis, S.E.; Aadand, R.K.

1994-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Area temperature system monitoring and computing based on adaptive fuzzy logic in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The many subfields in the wireless sensor networking literature include data fusion, data aggregation, remote environmental monitoring, sensing (temperature, pressure speed) and various military applications. The distance between sensor nodes can be ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic, Monitoring, RSSI, Temperature, WSN

Ing-Jiunn Su; Chia-Chih Tsai; Wen-Tsai Sung

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams: 1994 Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of characterizing and monitoring the following sources during calendar year 1994: liquid waste streams from Buildings 306, 320, 324, 326, 331, and 3720 in the 300 Area of Hanford Site and managed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory; treated and untreated Columbia River water (influent); and water at the confluence of the waste streams (that is, end-of-pipe). Data were collected from March to December before the sampling system installation was completed. Data from this initial part of the program are considered tentative. Samples collected were analyzed for chemicals, radioactivity, and general parameters. In general, the concentrations of chemical and radiological constituents and parameters in building wastewaters which were sampled and analyzed during CY 1994 were similar to historical data. Exceptions were the occasional observances of high concentrations of chloride, nitrate, and sodium that are believed to be associated with excursions that were occurring when the samples were collected. Occasional observances of high concentrations of a few solvents also appeared to be associated with infrequent building r eases. During calendar year 1994, nitrate, aluminum, copper, lead, zinc, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and gross beta exceeded US Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels.

Riley, R.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Damberg, E.G.; Evans, J.C.; Julya, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Ozanich, R.M.; Thompson, C.J.; Vogel, H.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30.5 meters in each borehole, and a nearly zero potential gradient throughout the remaining portion of the vadose zone. These hydrologic condition data and hydrologic property data indicate that little net downward liquid flow is occurring (if any) through the thick vadose zone. Conversely, gas flow by diffusion, and possibly by advection, may be an important transport mechanism. Environmental tracer measurements made on water extracted from geologic samples suggest that water vapor in the upper portion of the vadose zone is moving upward in response to evaporative demand of the present arid climate. Preliminary water quality data indicate that the key hazardous and radioactive constituents do not exceed appropriate standards. Monitoring instruments and equipment were installed in each pilot well for making in-situ measurements of key hydrologic and pneumatic parameters and to monitor change in these parameters over time.

BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13, 173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During fourth quarter 1992, no constituents analyzed exceeded the PDWS or the SRS Flag 2 criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 26 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow directions are south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates).

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2009 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Annual monitoring in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades was conducted in June 2009. MAP guidelines defined mitigation success for this project as 3000 established sagebrush transplants on a 4.5 ha mitigation site after five monitoring years. Annual monitoring results suggest that an estimated 2130 sagebrush transplants currently grow on the site. Additional activities in support of this project included gathering sagebrush seed and securing a local grower to produce between 2250 and 2500 10-in3 tublings for outplanting during the early winter months of FY2010. If the minimum number of seedlings grown for this planting meets quality specifications, and planting conditions are favorable, conservative survival estimates indicate the habitat mitigation goals outlined in the MAP will be met in FY2014.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals. also are required by the permits.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

The unlined settling basin operated from 1958 until 1985, receiving waste water that contained volatile organic solvents used for metal degreasing and chemical constituents and depleted uranium from fuel fabrication process in M Area. The underground process sewer line transported M-Area process waste waters to the basin. Water periodically overflowed from the basin through the ditch to the seepage area adjacent to the ditch and to Lost Lake.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Post-Closure Evaluation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site in Support of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-closure performance of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and Area 5 RWMS are evaluated for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement using current performance assessment and composite analysis methods and models. Two alternatives with different future waste volumes and inventories are evaluated. The No Action Alternative evaluates the inventory disposed through fiscal year (FY) 2010 plus an additional 4.5E5 cubic meters (m3) (1.59E7 cubic feet [ft3]) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The Expanded Operations Alternative evaluates the FY 2010 inventory plus an additional 1.42E6 m3 (5.03E7 ft3) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and 4.93E4 m3 (1.74E6 ft3) disposed at the Area 3 RWMS. Both the No Action and Expanded Operations Alternatives have a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. No significant difference between the two alternatives was found because the waste concentrations are similar. The performance assessment model assesses radiological risk for residents at the RWMS boundary where risk is more closely related to waste concentration than total waste inventory. Results for the composite analysis also indicate that the dose constraint and dose limit can be met for both alternatives.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and the risk index among factors including bird taxonomic groups, wind turbine and reference areas, wind turbine sizes and types, and geographic locations. The key questions addressed to meet this objective include: (1) Are there any differences in the level of bird activity, called ''utilization rate'' or ''use'', with the operating wind plant and within the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (2) Are there any differences in the rate of bird fatalities (or avian fatality) within the operating wind plant or the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (3) Does bird use, fatality rates, or bird risk index vary according to the geographic location, type and size of wind turbine, and/or type of bird within the operating wind plant and surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; and (4) How do raptor fatality rates at San Gorgonio compare to other wind projects with comparable data?

Anderson, R.; Tom, J.; Neumann, N.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. No constituent exceeded either the final Primary Drinking Water Standards or the SRS Flag 2 criteria during fourth quarter 1993. Iron, lead, and manganese were the only permit- required analytes that exceeded standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites in 1993. Tritium, aluminum, and other constituents not included in the permit have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically. These constituents were not analyzed fourth quarter 1993.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Surface Area and Microporosity of Carbon Aerogels from Gas Adsorption and Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A carbon aerogel was obtained by carbonization of an organic aerogel prepared by sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in water. The carbon aerogel was then CO2 activated at 800 C to increase its surface area and widen its microporosity. Evolution of these parameters was followed by gas adsorption and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively) with contrast variation by using dry and wet (immersion in benzene and m-xylene) samples. For the original carbon aerogel, the surface area, SSAXS, obtained by SAXS, is larger than that obtained by gas adsorption (Sads). The values become nearly the same as the degree of activation of the carbon aerogel increases. This feature is due to the widening of the narrow microporosity in the carbon aerogel as the degree of activation is increased. In addition, WAXS results show that the short-range spatial correlations into the assemblies of hydrocarbon molecules confined inside the micropores are different from those existing in the liquid phase. 1.

David Fairn-jimnez; Francisco Carrasco-marn; David Djurado; Franoise Bley; Franoise Ehrburger-dolle; Carlos Moreno-castilla

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

RESULTS OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING FOR THE 183-H SOLAR EVAPORATION BASINS AND 300 AREA PROCESS TRENCHES JANUARY THRU JUNE 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) monitoring at the 183-H solar evaporation basins and the 300 Area process trenches. It fulfills the requirement of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-645(11)(g), 'Release from Regulated Units', to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from January through June 2008. The current objective of corrective action monitoring the 183-H basins is simply to track trends. Although there is short-term variability in contaminant concentrations, trends over the past 10 years are downward. The current Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste [Permit No. WA 7890008967]) and monitoring plan remain adequate for the objective of tracking trends. The objective of groundwater monitoring at the 300 Area process trenches is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the corrective action program by examining the trend of the constituents of interest to confirm that they are attenuating naturally. The overall concentration of uranium in network wells remained above the 30 {micro}g/L drinking water standard in the three downgradient wells screened at the water table. Fluctuations of uranium concentration are caused by changes in river stage. The concentration of cis-1,2-dichloroethene remained above the 70 {micro}g/L drinking water standard in one well (399-1-16B). Concentrations are relatively steady at this well and are not affected by river stage. Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene concentrations were below detection limits in all wells during the reporting period.

HARTMAN MJ

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Characterization and monitoring of 300 Area Facility liquid waste streams: Status report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of characterizing and monitoring the following sources during a portion of this year: liquid waste streams from Buildings 331, 320, and 3720; treated and untreated Columbia River water; and water at the confluence of the waste streams (that is, end-of-pipe). Characterization and monitoring data were evaluated for samples collected between March 22 and June 21, 1994, and subsequently analyzed for hazardous chemicals, radioactivity, and general parameters. Except for bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, concentrations of chemicals detected and parameters measured at end-of-pipe were below the US Environmental Protection Agency existing and proposed drinking water standards. The source of the chemicals, except bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, is not currently known. The bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate is probably an artifact of the plastic tubing used in the early stages of the sampling program. This practice was stopped. Concentrations and clearance times for contaminants at end-of-pipe depended strongly on source concentration at the facility release point, waste stream flow rates, dispersion, and the mechanical action of sumps. When present, the action of sumps had the greatest impact on contaminant clearance times. In the absence of sump activity, dispersion and flow rate were the controlling factors.

Manke, K.L. [ed.; Riley, R.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Damberg, E.G.; Evans, J.C.; Ikenberry, A.S.; Olsen, K.B.; Ozanich, R.M.; Thompson, C.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, third quarter 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During third quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Mercury exceeded the Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS) in one analysis from well FSS 2D, and tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. The mercury result above PDWS is considered suspect because it was not supported by a reanalysis from the same sample or by historical data. Iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 3D, lead exceeded its criterion in wells FSS 3D and HSS 3D, and manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

187

Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

Howard Forsythe

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During fourth quarter 1992, the FSS wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells. Lead concentrations exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards during fourth quarter 1992, an event that is concurrent with a change in sampling procedures. Tritium is the primary nonpermit constituent that exceeds standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Monitoring crustal deformation in The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geodetic surveys since 1972-1973 reveal significant crustal deformation in The Geysers-Clear Lake region. Resurveys of precise control networks are measuring both vertical and horizontal ground movement, with most of the change continuing in the area of geothermal fluid withdrawal. Preliminary evidence suggests right-lateral horizontal movement on northwest-trending fault systems and vertical and horizontal compression of the deep geothermal reservoir system. A direct correlaton is suggested between ground-surface deformation and subsurface pressure changes in the reservoir system. Although surface changes appear too small to be of environmental concern in The Geysers-Clear Lake region, they indicate hydrodynamic changes in the reservoir of significant import.

Lofgren, B.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Earthquake-induced landslide hazard monitoring and assessment using SOM and PROMETHEE techniques: A case study at the Chiufenershan area in Central Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring and assessment of landslide hazard is an important task for decision making and policy planning in the landslide area. Massive landslides, caused by the catastrophic Chi-Chi earthquake in 1999, occurred in Central Taiwan, especially at Chiufenershan ... Keywords: Chiufenershan area, Landslide hazard assessment, Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE), Self-organizing map (SOM)

Wen-Tzu Lin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

This project is to evaluate the benefits of the System-Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM) system implemented in the Portland Metropolitan area as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This project is to evaluate the benefits of the System-Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM-timed ramp metering to manage traffic congestion during the morning and afternoon peak periods. The SWARM implemented in stages since May 2005 and is operating on six of the seven metered freeway corridors. Results

Bertini, Robert L.

194

A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); MacArthur, D. W. (Duncan W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 2.0: Wind Turbine Reliability and Maintainability Enhancement through System-wide Structure Health Monitoring and Modifications to Rotating Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY An evaluation of nondestructive structural health monitoring methods was completed with over 132 documents, 37 specifically about wind turbines, summarized into a technology matrix. This matrix lists the technology, what can be monitored with this technology, and gives a short summary of the key aspects of the technology and its application. Passive and active acoustic emission equipment from Physical Acoustics Corp. and Acellent Technologies have been evaluated and selected for use in experimental state loading and fatigue tests of composite wind turbine blade materials. Acoustic Emission (AE) and Active Ultrasonic Testing (AUT), were applied to composite coupons with both simulated and actual damage. The results found that, while composites are more complicated in nature, compared to metallic structures, an artificial neural network analysis could still be used to determine damage. For the AE system, the failure mode could be determined (i.e. fiber breakage, delamination, etc.). The Acellent system has been evaluated to work well with composite materials. A test-rig for reliability testing of the rotating components was constructed. The research on the types of bearings used in the wind turbines indicated that in most of the designs, the main bearings utilized to support the shaft are cylindrical roller bearings. The accelerated degradation testing of a population of bearings was performed. Vibration and acoustic emission data was collected and analyzed in order to identify a representative degradation signal for each bearing to identify the initiation of the degradation process in the bearings. Afterwards, the RMS of the vibration signal from degradation initiation up to the end of the useful life of the bearing was selected to predict the remaining useful life of the bearing. This step included fitting Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models to the degradation signals and approximating the probability distribution function (PDF) of remaining useful life based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulation of the ARMA models. This step was performed for different percentages of the degradation signal of each bearing. The accuracy of the proposed approach then was assessed by comparing the actual life of the bearing and the estimated life of the bearing from the developed models. The results were impressive and indicated that the accuracy of the models improved as more data was utilized in developing the ARMA models (we get closer to the end of the life of the bearing).

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

K. B. Campbell

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Towards a secure Frequency Monitoring NETwork (FNET) system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive and real-time wide area monitoring systems (WAMS), such as the Frequency Monitoring NETwork (FNET) developed at Virginia Tech, allow for the gathering of frequency data throughout the entire power grid. FNET uses the Internet as a communication ... Keywords: FNET, Smart Grid, cyber security

Joseph L. McDaniel; Ambareen Siraj

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Efficient Wide Area Data Transfer Protocols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stood the challenges presented by their extraordinary instru- ment in terms of data generation, distribution, and analysis. Many other research disciplines are now facing the...

204

Development of a Beam Condition Monitor System for the Experimental Areas of the LHC Using CVD Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, each bunch consisting of 10^11 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damages not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond has been studied for use as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with a Sr-90 source and high intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. The results from these investigations are p...

Fernndez-Hernando, L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Monitoring and Improving the Temporal Interpolation of Lateral-Boundary Coupling Data for Limited-Area Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is investigated how the quality of the temporal interpolation of lateral-boundary coupling data for limited-area models (LAMs) can be improved or kept under control, while increasing the data transfer between the coupling and the coupled model ...

Piet Termonia

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Monitoring the Coupling-Update Frequency of a Limited-Area Model by Means of a Recursive Digital Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In operational applications lateral-boundary coupling data are provided to one-way nested limited-area models with time intervals of more than an order of magnitude larger than the time step of the coupled model. In practice, these fixed coupling-...

Piet Termonia

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reactivity monitoring using the area method for the subcritic al VENUS-F core within the framework of the FREYA Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) could be employed to incinerate minor actinides and so partly contribute to answer the problem of nuclear waste management. An ADS consists of the coupling of a subcritical fast reactor to a particle accelerator via a heavy material spallation target. The on-line reactivity monitoring of such an ADS is a serious issue regarding its safety. In order to study the methodology of this monitoring, zero-power experimentswere undertaken at the GUINEVERE facility within the framework of the FP6-IP-EUROTRANS programme. Such experiments have been under completion within the FREYA FP7 project. The GUINEVERE facility is hosted at the SCK-CEN site in Mol (Belgium). It couples the VENUS-F subcritical fast core with the GENEPI-3C accelerator. The latter delivers a beam of deuterons, which are converted into 14-MeV neutrons via fusion reactions on a tritiated target. This paper presents one of the investigated methods for ADS on-line reactivity monitoring which has to be validated in the program of the FREYA project. It describes the results obtained when Pulsed Neutron Source experiments are analysed using the so called Area Method, in order to estimate the reactivity of a few sub-critical configurations of the VENUS-F reactor, around keff= 0.96. First the GUINEVERE facility is described. Then, following general considerations on the Area method, the results of its application to the neutron population time decrease spectra measured after a pulse by several fission chambers spread out over the whole reactor are discussed. Finally the reactivity values extracted are compared to the static reactivity values obtained using the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method.

N. Marie; G. Lehaut; J. L. Lecouey; A. Billebaud; S. Chabod; X. Doligez; F. R. Lecolley; A. Kochetkov; W. Uyttenhove; G. Vittiglio; J. Wagemans; F. Mellier; G. Ban; H. E. Thybault; D. Villamarin

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2005 through June 2006. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and UR warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VILB.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Along the east edge of the cover (repaired previously in August 2003, December 2003, May 2004, October 2004), an area of settling was observed during the December 2005 inspection to again be above the action level, and required repair. This area and two other areas of settling on the cover that were first observed during the December 2005 inspection were repaired in February 2006. The semiannual subsidence surveys were done in September 2005 and March 2006. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.015 m [-0.05 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring on the cover. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the CAU 110 cover is performing as expected. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) data indicated an increase in soil moisture (1 to 3% VMC change) at a depth of 1.8 m (6 ft.) due to the exceptionally heavy precipitation from the January and February 2005 precipitation events. The moisture profile returned to baseline conditions by October 2005. At 2.4 m (8 ft) below the cover surface, TDR data show soil moisture content remained between 10 and 13 percent VMC. Considering the heavy precipitation experience in this and the previous reporting period, a compliance level will be established when the system reaches a steady state and equilibrium has been established.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Results of 1999 Spectral Gamma-Ray and Neutron Moisture Monitoring of Boreholes at Specific Retention Facilities in the 200 East Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-eight wells and boreholes in the 200 East Are% Hanford Site, Washington were monitored in 1999. The monitored facilities were past-practice liquid waste disposal facilities and consisted of six cribs and nineteen ''specific retention'' cribs and trenches. Monitoring consisted of spectral gamma-ray and neutron moisture logging. All data are included in Appendix B. The isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on spectral gamma logs from boreholes monitoring the PUREX specific retention facilities; the isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 125}Sb, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on the logs from boreholes at the BC Controlled Area cribs and trenches; and {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 125}Sb were, identified on the logs from boreholes at the BX specific retention trenches. Three boreholes in the BC Controlled Area and one at the BX trenches had previous spectral gamma logs available for comparison with 1999 logs. Two of those logs showed that changes in the subsurface distribution of {sup 137}CS and/or {sup 60}Co had occurred since 1992. Although the changes are not great, they do point to continued movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. The logs obtained in 1999 create a larger baseline for comparison with future logs. Numerous historical gross gamma logs exist from most of the boreholes logged. Qualitative comparison of those logs with the 1999 logs show many substantial changes, most of which reflect the decay of deeper short-lived isotopes, such as {sup 106}Ru and {sup 125}Sb, and the much slower decay of shallower and longer-lived isotopes such as {sup 137}Cs. The radionuclides {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co have moved in two boreholes since 1992. Given the amount of movement and the half-lives of the isotopes, it is expected that they will decay to insignificant amounts before reaching groundwater. However, gamma ray logging cannot detect many of the contaminants of interest such as {sup 99}Tc, NO{sub 3}, or {sup 129}I, all of which can be highly mobile in the vadose zone and, for the radionuclides, have long half-lives.

DG Horton; RR Randall

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

210

FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Lee Slater

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 1 - a geopressured-geothermal test well, 1978. Volume III. Appendix II. Air quality monitoring, Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The air monitoring program, instrument types, and bag sampling program are described in each of five quarterly reports. The operating statistics for each of the major subsystems contained in the monitoring station are presented. National ambient air quality standards are presented for criteria pollutants and the monthly statistics for the monitoring station for the month are displayed. Daily averages, maximum daily five-minute averages retained in the data base as well as the times of occurrence, the five largest averages, and the diurnal variation of various recording times are tabulated. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil-Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1980. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, a summary of microseismic activity before and during 1980, and a description of the monitoring of a liquid tiltmeter at the test well site are included.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

217

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NNSA-Wide  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA-Wide Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Workforce Diversity Office of Civil Rights NA-1.2 Albuquerque Complex PO Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 Phone (505) 845-5517 Fax (505) 845-4963...

220

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wide open spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission's decision to open frequencies in the broadcast spectrum could enable broadband networks in rural areas, permit smart electric grids, and more.

Neil Savage

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Reactivity monitoring using the area method for the subcritic al VENUS-F core within the framework of the FREYA Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) could be employed to incinerate minor actinides and so partly contribute to answer the problem of nuclear waste management. An ADS consists of the coupling of a subcritical fast reactor to a particle accelerator via a heavy material spallation target. The on-line reactivity monitoring of such an ADS is a serious issue regarding its safety. In order to study the methodology of this monitoring, zero-power experimentswere undertaken at the GUINEVERE facility within the framework of the FP6-IP-EUROTRANS programme. Such experiments have been under completion within the FREYA FP7 project. The GUINEVERE facility is hosted at the SCK-CEN site in Mol (Belgium). It couples the VENUS-F subcritical fast core with the GENEPI-3C accelerator. The latter delivers a beam of deuterons, which are converted into 14-MeV neutrons via fusion reactions on a tritiated target. This paper presents one of the investigated methods for ADS on-line reactivity monitoring which has to be validated in the prog...

Marie, N; Lecouey, J L; Billebaud, A; Chabod, S; Doligez, X; Lecolley, F R; Kochetkov, A; Uyttenhove, W; Vittiglio, G; Wagemans, J; Mellier, F; Ban, G; Thybault, H E; Villamarin, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

224

RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999 to October 2000 period. Inspections of the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that maybe indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself. Physical inspections of the closure were completed in March and September 2000 and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The directional survey which is required to be completed every five years was run in the ER3-3 casing to determine if subsidence was occurring in the U-3fi emplacement borehole. Small changes were noted which are attributed to initial settling of the sand pack stemming. No evidence of subsidence within the emplacement borehole was observed. The subsidence survey for the October 1999 to October 2000 monitoring period indicated an increase in elevation of 0.244 centimeters (cm) (0.008 ft) compared to the previous year, July 1999. All changes in subsidence survey data taken to date are so small as to be at the survey instrument resolution level and it is not clear if they represent subsidence or measurement error. There is no clear evidence for any subsidence of the monument. Soil moisture monitoring results indicate dry stable conditions for all quarterly monitoring periods. The Residual Raw Neutron Counts remain below the compliance Action Level of 200 counts within the regulated interval of 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) for the period from October 1999 through October 2000.

D. F. Emer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

Anderson, D.F.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

228

Island Wide Management Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9 1986 9 1986 Island Wide Management Corporation 3000 Marcus Avenue Lake Success, New York 11042 Dear Sir or Madam: I am sending you this letter and the enclosed information as you have been identified by L. I. Trinin of Glick Construction Company as the representatives of the owners of the property that was formerly the site of the Sylvania-Corning Nuclear Corporation in Bayside, New York. The Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District and/or the Atomic Energy Commission in the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. As you may know, the former Sylvania-Corning Corporation Bayside site was identified as one such site.

229

Visitors Far and Wide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Visitors Far and Wide From left: Minister Danilov-Daniljan, Evan Mills (Assistant Director, Center for Building Science), Victoria Mats (interpreter and Soviet energy analyst), and Len Grossman (PG&E Energy Center) tour the PG&E Energy Center in San Francisco. The Russian Minister of Ecology and Natural Resources, Victor I. Danilov-Daniljan, spent three days in California as the Center's guest. The Minister presented information on current Soviet energy and environmental dilemmas and participated in a day-long roundtable discussion with representatives of major utilities, manufacturers of energy-efficient technologies, energy regulators, nongovernmental organizations, and Center scientists. Julian Aizenberg, one of the former Soviet Union's (FSU) foremost lighting

230

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For the Period July 2007-June 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110 for the period July 2007 through June 2008. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, perimeter fence, and use restriction (UR) warning signs was good. However, settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW021 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2005). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Two areas of settling and cracks were observed on the south and east edges of the cover during the September 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level and required repair. The areas were repaired in October 2007. Additional settling and cracks were observed along the east side of the cover during the December 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level, and the area was repaired in January 2008. Significant animal burrows were also observed during the March 2008 inspection, and small mammal trapping and relocation was performed in April 2008. The semiannual subsidence surveys were performed in September 2007 and March 2008. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.02 m [-0.08 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring overall on the cover. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the CAU 110 cover is performing well. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) data show regular changes in the shallow subsurface with significant rain events; however, major changes in volumetric moisture content (VMC) appear to be limited to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface or shallower, depending on the location on the cover. At 2.4 m (8 ft) below the cover surface, TDR data show soil moisture content remained between 9 and 15 percent VMC, depending on the TDR location. The west portion of the cover tends to reflect a lower moisture content and less variability in annual fluctuations in moisture content at this depth. Results of soil moisture monitoring of the cover indicate that VMC at the compliance level (at 2.4 m [8 ft] below the cover surface) is approaching a steady state. If the moisture content at this level remains consistent with recent years, then a recommendation may be made for establishing compliance levels for future monitoring.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Flexible application driven network striping over Wireless Wide Area Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse multiplexing, or network striping, allows the construction of a high-bandwidth virtual channel from a collection of multiple low-bandwidth network channels. Striping systems usually employ a packet scheduling policy ...

Qureshi, Asfandyar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

High Energy Wide Area Blunt Impact on Composite Aircraft Structures /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specimen thickness and layup, impactor geometry, material,event. Panel geometry and layup was designed and reviewed atskin that was the same layup and thickness of the stringers.

DeFrancisci, Gabriela K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

LHCNet: Wide Area Networking and Collaborative Systems for HEP  

SciTech Connect

This proposal presents the status and progress in 2006-7, and the technical and financial plans for 2008-2010 for the US LHCNet transatlantic network supporting U.S. participation in the LHC physics program. US LHCNet provides transatlantic connections of the Tier1 computing facilities at Fermilab and Brookhaven with the Tier0 and Tier1 facilities at CERN as well as Tier1s elsewhere in Europe and Asia. Together with ESnet, Internet2, the GEANT pan-European network, and NSFs UltraLight project, US LHCNet also supports connections between the Tier2 centers (where most of the analysis of the data will take place, starting this year) and the Tier1s as needed.See report

Newman, H.B,

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

A self-managing wide-area data streaming service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient and robust data streaming services are a critical requirement of emerging Grid applications, which are based on seamless interactions and coupling between geographically distributed application components. Furthermore the dynamism of Grid ... Keywords: Autonomic computing, Grid computing, Model based online control, Scientific data streaming

Viraj Bhat; Manish Parashar; Hua Liu; Nagarajan Kandasamy; Mohit Khandekar; Scott Klasky; Sherif Abdelwahed

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Securing Wide Area Measurement Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

measurement system (WAMS) security conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a project funded by the National SCADA Test Bed Program in cooperation with the...

237

Interactive large data exploration over the wide area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The top supercomputers typically have aggregate memories in excess of 100 TB, with simulations running on these systems producing datasets of comparable size. The size of these datasets and the speed with which they are produced define the minimum performance ... Keywords: large data, remote data exploration, visualization

Mark Hereld; Michael E. Papka; Joseph A. Insley; Michael L. Norman; Eric C. Olson; Rick Wagner

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy Analysis Department1 Implications of Wide-Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This analysis was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Department3 Project Overview Motivation: Concern that rapid fluctuations in photovoltaic plant (PV) output are a potential roadblock to PV integration - NERC stated that "PV installations can change output by +/- 70

239

Radiation monitoring system for the environment and safety project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project RAMSES (Radiation Monitoring System for the Environment and Safety) will provide LHC with a state of the art radiation monitoring and alarm system. RAMSES will survey the LHC accelerator, the LHC experimental areas and the environment of the LHC. The TIS (Technical Inspection and Safety) division will exploit this system to assess radiation risks and to control the releases of radioactivity. In addition, it will be integrated into the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and the LHC experiments. Obviously, RAMSES will already take into account CERN wide needs to renew the radiation monitoring system around the other CERN facilities. The requirements of the system are derived from CERN's own safety standards (CERN's Radiation Protection Manual, SAPOCO), from those of the CERN's two host states and from European standards. The mandate of the project team covers the system specification, prototyping, tendering, installation and integration of radiation monitors and industrial control equipment for sa...

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Scibile, L; Segura, G; Vojtyla, P; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

the World Wide Web  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

technical report has been made technical report has been made electronically available on the World Wide Web through a contribution from Walter L. Warnick In honor of Enrico Fermi Leader of the first nuclear reactor, Nobel Prize winner, and visionary technologist Dr. Warnick is delighted to be the first sponsor for posting a Department of Energy technical report and making it broadly available Office of Scientific and Technical Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy September 2008 osti.gov U N I T E D S T A T E S A T O M I C E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N AECD-3269 EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION OF A DNERGENT CHAIN REACTION BY E. Fermi January 4, 1952 [TIS Issuance ate] [chicago University] - T e c h n i c a l I n f o r m a t i o n S e r v i c e , O a k Ridge, T e n n e s s e e r ABSTRACTS Description of the construction and operation of the chain

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241

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Building Performance Monitoring, Control, and Information Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are of critical importance in achieving optimal low-energy building performance. Advanced monitoring and control technologies with high energy saving potential are widely...

244

Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Bakhtiari, Sasan (Bolingbrook, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Downers Grove, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

With the increase in demand for more efficient, higher-power, and higher-temperature operation of power converters, design engineers face the challenge of increasing the efficiency and power density of converters [1, 2]. Development in power semiconductors is vital for achieving the design goals set by the industry. Silicon (Si) power devices have reached their theoretical limits in terms of higher-temperature and higher-power operation by virtue of the physical properties of the material. To overcome these limitations, research has focused on wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond because of their superior material advantages such as large bandgap, high thermal conductivity, and high critical breakdown field strength. Diamond is the ultimate material for power devices because of its greater than tenfold improvement in electrical properties compared with silicon; however, it is more suited for higher-voltage (grid level) higher-power applications based on the intrinsic properties of the material [3]. GaN and SiC power devices have similar performance improvements over Si power devices. GaN performs only slightly better than SiC. Both SiC and GaN have processing issues that need to be resolved before they can seriously challenge Si power devices; however, SiC is at a more technically advanced stage than GaN. SiC is considered to be the best transition material for future power devices before high-power diamond device technology matures. Since SiC power devices have lower losses than Si devices, SiC-based power converters are more efficient. With the high-temperature operation capability of SiC, thermal management requirements are reduced; therefore, a smaller heat sink would be sufficient. In addition, since SiC power devices can be switched at higher frequencies, smaller passive components are required in power converters. Smaller heat sinks and passive components result in higher-power-density power converters. With the advent of the use of SiC devices it is imperative that models of these be made available in commercial simulators. This enables power electronic designers to simulate their designs for various test conditions prior to fabrication. To build an accurate transistor-level model of a power electronic system such as an inverter, the first step is to characterize the semiconductor devices that are present in the system. Suitable test beds need to be built for each device to precisely test the devices and obtain relevant data that can be used for modeling. This includes careful characterization of the parasitic elements so as to emulate the test setup as closely as possible in simulations. This report is arranged as follows: Chapter 2--The testing and characterization of several diodes and power switches is presented. Chapter 3--A 55-kW hybrid inverter (Si insulated gate bipolar transistor--SiC Schottky diodes) device models and test results are presented. A detailed description of the various test setups followed by the parameter extraction, modeling, and simulation study of the inverter performance is presented. Chapter 4--A 7.5-kW all-SiC inverter (SiC junction field effect transistors (JFET)--SiC Schottky diodes) was built and tested. The models built in Saber were validated using the test data and the models were used in system applications in the Saber simulator. The simulation results and a comparison of the data from the prototype tests are discussed in this chapter. Chapter 5--The duration test results of devices utilized in buck converters undergoing reliability testing are presented.

Chinthavali, M.S.

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

A World Wide Web Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A World Wide Web Update The Center for Building Science now has a World Wide Web homepage accessible from the general LBL homepage. Through WWW and the Mosaic browser, Internet...

248

Southwest Area Corridor Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Map DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy...

249

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

A general scalable and accurate decentralized level monitoring method for large-scale dynamic service provision in hybrid clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid cloud computing combines private clouds with geographically-distributed resources from public clouds, desktop grids or in-house gateways to provide the most flexibility of each kind of cloud platforms. Service provisioning for wide-area applications ... Keywords: Application health monitoring, Decentralized algorithm, Decentralized matrix factorization, Hierarchical decomposition, K-means clustering, Service provision

Yongquan Fu; Yijie Wang; Ernst Biersack

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

MCO Monitoring activity description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

SEXTON, R.A.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

253

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced Monitoring systems initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Gas characterization monitoring system functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the functional design criteria for the Gas Characterization Monitoring Systems (Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems,) to be designed, fabricated and installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas.

Schneider, T.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

257

of seashore Why monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource Manage ment at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Umeå. The survey of habitats and the field survey, the total area of shore habitats along the coast can be calculated and their overall of seashore monitoring Over an aerial photo of each sample unit, a hexagonal grid is laid. At every crossing

258

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

259

Safeguard Application Options for the Laser-Based Item Monitoring System (LBIMS)  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are developing a Laser-Based Item Monitoring System (LBIMS) for advanced safeguards at nuclear facilities. LBIMS uses a low-power laser transceiver to monitor the presence and position of items with retroreflective tags. The primary advantages of LBIMS are its scalability to continuously monitor a wide range of items, its ability to operate unattended, its low cost of implementation, and its inherent information security due to its line-of-sight and non-broadcasting operation. The primary proposed safeguard application of LBIMS is described in its name: item monitoring. LBIMS could be implemented in a storage area to continuously monitor containers of nuclear material and the area in which they are stored. The system could be configured to provide off-site notification if any of the containers are moved or removed or if the area is accessed. Individual tags would be used to monitor storage containers, and additional tags could be used to record information regarding secondary storage units and room access. The capability to register small changes in tag position opens up the possibility of several other uses. These include continuously monitoring piping arrangements for design information verification or recording equipment positions for other safeguards systems, such as tracking the opening and closing of autoclaves as part of a cylinder tracking system or opening and closing valves on a sample or product take-off line. Combined with attribute tags, which transmit information from any kind of sensor by modulating the laser signal, LBIMS provides the capability to wirelessly and securely collect safeguards data, even in areas where radio-frequency or other wireless communication methods are not practicable. Four application types are described in this report: static item monitoring, in-process item monitoring with trigger tags, multi-layered integration with trigger tags, and line-of-sight data transfer with attribute tags. Field trials for each of these applications are described.

Laughter, Mark D [ORNL

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Green optical network design : power optimization of wide area and metropolitan area networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancements in technology are fueling huge growth in network traffic capacity. Demand for low cost, reliable, and high bitrate transmissions grows 40-110% internationally every year. To date, most research has focused on ...

Lin, Katherine Xiaoyan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Carbon Storage - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Focus Area An MVA program is designed to confirm permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations...

262

World Wide Web Information Servers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

World Wide Web Information Servers World Wide Web Information Servers Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory recently announced a gopher and World Wide Web site. To get to the web site, telnet to www.lbl.gov, login: www. Access is provided to LBL's gopher, library catalog, and publication list. The Center is funding the implementation of a WWW network node for on-line access to publications, databases, and documents full of hypermedia links to other documents or information systems from the Energy & Environment Division. Full implementation is expected by May 1994, and will include access to a variety of information from all the research programs and centers. The technology transfer project calls for this newsletter to be published on WWW using the Mosaic interface under development at the National Center

263

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

266

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE) A failure or shutdown of the ventilation system will be signaled by cessation of the audible background "rumbling" sound of the building's HVAC system. As building durations. NOTE: Due to unpredictable pressure differentials in and around the labs during an HVAC failure

Strynadka, Natalie

267

Media Advisory: Site-wide Safety Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Media Advisory: Site-wide Safety Standards Media Advisory: Site-wide Safety Standards Media Advisory: Site-wide Safety Standards August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Michael Turner, MSA michael_j_turner@rl.gov 509-376-2872 What: Department of Energy to announce two additions to the Hanford Site-wide Safety Standards - a set of 14 areas where Hanford contractors have collaborated to establish one uniform standard to guide safe operations. The latest additions to the Site-wide Safety Standards are Fall Protection and Electrical Safety. DOE Hanford management will explain the significance of the Site-wide Safety Standards, their use and application at the Hanford Site, the benefits to workers and the example Hanford is setting for excellence in safety. Media will then be offered a demonstration of Fall Protection training, along with other training programs at the DOE's Volpentest HAMMER Training Center, operated by Mission Support Alliance.

268

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

269

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United United States Environmental Monitoring EPA 600/R-93/141 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory January 1992 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research and Development _EPA Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1991 Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientificand Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak ridge,TN 39831; pricesavailablefrom (615) 576-8401 Availableto the publicfrom the NationalTechnicalInformationService, U.S. Departmentof Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Price Code: PrintedCopyof MicroficheA01 Frontand back cover: CommunityMonitorStation (front) and Whole BodyLaboratory(back), Craig A. Tsosle EnvironmentalMonitoringSystemsLaboratory-LasVegas, Nevada Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report:

270

Flow cytometer jet monitor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches  

SciTech Connect

Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

Sullivan, J S

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

273

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

277

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Science with a wide-field UV transient explorer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time-variable electromagnetic sky has been well-explored at a wide range of wavelengths. Numerous high-energy space missions take advantage of the dark Gamma-ray and X-ray sky and utilize very wide field detectors to provide almost continuous monitoring of the entire celestial sphere. In visible light, new wide-field ground-based surveys cover wide patches of sky with ever decreasing cadence, progressing from monthly-weekly time scale surveys to sub-night sampling. In the radio, new powerful instrumentation offers unprecedented sensitivity over wide fields of view, with pathfinder experiments for even more ambitious programs underway. In contrast, the ultra-violet (UV) variable sky is relatively poorly explored, even though it offers exciting scientific prospects. Here, we review the potential scientific impact of a wide-field UV survey on the study of explosive and other transient events, as well as known classes of variable objects, such as active galactic nuclei and variable stars. We quantify our pred...

Sagiv, I; Ofek, E O; Waxman, E; Aharonson, O; Nakar, E; Maoz, D; Trakhtenbrot, B; Kulkarni, S R; Phinney, E S; Topaz, J; Beichman, C; Murthy, J; Worden, S P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

282

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007. Map of the area covered by a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS), "Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States" (DOE/EIS-0386) to address the environmental impacts from the proposed action and the range of reasonable alternatives. The proposed action calls for designating more than 6,000 miles of energy transport corridors across the West. Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007. More Documents & Publications

285

Machine Health Monitoring and Prognostication Via Vibration Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health monitoring of the hydropower turbine and timely identification of potential failure areas can prevent failure of the entire vertical axis hydropower turbine. A health monitoring system integrated within the turbine could locate blade failures, ...

Suyi Liu; Shuqing Wang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Real-time performance monitoring and management system  

SciTech Connect

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Stress-Based Fatigue Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FatiguePro software, developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and first deployed in 1989, is a fatigue monitoring program that is widely used around the world to assist with aging management of nuclear power plants. The FatiguePro stress-based fatigue (SBF) module has used a single stress term for calculating fatigue usage factors. This simplified approach was chosen not only because of computer limitations at the time, but also because the conventional stress cycle counting algorith...

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is a 12,718 acre complex located in Douglas County, Washington. Four distinct management units make up the area: Bridgeport, Chester Butte, Dormaier and Sagebrush Flat. The four Units are located across a wide geographic area within Douglas County. The Units are situated roughly along a north/south line from Bridgeport in the north to the Douglas/Grant county line in the south, 60 miles away. The wildlife area was established to conserve and enhance shrubsteppe habitat for the benefit shrubsteppe obligate and dependent wildlife species. In particular, the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area is managed to promote the recovery of three state-listed species: Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (threatened), greater sage grouse (threatened) and the pygmy rabbit (endangered). The US Fish and Wildlife Service also list the pygmy rabbit as endangered. Wildlife area staff seeded 250 acres of old agricultural fields located on the Sagebrush Flat, Dormaier and Chester Butte units. This has been a three project to reestablish high quality shrubsteppe habitat on fields that had either been abandoned (Dormaier) or were dominated by non-native grasses. A mix of 17 native grasses and forbs, most of which were locally collected and grown, was used. First year maintenance included spot spraying Dalmatian toadflax on all sites and mowing annual weeds to reduce competition. Photo points were established and will be integral to long term monitoring and evaluation. Additional monitoring and evaluation will come from existing vegetation transects. This year weed control efforts included spot treatment of noxious weeds, particularly Dalmatian toadflax, in previously restored fields on the Bridgeport Unit (150 acres). Spot treatment also took place within fields scheduled for restoration (40 acres) and in areas where toadflax infestations are small and relatively easily contained. Where toadflax is so widespread that chemical treatment would be impractical, we use the bioagent Mecinus janthinus, available through Professor Gary Piper of Washington State University. This year we released 4,000 M. janthinus on the Bridgeport Unit at 6 separate locations. Since 2002 we have released approximately 14,400 of these insects, 80% of these on the Bridgeport Unit. Additional weed control activities included mowing and spot spraying more than 32 miles of roads, cutting and removal of annual weeds within fenced deer exclosures. We upgraded the solar powered irrigation system that supplies water to a stand of water birch trees planted in 2002. Wildlife area staff designed and built a new solar array and installed a higher capacity pump. The increased capacity will ensure that these trees receive adequate water through the hot summer months and allow us to create at least one additional stand. This project is an important part in our effort to expand the available winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse on the Bridgeport Unit. Maintenance of fences, parking areas and roads continued during throughout the year. Two parking areas, at Chester Butte and Bridgeport, were graded and additional gravel added. Roads on the Bridgeport Unit were graded and repaired following spring runoff. Trespass and dumping issues have increased in recent years on the Bridgeport Unit. To address these problems we constructed four steel gates at access points on this unit. Each gate is tubular steel attached to 8-inch diameter steel posts, 10 feet long that are cemented into the ground. Two gates allow access to BPA substation facilities and power-line right-of ways so placement, construction and locking issues had to be coordinated with BPA's Real Estate staff in Spokane. Environmental Compliance Documentation issues were addressed again this year. This process has the potential to cause delays the completion of projects within the fiscal year. With this in mind and an eye toward the future, we requested that several projects planned for the coming years be surveyed this year. Beginning in August of 2007, area staff worked with BPA staff to identify work elements

Peterson, Dan [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ultra wide-bandwidth micro energy harvester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultra wide-bandwidth resonating thin film PZT MEMS energy harvester has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested. It harvests energy from parasitic ambient vibration at a wide range of amplitude and frequency via ...

Hajati, Arman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Portal Monitor Future Development Work: Hardware Improvements  

SciTech Connect

LANL portal monitor was a modification of a previously installed (permanent) unattended monitoring system (UMS). Modifications to the UMS to make the portal were sometimes based on mistaken assumptions about exercise-specific installation and access. Philosophical approach to real-time portal differs in some areas from UMS.

Browne, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

295

MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEYING AND MONITORING AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUPPORT OF THE ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS CONCEPT: SURVEY PARAMETERS AND INITIAL RESULTS Jump to: navigation,...

296

New RFID technology tracks and monitors nuclear materials | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New RFID technology tracks and monitors nuclear materials By Jared Sagoff * March 24, 2009 Tweet EmailPrint Advancement has applications in many areas involving remote sensing...

297

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Martinez Refinery Completes Plant-Wide Energy Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes how the Equilon Enterprises oil refinery in Martinez, California undertook a plant-wide energy assessment that focused on three key areas: waste minimization, process debottlenecking, and operations optimization. The assessment yielded recommendations, which, if implemented, can save more than 6,000,000 MMBtu per year and an estimated $52,000,000 per year, plus improve process control and reduce waste.

Not Available

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

300

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enterprise-Wide Agreements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise-Wide Enterprise-Wide Agreements Enterprise-Wide Agreements DOE's Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) has designed the IT Acquisition: Enterprise-Wide Agreement (EWA) Program to develop and implement policies and procedures that support the identification, acquisition, oversight and compliance of enterprise licenses. EWAs are Department-wide acquisitions of widely used commercial software. The EWA Program has two core objectives to achieve the Program mission : Maximizing IT buying power and reducing total cost of ownership; Streamlining the IT total acquisition lifecycle. The EWA Program applies a centralized, cross-functional, strategic enterprise software solutions approach. The EWA Program leverages opportunities to create efficiencies and enhances the value of IT

302

Wide Electrochemical Window Solvents - Energy Innovation Portal  

Biomass and Biofuels; ... This solvent has such a wide electrochemical window and such powerful solvating properties that it is an excellent target solvent ...

303

WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

Laine, E.F.

1959-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Interconnection-Wide Transmission Planning Initiative: Topic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Agency Input Regarding Electric Resource and Transmission Planning in the Texas Interconnection Interconnection-Wide Transmission Planning Initiative: Topic B, State Agency...

305

Interconnection-Wide Transmission Planning Initiative: Topic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interconnection-Wide Transmission Planning Initiative: Topic B, State Agency Input Regarding Electric Resource and Transmission Planning in the Texas Interconnection...

306

HY RID WIDE RANGE TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER  

TRANSIMPEDAN E AMPLIFIER TE HNOLOGY SUMMARY Many applications require wide range detection, where detector current is converted to a voltage by a

307

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Monitoring probe for groundwater flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Name: Shakti Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Summer 2010 Question: What is the best way to find a cat's heart rate using a stethoscope? Because I have tried to hear their heart beat but their purring is all I can hear. If I shouldn't use a stethoscope, then what should I use? Replies: Hi Shakti! If you want to use a stethoscope, the trick is to get your cat to stop purring. Two good ways that I have found to help stop the purring 1. Cover their nose (generally cats don't like this and will stop purring) or 2. Put on the tap to drip or lightly stream water (also, they generally don't like this and will stop purring). Alternatively, you can get their heart rate from feeling their pulse. A good place to try to feel a pulse is right where the leg attaches to the abdomen - in an area called the inguinal region. Now granted there are some heart conditions that will cause an animals pulse and their heart rates don't match up, and it's hard to feel if you have a fat cat, but it's a good place to try if you are really trying to get a heart rate in a healthy kitty!

310

STUDY and analysis of systems for monitoring in power substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensive development of science and technology in all areas of our daily live reflects and in the systems for monitoring and recording processes of abnormal modes in the power equipment of substations. Monitoring systems report their apogee in the ... Keywords: application, development, monitoring system, power substation

Nikolina Petkova; Valeri Mladenov; Angel Tsolov; Petar Nakov; Georgi Bozukov

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Health Monitoring System Technology Assessments---Cost Benefits Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of sensor-based structural health monitoring is very diverse and encompasses a wide range of activities including initiatives and innovations involving the development of advanced sensor, signal processing, data analysis, and actuation and ...

Kent Renee M.; Murphy Dennis A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

How should indicators be found for scenario monitoring ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scenario planning is a widely used approach for developing long-term strategies. The typical scenario process involves developing scenarios, identifying strategies whose success is contingent on the scenario, and monitoring ...

He, Zheng, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Exploiting home automation protocols for load monitoring in smart buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring and controlling electrical loads is crucial for demand-side energy management in smart grids. Home automation (HA) protocols, such as X10 and Insteon, have provided programmatic load control for many years, and are being widely deployed in ...

David Irwin; Sean Barker; Aditya Mishra; Prashant Shenoy; Anthony Wu; Jeannie Albrecht

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

AN IONIZATION CHAMBER LAUNDRY MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the amount of contamination remaining on a garment after it has been washed is an important part of hot laundry operations. In the past garments were monitored by measuring the contamination concentrated in the crotch with a GM tube probe. This type of spot check does not detect any isolated hot spots on other pants of the garment. To monitor the entire garment with a GM tube instrument is excessively time consuming for a large number of garments. To overcome these difficulties a sensitive, large-volume ionization chamber was constructed. It is rectangular in shape, 5 ft high by 2 1/2 ft wide by 4 in. deep. The center electrode is of a grid type and is mounted halfway between the front window and the back of the chamber. In a 0.5-mr/hr field, 180 v is sufficient to saturate toe chamber. In order to insure beta sensitivity, the front window has an equivalent thickness of approximately 7 mg/cm/sup 2/. The measuring device is a line-operated electrometer circuit equipped with an alarm that may be set at the rejection limit for the type of garment being monitored. A fullscale deflection on the most sensitive range is given by 2 to 3 mu C of liquid mixed fission products deposited on a garment. Since the chamber monitors the entire garment, the results are independent of the location of the contarnination. In practice, garments may be monitored at the rate of 7 per min, while only 3 per min may be completely checked with a GM tube probs. Field tests indicate that this instrument is stable and trouble free. Background causes a meter deflection of about 20 divisions, which is low enough to give reliable accuracy for monitoring garments. (auth)

Chester, J.D.; Handloser, J.S.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Building Sensors and Energy Monitoring Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Building Applications &1;&1; Current Status &1;&1; Key Challenges &2;&1;Energy Monitoring Systems in Homes TYPICAL NEW CARS &1;&1; 40-50 sensors per car &1;&1; Wide range of types *&1;...

317

Online circuit breaker monitoring system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circuit breakers are used in a power system to break or make current flow through power system apparatus. Reliable operation of circuit breakers is very important to the well-being of the power system. Historically this is achieved by regular inspection and maintenance of the circuit breakers. An automated online circuit breaker monitoring system is proposed to monitor condition, operation and status of high and medium voltage circuit breakers. By tracking equipment condition, this system could be used to perform maintenance only when it is needed. This could decrease overall maintenance cost and increase equipment reliability. Using high accurate time synchronization, this system should enable development of system-wide applications that utilize the data recorded by the system. This makes possible tracking sequence of events and making conclusions about their effect on-line. This solution also enables reliable topology analysis, which can be used to improve power flow analysis, state estimation and alarm processing.

Djekic, Zarko

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.iea.org/papers/pathways/monitoring.pdf Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs Screenshot References: Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy Efficient Programs[1] This document includes: A brief overview of MVE in the context of S&L programmes.

320

Agency-Wide Screening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agency-Wide Screening Agency-Wide Screening Agency-Wide Screening October 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis Federal agencies face energy-related requirements on new construction projects and major renovations. These Federal requirements range from reductions in fossil-fuel use to specifying the use of certain renewable energy technologies. As some agencies have already found out, not all sites or construction projects are created equal. Because many of the requirements are agency-wide, an effective and efficient way to meet these requirements is to consider and identify appropriate locations for these technologies across all agency land and building assets. FEMP can help Federal agencies conduct a renewable energy screening at all of its sites, or just at all of its upcoming construction project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

China Joins WorldWideScience Alliance  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the addition of more Chinese sources to WorldWideScience.org after a successful test period. DOE's Office of Science, through (OSTI), serves as the Operating Agent for...

322

WorldWideScience.org Goes Multilingual  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, June 11, 2010 WorldWideScience.org Goes Multilingual OAK RIDGE, TN - Now you can find non-English scientific literature from databases in...

323

Ultra-wide bandwidth piezoelectric energy harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, we present an ultra wide-bandwidth energy harvester by exploiting the nonlinear stiffness of a doubly clamped microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs) resonator. The stretching strain in a doubly clamped beam shows a ...

Hajati, Arman

324

Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture  

SciTech Connect

Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

McCown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Structural health monitoring of wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To properly determine what is needed in a structural health monitoring system, actual operational structures need to be studied. We have found that to effectively monitor the structural condition of an operational structure four areas must be addressed: determination of damage-sensitive parameters, test planning, information condensation, and damage identification techniques. In this work, each of the four areas has been exercised on an operational structure. The structures studied were all be wind turbines of various designs. The experiments are described and lessons learned will be presented. The results of these studies include a broadening of experience in the problems of monitoring actual structures as well as developing a process for implementing such monitoring systems.

Simmermacher, T.; James, G.H. III.; Hurtado, J.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v*Zy- i , . v*Zy- i , . r ,v * -i S # Af [, (e- . - o -A tl }r- 0 v-" l^~4~S J l ^-)^ I^U^ck iM clti ^ Area Power Administration Follow-up to Nov. 25, 2008 Transition Meeting Undeveloped Transmission Right-of-Way Western has very little undeveloped transmission right-of-way. There is a 7-mile right- of-way between Folsom, CA and Roseville, CA where Western acquired a 250' wide right-of-way but is only using half of it. Another line could be built parallel to Western's line to relieve congestion in the Sacramento area. In addition, Western has rights-of- way for many transmission lines that could be rebuilt to increase transmission capacity. For example, Western's Tracy-Livermore 230-kV line is a single circuit line but the existing towers could support a double circuit line. These rights-of-way would have to

328

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

329

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C); thus, they are critically important in determining global C cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agricultural land use over 150 years ago released 30-50% of the soil organic carbon (SOC). Improved agricultural practices have the capacity to recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby removing billions of tons of atmospheric CO2. These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., by crop rotations, increased use of higher biomass crops, perennial crops) and decreased losses (e.g., reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007]. Managing agricultural soils to increase SOC storage is a significant, immediately available, low-cost option for mitigating CO2 emissions, with a technical potential to offset as much as 800 Tg CO2/yr in the US (~13% of US CO2 emissions) [Lal et al., 2003] and 5000 Tg CO2/yr globally (~17% of global CO2 emissions) [Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; West, Tristram O.; Schumaker, Bonny L.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing agricultural soils to increase SOC storage is a significant, immediately available, low-cost option for mitigating CO2 emissions, with the technical potential to sequester as much as 800 Tg CO2/yr in the US (~13% of US CO2 emissions) [Lal et al., 2003] and 5000 Tg CO2/yr globally (~17% of global CO2 emissions) [Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, Earle R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; schumaker, Bonny L.; West, Tristram O.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the United States", Land Subsidence, Proceedings, IAHS-AIHS-1973, "Collapsing Soil and Subsidence", Geolo Seismicit -Factors Controlling Mine Subsidence in Utah and Colorado",

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C) and thus are critically important in determining global cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agriculture over the past 150 years released 30- 50% of soil organic carbon (SOC) stores [Mann, 1986]. Improved agricultural practices could recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby sequestering billions of tons of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., through crop rotation, higher biomass crops, and perennial crops) and decreasing losses (e.g., through reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; Schumaker, Bonny L.; West, Tristram O.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Home Area Network Performance Metrics and Monitoring - Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In considering a particular communication technology and protocol, one of the earliest steps that must be taken is to review features and performance claims by its publishing agency (manufacturer or supporting alliance). These claims are based on specific conditions, generally ideal ones. This is mainly because of practicality issues since it is difficult if not impossible to cover a technologys performance in every possible condition where it may be used. This approach also tends to put that technology ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

335

Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex October 2009 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 Site Office DOE/EIS-0387 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Draft Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex (DOE/EIS-0387) (Draft Y-12 SWEIS) CONTACT: For further information on this SWEIS, For general information on the DOE contact: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Pam Gorman Carol Borgstrom, Director Y-12 SWEIS Document Manager Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, GC-20 Y-12 Site Office U.S. Department of Energy

336

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Integrated environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington, has a mission of defense production, waste management, environmental restoration, advanced reactor design, and research development. Environmental programs at Hanford are conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The WHC environmental programs include the compliance and surveillance activities associated with site operations and waste management. The PNL environmental programs address the site-wide and the of-site areas. They include the environmental surveillance and the associated support activities, such as dose calculations, and also the monitoring of environmental conditions to comply with federal and state environmental regulations on wildlife and cultural resources. These are called independent environmental programs'' in that they are conducted completely separate from site operations. The Environmental Surveillance and Oversight Program consists of the following projects: surface environmental surveillance; ground-water surveillance; wildlife resources monitoring; cultural resources; dose overview; radiation standards and calibrations; meteorological and climatological services; emergency preparedness.

Jaquish, R.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. , 2007. Utility wind integration and operating impact2010. Western wind and solar integration study. Tech. rep. ,is commonly used in wind integration studies. Murata et

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and smoothing e?ects at a wind farm. Wind Energy 7 (2), 61uctuations from large wind farms. IEEE Transactions on Power

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Term power ?uctuation of wind turbines: Analyzing data frome?ects of distributed wind turbines. part 1. coherence andto utilities by multiple wind turbines. IEEE Transactions on

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid coupled wind energy conversion Systems-An analysis insystem operations perspective. IEEE Transaction on Energy Conversion

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

QuRiNet: A Wide-Area Wireless Mesh Testbed for Research and Experimental Evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in QuRiNet are powered by solar panels, running with multiple radios. QuRiNet provides the backbone in Figure 1. All nodes, except the gateway nodes, use solar power due to the lack of connectivity as a commu- nity rooftop wireless mesh network [2]. This network has to compete with home wireless networks

California at Davis, University of

345

High-speed wide area, data intensive computing: a Ten Year Retrospective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

another FDDI Brunswick LLNL Sandia interfaced router andNat. Storage Lab LLNL / Sandia RAID-II PsiTech video I/Owith Bell Labs, NCSA, and Sandia Livermore, were connected

Johnston, William E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Protocols for wide-area data-intensive applications: design and performance issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high-speed data transfer is vital to various data-intensive applications. While there have been remarkable technology advances to provide ultra-high-speed network bandwidth, existing protocols and applications may not be able to fully utilize ...

Yufei Ren; Tan Li; Dantong Yu; Shudong Jin; Thomas Robertazzi; Brian L. Tierney; Eric Pouyoul

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Survey and analysis of multimodal sensor planning and integration for wide area surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sensor planning in computer vision has been a subject of research for over two decades, a vast majority of the research seems to concentrate on two particular applications in a rather limited context of laboratory and industrial workbenches, ... Keywords: Sensor planning, cooperative sensing, multimodal sensing, persistent surveillance, threat object recognition, ubiquitous surveillance, wireless sensor network

Besma R. Abidi; Nash R. Aragam; Yi Yao; Mongi A. Abidi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

High-speed wide area, data intensive computing: a Ten Year Retrospective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handling system, video sequences are collected from the video-angiography imaging system, then processed, catalogued, stored, and made available to remote

Johnston, William E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management System Battery Storage Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the modeling approach, methodologies, and results of the sodium sulfur (NaS) battery evaluation study, which was conducted by Battelle for the California Energy Commission (CEC).

Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Ma, Jian; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Safety, visibility, and performance in a wide-area file system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As mobile clients travel, their costs to reach home filing services change, with serious performance implications. Current file systems mask these performance problems by reducing the safety of updates, their visibility, or both. This is the result of ...

Minkyong Kim; Landon P. Cox; Brian D. Noble

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Balancing authorities (BAs) are the entities responsible forit is not a reliability requirement, BAs in the U.S.power transfers with other BAs generally using hourly

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide interest in the deployment of photovoltaic generation (PV) is rapidly increasing. Operating experience with large PV plants, however, demonstrates that large, rapid changes in the output of PV plants are possible. Early studies of PV grid impacts suggested that short-term variability could be a potential limiting factor in deploying PV. Many of these early studies, however, lacked high-quality data from multiple sites to assess the costs and impacts of increasing PV penetration. As is well known for wind, accounting for the potential for geographic diversity can significantly reduce the magnitude of extreme changes in aggregated PV output, the resources required to accommodate that variability, and the potential costs of managing variability. We use measured 1-min solar insolation for 23 time-synchronized sites in the Southern Great Plains network of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and wind speed data from 10 sites in the same network to characterize the variability of PV with different degrees of geographic diversity and to compare the variability of PV to the variability of similarly sited wind. The relative aggregate variability of PV plants sited in a dense 10 x 10 array with 20 km spacing is six times less than the variability of a single site for variability on time scales less than 15-min. We find in our analysis of wind and PV plants similarly sited in a 5 x 5 grid with 50 km spacing that the variability of PV is only slightly more than the variability of wind on time scales of 5-15 min. Over shorter and longer time scales the level of variability is nearly identical. Finally, we use a simple approximation method to estimate the cost of carrying additional reserves to manage sub-hourly variability. We conclude that the costs of managing the short-term variability of PV are dramatically reduced by geographic diversity and are not substantially different from the costs for managing the short-term variability of similarly sited wind in this region.

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to wind and solar power. Environmental Science &Integration of Concentrating Solar Power and Utility-ScaleShort- Term Variability of Solar Power Andrew Mills and Ryan

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Framework for Middleware Supporting Real-Time Wide-Area Distributed Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computing is to effect impor- tant output actions within precisely specified time- windows. In RT DC systems-Oriented Real-time Distributed Computing), Washington D.C., April 2002, pp. 288-294. [Kop97] Kopetz, H., 'Real specification. 1. Introduction The history of distributed computing (DC) spans more than three decades

California at San Diego, University of

355

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

same level of reliability with and without PV. Section 3the contribution of PV to long-term planning reliability or

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the limits of solar photovoltaics (PV) in traditionalof the same amount of PV if all solar were to be located aton areal solar irradiance for analyzing areally-totalized PV

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the nordic countries. Wind Energy Holttinen, H. , Meibom,e?ects at a wind farm. Wind Energy 7 (2), 6174. NorthDOE), May 2008. 20% wind energy by 2030: Increasing wind

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .percentile of deltas in normalized wind power for individualchanges in normalized wind power between 10 geographically

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Generalized Replica Placement Strategy to Optimize Latency in a Wide Area Distributed Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to prodigious amounts of data and the grid can provide a platform for distributed access to this data. Data management, particularly location and provisioning, can be problematic in very large distributed grids. This has been recognized by grid researchers working on various aspects of grid storage. In fact, data

Chandy, John A.

360

Second annual report of the Environmental Restoration Monitoring and Assessment Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the salient features of the annual efforts of environmental monitoring and field investigations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report focuses on the watershed scale, striving to provide an ORNL site-wide perspective on types, distribution, and transport of contamination. Results are used to enhance the conceptual understanding of the key contaminants and the sources, fluxes, and processes affecting their distribution and movement. This report summarizes the efforts of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and Site Investigations (SI) program. WAG 2 is the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) system which drains the major contaminated sites at ORNL and discharges to the Clinch River where public access is allowed. The remedial investigation for WAG 2 includes a long-term multimedia environmental monitoring effort that takes advantage of WAG 2`s role as an integrator and conduit of contaminants from the ORNL site. This report also includes information from other site-specific remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) for contaminated sites at ORNL and data from other ongoing monitoring programs conducted by other organizations [e.g., the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance monitoring conducted by the Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section]. This information is included to provide an integrated basis to support ER decision making. This report summarizes information gathered through early 1993. Annual data, such as annual discharges of contaminants, are reported for calendar year 1992.

Clapp, R.B.; Watts, J.A. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Instrumentation and Control Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A more recent product is now available that contains this report, along with additional presentation materials to facilitate its use. See Product 1018109. This report provides guidance arising from the EPRI initiative on IC Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction. The document describes a wide range of options while emphasizing integrated modernization across the plant or fleet. Coordinated improvements to shared communications and computing infrastructure, plant processes, and organizat...

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

Traffic data repository at the WIDE project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It becomes increasingly important for both network researchers and operators to know the trend of network traffic and to find anomaly in their network traffic. This paper describes an on-going effort within the WIDE project to collect a set of free tools ...

Kenjiro Cho; Koushirou Mitsuya; Akira Kato

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/pdfs/48689.p Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach Screenshot References: Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach[1] Logo: Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL/DOE Approach

364

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Circuit breaker monitoring application using wireless communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circuit breakers are used in the power system to break or make current flow through power apparatus. Reliable operation of circuit breakers is critical to the well- being of the power system and can be achieved by regular inspection and maintenance. A low-cost automated circuit breaker monitoring system is developed to monitor circuit breaker control signals. An interface is designed on top of which different local and system-wide applications can be developed which utilize the data recorded by the system. Some of the possible applications are proposed. Lab and field evaluation of the designed system is performed and results are presented.

Ved, Nitin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Development Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.cgdev.org/section/initiatives/_active/forestmonitoringforactionfor Cost: Free Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Screenshot References: FORMA[1] "Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) uses freely available satellite data to generate rapidly updated online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions by paying to keep forests intact."

369

UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, United Nations Development Programme Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Resource Type: Workshop Website: www.un-redd.org/UNREDDProgramme/InternationalSupport/MeasurementReport UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification Screenshot References: UN-REDD Workshop: Monitoring, Assessment and Verification[1] Background "The specific objectives of the workshop were to develop a roadmap with

370

Industry-Wide Database: Circuit Breakers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Best practice maintenance and asset management decisions are based on risks associated with actual equipment condition and performance. However, little effort has been made to systematically collect and analyze such industry information for high-voltage circuit breakers. This document presents the results of the initial effort of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to explore the development of an industry-wide database (IDB) for high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs). The project identified ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

Air Pollution Background Monitoring over the Former Soviet Union: Fifteen Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular air pollution observations in background areas over the former Soviet Union (FSU) were started in the 1980s. The air background monitoring network consisted of 16 stations working under the Integrated Monitoring (IM) Program. Several air ...

Sergey G. Paramonov

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

China-GHG Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » China-GHG Monitoring (Redirected from GIZ-China GHG Monitoring) Jump to: navigation, search Name China - GHG Monitoring Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), Center for Clean Air Policy Partner on behalf of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References GTZ in the People's Republic of China[1] Overview The project aims to develop capacities for a GHG-Monitoring system and an

373

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy efficient cooperative multimodal ambient monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Video Sensor Networks (WVNs) are lively interest in the research community as flexible means for monitoring isolated areas. WVN effectiveness can be augmented when coupled with a network of low-power, low-cost Pyroelectric InfraRed (PIR) detectors ... Keywords: multimodal surveillance, power aware design, pyroelectric infrared, solar harvester, wireless video sensor network

Michele Magno; Davide Brunelli; Piero Zappi; Luca Benini

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

OPTIMIZING PLACEMENT OF STATIONARY MONITORS ? 1 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(The terms monitors and sensors can be used interchangeably, although we .... An adversary can enter the area at any node (1,j) in the first column. ...... objective function is not ascending in our search direction at a stepsize of , and is...

376

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

377

Network Management and Performance Monitoring at SLAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subjectively, the ultimate measurers of system performance are the users and their perceptions of the performance of their networked applications. The performance of a system is affected by the physical network plant (routers, bridges, hubs, etc.) as well as by every "computer " and peripheral device that is attached to it, and the software running on the computers and devices. Performance monitoring of a network must therefore include computer systems and services monitoring and well as monitoring of the physical network plant. This paper will describe how this challenge has been tackled at SLAC, and how, via the World Wide Web 1,2 , this information is made available for quick perusal by concerned personnel and users. INTRODUCTION The ultimate measure of system performance is the perception of the users. The users' perception is generally based on the response time to various commands they enter at their keyboards. This maybe any command from a print command, the submission of a l...

Logg And; C. A. Logg; R. L. A. Cottrell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Committee on Monitoring Research Terms of Reference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Council is, therefore, developing an overall proposal for monitoring the progress of research within NOAA. The four key elements of the new monitoring strategy are: To link research milestones with activities in the Program Operating Plans of the goal and program teams, the Annual Operating Plans of the Line Offices and the performance objectives of the NOAA strategic plan; To regularly evaluate the quality, relevance, and value of NOAAs research, both internally in NOAA, and by external review teams; To use a NOAA-wide database to track research accomplishments, and the outcomes in society that result from them; To track the financial reporting of research activities across the Agency. Because monitoring of research in NOAA is proposed to be systematic and ongoing, it is appropriate to establish a permanent Committee of the Research Council for that purpose. The NOAA Executive Panel endorsed such a Committee. Definitions Research and development are defined as:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

2005 River Corridor Cleanup Contractor Revegetation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a compilation of the results of vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2005 for the Environmental Restoration Contractor's revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

A. L. Johnson

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cinematic color: from your monitor to the big screen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Color affects many areas of the computer-graphics pipeline, From texture painting to lighting, rendering, compositing, image display, and the theater, handling color is a tricky problem. Tired of getting your images right on the monitor only to have ...

Jeremy Selan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Pipeline Research: Best Practices in Monitoring Technology Energy Systems Research pipelines from outofstate supply basins located in the southwestern United States, the Rocky Mountains, and Canada. These pipelines run throughout the state, including underneath high population areas

382

A secure monitoring and control system for Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maintenance of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can carry high or prohibitive costs, particularly, if the WSN is deployed in unattended areas. Secure monitoring and control of the WSN is vital, however, practical systems are rare and limited with ... Keywords: Monitoring,Wireless sensor networks,Control systems,Intrusion detection,Elliptic curve cryptography

Michael Riecker, Rainer Thome, Dingwen Yuan, Matthias Hollick

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference[1] Resources Design of a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan Audit of Solar Home Systems Project Mid-term Review Panel for Solar Home Systems Project Socio-Economic Survey of the Photovoltaic Pilot Project References ↑ "Renewable Energy Monitoring Evaluation Terms of Reference" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Renewable_Energy_Monitoring_Evaluation_Terms_of_Reference&oldid=329154"

384

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

386

Strategic Focus Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas Lockheed Martin on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories will consider grant requests that best support the Corporation's strategic focus areas and reflect effective...

387

Table 4-3 Site Wide Environmental Management Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of Table 4-3. Site-Wide Environmental Management Matrix National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex FINAL POTENTIAL...

388

Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel Management Government-Wide Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan (2011), Office of Personnel...

389

Special Section Guest Editorial: Advances in Remote Sensing for Monitoring Global Environmental Changes  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on advances in remote sensing for monitoring global environmental changes, and discussed10 papers selected from a number of areas of expertise.

Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Chang, Ni-Bin

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or fencepost) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be used for classified data transmission in place of NSA Type 1 devices.

Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Review Functional hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a costeffective manner.

Michael R Pinsky; Didier Payen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluating the Benefits of a System-Wide Adaptive Ramp-Metering Strategy in Portland, Soyoung Ahn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating the Benefits of a System-Wide Adaptive Ramp-Metering Strategy in Portland, Oregon-Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM) system is being implemented in the Portland metropolitan area, replacing the previous pre-timed ramp-metering system. SWARM has been deployed on six major corridors and operates during

Bertini, Robert L.

395

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

396

Managing Imported Fire Ants in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The imported fire ant is found in much of Texas and across the southeastern U.S. This publication describes options for managing the pest in specific locations such as home lawns, gardens and buildings. Other topics include fire ant treatment methods, fire ant identification, medical problems, and organizing an area-wide suppression program. There is also a guide to fire ant insecticides.

Drees, Bastiaan M.

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Transportation energy contingency plans for rural areas and small communities  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to determine the most effective transportation fuel conservation measures which could be implemented by such areas during energy emergencies. The study involved a review of the transportation fuels contingency planning literature, state transportation energy contingency plans (with special emphasis on that for Missouri) and transportation studies recently conducted in rural Missouri, together with a survey by mail of local government officials, telephone interviews with rural residents and participation in two community-wide attitude surveys in the Meramec Region of Missouri. On the basis of the review of the literature and the results of the surveys, recommendations have been made on both the strategies that could be implemented to reduce gasoline consumption in rural areas and the institutional arrangements required for coping with a transportation fuels shortage. For small communities and rural areas of Missouri, it was specifically recommended that the multi-county regional planning commission should become the lead agency in implementing and coordinating fuel conservation measures in the event of a serious petroleum shortfall. Each regional planning commission would serve as a single focal point in communicating with the State Energy Office in behalf of its numerous county and city members. Furthermore, the existing statewide network of emergency preparedness officers should be utilized to inventory local fuel distribution services, monitor local service station operating practices and to serve motorists who might be stranded without fuel. Finally, the University of Missouri Cooperative Extension Service should offer educational programs covering topics as fuel conserving driving techniques, vehicle maintenance, trip planning, and ridesharing.

Dare, C.E.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Hopper Batch Jobs See the man pages for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, ALPS logs and job summary statistics. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. To delete a job from the hopper xfer queue users must add an additional parameter @hopper06 Example:6004861.hopper06@hopper06 qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

What We Monitor & Why  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by monitoring wildlife, plants, water quality, and air quality. June 27, 2012 Raft Trip: rafts on the Rio Grande Workers prepare for the annual Fall sampling campaign on the...

402

WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart A. Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the WIPP DOEWIPP-03-3230 Describes the groundwater...

403

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Structure function monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Improved neutron monitor systems for Savannah River Site separations facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), in conjunction with Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Technology personnel, has developed and implemented a comprehensive program to improve the performance and reliability of neutron detector systems (neutron monitors) in the SRS separations areas. The neutron monitors, which monitor the buildup of fissile material in the mixer-settler banks of the solvent extraction process, are important nuclear safety control devices. A review of the performance history of the neutron monitors reveals that many of the systems exhibit problems arising from several causes, including: low neutron sensitivity, high susceptibility to electromagnetic interferences (due to long cable runs between detectors and their electronics), and high maintenance requirements. To address these problems, the neutron monitor improvement program encompasses both technical and administrative improvements, including: substitution of more sensitive neutron monitors at many locations in the solvent extraction areas, the development of an integrated preamplifier/amplifier package to eliminate long cable runs, and improvements in the neutron monitor functional test procedures to reduce maintenance requirements. The implementation of these improvements, already partially complete, is expected to provide enhanced operation and reliability for the neutron monitors. This paper will present a description of the solvent neutron monitors as well as technical details of the improvement program. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Griffin, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Metropolitan area network support at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in wide area network service offerings, coupled with comparable developments in local area network technology have enabled many research sites to keep their offsite network bandwidth ahead of demand. For most sites, the more difficult and costly aspect of increasing wide area network capacity is the local loop, which connects the facility LAN to the wide area service provider(s). Fermilab, in coordination with neighboring Argonne National Laboratory, has chosen to provide its own local loop access through leasing of dark fiber to nearby network exchange points, and procuring dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) equipment to provide data channels across those fibers. Installing and managing such optical network infrastructure has broadened the Laboratory's network support responsibilities to include operating network equipment that is located off-site, and is technically much different than classic LAN network equipment. Effectively, the Laboratory has assumed the role of a local service provider. This paper will cover Fermilab's experiences with deploying and supporting a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) infrastructure to satisfy its offsite networking needs. The benefits and drawbacks of providing and supporting such a service will be discussed.

DeMar, Phil; Andrews, Chuck; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; Colon, Orlando; Fry, Steve; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Lamore, Donna; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wireless boundary monitor system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Wireless boundary monitor system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

412

Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

Pregenzer, A.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administrations Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

William T. Hartwell

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

Applications of Underwater Search and Identification Technology on Monitoring of Underwater Structures and Analysis of Upper-Layer Geological Properties of Seabed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The application of underwater search and identification technology has been widely used in the underwater engineering. There are two major fields in this thesis: monitoring (more)

Yeh, Ti-ting

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

VME system monitor board  

SciTech Connect

Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Instrumentation and Control Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction: Utility Application Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This CD provides guidance from the EPRI initiative on IC Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction. Included on the CD are EPRI Technical Report 1015087, Instrumentation and Control Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction: Utility Application Guideline, published October 2007, and two multimedia briefings. The report and briefings describe a wide range of options while emphasizing integrated modernization across the plant or fleet. Coordinated improvements to shared communi...

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Division/ Interest Area Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn more about Divisions and Interest areas. Division/ Interest Area Information Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division Divisions fats job Join lipid lipids Member member get a member Membership memori

419

High Performance Network Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric...

422

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane...

423

Usability in multiple monitor displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to examine the impact of multiple monitors on user performance and multitasking. Forty-three participants were assigned to two groups - a multi-monitor group and a singlemonitor group - to carry out a series of tasks. ... Keywords: large display monitor, multiple monitors, multitasking, usability, user performance

Jacob M. Truemper; Hong Sheng; Michael G. Hilgers; Richard H. Hall; Morris Kalliny; Basanta Tandon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Criticality safety evaluation for K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are currently being made to remove sludge from the Disassembly Basin in all reactor areas. Because this sludge contains fissile isotopes, it is necessary to perform a criticality safety evaluation for the planned activities. A previous evaluation examined the criticality safety aspects of the sludge removal process for L Area. This document addresses the criticality safety aspects of the K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup work. The K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup will involve, as a first step, pumping the basin sludge into the Monitor Basin portion of the Disassembly Basin. From the Monitor Basin, the sludge will be pumped into tanks or containers for permanent disposition. The criticality safety evaluation discussed in this document covers the transfer of the sludge to the Monitor Basin.

Rosser, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

426

Monitoring Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Overview Please see the man pages of the commands below for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, and job summary statistics. Command Description qsub batch_script Submit batch script to queue; returns job_id. qdel job_id Delete job from queue. qhold job_id Place job on hold in queue. qrls job_id Release held job. qalter Change attributes of submitted job. qmove new_queue job_id Move job to a different queue. qstat -a List jobs in submission order. qstat -f job_id Produce detailed report about job. qs List jobs in priority order. showq List jobs in priority order, categorized by job state. showstart job_id Produce estimate of start time for job. checkjob job_id Produce scheduling diagnostics for job.

427

Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies ( 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

Samborsky, J.K.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

Samborsky, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

WorldWideScience.org: China's Participation Expands Access to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

International Council for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTI), which serves as a primary sponsor of the WorldWideScience Alliance. WorldWideScience.org was conceived and...

433

Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The CO-concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream.

Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The CO-concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. 4 figs.

Meltser, M.A.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical ...  

Wide electrochemical window solvents for use in electrochemical devices and electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents United States Patent

436

Energy efficiency study of single-wide manufactured homes  

SciTech Connect

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was among Tennessee Technological University, Clayton Homes, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Manufactured homes now make up a substantial portion of the new home market, and improving the energy efficiency of these homes would save significant amounts of energy. This project explored the impact of differing levels of attic insulation, the use of evacuated insulation panels, and the application of a solar reflective roof coating. The performance of the installed roof cavity insulation compared favorably with that predicted by laboratory measurements. The more heavily insulated of the two units used about 30% less energy over the period of the project than the standard unit. Based on the experimental data, computer simulations for nine cities were completed for a single-wide manufactured home with the solar reflective roof coating. Annual electric power savings ranged from 894 kWh in Rapid City to 2119 kWh for the same roof area in Los Angeles. The field performance of vacuum insulation panels was compared with laboratory performance. The panels will perform as expected if protected from puncture.

Yarbrough, D.W.; Andrews, G.J.; Stovall, T.K.; Kelly, T.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR THE WIDE-ANGLE `PARABOLIC' EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR THE WIDE-ANGLE `PARABOLIC' EQUATION GEORGIOS AKRIVIS Abstract. We consider a model initial and boundary value problem for the wide-angle `parabolic' equation Lur = icu, the wide-angle `parabolic'equation of underwater acoustics. Given R > 0, µ 0, > 0, , and q real

Akrivis, Georgios

438

Intelligent ICA-SVM fault detector for non-Gaussian multivariate process monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, the independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely used for multivariate non-Gaussian process monitoring. For principal component analysis (PCA) based monitoring method, the control limit can be determined by a specific distribution (F ... Keywords: Autocorrelated, Fault detector, ICA, PCA, SVM

Chun-Chin Hsu; Mu-Chen Chen; Long-Sheng Chen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

FoneAstra: Enabling Remote Monitoring of Vaccine Cold-Chains Using Commodity Mobile Phones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FoneAstra: Enabling Remote Monitoring of Vaccine Cold-Chains Using Commodity Mobile Phones Rohit-cost, energy-efficient system to remotely monitor the temperature and location of vaccines in a country- wide-tracking of vaccines in transit, based on the mobile phone's cell tower-IDs. We present results from an ongoing lab

Anderson, Richard

440

Rack Protection Monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wide area monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Energy monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

A system for monitoring and displaying the consumption of energy by measuring the actual energy consumed and comparing the measured energy consumption with an ideal or desired energy consumption. The desired energy consumption data may be based upon actual operations or may be generated by ideal consumption characteristics. In some instances, the ideal figures may be modified to compensate for variations in external conditions.

Bertolasi, R.B.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Drought Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Drought Monitor was started in spring 1999 in response to a need for improved information about the status of drought across the United States. It serves as an example of interagency cooperation in a time of limited resources. The Drought ...

Mark Svoboda; Doug LeComte; Mike Hayes; Richard Heim; Karin Gleason; Jim Angel; Brad Rippey; Rich Tinker; Mike Palecki; David Stooksbury; David Miskus; Scott Stephens

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Monitoring informs management  

SciTech Connect

Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

West, Tristram O.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

445

Rack protection monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-1