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  1. Hartford Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hartford Electric Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (262) 670-3700 Website: hartfordelectric.org Outage Hotline: (262) 670-3710 or (262)...

  2. City of Columbus- Green Columbus Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Columbus Fund incentivizes sustainable development and redevelopment in Columbus, Ohio. The Fund reimburses private and non-profit developers the application fee for the Green Building...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The Hartford | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Hartford Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The Hartford Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The Hartford Joined the Challenge: April 2013 Headquarters: Hartford, CT Charging Locations: Hartford, CT; Windsor, CT; Simsbury, CT Domestic Employees: 20,000 With more than 200 years of expertise, The Hartford is a leader in property and casualty insurance, group benefits and mutual funds. In 2011, The Hartford installed 6 charging stations at its three main campuses in Hartford, Simsbury and

  4. Columbus, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organizations in Columbus, Ohio 3 Registered Policy Organizations in Columbus, Ohio 4 Registered Energy Companies in Columbus, Ohio 5 Utility Companies in Columbus, Ohio 6...

  5. Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7637111, -72.6850932 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  6. Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization...

  7. West Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map West Hartford is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau...

  8. Columbus, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Columbus, Ohio, Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Columbus, Ohio, Sites. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is responsible for maintaining records for this site. Location of the Columbus Sites Site Description and History The Columbus, Ohio, Sites consist of two geographically separate properties owned by the Battelle Memorial Institute: the King Avenue site, located in the city of Columbus, and the West Jefferson site, located approximately 15 miles

  9. Hartford Steam Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hartford Steam Co Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 860-725-7005 Website: www.hartfordsteam.com Outage Hotline: 860-725-7005 References: EIA...

  10. Columbus, Ohio's RDF experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, H.A. )

    1988-01-01

    This is a presentation on the Columbus, Ohio Trash Burning Power Plant from its original design assumptions and considerations to its start-up and operation. Problems associated with an infant technology and subsequent modifications to make it one of the most successful operations are today discussed in non-technical detail. By the end of 1987, the Columbus plant successfully disposed of its 1,600,00th ton of trash following its start-up in December 1983.

  11. City of Columbus, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Columbus Place: Ohio Website: columbus.govpublicutilities Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesColumbus-Public-Utilities99480283674 Outage Hotline: 614-645-7627 References:...

  12. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study- Hartford Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 9, 2008, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Hartford, CT to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The agenda, full...

  13. Columbus HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Columbus HTS Power Cable This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical link in a utility substation in Columbus, Ohio. PDF icon Columbus HTS Power Cable More Documents & Publications HTS Cable Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects Albany HTS Power Cable

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Columbus East OH Site -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Documents Related to Columbus East, OH Columbus East Site Aerial Photograph FACT SHEET Office of Legacy Management Columbus East, Ohio, Site OH.26-1 - DOE Memorandum, Wagoner to ...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Columbus

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdficon Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Columbus, Ohio, Sites Fact Sheet August 3, 2015 Other Documents Closeout of BCLDP Oversight Assessment Report ...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Columbus

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Responsibility for maintaining records for the Columbus sites transferred to DOE's Office of Legacy Management in 2008. The sites require records management and stakeholder ...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Battelle Columbus Laboratories...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Columbus Laboratories W Jefferson Plutonium Facilities - OH 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Battelle Columbus Laboratories W Jefferson Plutonium Facilities (OH.15) Designated...

  18. Columbus, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Columbus is a village in Adams County, Illinois. It falls under Illinois' 18th congressional district.12...

  19. Columbus, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Columbus is a city in Hickman County, Kentucky. It falls under Kentucky's 1st congressional district.12...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Battelle Columbus Laboratories W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Jefferson Plutonium Facilities - OH 15 Columbus Laboratories W Jefferson Plutonium Facilities - OH 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Battelle Columbus Laboratories W Jefferson Plutonium Facilities (OH.15) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Documents Related to Battelle Columbus Laboratories W Jefferson Plutonium

  1. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  2. Columbus County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Columbus County, North Carolina Boardman, North Carolina Bolton, North Carolina Brunswick, North Carolina Cerro Gordo, North...

  3. City of Columbus, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phone Number: 662-328-7192 ext. 113 or 114 Website: www.columbuslw.comindex.html Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesColumbus-Light-Water444721805615715 Outage Hotline:...

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- ColumbusEast_FUSRAP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management activities consist of managing site records and responding to stakeholder inquiries. For more information about the Columbus East Site, view the fact ...

  5. Trash will fuel new Columbus plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Columbus, Ohio is building a refuse- and coal-fired 90-MW municipal electric plant that will burn 3000 tons of refuse a day. The plant will burn 80% trash and 20% low-sulfur coal (with the option of burning either all coal or all trash) because the 80-20 ratio offers the best balance between boiler corrosion and efficiency. A general obligation bond sale rather than federal or state financing is possible because of the city's good bond rating. The plant will include a fine-shredder, waste treatment facility, and a coal storage area. Pollution control will be handled by six oversized electrostatic precipitators, six mechanical dust collectors, and three 275-foot stacks. (DCK)

  6. Downlight Demonstration Program: Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Robert G.; Perrin, Tess E.

    2014-05-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that there were about 700 million downlight luminaires installed in residential and commercial buildings in the U.S. as of 2012, with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires representing less than 1% of this installed base. Downlight luminaires using conventional incandescent, halogen, and compact fluorescent lamps have lower efficacies and shorter expected lifetimes than comparable LED systems, but the lower initial cost of the conventional technology and the uncertainties associated with the newer LED technology have restricted widespread adoption of LED downlight luminaires. About 278 tBtu of energy could be saved annually if LED luminaires were to saturate the downlight market, equating to an annual energy cost savings of $2.6 billion. This report summarizes an evaluation of LED recessed downlight luminaires in the guest rooms at the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Columbus, OH. The facility opened in October of 2012, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a post-occupancy assessment of the facility in January–March of 2014. Each of the 484 guest rooms uses seven 15 W LED downlights: four downlights in the entry and bedroom and three downlights in the bathroom. The 48 suites use the seven 15 W LED downlights and additional fixtures depending on the space requirements, so that in total the facility has more than 3,700 LED downlights. The downlights are controlled through wall-mounted switches and dimmers. A ceiling-mounted vacancy sensor ensures that the bathroom luminaires are turned off when the room is not occupied.

  7. An introduction to GUGA in the COLUMBUS Program System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, R.

    1992-12-31

    The COLUMBUS Program System is a collection of Fortran programs for performing general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and doubele-exicitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) wave function optimization based on the graphical unitary group approach (GUGA). This paper describes at an introductory level how wave functions are specified and characterized in the COLUMBUS Program System in terms of the unitary group, and in particular, using the graphical representation proposed by Shavitt.

  8. Next Generation Luminaire (NGL) Downlight Demonstration Project, Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R. G.; Perrin, T. E.

    2014-09-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code.

  9. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  10. 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details...

  11. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  12. Finding of no significant impact, decontamination and decommissioning of Battelle Columbus Laboratories in Columbus and West Jefferson, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been developed by the Department of Energy in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the proposed decommissioning of contaminated areas at the Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. The discussions in Section 1.0 provide general background information on the proposed action. Section 2.0 describes the existing radiological and non-radiological condition of the Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Section 3.0 identifies the alternatives considered for the proposed action and describes in detail the proposed decommissioning project. Section 4.0 evaluates the potential risks the project poses to human health and the environment. Section 5.0 presents the Department of Energy's proposed action. As a result of nuclear research and development activities conducted over a period of approximately 43 years performed for the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and under commercial contracts, the 15 buildings became contaminated with varying amounts of radioactive material. The Department of Energy no longer has a need to utilize the facilities and is contractually obligate to remove that contamination such that they can be used by their owners without radiological restrictions. This Environmental Assessment for the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project is consistent with the direction from the Secretary of Energy that public awareness and participation be considered in sensitive projects and is an appropriate document to determine action necessary to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. 30 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  14. Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Battelle Columbus Laboratories Agreement Name Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995 State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Approve the Compliance Plan Volume of the amended PSTP, hereafter referred to as the "approved STP," and address the generation and treatment of mixed wastes at the Facilities Parties DOE; Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Date 10/4/1995 SCOPE * Approve the

  15. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    Shapefiles and spreadsheets of structural data, including attitudes of faults and strata and slip orientations of faults. - Detailed geologic mapping of ~30 km2 was completed in the vicinity of the Columbus Marsh geothermal field to obtain critical structural data that would elucidate the structural controls of this field. - Documenting E‐ to ENE‐striking left lateral faults and N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults. - Some faults cut Quaternary basalts. - This field appears to occupy a displacement transfer zone near the eastern end of a system of left‐lateral faults. ENE‐striking sinistral faults diffuse into a system of N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults within the displacement transfer zone. - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  16. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  17. National incinerator testing and evaluation program: The environmental characterization of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) Combustion Technology, Mid-Connecticut Facility, Hartford, Connecticut. Final report, June 1987-March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finklestein, A.; Klicius, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives results of an environmental characterization of refuse-derived (RDF) semi-suspension burning technology at a facility in Hartford, Connecticut, that represents state-of-the-art technology, including a spray dryer/fabric filter flue-gas cleaning (FGC) system for each unit. Results were obtained for a variety of steam production rates, combustion conditions, flue gas temperatures, and acid gas removal efficiencies. All incoming wastes and residue streams were weighed, sampled, and analyzed. Key combustor and FGC system operating variables were monitored on a real time basis. A wide range of analyses for acid gases, trace organics, and heavy metals was carried out on gas emissions and all ash residue discharges.

  18. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance US General Serices Administration - Project 193, John W. Bricker Federal Building, Columbus, OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings from an onsite audit of the John W. Bricker Federal building located in Columbus, Ohio. The Federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would either reduce electrical and gas consumption or increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  19. Hartford County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Connecticut Light and Power DBS Energy Inc Energy Recovery Associates Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen National Energy Resource Corporation Pioneer Valley Photovoltaics...

  20. Economic effects of fracture in the United States. Part 1. A synopsis of the September 30, 1982 report to NBS by Battelle Columbus Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Christ, B.W.

    1983-03-01

    The National Bureau of Standards and Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) have completed a study to assess the costs of material fracture to the United States for the year 1978. This exhaustive assessment used the econometric input-output model to identify contributions from the entire US economy. The study included all materials and all types of structures and included both fracture occurrence and fracture prevention costs. The costs were large. In 1982 dollars the total cost was estimated to be $119 billion per year, about 4 percent of the gross national product. An estimated $35 billion per year could be saved through the use of currently available technology. Costs could be further reduced by as much as $28 billion per year through fracture-related research. The costs are primarily associated with the transportation and construction industries: motor vehicles, aircraft, and the building of homes and non-residential construction. Metal structures contributed substantially larger costs than non-metal structures. A greater percentage of these costs were expended on fracture prevention than on fracture occurrence. The study concluded that substantial material, transportation, and capital investment costs could be saved if technology transfer, combined with research and development, succeeded in reducing the factors of uncertainty related to structural design. Equally safe or safer structures could be produced with substantial cost savings in material, transportation, and capital investment. This could be done by reducing the uncertainty currently related to structural design through better predictions of structural performance from materials properties, better process and quality control and in-service flaw monitoring, and less materials variability.

  1. Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1982-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

  2. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Power Company Remarks of John F. Bilda, General Manager, ... of the United States, Canada & Australia 1 - The ... PDF icon Remarks of Kevin R. Hennessy PDF icon Remarks of ...

  3. East Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  4. Microsoft Word - Statement Rick Terven.Plumbers Pipefitters.Hartford...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Water and Clean Water State Revolving Funds. States would identify natural gas pipeline projects and, as with the established state revolving funds, would have to match 20 ...

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kerr McGee Site in Columbus, Mississippi. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kerr McGee site in Columbus, Mississippi, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  6. Columbus East, Ohio, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    an intermediate product) under contract to E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (DuPont). ... Upon completion of the extrusion project, representatives of MED and DuPont visually ...

  7. Columbus Southern Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    470,265 3,462 144,074 1,859,553 750,271 2008-01 62,700 778,967 672,453 51,808 682,742 78,607 25,593 469,250 3,503 140,101 1,930,959 754,563 References "EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  8. Columbus, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2014404,"lon":-85.9213796,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Columbus, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Design Group, Inc. Edison Welding Institute Go Sustainable Energy, LLC Green Energy Ohio Hyper Tech Research Inc Juice Technologies LLC OTB USA Inc Osiris (Shanghai)...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Glenn Poole Verso Maine Energy.QER Hartford...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Presenter - Glenn S. Poole Glenn.Poole@versopaper.com * From Monson, Maine * UMO-EE (1971) * Bangor Hydro Electric Co. * Bucksport Paper Mill (42yrs) * Verso Energy Manager (3 ...

  11. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meeting Files: Meeting Agenda, Meeting Briefing Memo, Federal Register Notice, Meeting Summary, Transcript of Meeting, and Panelist Remarks

  12. Columbus, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.8276002, -107.6400232 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  13. Columbus Southern Power Company (doing business as AEP Ohio)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    distribution system efficiency and reliability and enable consumers to reduce their energy use and save money. The project will include 13 different technologies from the...

  14. Project Fact Sheet Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The new cable design incorporated in this project has the potential to further reduce space requirements by run- ning all three phases of a power line through a single cable. Power ...

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tindall Homes, Columbus...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building and Construction Solutions) to build 20 luxury homes in northern New Jersey ... testing showed a HERS score of 58. To build a higher-performance home, Tindall focused ...

  16. Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  17. Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  18. Geothermometry At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References Lisa Shevenell, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Chris Kratt, James Faulds, Robin Penfield (2008) Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource...

  19. Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1). References Lisa Shevenell, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Chris Kratt, James Faulds, Robin Penfield (2008) Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource...

  20. word2pdf43408.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Or You may contact Our Sales Office: Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company Group ... CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE HARTFORD LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY Simsbury, ...

  1. Agenda: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Part II: Hartford, CT Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Phoenix Auditorium, 79 Elm Street, Hartford, CT 1:00 P.M. - Introduction & Officials Panel...

  2. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tindall Homes, Columbus, New Jersey

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of Tindall Homes who worked with Building America research team IBACOS to build 20 HERS-58 homes with R-49 mixed attic insulation, poly-iso foam in advanced framed walls, precast concrete basement walls with rigid foam, tight airsealing, and HRVs

  3. Battelle Columbus Laboratories Director's Final Findings and Orders, October 4, 1995

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UCNI Basis for UCNI What documents contain the legal and policy foundations for the UCNI program? Section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.), is the statutory basis for the UCNI program. 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information specifies many detailed policies and requirements concerning the UCNI program. DOE O 471.1B, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information,

  4. Best Practices Case Study: Tindall Homes - Princeton, NJ, Legends at Mansfield, Columbus, NJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    Case Study of Tindall Homes, who worked with Building America to design an optimal package including advanced framing, insulated precast concrete basement walls, polyurethane foam in the walls, and R-49 of batt plus blown cellulose in the attics. Some homes included a detached garden shed with photovoltaic panel-covered roofs.

  5. Best Practices Case Study: Tom Walsh and Co. - New Columbus, Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    Case study of Tom Walsh, who achieved 50% in heating and cooling energy savings over the 2004 IECC with advanced framing, superior air sealing, extra insulation, and ducts in conditioned space. Surface water runoff in the large urban rebuild development was handled with pervious pavers, swales, retention of existing trees, and green spaces.

  6. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tindall Homes, Columbus, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    The builder worked with IBACOS to build 20 HERS-58 homes with R-49 mixed attic insulation, poly-iso foam in advanced framed walls, precast concrete basement walls with rigid foam, tight airsealing, and HRV

  7. Economic effects of fracture in the United States. Part 2. A report to NBS by Battelle Columbus Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duga, J.J.; Fisher, W.H.; Buxbaum, R.W.; Rosenfield, A.R.; Buhr, A.R.; Honton, E.J.; McMillan, S.C.

    1983-03-01

    Materials produced in the United States - and the structures, containers and other products made from them - are all subject to fracture. While our understanding of material fracture has advanced considerably over the past several decades, we still need to overdesign structures so as to maintain safety factors and to assure reliability, and we still expend much effort on maintenance and repair to prevent catastrophic failures. The total cost of fractures ($99.0 billion) is 4.4 percent of the Gross National Product for full employment 1978. If we assume no great change in the relative size of these costs in today's economy - with a GNP of approximately $3000 billion - current (1982) costs of fracture are running at a level of about $132 billion per year. Over 80 percent of the costs are technology based: they derive primarily from technologies of production and the amounts of material used in production process in order to prevent fracture. It is largely within this area that future research and development will have their greatest impacts. Future cost reductions can be addressed on a sector-by-sector basis through a detailed analysis of the cost components that accrue to individual sectors as provided in this report. A major portion of resource savings may be realized by the transfer of existing technology, i.e., applying a technology developed for one use to another one, perhaps far removed. Depending upon the particular sector(s) involved, savings may accrue to producers, to users, and/or society at large. In addition, an almost equal resource savings may be obtained through basic and applied research, and the subsequent dissemination and application of new technology throughout the productive economy.

  8. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: QM Power, Inc. – Lee’s Summit, MOPartners: United Technologies Research Center – East Hartford, CT

  9. Sebastian County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Arkansas Barling, Arkansas Bonanza, Arkansas Central City, Arkansas Fort Smith, Arkansas Greenwood, Arkansas Hackett, Arkansas Hartford, Arkansas Huntington,...

  10. Department of Energy Announces Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting in Rhode Island, Connecticut

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advisory of a two-part Quadrennial Energy Review public meeting in Providence, R.I. and Hartford, Conn.

  11. Lowndes County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mississippi Columbus AFB, Mississippi Columbus, Mississippi Crawford, Mississippi New Hope, Mississippi Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLowndesCounty,Mis...

  12. Ohio and the Manhattan Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Today, LM is responsible for sites in Ashtabula, Columbus (including Columbus East), Fairfield, Fernald, Hamilton, Mound, Oxford, Piqua, and Toledo. Over the coming years, we ...

  13. EA-1712: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, Tennessee, and Columbus, Georgia

  14. EA-1712: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery And Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, Tennessee, And Columbus, Georgia

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Columbus Labs - OH 01 Memorial Institute Battelle Columbus Labs - OH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle Columbus Labs (OH.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Documents Related to Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle Columbus Labs

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Columbus, Ohio Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles Lower Emissions in Columbus, Ohio on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicles

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellow Cab Converts Taxis to Propane in

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Columbus, Ohio Yellow Cab Converts Taxis to Propane in Columbus, Ohio to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellow Cab Converts Taxis to Propane in Columbus, Ohio on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellow Cab Converts Taxis to Propane in Columbus, Ohio on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellow Cab Converts Taxis to Propane in Columbus, Ohio on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellow Cab Converts Taxis to Propane in

  18. Connecticut Light and Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Light and Power Address: P.O. Box 270 Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: 06141 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer...

  19. Butler County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iowa Clarksville, Iowa Dumont, Iowa Greene, Iowa New Hartford, Iowa Parkersburg, Iowa Shell Rock, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleButlerCounty,Iowa&...

  20. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Research Center in East Hartford | Department of Energy Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received

  1. Lyon County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype A. Places in Lyon County, Kansas Admire, Kansas Allen, Kansas Americus, Kansas Bushong, Kansas Emporia, Kansas Hartford, Kansas Neosho Rapids, Kansas Olpe, Kansas Reading,...

  2. High-Performance Commercial Cold Climate Heat Pump | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lead Performer: United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT Partners: Carrier Corporation - Farmington, CT DOE Funding: 1,500,000 Cost Share: 373,000 Project Term: ...

  3. Geneva County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geneva, Alabama Hartford, Alabama Malvern, Alabama Samson, Alabama Slocomb, Alabama Taylor, Alabama Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGenevaCounty,Alabama...

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location.

  5. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General directions are available on the United Technologies Research Center website. WHERE: United Technologies Research Center 411 Silver Lane East Hartford, CT 06108 Media ...

  6. Energy Media Advisories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    initiative. February 3, 2011 U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow,...

  7. Licking County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Licking County, Ohio Alexandria, Ohio Beechwood Trails, Ohio Buckeye Lake, Ohio Granville South, Ohio Granville, Ohio Gratiot, Ohio Hanover, Ohio Harbor Hills, Ohio Hartford,...

  8. United Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Technologies Corp Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: CT 06101 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: UTC is a global technology corporation with activities in aerospace,...

  9. Avon, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Avon is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 Registered Energy Companies in Avon,...

  10. CX-003989: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Landfill Gas Utilization - Columbus CountyCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/22/2010Location(s): Columbus County, North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  11. CX-000262: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio City ColumbusCX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1Date: 12/21/2009Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. Home Weatherization Visit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits...

  13. Bartholomew County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indiana Columbus, Indiana Edinburgh, Indiana Elizabethtown, Indiana Hartsville, Indiana Hope, Indiana Jonesville, Indiana Taylorsville, Indiana Retrieved from "http:...

  14. EIS-0200: DOE Notice of Availability of the Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation, Storage, Characterization, and Disposal of Transuranic Waste Currently Stored at the Battelle West Jefferson Site Near Columbus, Ohio

  15. EIS-0200-SA-02: Supplement Analyis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation, Storage, Characterization, and Disposal of Transuranic Waste Currently Stored at the Battelle West Jefferson Site near Columbus, Ohio

  16. CX-004144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large Scale Testing, Demonstration and Commercialization of Nanoparticle-based Fuel Cell CoolantCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/14/2010Location(s): Whitehall, PennsylvaniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. Better Buildings Challenge Partners Exceed $1.3 Billion in Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A list of all goal achievers is in the 2016 Progress Report. This year's 18 goal achievers include: City of Atlanta, GA Arby's Cummins, Inc. eBay, Inc. Hartford Financial Services ...

  18. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshops...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 11, 2008 San Francisco, CA June 18, 2008 Oklahoma City, OK July 9, 2008 Hartford, CT July 29, 2008 Atlanta, GA August 6, 2008 Las Vegas, NV September 17, 2008 Chicago, IL DOE ...

  19. QER- Comment of Elaine Mroz

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elaine Mroz Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meetings ‘‘Infrastructure Restraints- New England” held April 21, 2014, in Providence, RI and Hartford, CT. Please see attached file.

  20. TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Receiving Station j3 Eact Hartford 8, Connecticut Attention: To be opened by IL J. Kelly, Fox Project Please notify C. R. h?iU.iken, Pratt &Whitney, direct of any costs...

  1. CX-004915: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    United Technologies Research Center - Water-Based Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/16/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  2. Blue Hills, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Hills is a census-designated place in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References ...

  3. CX-007525: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Connecticut-City-Hartford CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 01/06/2012 Location(s): Connecticut Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  4. West Simsbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Simsbury is a census-designated place in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References...

  5. CX-005347: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Incentive ProgramCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 03/02/2011Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Legrand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Legrand Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Legrand Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Legrand Joined the Challenge: November 2014 Headquarters: West Hartford, CT Charging Locations: West Hartford, CT; Syracuse, NY; Fairfield, NJ Domestic Employees: 2,500 Legrand specializes in products and systems for electrical installations and information networks and is committed to integrating sustainability into the way it conducts business. In alignment with its sustainability commitment, Legrand,

  7. Louisa County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Columbus Junction, Iowa Cotter, Iowa Fredonia, Iowa Grandview, Iowa Letts, Iowa Morning Sun, Iowa Oakville, Iowa Wapello, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  8. NREL Technologies Win National Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Invented by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, and commercialized by the Future Energy Resources Corp. of Atlanta, Ga., with assistance from NREL and Vermont's Burlington Electric ...

  9. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3919 Univ of Texas-Austin Cameron, TX Field Site: Schlumberger Cameron Well Test Site - Cameron, TX; Previously approved: Ohio State U - Columbus OH; Columbia U (Lamont Doherty...

  10. Directory of Small Business Program Managers (SBPMs)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Consol Business Center (EM) Anne Marie Bird (513) 246-0569 Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Derrick Hamilton Manager, Supplier Diversity & SBPM W: ...

  11. Programmatic Framework | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Site Columbus East, Ohio, Site Fairfield, Ohio, Site Granite City, Illinois, Site Hamilton, Ohio, Site Indian Orchard, Massachusetts, Site Jersey City, New Jersey, Site ...

  12. Legacy Management FUSRAP Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Columbus East, Ohio, Site Fairfield, Ohio, Site Granite City, Illinois, Site Hamilton, Ohio, Site Indian Orchard, Massachusetts, Site Jersey City, New Jersey, Site ...

  13. Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... clean up of six waste pits, soil and groundwater remediation, waste treatment and disposal, demolition of ... at its two laboratory facilities in the Columbus, Ohio, area. ...

  14. Go Sustainable Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Energy, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Go Sustainable Energy, LLC Name: Go Sustainable Energy, LLC Address: 3857 N. High Street, Suite 208 Place: Columbus, Ohio...

  15. Clean Fuels Ohio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clean Fuels Ohio Address: 3400 North High Street, Suite 430 Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43202 Website: www.cleanfuelsohio.org References:...

  16. Hyper Tech Research Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tech Research Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hyper Tech Research Inc. Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43212 Product: Maker of superconductors, superconducting wires,...

  17. Other Participants 1996 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    , Sacramento , CA Mission San Jose High School , Freemont , CA Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Montrose High School, Montrose, CO Monument Valley High School ...

  18. Ohio Advanced Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ohio Advanced Energy Address: 100 S. Third Street Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43201 Website: www.ohioadvancedenergy.orgnew References: Ohio...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohio

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    East Site Columbus Sites Fairfield Site Fernald Preserve Hamilton Site Mound Site Oxford Site Painesville Site Piqua Decommissioned Reactor Site Toledo Site Last Updated: 1...

  20. Delaware County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Delaware County, Ohio US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Delaware County, Ohio City of Westerville, OH Smart Grid Project Columbus Southern Power Company (doing business...

  1. Franklin County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Franklin County, Ohio US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Franklin County, Ohio City of Westerville, OH Smart Grid Project Columbus Southern Power Company (doing business...

  2. Georgia Power Compnay Three 30 MW Renewable Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Fort Stewart, and Fort Gordon 3 Project Description Fort Benning 374 acres near Columbus, Georgia 4 Fort Gordon 199 acres near Augusta, Georgia 5 Fort Stewart 227 acres ...

  3. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OR Ohio State Uuiversity, Columbus, OH (*) Stauffer Tenescal Co., Richmond, CA Tocco Induction Heating Division, Cleveland, OH Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co., Utica, NY Tltaniua...

  4. EA-1788: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sapphire Energy, Inc.'s Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) Facility in Columbus, New Mexico Sapphire Energy Company proposes to construct and operated an Integrated Algal...

  5. American Municipal Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipal Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Municipal Power Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43219 Product: AMP is a non-profit corporation that owns and operates electric...

  6. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbus, OH FESCCCrosscutting Research Div. Steven M. Seachman Advanced Control Architecture and Sensor Information Development for Process... The proposed work is to develop...

  7. Edison Welding Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Welding Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Edison Welding Institute Address: 1250 Arthur E. Adams Drive Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43221-3585 Sector: Efficiency, Services...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohio State University Metallurgic...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EXPERIMENT STATION (OH.0-05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Columbus , Ohio...

  9. Environment Ohio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environment Ohio Address: 203 E. Broad Street, Suite 3 Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43215 Website: www.environmentohio.org References: http:www.environmentohio.org This article...

  10. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N Wilkowski G Battelle Columbus OH United States MATERIALS SCIENCE NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY PIPES FRACTURE PROPERTIES CRACK PROPAGATION NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CARBON STEELS...

  11. Effects of toughness anisotropy and combined tension, torsion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G. Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States) 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; PIPES; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; CRACK PROPAGATION; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; CARBON...

  12. Secretary Chu Announces Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide Secretary Chu Announces Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide August 31, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Columbus, OH - At an ...

  13. US Biofuels Ltd Ohio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuels Ltd Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Name: US Biofuels Ltd (Ohio) Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43215 Product: Builder of a bioethanol plant in Richmond, OH. References: US...

  14. The Ohio Environmental Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio Environmental Council Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Ohio Environmental Council Address: 1207 Grandview Avenue, Suite 201 Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43212-3449 Website:...

  15. EA-1788: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sapphire Energy Inc.'s Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) Facility in Columbus, New Mexico Sapphire Energy Company proposes to construct and operated an Integrated Algal...

  16. Green Energy Ohio | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Energy Ohio Address: 7870 Olentangy River Road, Suite 209 Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43235 Sector: Biomass, Solar, Wind energy Product: Trainining and education Phone Number:...

  17. Identification of a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a New Blind Geothermal System with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing and Shallow Temperature Measurements at Columbus Salt Marsh, Esmeralda County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search...

  18. Versa Glass | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Versa Glass Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43220 Product: Versa is manufacturing a new technology privacy glass in Ohio that is LEED and has cleantech properties...

  19. SCI Engineered Materials Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SCI Engineered Materials Inc Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43228 Product: Supplier of manufacturing equipment for the vacuum coating and PV deposition industries, in addition to...

  20. Byers Auto | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Byers Auto Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Byers Auto Energy Purchaser Byers Auto Location Columbus OH Coordinates...

  1. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Warehouses Aliquippa Springdale Seymour Beverly Indian Orchard New York Columbus East Oxford Hamilton Fairfield Wayne Burris Park Tonawanda North, Unit 1 Tonawanda North, Unit 2...

  2. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cell Seminar & Energy Exposition Columbus, Ohio Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director Fuel Cell Technologies Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable ...

  3. EERE Success Story-Dynalene Fuel Cell Coolants Achieve Commercial Success

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Dynalene Fuel Cell Coolants Achieve Commercial Success EERE Success Story-Dynalene Fuel Cell Coolants Achieve Commercial Success August 26, 2014 - 12:34pm Addthis Dynalene Inc. of Whitehall, Pennsylvania, has completed large scale testing and demonstration of nanoparticle-based fuel cell coolant, and has achieved commercial success in multiple markets. Dynalene's fuel cell coolant has very low electrical conductivity and uses non-ionic corrosion inhibitors and

  4. CX-001882: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbus City American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (S) Act 5-Business Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan ProgramCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 04/21/2010Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  5. CX-001615: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbus City American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (S) Act 8-Home Energy Efficiency Base load Reduction ProgramCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 04/07/2010Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. CX-006893: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership/Frito Lay Columbus Propane Fueling InfrastructureCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/28/2011Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-004091: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership - City of Columbus Compressed Natural Gas StationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/30/2010Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  9. FUSRAP Stakeholder Report_3.cdr

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Beverly Indian Orchard New York Shpack Landfill E.I. DuPont Site Columbus East Niagara ... Albany Research Center, Albany, OR E.I. DuPont, Deepwater, NJ KellexPierpont, Jersey ...

  10. 2007 Strategic Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Durita Bear Creek Gas Hills North Wayne Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research E.I. DuPont Gas Hills West Columbus Shoal Central Nevada Test Area Panna Maria Rocky Flats ...

  11. CX-006851: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Targeting Industrial Efficiency - Fortin WeldingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/20/2011Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  12. CX-006584: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil)CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 08/15/2011Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UNrvn.,,r, 4-5200 blr. Saul Strauch Technical Liason Division United States Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office 70 Columbus Avenue New York 23, New York ...

  14. CX-002620: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership (OATP)CX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 06/10/2010Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. Luna County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Luna County, New Mexico Columbus, New Mexico Deming, New Mexico Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLunaCounty,NewMe...

  16. OTB USA Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OTB USA Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: OTB USA Inc Address: 1871 Suffolk Rd. Place: Columbus, Ohio Zip: 43221 Sector: Solar Product: Other:Capital Equipment Phone Number:...

  17. CX-007463: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ohio Advanced Transportation Partnership/City of Columbus Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 12/20/2011 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. 1992index.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORD675.FE 092892 92-72-NG Intalco Aluminum Corporation ORD674.FE 092492 92-85-NG Mercado Gas Services, Inc. ORD673.FE 092492 92-67-NG Columbus Energy Corporation ORD672.FE...

  19. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  20. Bartholomew County Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bartholomew County Rural E M C Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bartholomew County Rural E M C Address: 1697 W. Deaver Road Place: Columbus, Indiana Zip: 47201 Phone Number: (812)...

  1. Sapphire Energy - Integrated Algal Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... * Produced over 2,000 gallons of crude oil * Upgraded bio crude oil to produce on ... algae for 29 months in Columbus, New Mexico Produced Green Crude for 24 months in Las ...

  2. untitled

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Columbus East Site M:\LTS\111\0001\10\000\S0824300\S0824300-13.mxd coatesc 09/28/2011 12:04:21 PM 0 200 10

  3. CX-004923: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Battelle-Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Reverse Absorption Osmosis CycleCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/04/2010Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  4. Portsmouth Site Engineer Authors Safety Standard | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... A Columbus native, Mayer has been a voting member of ASTM since 1990 and lives in Portsmouth, Ohio, with his wife, Jaclyn. Addthis Related Articles Workers from Fluor-BWXT ...

  5. Ohio Closure Projects Ceremony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    During the Cold War era, Columbus, Ashtabula, and Fernald were critical parts of America's ... we have restored 84 sites that played a role in Cold War era production across the nation. ...

  6. Secretary Chu Announces $620 Million for Smart Grid Demonstration and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Projects | Department of Energy $620 Million for Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Projects Secretary Chu Announces $620 Million for Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Projects November 24, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis COLUMBUS, OHIO - At an event in Columbus, Ohio this afternoon, Secretary Chu announced that the Department of Energy is awarding $620 million for projects around the country to demonstrate advanced Smart Grid technologies and integrated systems that

  7. Secretary Chu Announces Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide Secretary Chu Announces Two Million Smart Grid Meters Installed Nationwide August 31, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Columbus, OH - At an event today at Battelle headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that two million smart grid meters have been installed across the country, helping to reduce energy costs for families and businesses. As a result of funding from the Recovery Act, smart grid

  8. Secretary Chu Announces $187 Million to Improve Vehicle Efficiency for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Trucks and Passenger Vehicles | Department of Energy Announces $187 Million to Improve Vehicle Efficiency for Heavy-Duty Trucks and Passenger Vehicles Secretary Chu Announces $187 Million to Improve Vehicle Efficiency for Heavy-Duty Trucks and Passenger Vehicles January 11, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Columbus, Ind. - At an event today in Columbus, Indiana, Secretary Chu announced the selection of nine projects totaling more than $187 million to improve fuel efficiency for heavy-duty

  9. WIPP Instructors to Provide Specialized Training For Indiana Emergency Response Professionals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indiana Emergency Response Professionals CARLSBAD, N.M., January 25, 2001 - Trainers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will be in Indianapolis, Indiana, January 29-30 and February 1-2 to teach emergency response professionals what to do should they arrive at an accident involving a WIPP shipment. Transuranic radioactive waste shipments from DOE's Battelle Columbus Laboratories in Columbus, Ohio, are tentatively scheduled to begin in 2002. Trucks coming

  10. CX-004690: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Natural Refrigerant Very-High Efficiency Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning SystemCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 12/16/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  12. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  13. CX-005443: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plug and Play Distributed Power Systems for Smart-Grid Connected BuildingsCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 03/17/2011Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-000698: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut - State Building Energy Improvements: 79 Elm StreetCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.4, B1.24, B1.31, B2.5, B5.1Date: 01/05/2010Location(s): Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-002716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Advanced Low Temperature Heat Recovery Absorption Chiller Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) ModuleCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 06/11/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-004641: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Whole Building Energy DiagnosticsCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 12/09/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides preliminary results from the evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment, early results and agency experience are also provided.

  18. CX-002111: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Optimization of Hybrid-Water/Air-Cooled Condenser In an Enhanced Turbine Geothermal Organic Rankine Cycle SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9Date: 05/05/2010Location(s): East Hartford, CTOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  19. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems; Volume 6 Building America Best Practices Series

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Commercial Cold Climate Heat Pump High-Performance Commercial Cold Climate Heat Pump Credit: United Technologies Research Center Credit: United Technologies Research Center Lead Performer: United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT Partners: Carrier Corporation - Farmington, CT DOE Funding: $1,500,000 Cost Share: $373,000 Project Term: 3/1/2013 - 5/29/2015 Funding Opportunity: Energy Savings Through Improved Mechanical Systems and Building Envelope Technologies 2012 (DE-FOA-0000621)

  20. High-efficiency Low Global-Warming Potential (GWP) Compressor | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy efficiency Low Global-Warming Potential (GWP) Compressor High-efficiency Low Global-Warming Potential (GWP) Compressor Lead Performer: United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT DOE Total Funding: $974,000 Cost Share: $417,000 Project Term: September 2015 - August 2017 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2015, DE-FOA-0001166 Project Objective United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) proposes to demonstrate

  1. Shirley Ann Jackson | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shirley Ann Jackson About Us Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. - President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Former Chairman, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Shirley Ann Jackson The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D., is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. She was elected to the Brookings Board of Trustees in 2000. Described by Time Magazine as "perhaps the

  2. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shirley Ann Jackson About Us Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. - President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Former Chairman, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Shirley Ann Jackson The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D., is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. She was elected to the Brookings Board of Trustees in 2000. Described by Time Magazine as "perhaps the

  3. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 6 2007 Mr. Steve Zappe, Project Leader Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 Subject: Final Audit Report A-07-24 of the SRS/CCP Battelle Columbus RH Waste Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the final Audit Report for Audit A-07-27 of the Savannah River Site/Central Characterization Project (SRS/CCP) Battelle Columbus Remote Handled (RH) Waste, for the processes performed to characterize and certify waste as

  4. U'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 1335.8 ()ti ,I$ -;z. ew - Ii ' .(u;-WJ U' rAted States Government ( -,) L,~J;~,~~,~~yl/ 1 i I \ Department of Energy DATE: OCT 0 8 1992 _ -.. 6t+ZL REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. -A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUSJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at 8&T Metals Facility, Columbus, Ohio TO: Manager, DOE Oak Ridge Field Office This is to notify you that the B&T Metals facility in Columbus, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

  5. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -/' ,4&y &yL I Ri $4 p 7.3 $ c p/. -9 i Mr. Roger Boyd Ohio Environmental Protection Agency P.O. Box 1049 Columbus, Ohio 43266-0149 Mr. Kevin Driesbach Radiological Health Program Department of Health 1224 Kinnear Road Columbus, Ohio 43212 Mr. William Franz Federal Facility Coordinator EPA Region V 230 South Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60604 Gentlemen: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to (1) identify,

  6. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~ ~erivation of ~uidelines for Uranium Residual Radioactive Material in soil at the B&T Metals Company Site, Columbus,. Ohio Environmental Assessment Division f i Argonne National Laborgory Operated by The Unlvenlty of ChCago. under Contract w-31-109-Eng-38, lor tne United States Department of Energy Derivation of Guidelines for Uranium Residual Radioactive Material in Soil at the B&T Metals Company Site, Columbus, Ohio by S. Kamboj. M. Nimmagadda, and C. Yu Env~ronmental Assessment

  7. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) - Contract No. DE-ACOS-9 1 OR21 949 Post-Remedial Action Report for the 8. & T Metals Site Columbus, Ohio October 1996 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT f OR THE . . B&T METALS SITE COLUMBUS. OHIO OCTOBER 1 W6 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-ACOS-91 OR2 1949 I Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tcnncssoe I Bcchtel lob No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES

  8. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    T O G. L. Palau Subject Scoping Notice: The B&T Metals Site, Columbus, Ohio F i l s No. 744011 13 ~ a t t February 26, 1996 F P m l D. D. Sexton b of Environmental Compliance EX^. Oak Ridge ~t 4-3643 BACKGROUND The purpose of this Scoping Notice is to formalize the identification and evaluate the application of federal and state rulcs and regulations that apply to the cleanup of the B&T Metals site, located in Columbus, Ohio. This environmental compliance evaluation is based on

  9. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Velma Avenue Columbus, 0h.o 4321 1-2497 6141297-2300 Fax: 297-241 1 OH I 0 HISTORICAL SOCIETY SlSCE 1885 February 23, 1996 David G. Adler, Site Manager F o m r Sites Restoration Division Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office P.O. 80x 200T Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 -8723 Dear Mr. Adler: Re: 8 8 T Metal Building, Columbus, Ohio This is in response to your correspondence, received on February 22, 1996, regarding the project noted above. My staff has reviewed carefully the information

  10. United States Government Department of Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b) -- OH.26 1 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: >$ a REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at B&T Metals in Columbus, Ohio TO: L. Price, OR The B&T Metals facility, located at 425 West Town Street in Columbus, Ohio, is hereby designated for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from

  11. CX-007013: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Compression Ratio Turbocharged Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol EnhancementCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/21/2011Location(s): Columbus, IndianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office

  12. Commercialization of Medium Voltage HTS Triax TM Cable Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, David

    2012-12-31

    The original project scope that was established in 2007 aimed to install a 1,700 meter (1.1 mile) medium voltage HTS Triax{TM} cable system into the utility grid in New Orleans, LA. In 2010, however, the utility partner withdrew from the project, so the 1,700 meter cable installation was cancelled and the scope of work was reduced. The work then concentrated on the specific barriers to commercialization of HTS cable technology. The modified scope included long-length HTS cable design and testing, high voltage factory test development, optimized cooling system development, and HTS cable life-cycle analysis. In 2012, Southwire again analyzed the market for HTS cables and deemed the near term market acceptance to be low. The scope of work was further reduced to the completion of tasks already started and to testing of the existing HTS cable system in Columbus, OH. The work completed under the project included: Long-length cable modeling and analysis HTS wire evaluation and testing Cable testing for AC losses Optimized cooling system design Life cycle testing of the HTS cable in Columbus, OH Project management. The 200 meter long HTS Triax{TM} cable in Columbus, OH was incorporated into the project under the initial scope changes as a test bed for life cycle testing as well as the site for an optimized HTS cable cooling system. The Columbus cable utilizes the HTS TriaxTM design, so it provided an economical tool for these of the project tasks.

  13. CX-005566: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    State Energy Program American Recovery Reinvestment Act - Central Ohio BioEnergy Columbus - Compressed Natural Gas Fueling StationCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/05/2011Location(s): OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  14. CX-008243: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbus City American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - Downtown Bike Infrastructure Improvement CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.33, B5.1 Date: 05/02/2012 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-002291: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Southern Power (AEP) Ohio Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B5.1Date: 05/18/2010Location(s): Columbus, OhioOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects A National Effort to Introduce New Technology into the Power Delivery Infrastructure PDF icon High-Temperature Superconductivity Cable Demonstration Projects More Documents & Publications HTS Cable Projects Superconductivity Program Overview Columbus HTS Power Cable

  17. Deformation and Forming of Joined Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carsley, John; Hovanski, Yuri; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2014-09-23

    Introductory article to a set of invited papers from the TMS committee on shaping and forming. This paper introduces a set of papers that were prepared to discussing the deformation and forming of joined materials, and to announce an upcoming symposium at the 2015 MS&T meeting in Columbus Ohio.

  18. CX-003781: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Spark Ignited Engine Development for Combined Heat and Power ApplicationCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.2, B3.6, B5.1Date: 09/07/2010Location(s): Columbus, IndianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-008898: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Georgia-City-Columbus CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. Experimental development of a multi-solid fluidized bed reactor concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litt, R.D.; Paisley, M.A.; Tewksbury, T.L.

    1990-02-01

    Battelle's Columbus Division is developing a coal mild gasification process based upon the Multi-Solid Fluidized bed reactor system to produce high quality liquid and gaseous products. This process uses 2-stages to gasify coal at high throughputs to produce a range of products in compact reactors without requiring an oxygen plant. 8 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. INTEGRATED ELECTRIC DRIVE WITH HV2 MODULAR ELECTRIC MACHINE AND SIC BASED POWER CONVERTERS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio State University – Columbus, OH A high performance, high-speed drive capable of integrating into electric grids will be designed, tested and demonstrated. If successful, the proposed project will significantly advance transformer-less drive technologies for a range of industries and motor applications. Fact sheet coming soon.

  2. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  3. Microsoft Word - AMS Report v6.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ADVANCED MICROTURBINE SYSTEMS Final Report for Tasks 1 Through 4 and Task 6 T. Rosfjord, Program Manager W. Tredway, Deputy Program Manager A. Chen, J. Mulugeta, and T. Bhatia United Technologies Research Center East Hartford, CT 06118 March 26, 2007 Prepared for The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Distributed Energy Award No. DE-FC26-00CH11060 Report Number DOE/CH/11060-1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  5. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .-, EFZ. lor-%., United States Governmerit memorandum DATE: FEB 2 1 1991 MEPLY TO EM- 421 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: A u t h o r i t y Determination--8&T Metals i n Columbus, Ohio TO: The F i l e The attached review documents the basis f o r determining whether DOE has a u t h o r i t y f o r t a k i n g remedial a c t i o n a t the BaT Metals f a c i l i t y i n Columbus, Ohio, under the Formerly U t i 1 ized Sites Remedi a1 Action Program (FUSRAP). The B&T Hetals f a c i l i t y was used by the

  6. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    e ~ a r t m e n t of Energy Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge. Tennessee 37831- November 7, 1995 Dave To1 b e r t B&T Metals Company & B&T F l o o r Company P. 0 . Box 163520 Columbus, Ohio 43216-3520 Dear M r . To1 b e r t : REAL ESTATE LICENSE REORDOER-7-96-0103, B&T METALS COHPANY, COLUMBUS, OH Enclosed f o r your records i s a copy o f the f u l l y executed 1 icense between B&T Metals Company and the Department o f Energy. Is t h e separate l i c e n s e f o

  7. Using Graphite to view network data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphite to Visualize Network Data Jon Dugan <jdugan@es.net> Summer ESCC 2010, Columbus, OH Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science ESnet Statistics Overview ESxSNMP (Data Collection) ESxSNMP (Data Collection) Graphite (Visualization) Graphite (Visualization) Analytics (Custom Reports) Analytics (Custom Reports) Net Almanac (Metadata) Net Almanac (Metadata) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science What

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparison of Cloud Base Height at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site C.P. Kalb Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio and Oklahoma Weather Center National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Norman, Oklahoma A.R. Dean, R.A. Peppler, and K.L. Sonntag Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data Quality Office The University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is an interagency program

  9. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine improvement and efficiency gained by teamwork April 3, 2012 Car companies come calling to research and develop highly efficient, clean engines Cummins, Inc., is a U.S. corporation that designs, manufactures, distributes and services engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission control and electrical power generation systems. Headquartered in Columbus, Indiana, Cummins sells in approximately 190 countries - 2 - and territories

  10. Microsoft Word - 12-63201 PORTS 8th Rev Draft Comprehensive Summary May 2014 For Production Final

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 1 2015 Archaeology Reviews Manager Ohio History Connection State Historic Preservation Office 800 East 17th A venue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: PPP0-03-3175756-16 TRANSMITTAL OF THE COMPREHENSIVE SUMMARY REPORT OF CULTURAL RESOURCE SURVEYS AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT Enclosed for your information is the report "Comprehensive Summary Report of Cultural Resource Investigations Conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS Facility), Scioto and Seal

  11. fe0024357-osu | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources - Field Labs Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (USEEL) Last Reviewed 9/9/2015 DE-FE0024357 Goal The goal of this project is to develop and maintain a field research facility in the heart of the Utica Shale play that will provide a platform for environmental and geotechnical studies before, during, and after unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development. Performers The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia The Wilds,

  12. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exposition | Department of Energy Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Overview of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office presented by Sunita Satyapal at the 2013 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition in Columbus, Ohio. PDF icon DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Technologies Program - DOD-DOE Workshop: Shipboard APUs Overview DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell

  13. ESCC Evening Discussion: High Performance Data Transfer Eli Dart, Network Engineer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESCC Evening Discussion: High Performance Data Transfer Eli Dart, Network Engineer ESnet Network Engineering Group Summer ESCC/Joint Techs Columbus, OH July 14, 2010 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science High Performance Data Transfer * This is a broad topic with several components * Last discussion - perfSONAR * Tonight's discussion - possible next steps to increase the performance achieved by scientists in their use of the network - What is

  14. ESCC Performance Discussion - July 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PerfSONAR Update Joe Metzger, Network Engineer ESnet Network Engineering Group Summer ESCC Columbus, OH July 15, 2010 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science perfSONAR Workshop Summary * 4 Topics addressed * Community building * Expanding perfSONAR technology * Research uses * Operations & deployment * Results * Very optimistic schedule: final report due in 2 months * Working documents are on-line with links on the workshop agenda 7/19/2010 2

  15. ESnet Defined: Challenges and Overview Department of Energy Lehman Review of ESnet February 21-23, 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Circuits Landscape Summer 2010 ESCC Meeting Columbus, OH Evangelos Chaniotakis, ESnet Network Engineer Lawrence Berkeley National Lab 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Context and Goals * Guaranteed bandwidth services are maturing. * The installed footprint is expanding at a good pace. * More and more places are deploying these services and managing them via network automation tools ESnet wants to help the sites: * Understand not only SDN but

  16. ESxSNMP: ESnet eXtensible SNMP System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESxSNMP: ESnet eXtensible SNMP System Jon Dugan <jdugan@es.net> Summer JointTechs 2010, Columbus, OH Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science ESnet Statistics Overview ESxSNMP (Data Collection) Graphite (Visualization) Analytics (Custom Reports) Net Almanac (Metadata) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Why another SNMP collection system? Desire to retain raw, unmolested data * Disk is cheap * At

  17. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SEP 0 6 201 3 David Snyder, Ph.D. Archaeology Reviews Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office 1982 Velma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: PPPO-03-1934422-13 TRANSMITTAL OF THE PHASE I CULTUTRAL RESOURCE INVESTIGATION OF SELECTED HISTORICAL SITES AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, SCIOTO AND SEAL TOWNSHIPS, PIKE COUNTY, OHIO Enclosed for your information is the Phase I Cultural Resource Investigation of Selected Historical Sites at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  18. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MAR 1 9 2014 David Snyder, Ph.D. Archaeological Reviews Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office 1982 Velma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: PPPO-03 -2170825-14 TRANSMITTAL OF THE SUMMARY REPORT OF HISTORIC-ERA ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES WITHIN THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, PIKE COUNTY, OHIO (RSI/PORTS-228) Enclosed for your information is the report "Summary Report of Historic-Era Archaeological Resources within the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Pike County,

  19. SREL Reprint #3222

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Carrion cycling in food webs: comparisons among terrestrial and marine ecosystems James C. Beasley1, Z. H. Olson1, and T. L. DeVault2 1Dept of Forestry and Natural Resources, 195 Marstellar Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA 2US Dept of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, Ohio Field Station, 6100 Columbus Avenue, Sandusky, OH 44870, USA Abstract: In light of current global changes to ecosystem

  20. Obama Administration Announces New Funding for Biomass Research and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development Initiative | Department of Energy New Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative Obama Administration Announces New Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative March 22, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the Administration's all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced up to $35 million over three years to support research and development in

  1. Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Production Sites in Ohio | Department of Energy Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio January 19, 2007 - 9:59am Addthis Over 1,100 Acres in Fernald, Columbus and Ashtabula Restored CROSBY TOWNSHIP, OH - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today certified that environmental cleanup is complete at three former weapons

  2. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    042007 Mr. James Bearzi, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bldg. 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6313 Subject: Request for Evaluation of an AK Sufficiency Determination for SR-Rl- BClDP.001 Dear Mr. Bearzi: We are submitting for your evaluation, a provisional approval of an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) Sufficiency Determination Request for Battelle Columbus laboratory (BCl) waste stream SR-Rl-BClDP.001. In accordance with the Waste

  3. AMCHITICA ISLAND, ALASKA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Environment o f AMCHITICA ISLAND, ALASKA hlelvin L. hlerritt Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Editors R. Glen Fuller Battelle Colu~nbus Laboratories Columbus, Ohio Prepared for Division of Military Application Energy Research and Development Administration Published by Technical Infor~nation Center Energy Research and Development Administration Library of Congress Cataloging in Pt~blication Data hlain entry under title: The Environment of Amchitka Island, Alaska "TlD-26712."

  4. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Highlights Applications open next week for the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics. Katherine Myers, George Washington University, won the 2012 Jefferson Science Associates Thesis Prize Look at this video from "Project Lead The Way" by students from Hilliard Davidson High School in Columbus, OH Bias Persists for Women of Science, a Study Finds Girls in STEM: A New Generation of Women and Science Millennials struggle with confrontation at work image Diversity Statement

  5. Clean Fleet Final Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    1 S u m m a r y December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the

  6. Federal Express CleanFleet Final Report Volume 4: Fuel Economy

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    4 F u e l E c o n o m y December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle,

  7. Federal Express CleanFleet Final Report Volume 8: Fleet Economics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    8 F l e e t E c o n o m i c s FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments.

  8. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass Final Report Work Performed Under: Contract No.: DE-F-G02-00ER86106 For: U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown, WV By David Ramey Environmental Energy Inc. 1253 N. Waggoner Road P.O. Box 15 Blacklick, Ohio 43004 And Shang-Tian Yang Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The Ohio State University 140 West 19 th Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43210 - 2004 - Table of Contents Page Proposal Face Page

  9. V O L U M E

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    7 V e h i c l e E m i s s i o n s FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because

  10. GridLAB-D/SG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-08-30

    GridLAB-D is a new power system simulation tool that provides valuable information to users who design and operate electric power transmission and distribution systems, and to utilities that wish to take advantage of the latest smart grid technology. This special release of GridLAB-D was developed to study the proposed Smart Grid technology that is used by Battelle Memorial Institute in the AEP gridSMART demonstration project in Northeast Columbus, Ohio.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohio State University Metallurgical

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Engineering Experiment Station -OH 0-05 Ohio State University Metallurgical Engineering Experiment Station -OH 0-05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION (OH.0-05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Columbus , Ohio OH.0-05-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 OH.0-05-2 Site Operations: Ohio State ordered 130 grams of uranium from the AEC. This commercial

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    026 Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - 026 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (026 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is located in south central Ohio, approximately 20 miles north of Portsmouth, Ohio and 70 miles south of Columbus, Ohio.

  13. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Holiday Release Schedule The prices are published around 5:00 p.m. Monday (Eastern time), except on government holidays, when the data are released on Tuesday (but still represent Monday's price). Data for: Alternate Release Date Release Day Holiday October 12, 2015 October 13, 2015 Tuesday Columbus January 18, 2016 January 19, 2016 Tuesday Martin Luther King Jr. February 15, 2016 February 16, 2016 Tuesday President's May 30, 2016 May 31, 2016 Tuesday Memorial July 4, 2016 July 5, 2016 Tuesday

  14. V-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 V e h i c l e E m i s s i o n s FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because

  15. Project Financing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202 \ 586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical

  16. QER- Comment of Rachel Branch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 20, 2014 I hereby respectfully request that the Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force on the Infrastructure Constraints in New England oppose any new development or building of any more fossil fuel infrastructure and only allow the repair of existing infrastructure that is absolutely necessary as we transition to sustainable, renewable sources. Further, I respectfully request that any and all subsidies, tax incentives and/or tax exemptions hereinafter be appropriated and/or directed only to sustainable, renewable sources, i. e., solar, wind, and hydro energy, and development of electrical storage capacities for those sustainable and renewable sources. I further request that any funds spent to push for fossil fuel infrastructure be transparent to the general public. As you are holding meetings in Providence and Hartford, when will your meeting in Massachusetts be scheduled so that Commonwealth of Massachusetts residents can participate? Respectfully submitted, Rachel I. Branch

  17. Thermal performance of a scramjet combustor operating at Mach 5.6 flight conditions. Final report, May 1996--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stouffer, S.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Emmer, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the experimental data and the procedures used in acquiring and reducing the thermal loads data during tests of a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC). This research effort is part of the UTRC effort to develop dual-mode scramjet combustor technology to support the development of Mach S missile technology. The objective of the thermal loads testing was to map the thermal and mechanical loads, including heat transfer, dynamic and static pressures, and skin friction in a scramjet combustor during direct-connect scramjet tests. The tests were conducted at the UTRC Ramject/Scramjet direct-connect combustor test facility in East Hartford, CT.

  18. WIPP Stakeholder Information Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 WIPP Stakeholder Information Documents Closure of Underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit Submittal of Final Audit Reports Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-14 of the AMWTP dated September 27, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report A-07-03 of the ANL-CCP dated September 18, 2007 Final Audit Report A-07-24 of the SRS-CCP Battelle Columbus RH Waste dated September 6, 2007 Transmittal of the Certification Audit Report for the Hanford Site, Audit A-07-10 dated

  19. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics 1 10 East 40 th Street, Suite 3601, New York, NY 10016 Tel: +1.212.532.1158 | Fax: +1.212.532.1162 | Web: www.rhgroup.net Address: 5 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019 | Tel: +1.212.532.1158 | Fax: +1.212.532.1162 | Web: www.rhg.com Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics Trevor Houser Partner, Rhodium Group tghouser@rhg,com EIA | June 18, 2013 EIA | Making Sense of Chinese Energy Statistics 2 Why Good Chinese Energy Statistics Matter for Energy

  20. rzq8042.tmp

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6*456 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY REGION 5 77 WEST JACKSON BOUtEVARD CHICAGO,IL 60604-3590 Illl!8l03,;L1 REPLY TO THE ATTENTION OF: Ray Miskelley Office of the Chief Counsel u. S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Frances Kovak Legal Section Ohio EPA 1800 Watermark Drive Columbus, Ohio 43216 SRF-SJ Subject: Administrative Consent Order, In the Matter of United States Department of Energy: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, OH7 890 008 983 Dear

  1. Obama Administration Announces $3.2 Billion in Funding for Local Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightweight Materials for Advanced Vehicles | Department of Energy 14.2 Million in New Funding to Develop Lightweight Materials for Advanced Vehicles Obama Administration Announces $14.2 Million in New Funding to Develop Lightweight Materials for Advanced Vehicles March 22, 2012 - 2:01pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced a new $14.2 million effort at

  2. Obama Administration Announces Loan Guarantees to Construct New Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy 450 Million to Design and Commercialize U.S. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Obama Administration Announces $450 Million to Design and Commercialize U.S. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors March 22, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced new funding to advance the development of

  3. 2B-05.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen (Eds.), Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds -2004. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds (Monterey, CA; May 2004). ISBN 1-57477-145-0, published by Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, www.battelle.org/bookstore. STEAM AND ET-DSP COMBINED FOR DNAPL REMEDIATION: FULL-SCALE SITE RESTORATION AT YOUNG-RAINEY STAR CENTER ABSTRACT: In March of 2003, the United States Department of

  4. Obama Administration Announces $14.2 Million in New Funding to Develop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweight Materials for Advanced Vehicles | Department of Energy 14.2 Million in New Funding to Develop Lightweight Materials for Advanced Vehicles Obama Administration Announces $14.2 Million in New Funding to Develop Lightweight Materials for Advanced Vehicles March 22, 2012 - 2:01pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced a new $14.2 million effort at

  5. Obama Administration Announces $450 Million to Design and Commercialize

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy 450 Million to Design and Commercialize U.S. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors Obama Administration Announces $450 Million to Design and Commercialize U.S. Small Modular Nuclear Reactors March 22, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis COLUMBUS, Ohio - Today, as President Obama went to Ohio State University to discuss the all-out, all-of-the-above strategy for American energy, the White House announced new funding to advance the development of

  6. Image

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Snyder, Ph.D. Ohio Historic Preservation Office Archaeology Reviews Manager Resource Protection and Review 1982 Velma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office 1017 Majestic Drive, Suite 200 Lexington, Kentucky 40513 (859) 219-4000 NOV 2 2 20Ut PPPO-03-1025228-11 PHASE II SITE EVALUATIONS OF 33PK212 AND 33PK213 FOR THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION FACILITY, SEAL TOWNSHIP, PIKE COUNTY, OHIO The purpose of this letter is to provide the

  7. EERE Success Story-California and New Mexico: Sapphire Energy Advances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Commercialization of Algae Crude Oil | Department of Energy New Mexico: Sapphire Energy Advances the Commercialization of Algae Crude Oil EERE Success Story-California and New Mexico: Sapphire Energy Advances the Commercialization of Algae Crude Oil January 31, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Sapphire Energy, Inc.-one of the world's leaders in algae-based green crude oil production-has made significant advances toward commercializing algae crude oil at its Columbus, New Mexico, algae-to-crude oil

  8. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

  9. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    'JUN 2 0 2013 David Snyder, Ph.D. Archaeology Reviews Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office 1982 Velma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: PPPO-03-1927531-13 TRANSMITTAL OF THE PHASE I ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF SITES 33PK322, 33PK323, AND 33PK324 AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DU'FUSION PLANT, PIKE COUNTY, OHIO AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS Enclosed for your information is the Phase I Archaeological Survey o/Sites 33PK322, 33PK323, and 33PK324 at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS),

  10. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09284 Univ. of Louisiana-Laf Lafayette, LA Battelle: Columbus, OH. Battelle is the subrecipient of the University of Louisiana, who is the prime Recipient of the project. This CX is for the work that Battelle is responsible for. FE/TDIC/Coal/Carbon Storage Team Brian Dressel Statistical Analysis of CO2 Exposed Wells to Predict Long Term Leakage Evaluate and model data collected from others. No field activities are associated with the work that Battelle is involved with. Task 7.3,8,9 and 10 Brian

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 02.11.2010_Smart Grid Conference.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPL Project Summary Prepared by Bruce Renz, Smart Grid Implement Strategy Team February 11, 2010 Smart Grid and Overhead Reliability Conference - Columbus, OH Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-AC26-04NT41817 This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

  12. Clean Fleet Final Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    2 P r o j e c t D e s i g n a n d I m p l e m e n t a t i o n FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or

  13. Clean Fleet Final Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    3 V e h i c l e M a i n t e n a n c e a n d D u r a b i l i t y FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the

  14. Dr. David Snyder

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 4 2013 Archaeology Reviews Manager Ohio Historic Preservation Office 1982 Velma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211 Dear Dr. Snyder: PPPO-03-2088012-14 TRANSMITTAL OF A REPORT ON PREHISTORIC ARCHAEOLOGICAL COMPONENTS IDENTIFIED AT HISTORIC-ERA SITES AT THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT Enclosed for your information is the report titled "Pre-Historic Archaeological Components Identified at Six Historic-Era Farmstead Sites (33Pk185, 33Pk203, 33Pk206, 33Pk 211, 33Pk217 and 33Pk218) Within the

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Case School of Applied Science Ohio

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    State University - OH 0-01 Case School of Applied Science Ohio State University - OH 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Case School of Applied Science, Ohio State University (OH.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Columbus , Ohio OH.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 OH.0-01-1 Site Operations: Research and Development involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. OH.0-01-3 Site

  16. Natural gas cofiring in a refuse derived fuel incinerator: Results of a field evaluation. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshai, R.Z.; Hong, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    An evaluation of emissions reduction and improved operation of a municipal solid waste incinerator through natural gas cofiring is presented. A natural gas cofiring system was retrofitted on a refuse derived fuel combustor of the Columbis Solid Waste Reduction Facility in Columbus, Ohio. The field evaluation, conducted between July 6 and August 5, 1992, showed significant improvements in emissions and boiler operations. Carbon monoxide emissions were reduced from the baseline operations range of 530 to 1,950 parts per million to less than 50 ppm. Emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans were also reduced.

  17. I'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Washi,ngton, DC 20585 &B 1 7' i995 ' . ,~ : ' , I' > :~ i ; _' The Honorable Greg Lashutka 90 West Broad Street ._' Columbus, Ohio .43215 .f ~, " 1 ', ..,, Dear Mayor Lashutka: ', : ,, . ! . i Secretary ,of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a~ new',approach' to'openness in' the Department,of Energy. (DOE) and i,ts communications with the public. In. support of this initiative, we are,pleased to forward the~enclosed information related to the formerOhio State lJniv,er,sity site in

  18. Environmental characterization studies of a high-throughput wood gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.; Niemann, R.C.; Wilzbach, K.E.; Paisley, M.

    1983-01-01

    Potential environmental effects associated with thermochemical biomass gasification have been studied by Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL). A series of samples from the process research unit of an indirectly heated, high-throughput wood gasifier operated by BCL has been analyzed for potentially toxic organic compounds and trace elements. The results indicate that, under the test-run conditions, the gasification of both pine and hardwood is accompanied by the formation of some oil, the heavier fraction of which gives a positive response in the Ames assay for mutagenicity and contains numerous phenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, including some carcinogens. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  19. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Holiday Release Schedule for This Week In Petroleum The standard release time and day of the week will be after 1:00 p. m. (Eastern time) on Wednesdays with the following exceptions. Data for the week ending Alternate Release Date Release Day Release Time Holiday October 9, 2015 October 15, 2015 Thursday after 1:00 p.m. Columbus November 6, 2015 November 12, 2015 Thursday after 1:00 p.m. Veterans January 15, 2016 January 21, 2016 Thursday after 1:00 p.m. Martin Luther King Jr. February 12, 2016

  20. Geomorphology K

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Geomorphology K . R. Everett Institute of Polar Studies and Department of Agronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Amchitkn Island is composed of six distinct geomorphic regions. The major elements of each region are strongly controlled by ~ e o l o g i c structure and to n lesser degree b y rock type. The eastern three regions are characterized b y pond-dotted uplaitds of low eleuatiolt. These aresurrounded b y areas of one or more elevated ? i ~ a r i l ~ e terraces. Struc- turally

  1. OAK RIDGE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    or _^ *ORNL/RASA-89/1 I : OAK RIDGE _NATIONAL LABORATORY |*H~~~~~ -~~Results of the I'I-------_____ ~ Preliminary Radiological * "~ i, .irri uSurvey at B&T Metals, _" 425 West Town Street, i * !' V Columbus, Ohio (C0001) I i. U Wo. 0aa-. r m ~~~~~~~~~ if? _ ~ W. D. Cottrell J. L Quillen J. W. Crutcher , I OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNL/RASA-89/1 3*1~~ ~HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Waste Management Research and

  2. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Verification Survey at B&T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio M. E. Murray V. P. Patania C. A. Johnson This report h s ken rcpmduccd directly from the t f s i avail3ble copy. Avaihble to DOE and DOE c o n m u x s from the Olficc of Scienlific and Technical inlormaliar. P.O. Boa 6 1 . W Ridsee. l X 378331: priccsav&lable from (6t5) 576-8101, TTS 6268401. A v ~ i t b I e t o h e public lmm the Naliorul Technical Inlormalion Service. U.S. Dcpvtmenl 01 Commcrcc. 5285 Pon Royal Rd..

  3. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-044 Idaho EC B3-6.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10-2008 CONCLUDING MATERIAL Review Activity: Preparing Activity: DOE Operations Offices Field Offices DOE-HS-11 NA NNSA Service Center HS CH OH Project Number: EM ID GFO FSC 6910-0069 NE NV SC OR RL OAK SR RP National Laboratories Area Offices BNL Pantex Site Office LLNL Ashtabula Area Office LANL Carlsbad Area Office PNNL Columbus Area Office Sandia Fernald Area Office FNL Los Alamos Area Office West Valley Area Office Kirtland Area Office Pinellas Area Office Kansas City Area Office Miamisburg

  4. Aspen Process Flowsheet Simulation Model of a Battelle Biomass-Based Gasification, Fischer-Tropsch Liquefaction and Combined-Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-30

    This study was done to support the research and development program of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels using current state-of-the-art technology. The Mitretek study investigated the use of two biomass gasifiers; the RENUGAS gasifier being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology, and the indirectly heated gasifier being developed by Battelle Columbus. The Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio indirectly heated biomass gasifier was selected for this model development because the syngas produced by it is better suited for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with an iron-based catalyst for which a large amount of experimental data are available. Bechtel with Amoco as a subcontractor developed a conceptual baseline design and several alternative designs for indirect coal liquefaction facilities. In addition, ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation models were developed for each of designs. These models were used to perform several parametric studies to investigate various alternatives for improving the economics of indirect coal liquefaction.

  5. Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2014-09-12

    Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

  6. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  7. Technical status of the Dish/Stirling Joint Venture Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bean, J.R.; Diver, R.B.

    1995-06-01

    Initiated in 1991; the Dish/Stirling Joint Venture Program (DSJVP) is a 5-year, $17.2 million joint venture which is funded by Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) of Columbus, Indiana and the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Solar Thermal and Biomass Power Division. Sandia National Laboratories administers and provides technical management for this contract on the DOE`s behalf. In January, 1995; CPG advanced to Phase 3 of this three-phase contract. The objective of the DSJVP is to develop and commercialize a 7-kW. Dish/Stirling System for remote power markets by 1997. In this paper, the technical status of the major subsystems which comprise the CPG 7-kW{sub e} Dish/Stirling System is presented. These subsystems include the solar concentrator, heat pipe receiver, engine/alternator, power conditioning, and automatic controls.

  8. Rupture of Model 48Y UF/sub 6/ cylinder and release of uranium hexafluoride. Cylinder overfill, March 12-13, 1986. Investigation of a failed UF/sub 6/ shipping container. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    NUREG-1179, Volume 1, reported on the rupture of a Model 48Y uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) cylinder and the subsequent release of UF/sub 6/. At the time of publication, a detailed metallurgical examination of the damaged cylinder was under way and results were not available. Subsequent to the publication of Volume 1, a second incident occurred at the Sequoyah Fuels Corporation facility. On March 13, 1986, a Model 48X cylinder was overfilled during a special one-time draining procedure; however, no release of UF/sub 6/ occurred. An Augmented Investigation Team investigated this second incident. This report, NUREG-1179, Volume 2, presents the findings made by the Augmented Investigation Team of the March 13 incident and the report of the detailed metallurgical examination conducted by Battelle Columbus Division of the cylinder damaged on January 4, 1986.

  9. Next Generation Luminaire (NGL) Downlight Demonstration Project: St. Anthony's Hospital

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. DOE conducts demonstration projects documenting the performance of LED luminaires relative to conventional technologies to increase market adoption of energy-efficient LED systems and to stimulate ongoing product development. These demonstration projects evaluate various aspects of lighting design, purchase, installation, and operation, and they assess the impacts LED technology might have on building owners and users.The prior reports featured NGL-recognized LED downlight luminaires in projects that were either new construction (Hilton Columbus Downtown) or a major renovation (Alston & Bird, LLC). But purchasing and installing new luminaires is not always feasible for existing buildings. For this report, the DOE evaluated the use of LED replacement lamps in the existing CFL downlights at St. Anthony Hospital in Gig Harbor, WA.

  10. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Golder Associates draft test plan for in situ testing in an exploratory shaft in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hambley, D.F.; Mraz, D.Z.; Unterberter, R.R.; Stormont, J.C.; Neuman, S.P.; Russell, J.E.; Jacoby, C.H.; Hull, A.B.; Brady, B.H.G.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents the peer review conducted by Argonne National Laboratory of a document entitled ''Draft Test Plan for In Situ Testing in an Exploratory Shaft in Salt,'' prepared for Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation by Golder Associates, Inc. In general, the peer review panelists found the test plan to be technically sound, although some deficiencies were identified. Recommendations for improving the test plan are presented in this review report. A microfiche copy of the following unpublished report is attached to the inside back cover of this report: ''Draft Test Plan for In Situ Testing in an Exploratory Shaft in Salt,'' prepared by Golder Associates, Inc., for Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio (March 1985).

  11. UI,!JTYT) CTaTT:$ A'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .w. q7 -3 UI,!JTYT) CTaTT:$ A' =O:iI c E' XI:' ;' r' CO1 1-1 S?IO" New Ynrl: Operations Office 70 Columbus iivenue xew Yor'k '?5, 3. Y. I;JFOi< ~,4?' 101? F(:i{ Ti!T; DRESS P)R j:g&isZ No. 17, fi?HIL 2, i-31r:j T:?l3i",TlAY r. I.:. Tel. No. Plaza r[-3600, Ext. 2rjj Aridi l!.L, lg.l3 The United States Atomic Energy Commission has oomploted arrangements with the Federal 'urorlrs Agency for tne use of ths Magnesium Keduction Plant (Pluncor 649) at Luckey, Ohio, for the production

  12. I I LI I L I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LI - I L I 1 II C c - ORNL/RASA-9618 OAK RlDGE NATlONAl. LA8ORATORY Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey at B&T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio (cooolv) M . E. Murray V. P. Patania C. A. Johnson M N M E D *wD OPEbM~ B V WUCNEEDllW?ME IWiARCH CoRpoRAng FoRTHEwITf@%tATeB ltEpAAMwTmBMeR(Ly ORNL-27 (34el ~~- L._~ This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Avaiiable to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and

  13. Learning Scene Categories from High Resolution Satellite Image for Aerial Video Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic scene categorization can benefit various aerial video processing applications. This paper addresses the problem of predicting the scene category from aerial video frames using a prior model learned from satellite imagery. We show that local and global features in the form of line statistics and 2-D power spectrum parameters respectively can characterize the aerial scene well. The line feature statistics and spatial frequency parameters are useful cues to distinguish between different urban scene categories. We learn the scene prediction model from highresolution satellite imagery to test the model on the Columbus Surrogate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CSUAV) dataset ollected by high-altitude wide area UAV sensor platform. e compare the proposed features with the popular Scale nvariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. Our experimental results show that proposed approach outperforms te SIFT model when the training and testing are conducted n disparate data sources.

  14. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    / m - 1 2 0 6 7 4 Department of Energy Oak Ridge *rations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8723 September 19, 1994 Hr. Saul Gleiser Ohio H i s t o r i c a l Society H i s t o r i c Preservation D i v i s i o n 1982 Yelma Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43211-2497 Dear Mr. Gleiser: ASSOCIATE AIRCRAFT SITE - NHPA (SECTION 106) DETERHINATION I n accordance w i t h Section 106 o f the National H i s t o r i c Preservation Act (NHPA), the Department o f Energy (WE) has determined t h a t the proposed

  15. Implementing comprehensive de-licensing process for the West Jefferson North Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Keith

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Implementation of the comprehensive de-licensing process for the West Jefferson North (WJN) facility was documented through the Final Certification of Completion. The Final Certification of Completion summarizes the performance and results of the final status surveys of the affected and unaffected areas of the West Jefferson North (WJN) site as part of the completion of the Columbus Closure Project (CCP). Final status survey processes adhered to the requirements of the 'Radiological Characterization and Final Status Plan for Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project, West Jefferson Site' DD-97-02, Rev. 0 (hereinafter DD-97-02), as reflecting the requirements of draft NUREG 5849. Surveys were performed throughout the decommissioning and remediation activities performed at the WJN and documented in Final Status Survey Reports (FSSR). Throughout the project, the CCP activity engaged the oversight of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI), and the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). The ESSAP of the ORISE fulfilled the Independent Verification Contractor (IVC) role for the CCP under contract to the Oak Ridge Office of the DOE. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also performed independent review of the in-process final status surveys. The FSSR, in conjunction with the IVC Letter Reports and the NRC inspection reports, document that the endpoint criteria objectives of the NRC-approved Decommissioning Plan have been met for WJN site as covered by the CCP. (author)

  16. Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

  17. Educating the public about America`s fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H. [C.E.E.D., Northfield, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Today we would like to take a few moments of your time to talk about America`s fuel-coal, and a new organization created to educate decision makers, the public and educators. The Center for Energy & Economics Development (CEED) began as a concept in late 1992, and began operations with the creation of the Southern Region in March of 1993. Discussions began among several railroad CEO`s who were concerned that their major revenue commodity - coal - was experiencing serious problems due to public opposition and governmental restrictions. Conversations with their counterparts in the coal industry resulted in an agreement to forget parochial and often conflicting interests in Washington, and pursue the development of an overall grassroots joint-effort to protect the coal option. Those of you familiar with the history of conflict between these two industries recognize that this was a major step, and one that has led to an exciting new initiative. The coal/rail discussions examined a variety of approaches that the coalition might follow. Rather than jumping off into unchartered waters, or retraveling old roads, the group decided to first find out what was known and unknown about coal and energy. A Washington public relations firm, and a well known polling organization began the process in December of 1992 with a comprehensive opinion research program that would allow us to understand attitudes and opinions about energy and economic development, specifically coal and related issues. We reviewed the public-opinion history of coal beginning with the first national survey conducted in 1944, and then held a series of qualitative focus discussions in Tampa, Hartford, Denver and Indianapolis. In each city there was a discussion between business leaders and environmental activists, and one with the general public. In January of 1993, the focus groups were followed by a quantitative assessment of national opinion measuring trends, collecting demographic and geographic differences.

  18. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R.

    1986-01-23

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  19. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasseter, R. H.; Eto, J. H.; Schenkman, B.; Stevens, J.; Volkmmer, H.; Klapp, D.; Linton, E.; Hurtado, H.; Roy, J.

    2010-06-08

    CERTS Microgrid concept captures the emerging potential of distributed generation using a system approach. CERTS views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a 'microgrid'. The sources can operate in parallel to the grid or can operate in island, providing UPS services. The system can disconnect from the utility during large events (i.e. faults, voltage collapses), but may also intentionally disconnect when the quality of power from the grid falls below certain standards. CERTS Microgrid concepts were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resynchronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults.

  20. Multiscale Toxicology - Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrall, Brian D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2012-09-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle, Columbus), to initiate a collaborative research program across multiple Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories aimed at developing a suite of new capabilities for predictive toxicology. Predicting the potential toxicity of emerging classes of engineered nanomaterials was chosen as one of two focusing problems for this program. PNNLs focus toward this broader goal was to refine and apply experimental and computational tools needed to provide quantitative understanding of nanoparticle dosimetry for in vitro cell culture systems, which is necessary for comparative risk estimates for different nanomaterials or biological systems. Research conducted using lung epithelial and macrophage cell models successfully adapted magnetic particle detection and fluorescent microscopy technologies to quantify uptake of various forms of engineered nanoparticles, and provided experimental constraints and test datasets for benchmark comparison against results obtained using an in vitro computational dosimetry model, termed the ISSD model. The experimental and computational approaches developed were used to demonstrate how cell dosimetry is applied to aid in interpretation of genomic studies of nanoparticle-mediated biological responses in model cell culture systems. The combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a highly quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their physical form in a controlled manner.

  1. Driving toward excellence in transportation and logistics operations and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, D.

    2007-07-01

    DoE's EM is the largest cleanup project in the world: 114 sites, 31 states, 2,000,000 acres. EM scope includes remediation, processing and transportation of approximately: 25 tons of plutonium, 108 tons of plutonium residues, 88 million gallons of radioactive liquid waste, 2,500 tons of spent nuclear fuel, 137,000 cubic meters of transuranic waste, 1.3 million cubic meters of low-level waste. This series of slides presents: the Rocky Flats Status, the Fernald Closure Project, the Mound/Miamisburg and Battelle Columbus statuses, the DUF{sub 6} (Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride) Conversion Project Overview, Conversion and Transport Logistics; DoE's EM Measures of Success and performance (transportation incident criteria); the application of technology to Enhance Motor Carrier Performance, Safety, and Emergency Preparedness (technological capabilities for DOE to improve driver performance, shipment safety, and emergency response); the Motor Carrier Tracking and Alert system; DOE Load Securement Field Guide and Checklist developed to ensure all shipments are secured prior to shipment; The transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) and outreach support; the EM Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response (TransCAER); and the Commodity Flow Survey data of Tennessee, Flagstaff, and Texas/Louisiana.

  2. Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

  3. Immersion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1991-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of exposure studies performed on two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated Tuff Repository conditions. Testing was performed at 90{degrees}C in three environments; simulated J-13 well water, and two environments that simulated the chemical effects resulting from boiling and irradiation of the groundwater. Creviced specimens and U-bends were exposed to liquid, to vapor above the condensed phase, and to alternate immersion. A rod specimen was used to monitor corrosion at the vapor-liquid interface. The specimens were evaluated by electrochemical, gravimetric, and metallographic techniques following approximately 2000 hours of exposure. Results of the exposure tests indicated that all four alloys exhibited acceptable general corrosion rates in simulated J-13 well water. These rates decreased with time. Incipient pitting was observed under deposits on Alloy 825 and pitting was observed on both Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 715 in the simulated J-13 well water. No SCC was observed in U-bend specimens of any of the alloys in simulated J-13 well water. 33 refs., 48 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-08-27

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) release of 2002 SWC request-for-proposal, (2) organized and hosted the Spring SWC meeting in Columbus, Ohio for membership proposal presentations and review; (3) tentatively scheduled the 2002 fall technology transfer meeting sites, and (4) continued to recruit additional Consortium members. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  5. 56th and Walnut: A Philly Gut Rehab Development; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Load-bearing brick-masonry multifamily buildings are prevalent in urban areas across much of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic. In most instances, these buildings are un-insulated unless they have been renovated within the past two decades. Affordable housing capital budgets typically limit what can be spent and energy improvements often take a back seat to basic capital improvements such as interior finish upgrades and basic repairs. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) is researching cost effective solution packages for significant energy efficiency and indoor air-quality improvements in these urban buildings. To explore how these low-cost retrofits can effectively integrate energy efficiency upgrades, CARB partnered with Columbus Property Management and Development, Inc. on a community-scale gut rehabilitation project located at 56th Street and Walnut Street in Philadelphia, consisting of 32 units in eleven 3-story buildings. These buildings were built in the early 1900s using stone foundations and solid brick-masonry walls. They were renovated in the 1990s to have interior light gauge metal framing with R-13 batt in the above-grade walls, induced-draft furnaces, and central air conditioning.

  6. Assessment of the integrity of spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage demonstrations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Dobbins, J.C.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes the histories of 17 Zircaloy-clad spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage tests and demonstrations at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) and Climax facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 18th assembly was shipped to the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) and remained there for extensive characterization and as a source of specimens for whole-rod and rod-segment dry storage tests. The report traces the history of the assemblies after discharge from the Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized-water reactor (1975 and 1977) through shipment (first arrival at EMAD in December 1978), dry storage tests and demonstrations, and shipment by truck cask from EMAD to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in May/June 1986. The principal objectives of this report are to assess and document the integrity of the fuel during the extensive dry storage activities at NTS and BCL, and to briefly summarize the dry storage technologies and procedures demonstrated in this program. The dry storage tests and demonstrations involved the following concepts and facilities: (1) surface drywells (EMAD); (2) deep drywells (425 m underground in the Climax granite formation); (3) concrete silo (EMAD); (4) air-cooled vault (EMAD); (5) electrically-heated module for fuel assembly thermal calibration and testing (EMAD/FAITM). 20 refs., 43 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS), conducted June 22 through July 10, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the NTS. The Survey covers all environment media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations and activities performed at the NTS, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by the Battelle Columbus Division under contract with DOE. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the NTS Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the NTS Survey. 165 refs., 42 figs., 52 tabs.

  8. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  9. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  10. BCLDP site environmental report for calendar year 1997 on radiological and nonradiological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, J.

    1998-09-30

    Battelle Memorial Institute currently maintains its retired nuclear research facilities in a surveillance and maintenance (S and M) mode and continues decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities. The activities are referred to as the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). Operations reference in this report are performed in support of S and M and D and D activities. The majority of this report is devoted to discussion of the West Jefferson facility, because the source term at this facility is larger than the source term at Battelle`s King Avenue site. The contamination found at the King Avenue site consists of small amounts of residual radioactive material in solid form, which has become embedded or captured in nearby surfaces such as walls, floors, ceilings, drains, laboratory equipment, and soils. By the end of calendar year (CY) 1997, most remediation activities were completed at the King Avenue site. The contamination found at the West Jefferson site is the result of research and development activities with irradiated materials. During CY 1997, multiple tests at the West Jefferson Nuclear Sciences Area found no isotopes present above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for air releases or for liquid discharges to Big Darby Creek. Data obtained from downstream sampling locations were statistically indistinguishable from background levels.

  11. QER- Comment of Don Ogden

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force and Energy Policy Systems Analysis Staff: We are unable to attend today's public meeting in Hartford, CT. With only four working days advanced notice of this event we find it difficult to believe that any real effort has been made on your part to reach out to the public for their input. Be that as it may, we want to take this opportunity to comment on the very subject of this meeting. The only true energy related "Infrastructure constraints" we are aware of here in New England are those experienced by corporate entities who seek to export our precious resources to other nations for profit. This, of course, is not at all in the public's interest. Certainly you recall all the efforts our goverment put into establishing "Energy Independence"? That phrase has, and continues to be the watchword heard throughout our nation. Why now, when so-called "Energy Independence" has yet to be established, would we choose to enable private corporations to export gas and oil to other countries at our expense? Further, why is it that corporations and their supporters in government are not actively seeking to repair the massive and dangerous leaks in our existing pipelines? How can corporations and government agencies who reportedly oversee energy corporations even consider building new pipelines when the existing ones are in so need of repair? With this in mind, the only "constraints" we are aware of are the lack of constraints on energy corporations run amok, forever seeking more profits at the expense of the public good. Please recall your mission: "The mission of the Energy Department is to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions." Such security is only possible if we plan ahead for future generations in the midst of the Climate Crisis. Selling off our energy resources to other nations until they are depleted is not in keeping with that mission. Allowing existing energy infrastructure to leak methane and other elements into our compromised atmosphere is not in keeping with that mission. Let's have some of those "transformative solutions", let's put every effort into limiting gas & oil leaks and keeping our energy resources here at home. Don Ogden, producer/co-host The Enviro Show WXOJ-LP & WMCB

  12. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  13. QER- Comment of Stephen Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I attended the meeting yesterday in Hartford, Conn. I thank you for the opportunity to speak during the public comment period. I thanked the moderator, Fred Hanson, for bringing up the option of Conservation and Energy Efficiency to the last panel. The following are the comments I presented. I would first like to say that the Northeast does not have an energy supply problem. The problem that we have is a demand/supply issue. If the problem is only referred to as a supply problem then only supply solutions will be looked at. When we talk about meeting our energy needs, the conversation should start with: 1st Conservation 2nd Energy Efficiency …..and if we have a concern about Climate Change 3rd Renewables 4th Polluting technologies such as Fossil Fuels and Nuclear If we do not implement this list in the above order we will leave a very different climate and a planet that is difficult to live on for our children. I would next like to illustrate the power of Conservation, Energy Efficiency and Renewables. Two years ago my wife and I had the good fortune to be chosen to participate in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Program. Thank you to National Grid and the state of Massachusetts. By super insulating and air sealing our house, installing an air-source heat pump and a 2.4kW solar system, along with practicing conservation, our total energy bill for last year was $60, which equals 300 pounds of CO2 equivalent. This includes this past winter with its "polar vortex". Conservation, Efficiency and Renewables have been mentioned by a few of the presenters today. We need to bring Conservation, Efficiency and Renewables to center stage to solve our energy needs. Recommendations: 1. Institute to a greater extent "Peak Load Shaving". 2. Make it mandatory that all buildings that are built are Zero Net Energy or Zero Plus Energy. 3. Institute a more aggressive "Time of Use" Electric and Gas Metering System that Mr Reilly of the Vermont Electric Power Company mentioned earlier. 4. Put a severe Carbon Tax on all polluting Energy Producers. 5. Measure CO2 emissions for the complete cycle of extraction, transportation, storage and burning of all Energy options. 6. Remove all incentives and support for Energy Producers of Fossil Fuel and Nuclear. Thank you, Stephen Kurkoski

  14. Venezuela offshore oil and gas production development: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez La Salvia, H.; Schwartz, E.; Contreras, M.; Rodriguez, J.I.; Febres, G.; Gajardo, E.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a short history of offshore oil and gas production in Venezuela starting in Lake Maracaibo in 1923. The main emphasis has been the results of the recent R and D and the exploratory offshore programs in areas like Orinoco Delta located in the Atlantic Ocean, Northeast and Northwest Venezuela in the Caribbean sea. In the R and D offshore program the main objectives were: (1) To establish the local environmental, oceanographical, geotechnical and seismicity conditions for the Venezuelan Continental Platform. (2) To give a technical support to the PDVSA Operating Affiliates during the exploratory programs including: (a) to develop accurate drilling vessel positioning systems; (b) evaluation of sea bottom geotechnical conditions for safely operating the jack-ups and drilling vessels involved in the exploratory wells and (c) to identify those areas which because of their special nature require further investigation to establish preliminary type of platforms required for the areas to be developed or to evaluate other solutions proposed by Foreign Consultant Engineering Companies to the PDVSA Operating Affiliated Companies. The main objective of PDVSA for the coming future will be to develop the North of Paria Gas Field through the initially named Christopher Columbus Project now Sucre Gas, S.A., a consortium conformed by LaGoven, S.A. Shell, Exxon and Mitsubishi. objective of this paper is to give an idea of the history of the Venezuelan Oil and Gas Offshore development giving emphasis to the results of the INTEVEP S.A. Red offshore program and to show some results of the particular characteristics of oceanographical, environmental, geotechnical and seismic conditions in the main areas evaluated during the exploratory program: Orinoco Delta, Gulf of Paria and North of Paria.

  15. A Community-Based Approach to Leading the Nation in Smart Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2013-12-31

    Project Objectives The AEP Ohio gridSMART® Demonstration Project (Project) achieved the following objectives: • Built a secure, interoperable, and integrated smart grid infrastructure in northeast central Ohio that demonstrated the ability to maximize distribution system efficiency and reliability and consumer use of demand response programs that reduced energy consumption, peak demand, and fossil fuel emissions. • Actively attracted, educated, enlisted, and retained consumers in innovative business models that provided tools and information reducing consumption and peak demand. • Provided the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) information to evaluate technologies and preferred smart grid business models to be extended nationally. Project Description Ohio Power Company (the surviving company of a merger with Columbus Southern Power Company), doing business as AEP Ohio (AEP Ohio), took a community-based approach and incorporated a full suite of advanced smart grid technologies for 110,000 consumers in an area selected for its concentration and diversity of distribution infrastructure and consumers. It was organized and aligned around: • Technology, implementation, and operations • Consumer and stakeholder acceptance • Data management and benefit assessment Combined, these functional areas served as the foundation of the Project to integrate commercially available products, innovative technologies, and new consumer products and services within a secure two-way communication network between the utility and consumers. The Project included Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), Distribution Management System (DMS), Distribution Automation Circuit Reconfiguration (DACR), Volt VAR Optimization (VVO), and Consumer Programs (CP). These technologies were combined with two-way consumer communication and information sharing, demand response, dynamic pricing, and consumer products, such as plug-in electric vehicles and smart appliances. In addition, the Project incorporated comprehensive cyber security capabilities, interoperability, and a data assessment that, with grid simulation capabilities, made the demonstration results an adaptable, integrated solution for AEP Ohio and the nation.

  16. Status of the Advanced Stirling Conversion System Project for 25 kW dish Stirling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaltens, R.K.; Schreiber, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial Solar Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by Sandia as one of the most promising heat engines for terrestrial applications. The Stirling engine also has the potential to meet DOE's performance and cost goals. The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting technology development for Stirling convertors directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power requirements include high reliability with very long life, low vibration and high system efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. NASA Lewis is providing management of the Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) Project through an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with the DOE. Parallel contracts continue with both Cummins Engine Company (CEC), Columbus, Indiana, and Stirling Technology Company (STC), Richland, Washington for the designs of an ASCS. Each system'' design features a solar receiver/liquid metal heat transport system, and a free-piston Stirling convertor with a means to provide nominally 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's performance and long-term'' cost goals. The Cummins free- piston Stirling convertor incorporates a linear alternator to directly provide the electrical output, while the STC design generates electrical power indirectly through a hydraulic pump/motor coupled to an induction generator. Both the Cummins and STC ASCS designs will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the early 1990's. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Example process hazard analysis of a Department of Energy water chlorination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    On February 24, 1992, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a revised version of Section 29 Code of Federal Regulations CFR Part 1910 that added Section 1910.119, entitled ``Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (the PSM Rule). Because US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 5480.4 and 5483.1A prescribe OSHA 29 CFR 1910 as a standard in DOE, the PSM Rule is mandatory in the DOE complex. A major element in the PSM Rule is the process hazard analysis (PrHA), which is required for all chemical processes covered by the PSM Rule. The PrHA element of the PSM Rule requires the selection and application of appropriate hazard analysis methods to systematically identify hazards and potential accident scenarios associated with processes involving highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs). The analysis in this report is an example PrHA performed to meet the requirements of the PSM Rule. The PrHA method used in this example is the hazard and operability (HAZOP) study, and the process studied is the new Hanford 300-Area Water Treatment Facility chlorination process, which is currently in the design stage. The HAZOP study was conducted on May 18--21, 1993, by a team from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Battelle-Columbus, the DOE, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The chlorination process was chosen as the example process because it is common to many DOE sites, and because quantities of chlorine at those sites generally exceed the OSHA threshold quantities (TQs).

  18. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  19. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  20. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

    2008-07-25

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

  1. PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

    2006-01-23

    The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We plan to treat these wastes as transuranic waste (TRU) for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which will reduce the WTP system processing time by three years. We are also developing and testing bulk vitrification as a technology to supplement the WTP LAW vitrification facility for immobilizing the massive volume of LAW. We will conduct a full-scale demonstration of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System by immobilizing up to 1,100 m{sup 3} (300,000 gallons) of tank S-109 low-curie soluble waste from which Cs-137 had previously been removed. This past year has been marked by both progress and new challenges. The focus of our tank farm work has been retrieving waste from the old single-shell tanks (SSTs). We have completed waste retrieval from three SSTs and are conducting retrieval operations on an additional three SSTs. While most waste retrievals have gone about as expected, we have faced challenges with some recalcitrant tank heel wastes that required enhanced approaches. Those enhanced approaches ranged from oxalic acid additions to deploying a remote high-pressure water lance. As with all large, long-term projects that employ first of a kind technologies, we continue to be challenged to control costs and maintain schedule. However, it is most important to work safely and to provide facilities that will do the job they are intended to do.

  2. Effect of Component Failures on Economics of Distributed Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, Barry T.

    2012-02-02

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for both. Some societal benefits associated with financial benefits to the utility of having a distributed generation capacity that is not fossil-fuel based have been included into the economic models. Also included and quantified in the models are several benefits to society more generally: job creation and some estimates of benefits from avoiding greenhouse emissions. PV system failures result in a lowering of the economic values of a grid-connected system, but this turned out to be a surprisingly small effect on the overall economics. The most significant benefit noted resulted from including the societal benefits accrued to the utility. This provided a marked increase in the valuations of the array and made the overall value proposition a financially attractive one, in that net present values exceeded installation costs. These results indicate that the Department of Energy and state regulatory bodies should consider focusing on societal benefits that create economic value for the utility, confirm these quantitative values, and work to have them accepted by the utilities and reflected in the rate structures for power obtained from grid-connected arrays. Understanding and applying the economic benefits evident in this work can significantly improve the business case for grid-connected PV installations. This work also indicates that the societal benefits to the population are real and defensible, but not nearly as easy to justify in a business case as are the benefits that accrue directly to the utility.

  3. QER- Comment of Martha Tirk

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    I write as a concerned citizen from Ashfield, one of the rural western Massachusetts towns that would be affected by the proposed installation of a gas pipeline along the existing electrical power grid by Kinder Morgan/TGP. My property abuts easements for these high tension lines. My concerns are threefold: 1. The valuation of my property, and that of others affected by this proposed pipeline, would decrease substantially should this installation become a reality. This will negatively impact the tax basis and in aggregate, reduced tax revenues for our town will have a significant negative effect on schools, public safety, road maintenance and other services. 2. I question the ability to adequately insure my property in the event of this installation becoming a reality. The risks associated with the transport and storage of gas are frightening and real, particularly "fracked' gas with the additives - known and unknown - that become a part of its composition through the shale drilling process and through reactions with the steel pipe in which its carried. My insurance policy, a standard one, will not cover losses that could foreseeably be incurred as a result of leakage, explosion, fire, or other distinctly possible incidents along the pipeline route. 3. The salability of my property will be negatively impacted by this pipeline. In fact, the mere proposal has already had an affect. My immediate neighbor, an older woman who has been living in and maintaining an historic 200+ year old farm house for over 30 years, has recently lost the sale of her home as news of Kinder Morgan's intent has become widespread. We live in a small and rural town. Our quality of life is as precious to us as our natural and community resources - clean water, clean air, rich farmland, and neighbors who take the time to be educated about the impact of proposed large-scale energy generating and transmission projects because we care deeply about preserving all of it. I don't pretend to understand all of the science and nuance involved, but it's clear to me that safety and environmental risks, and the financial risks to our entire community, are significant. What's not clear is how any of us would benefit from the presence of this pipeline in our town and in our region. I am opposed to "fracking" in the first place, and concerned that the real problem is continued dependence on fossil fuels as opposed to renewable and clean energy. Apart from my concerns about "fracked" gas, I do not believe we need more fossil fuel infrastructure. What we do need is a public-private partnership that promotes sustainable, renewable energy sources and the development of storage capacity for electricity generated by those sources. I cannot attend either of your meetings tomorrow in Hartford or Providence but wanted to express my concerns. Thank you.

  4. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 20–21, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industry’s needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  5. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

    2009-06-18

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

  6. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a noticeable reaction layer. T-111 was found to have a small reaction layer at the interface with deposited Hastelloy X. Mar M-247 had a reaction layer larger than T-111. Hastelloy X joined well with a substrate of the same alloy, and throughout the experiments was found to have a density of {approx}99%, based on metallographic observations of porosity in the deposit. Of the three joining methods tested, inertial welding of bar stock appears to be the most mature at this time. MPW may be an attractive alternative due to the potential for high bond integrity, similar to that seen in explosion bonding. However, all three joining methods used in this work will require adaptation in order to join piping and tubing. Further investigations into the change in mechanical properties of these joints with time, temperature, irradiation, and the use of interlayers between the two materials must also be performed.

  7. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

  8. QER- Comment of Janice Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposal for Conservation Reward Rate for Electricity First of all, thank you for the time you are taking to hear from the public along with the industry and government officials in this critical matter. I attended the public hearing in Hartford CT two days ago and was able to comment on parts of what we are proposing here. We are writing to open a conversation with you about a proposal that we have been discussing in our past meetings. We would like to see you initiate legislation that would mandate a "stepped rate" for electricity, under which consumers who used less would pay a lower rate per kilowatt hour than those who used more. Background North Quabbin Energy is a community group from the nine North Quabbin towns in north central Massachusetts that focuses on education and local action relating to ways to conserve energy and support local and regional enterprises that reduce our dependence on imported resources. The towns are Athol, Orange, Petersham, Royalston, Warwick, Wendell, New Salem, Erving and Phillipston. Our members include representatives from the appointed Energy Committees of these towns. For the past six years, we have participated in many different types of events and activities, always with an emphasis on the idea that the single best way to address the high financial, social, and environmental costs of our current energy use patterns is to consume less energy in the first place. What we have discovered in our community work is that most people seem aware of the reasons for conserving energy (lowering greenhouse gas emissions, saving money, reducing dependence on oil and other imported resources, etc.). Many are also knowledgeable about the basic weatherization and conservation strategies that utilities, municipalities, and community groups like ours try to promote (for example, adding insulation to homes, turning thermostats down, or using fluorescent or LED lighting rather than incandescent bulbs). Yet except when energy prices are extraordinarily high, it appears that there is a great deal of inertia among the general public about actually making changes in their energy consumption patterns. This proposal would address that issue of inertia by creating a direct incentive program for using less electricity. People could very quickly and easily make changes that would lower their electric use, and would see immediate results on their electric bills. Comparable programs Many utilities are beginning to offer peak and off-peak metering as a way to equalize demand on the electric grid, but although this is useful in making people more aware of their energy use patterns, it does nothing to reduce overall demand and may actually encourage more wasteful consumption at off-peak times. A few utilities are starting to offer the kind of stepped rate or rewards program that we are proposing. For example, Western Massachusetts Electric Company recently inaugurated a program that awards "points" (redeemable for consumer items) for the numbers of kilowatt hours saved. In our opinion, this kind of program sends the wrong message because it encourages people to save in one area (electricity use) in order to consume in another. Examples of programs more in line with what we are proposing already exist. One is British Columbia Hydro's "Conservation Rate," started in April 2010. Under their Residential Conservation Rate, customers pay 7.52 cents per kWh for the first 1,350 kWh they use over an average two-month billing period. Above that amount, customers pay 11.27 cents per kWh for the balance of the electricity used during the billing period. In nearby Vermont, the Washington Electric Cooperative has had stepped or tiered rates for years. They reward residential users with a relatively very low rate of 9.43 cents per kWhr for the first 200 kWhrs, and then charge a significantly higher rate of 21.06 cents thereafter. As a result, their customers use on average about 11% less than the households in our area. Points for discussion What might be a reasonable target figure for the stepped rate? The current Massachusetts average is about 610 kWh/month. Members of North Quabbin Energy have demonstrated that it is quite possible to use a half or even a third of that amount without any decline in standard or quality of living1. In fact, this level of reduction is imperative given the seriousness of climate change and resource depletion. How could this change best be promoted to the public? We would argue that this is not a rate increase, but rather a rate redistribution that rewards lower energy consumption. It seems important to emphasize the positive rewards of this kind of change, rather than framing it as a penalty for higher use2. It also seems crucial to demonstrate from the outset that reducing a household's electric use can be done with surprising ease, given a greater awareness of how much energy waste can be avoided with a change in behavior. How could the concerns of low-income customers, those with large families, or those who heat exclusively with electricity be addressed? The BCHydro and Washington Electric Cooperative programs provide useful models for addressing these questions, and there is a great deal of regional data that shows how these consumers would by no means be penalized in the kind of pricing structure we are proposing. What programs could be funded with the increased revenues? Public outrage would be justified if the money went into the general coffers of the utility companies and fossil fuel energy supply and distribution companies. Enhanced conservation programs should be the target of these revenues. Attachments: 1 NQE individual.pdf, 2 NQE proposed incentive rate Note - if attachments do not go through, see this web page for these documents: http://northquabbinenergy.org/wordpress/?page_id=205

  9. Final Scientific/ Technical Report. Playas Grid Reliability and Distributed Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Van; Weinkauf, Don; Khan, Mushtaq; Helgeson, Wes; Weedeward, Kevin; LeClerc, Corey; Fuierer, Paul

    2012-06-30

    The future looks bright for solar and renewable energies in the United States. Recent studies claim that by 2050, solar power could supply a third of all electricity demand in the country’s western states. Technology advances, soft policy changes, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve this goal. But the larger question is, what would it take to do more throughout the United States? The studies tie future solar and renewable growth in the United States to programs that aim to lower the soft costs of solar adoption, streamline utility interconnections, and increase technology advances through research and development. At the state and local levels, the most important steps are; Net metering: Net metering policies lets customers offset their electric bills with onsite solar and receive reliable and fair compensation for the excess electricity they provide to the grid. Not surprisingly, what utilities consider fair is not necessarily a rate that’s favorable to solar customers; Renewable portfolio standards (RPS): RPS policies require utilities to provide a certain amount of their power from renewable sources; some set specific targets for solar and other renewables. California’s aggressive RPS of 33% renewable energy by 2020 is not bankrupting the state, or its residents; Strong statewide interconnection policies: Solar projects can experience significant delays and hassles just to get connected to the grid. Streamlined feasibility and impact analysis are needed. Good interconnection policies are crucial to the success of solar or renewable energy development; Financing options: Financing is often the biggest obstacle to solar adoption. Those obstacles can be surmounted with policies that support creative financing options like third-party ownership (TPO) and property assessed clean energy (PACE). Attesting to the significance of TPO is the fact that in Arizona, it accounted for 86% of all residential photovoltaic (PV) installations in Q1 2013. Policies beyond those at the state level are also important for solar. The federal government must play a role including continuation of the federal Investment tax credit, responsible development of solar resources on public lands, and support for research and development (R&D) to reduce the cost of solar and help incorporate large amounts of solar into the grid. The local level can’t be ignored. Local governments should support: solar rights laws, feed-in tariffs (FITs), and solar-friendly zoning rules. A great example of how effective local policies can be is a city like Gainesville, Florida , whose FIT policy has put it on the map as a solar leader. This is particularly noteworthy because the Sunshine State does not appear anywhere on the list of top solar states, despite its abundant solar resource. Lancaster, California, began by streamlining the solar permitting process and now requires solar on every new home. Cities like these point to the power of local policies, and the ability of local governments to get things done. A conspicuously absent policy is Community Choice energy, also called community choice aggregation (CCA). This model allows local governments to pool residential, business, and municipal electricity loads and to purchase or generate on their behalf. It provides rate stability and savings and allows more consumer choice and local control. The model need not be focused on clean energy, but it has been in California, where Marin Clean Energy, the first CCA in California, was enabled by a state law -- highlighting the interplay of state and local action. Basic net metering8 has been getting a lot of attention. Utilities are attacking it in a number of states, claiming it’s unfair to ratepayers who don’t go solar. On the other hand, proponents of net metering say utilities’ fighting stance is driven by worries about their bottom line, not concern for their customers. Studies in California, Vermont , New York and Texas have found that the benefits of net metering (like savings on investments in infrastructure and on meeting state renewables requirements) outweigh the costs (like the lowered revenue to cover utility infrastructure costs). Many are eagerly awaiting a California Public Utilities Commission study due later this year, in the hopes that it will provide a relatively unbiased look at the issue. Meanwhile, some states continue to pursue virtual net metering policies. Under Colorado’s Solar Gardens Act, for example, utility customers can subscribe to power generated somewhere other than their own homes. The program allowed by that bill sold out in 30 minutes, evidence of the pent-up demand for this kind of arrangement. And California solar advocates are hoping for passage of a “shared renewables” bill in that state, which would provide for similar solar are significant in bringing solar power to the estimated 75% (likely a conservative number) of can’t put solar on our own roof. As great a resource as the sun is, when it comes to actually implementing solar or other renewables, technology advances, policy changes, bureaucratic practices, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve a 30% by 2050 national goal. This project incorporated research activities focused on addressing each of these challenges. First, the project researchers evaluated several leading edge solar technologies by actually implementing these technologies at Playas, New Mexico, a remote town built in the 1970s by Phelps Dodge Mining Company for the company’s employees. This town was purchased by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in 2005 and converted to a training and research center. Playas is an all-electric town served by a substation about seven miles away. The town is the last user on a 240 kV utility transmission line owned by the Columbus Electric Cooperative (CEC) making it easy to isolate for experiment purposes. The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) perform various training and research activities at this site. Given its unique nature, Playas was chosen to test Micro-Grids and other examples of renewable distributed energy resources (DER). Several proposed distributed energy sources (DERs) were not implemented as planned including the Micro-Grid. However, Micro-Grid design and computer modeling were completed and these results are included in this report. As part of this research, four PV (solar) generating systems were installed with remote Internet based communication and control capabilities. These systems have been integrated into and can interact with the local grid So that (for example) excess power produced by the solar arrays can be exported to the utility grid. Energy efficient LED lighting was installed in several buildings to further reduce consumption of utility-supplied power. By combining reduced lighting costs; lowering HVAC loads; and installing smart PV generating equipment with energy storage (battery banks) these systems can greatly reduce electrical usage drawn from an older rural electrical cooperative (Co-Op) while providing clean dependable power. Several additional tasks under this project involved conducting research to develop methods of producing electricity from organic materials (i.e. biofuels, biomass. etc.), the most successful being the biodiesel reactor. Improvements with Proton Exchange Membranes (PEM) for fuels cells were demonstrated and advances in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) were also shown. The specific goals of the project include; Instrumentation of the power distribution system with distributed energy resources, demand-side control and intelligent homes within the town of Playas, NM; Creation of models (power flow and dynamic) of the Playas power distribution system; Validation of the models through comparison of predicted behavior to data collected from instrumentation; and Utilization of the models and test grid to characterize the impact of new devices and approaches (e.g., distributed generation and load management) on the local distribution system as well as the grid at large. In addition to the above stated objectives, the research also focused on three critical challenges facing renewable distributed energy platforms: 1) hydrogen from biomass, 2) improved catalyst support systems for electrolysis membranes and fuel cell systems, and 3) improved manufacturing methodologies of low cost photovoltaics. The following sections describe activities performed during this project. The various tasks were focused on establishing Playas as a “…theoretical and experimental test bed…” through which components of a modern/smart grid could be characterized. On a broader scale, project efforts were aimed at development of tools and gathering of experience/expertise that would accelerate progress toward implementation of a modern grid.

  10. COMPNAME","COMPID","YEAR","PLANTNAME","KIND","CONSTRUC","INSTALLED","MAXCAP","NE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EQUIP","TOTCOST","COSTCAP","GROSSEXP","OPERENG","FUEL","COOLANTS","STEXP","STOTH","STTRANS","ELECEXP","MISCST","RENTS","MAINSUP","MAINSTRUC","MAINBOIL","MAINELEC","MAINMISC","TOTPROD","EXPKWH","UNITCL","QUANTCL","AVGHEATCL","ACDELCL","ACBURNCL","ACBTUCL","ACNETGENCL","ABTUNETGCL","UNITGAS","QUANTGAS","AVGHEATGAS","ACDELGAS","ACBURNGAS","ACBTUGAS","ACNETGNGAS","ABTUNETGAS","UNITOIL","QUANTOIL","AVGHEATOIL","ACDELOIL","ACBURNOIL","ACBTUOIL","ACNETGNOIL","ABTUNETOIL" "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Sequoyah","Nuclear","01/01/81",,2441160,2303000,8760,1008,1.8570502e+10,3184031,533636867,2488511062,3025331960,1239,33187938,21080862,86166618,4316783,11925073,0,0,13329621,28360769,0,16330987,1528775,8295886,3650336,7012139,201997849,11,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",189924066,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10230 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Nuclear","01/01/96","1/1/1996",1269000,1200000,8208,728,8230350000,1953589,2108999339,4827648621,6938601549,5468,30551823,12179502,38261150,3963151,7056493,0,0,10400580,24553068,0,14243155,2328791,9244870,870737,990214,124091711,15,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",84467683,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10260 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",1088000,1407000,8760,14,256798000,0,6064116,119609619,125673735,116,112893140,2747882,9870790,0,0,0,0,0,477926,0,2274,1326,0,475339,7436,13582973,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",24224936,139600,0,0.41,0.03,0,13170 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",325200,431000,8760,8,176258000,0,3324533,63486109,66810642,205,80539157,665541,6810251,0,0,0,0,0,151587,0,1339166,1553,0,3922,4338,8976358,51,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2252179,1024,0,2.67,2.61,0,0,"Gallons",2063233,139100,0,0.37,0,0.03,14710 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Browns Ferry","Nuclear","01/01/74","1/1/1977",3456000,2529000,8760,1085,1.771301e+10,890631,909522117,3830292072,4740704820,1372,47061477,58344025,102890781,3642332,11672365,0,0,16130309,26099224,0,5560106,0,25822517,1921329,0,252082988,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",186421503,0,0,0,0.53,0,10520 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Cumberland","Steam","01/01/73","1/1/1973",2600000,2591000,8760,323,1.6530325e+10,1829568,103903145,1638681020,1744413733,671,63827428,5077791,197194700,0,86656,0,0,3945,13987241,0,1210473,1306476,16946838,4232440,841362,240887922,15,"Tons",6868849,10459,26.16,27.86,1.2,0.01,9746,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","1/1/1972",820300,622000,8760,9,264695000,0,3063638,102977658,106041296,129,1709273,879771,11709062,0,0,0,0,0,72128,0,301000,0,0,150309,2816,13115086,50,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3589538,1024,0,3.06,3.03,0,0,"Gallons",1173222,139500,0,0.55,0,0.03,14460 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","1/1/1972",476000,420000,8760,7,326221000,0,2826177,64911682,67737859,142,3078759,1248563,12167389,0,0,0,0,0,69117,0,27275,0,0,74,2699,13515117,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3866688,1024,0,2.8,2.71,0,0,"Gallons",3619161,138400,0,0.35,0,0.03,13670 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Bull Run","Steam","01/01/67","1/1/1967",950000,912000,8760,87,4389788000,2220883,35786684,300943172,338950739,357,21987402,2324904,50419615,0,2286709,0,0,1742,6906593,0,754423,481980,8505768,2788903,314448,74785085,17,"Tons",1593346,11895,28.85,30.74,1.24,0.01,9257,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Steam","01/01/59","1/1/1959",990000,858000,8760,122,4102572000,142024,73025058,451231229,524398311,530,20254094,1206283,60294160,0,16,0,0,0,9854407,0,392524,824748,8011764,5402527,184253,86170682,21,"Tons",2039487,9680,25.5,29.45,1.39,0.01,10585,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Steam","01/01/42","1/1/1945",240000,0,8760,0,-1381000,11997,4933530,18578656,23524183,98,-6629,177,0,0,0,0,0,0,109802,0,908,5,0,0,0,110892,-80,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Paradise","Steam","01/01/63","1/1/1970",2558200,2286000,8760,296,1.4181992e+10,8519495,115906466,1287447341,1411873302,552,57696636,6093708,168293657,0,752026,0,0,536,10779025,0,3529172,4127133,18094770,3094627,676700,215441354,15,"Tons",6332104,10413,21.43,26.2,1.14,0.01,10280,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Steam","01/01/56","1/1/1959",1255200,992000,8760,131,7002818000,690082,44703289,427469961,472863332,377,5073325,1612720,80238724,0,1258244,0,0,73323,7350012,0,1803476,714460,6039653,3054984,792751,102938347,15,"Tons",3266195,9540,22.99,24.49,1.19,0.01,9651,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"John Sevier","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1957",800000,748000,8760,129,5522165000,1570328,37309270,253176616,292056214,365,2993416,946133,70531483,0,3286201,0,0,0,4864155,0,569877,953882,3537596,666934,559907,85916168,16,"Tons",2120222,11710,32.44,33.21,1.3,0.01,9802,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Kingston","Steam","01/01/54","1/1/1955",1700000,1583000,8760,275,1.0147089e+10,3475653,55125946,433125237,491726836,289,31839874,1201130,133624099,0,732904,0,0,671,15993919,0,2888077,697638,10886872,3114678,359796,169499784,17,"Tons",4038449,11134,31.75,32.96,1.34,0.01,9845,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1965",1350000,1283000,8760,222,6557785000,279029,50717782,608908796,659905607,489,12808186,3684548,92134159,0,115314,0,0,3096,11894009,0,1552144,1216679,16776178,4392373,150021,131918521,20,"Tons",2890398,10787,27.4,31.47,1.38,0.01,10066,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Shawnee","Steam","01/01/53","1/1/1956",1750000,1368000,8760,264,8060005000,504507,64076435,534941906,599522848,343,20760203,5379072,113531307,0,6565666,0,0,278,7470171,0,2988378,2163530,11022440,5415043,396055,154931940,19,"Tons",3766896,10234,28.54,29.83,1.34,0.01,10474,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Steam","01/01/51","1/1/1959",1485200,1213000,8760,269,6638234000,87967,76839994,522564850,599492811,404,5328716,12443723,83697340,0,-481100,0,0,6321,6501533,0,2973740,1891947,6444598,2867797,430252,116776151,18,"Tons",2922958,11389,26.49,28.52,1.16,0.01,10912,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Widows Creek","Steam","01/01/52","1/1/1965",1968760,1652000,8760,332,8498846000,855691,74795817,748521437,824172945,419,22653730,3695032,119092329,0,6555644,0,0,1697,9854746,0,1449646,2594983,13869309,4635675,4932791,166681852,20,"Tons",3858785,10808,28.8,30.16,1.27,0.01,10896,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"PALO VERDE 17.49%","n","01/01/86","01/01/88",666364,659000,8760,0,5317709000,1244457,281584974,735793972,1018623403,1529,6013000,4282694,25651422,2986065,4032493,0,0,2276671,26939892,0,5837013,1933729,6303817,3749209,2418208,86411213,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBTU",57406,0,0,440.13,0.44,0.01,10795,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"San Tan","Combined Cy","01/01/74","01/01/75",414000,292000,4112,43,714062000,149179,2773141,65463525,68385845,165,-5000,380221,14107193,0,1594474,0,0,0,845877,0,332730,170816,0,7389209,249749,25070269,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",6579686,1017,2.12,2.12,2.08,0.02,9372,"BBL",291,485968,0,24.61,4.22,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"SOLAR PV1 & PV2","So1ar","01/01/98","01/01/98",216,100,3000,0,119493,0,0,1676818,1676818,7763,1852000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Steam","01/01/52","01/01/54",108000,106000,736,12,50072000,313326,2433283,15283485,18030094,167,726000,180057,1483303,0,338591,0,0,169009,304652,0,157896,27729,608781,344347,214929,3829294,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",651225,1016,2.16,2.16,2.12,0.03,13215,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/73",226850,149000,290,0,18990000,0,0,16888448,16888448,74,0,114913,724438,0,85074,0,0,0,40298,0,64493,11249,0,291038,96634,1428137,75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",281631,1017,2.09,2.09,2.06,0.04,15094,"BBL",60,488889,0,24.61,4.19,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"MOHAVE 10%","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",163620,158000,8715,0,996913000,42812,5046928,50920964,56010704,342,1221000,250561,13703464,0,389195,0,0,245787,1776796,-12611,497248,178489,1673455,685271,112185,19499840,20,"Tons",457815,10939,28.47,29.64,1.35,0.01,10093,"MCF",45107,1028,0,2.94,2.86,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CORONADO","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/80",821880,760000,8760,213,5039392000,8300198,158523884,696108809,862932891,1050,7523000,1228492,96325127,0,4607490,0,0,403466,4002498,10446,1754276,1703703,12035645,3902862,1238765,127212770,25,"Tons",2632698,9886,34.53,35.42,1.79,0.02,10357,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",24155,137315,24.21,26.79,4.65,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CRAIG 29%","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/81",259414,248000,8760,0,2050747000,83589,52424794,181936864,234445247,904,680000,368849,22362014,0,1036824,0,0,425951,1689040,12271,323682,251566,1760910,701820,370069,29302996,14,"Coal",1040589,10060,22.56,21.42,1.06,0.01,10223,"MCF",28100,1000,0,2.49,2.49,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CROSS CUT","Steam","01/01/42","01/01/49",30000,3000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 21.7%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",522857,488000,8760,539,3676183000,42866,27115117,246304509,273462492,523,5605000,1396220,45545213,0,1123640,0,0,257918,3750053,132023,667722,165042,7069421,2110905,434407,62652564,17,"Tons",1685726,10956,23.51,26.74,1.22,0.01,10061,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",8625,139078,22.75,28.63,4.9,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 100%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",2409480,2250000,8760,539,1.6020912e+10,197537,124954457,1135043822,1260195816,523,25829493,6236459,196347455,0,5554459,0,0,1293757,8406791,0,3306198,769371,29759456,10024854,2263428,263962228,16,"Tons",7339290,10979,23.5,26.63,1.21,0.01,10074,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",39756,139079,22.75,22.47,3.85,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"FOUR CORNERS 10%","Steam","01/01/69","01/01/70",163620,148000,8760,0,1176172000,11573,7334703,91939839,99286115,607,37000,105696,11684589,0,978340,0,0,90099,1040379,83795,135949,61864,1112429,291525,340786,15925451,14,"Tons",644302,8885,17.41,17.97,1.01,0.01,9757,"MCF",26430,1008,0,4.13,4.1,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"HAYDEN 50%","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",137700,131000,6809,0,812423000,482702,13855905,64632670,78971277,574,16419000,157050,8427442,0,469402,0,0,101091,1360780,0,245277,92834,431566,123971,241674,11651087,14,"Tons",413486,10561,22.49,20.28,0.96,0.01,10759,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",1248,138870,26.63,32.67,5.6,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/61",390472,407000,4062,62,888092000,139014,5833721,51714773,57687508,148,23000,345003,21091146,0,1032200,0,0,1186582,715713,0,741888,530777,2232219,897096,413430,29186054,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",9553025,1009,2.14,2.14,2.12,0.02,10859,"BBL",3,500000,0,24.61,4.1,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Gas Turbine","01/01/74","01/01/75",222950,197000,451,0,42223000,0,299904,22692012,22991916,103,0,108584,1469697,0,233742,0,0,0,36481,0,284381,9332,0,296342,34359,2472918,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",617372,1007,2.12,0,2.1,0.03,14371,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Alexandria City",298,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/56","01/01/74",171000,170000,5326,20,194429,0,0,0,0,0,0,708998,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,199997,14994,0,404462,0,1328451,6833,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346281,10,2.24,2.24,2.14,0.03,12.45,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/50",,102500,103000,8760,45,381623000,0,0,0,0,0,0,4120850,6152121,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,10272971,27,,239196,8800,25.72,25.72,1.46,0.02,11031,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","1/1/1972",22000,18000,95,0,1007000,0,0,0,0,0,0,9422,53460,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62882,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,99000,137300,0.54,0.54,3.93,0.05,13498 "Anaheim City of",590,1999,,"GAS TRUBINE","01/01/90","01/01/91",49270,45998,638,6,27719000,0,9226000,27237000,36463000,740,0,280835,699954,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,187223,0,0,0,1146979,2314991,84,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",258683,1009,2.76,2.76,2.74,25.7,9394,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#1","4 Gas 2 Int","01/01/62","01/01/72",85000,33000,1010,14,9983618,80839,3457655,22418738,25957232,305,380194,55796,353989,0,0,0,0,809120,0,3922,67280,67353,0,442853,0,1800313,180,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,273580,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.03,19744,778,0,133500,33.82,33.82,6.03,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#2","3 Gas 1 Ste","01/01/75","01/01/84",243200,151000,19516,30,759258360,11240,8928538,75136820,84076598,346,5364843,257796,10642281,0,678572,0,0,1623991,233929,0,330573,231135,303990,1190866,118352,15611485,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7701758,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.01,10144,570,0,133500,34.71,34.71,6.19,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Gas Turbine","01/01/54","01/01/54",5500,5000,0,0,493000,0,0,1065016,1065016,194,0,142,36663,0,0,0,0,7532,0,0,143,0,0,142049,0,186529,378,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1347,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Northeast","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",31500,31300,7566,24,120607160,70498,2376720,5711293,8158511,259,0,42490,2760067,0,395223,0,0,366434,798118,0,24135,51518,290200,20129,3652,4751966,39,"TON",58175,12000,39.8,39.48,1.64,0.02,12637,"MCF",125541,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.03,12648,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Steam","01/01/35","01/01/54",27500,22500,465,11,4508000,24099,1221355,5587700,6833154,248,0,31568,193351,0,41643,0,0,12652,492890,0,23781,136549,88433,55977,1897,1078741,239,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",70119,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.04,15874,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER TURBINES","GAS TURBINE","01/01/88","01/01/88",200000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER SOLAR","SOLAR","01/01/86","01/01/86",300,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER","STEAM","01/01/70","01/01/77",726000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"HOLLY","STEAM","01/01/60","01/01/74",558000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"SEAHOLM","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/55",120000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Braintree Town of",2144,1999,"Potter II","Gas Turbine","01/01/77","01/01/77",97500,79500,1284,27,72929000,20271,3762859,18429374,22212504,228,132748,176565,2625145,0,1154442,0,0,0,0,0,158096,316309,488498,491410,262035,5672500,78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",931167,1035,3.03,3.03,2.92,0.03,11631,"BBLS",14190,138809,15.72,15.72,2.7,0.03,10520 "Brownsville Public Utils Board",2409,1999,"SILAS RAY","STEAM GAS T","01/01/46","01/01/77",155000,197000,5256,29,206,528443,4499041,192117166,197144650,1272,0,205477,6239714,0,1311,0,0,155739,309455,0,74856,224382,203068,176038,1264465,8854505,42983034,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346974,1059,2.65,2.65,2.5,0.03,12048,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2439,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/70","01/01/87",39,30,265,8,5177,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,311874,0,0,0,0,499578,0,0,0,0,0,216081,0,1027533,198480,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",72688,1000,3.8,3.8,3.8,0.06,29839,"Bbl29839",639,128000,55.63,55.63,7.12,0.06,29839 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Bryan Municipal","STEAM, GAS","01/01/55","01/01/74",138000,115000,0,20,118273000,0,7590674,7546886,15137560,110,46427,76607,3529286,0,372623,0,0,606045,154868,9320,63805,20315,520977,159461,31344,5544651,47,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1626575,1,2.25,2.25,2.21,0.03,14.05,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Roland C. Dandy","STEAM","01/01/77","01/01/77",105000,106000,0,19,461142000,1183486,10201555,18752019,30137060,287,105283,76291,11510542,0,391030,0,0,512056,181517,12858,53081,31539,405327,91686,57727,13323654,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",5120070,1,2.24,2.24,2.21,0.02,11.36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Gas Turbine","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/71",25500,25000,106,1,2093500,13587,531143,3214616,3759346,147,17164,6073,130467,0,0,0,0,324,5442,16648,0,0,0,75762,0,234716,112,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",6016,137674,20.61,21.69,3.75,0.06,16616 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Joseph C McNeil GenrЬ ","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",50,53,4305,48,183109400,278455,18147811,50484579,68910845,1378217,571376,140467,6439721,0,788415,0,0,291816,360657,0,131396,35661,553086,1325161,20193,10086573,55,"Wood-Tons",263762,4750,23.46,23.52,2.47,0.03,13742,"MCF",66041,1012124,2.82,2.82,2.78,0.24,86785,"BBL",2260,136430,20.13,21.19,3.7,0,71.02 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Streeter Station","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/73",51500,50000,1650,23,38111600,281328,3758281,14375110,18414719,358,699506,97410,1113417,0,230220,0,0,102634,142771,0,90418,180725,588058,55402,9122,2610177,68,"Tons",19527,12429,38.79,36.49,1.47,0.02,14033.99,"MCF",49410,1000,2.75,2.75,2.75,0.04,14033.99,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Combustion Turbine","Combustion","01/01/68","01/01/68",25000,20000,193,0,2814300,70777,134588,3497629,3702994,148,3062,4978,122537,0,0,0,0,5713,0,0,6674,9708,0,32837,0,182447,65,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",50599,1000,2.42,2.42,2.42,0.04,17979.25,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"Reid Garner #4","Steam-coal","01/01/83","01/01/83",275000,250000,0,96,1597086000,319709000,0,0,319709000,1163,0,0,22054817,0,0,0,0,0,21659183,0,0,0,0,0,0,43714000,27,"Tons",672949,11858,0,13.11,1.31,0.01,11079,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",7515,133622,0,25,4.55,0.05,11570 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"BottleRock & S Geysep","Steam-Geoth","01/01/85","01/01/85",55000,0,0,0,0,10000,0,0,10000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Chanute City of",3355,1999,"Plant #3","Internal Co","01/01/85","01/01/91",31915,39975,595,8,10378156,50000,612000,15500000,16162000,506,0,369525,245371,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,166666,0,0,136912,0,918474,89,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",78668,1000,2.66,2.66,2.66,0.02,0.02,"Barrels",3969,138000,26.57,26.57,0.08,0.01,0.01 "PUD No 1 of Clark County",3660,1999,"River Road CCCT","Gas Turbine","01/01/97","01/01/97",248000,258504,7058,21,1711891704,1053160,141767983,13187783,156008926,629,2319343,4203148,23066109,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,91900,0,0,0,27361157,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",11463,1060,2042,2012,1.9,0.01,7114,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Combine Cyc","01/01/71","01/01/71",25550,24000,2149,6,43507,0,0,4581109,4581109,179,0,10000,1053091,0,0,0,0,130000,80000,0,10000,0,12009,328580,0,1623680,37320,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",374997,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.02,8.62,"BBL",70,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.05,13.99 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/65","01/01/65",11500,11500,754,6,12158,0,0,1445133,1445133,126,0,10000,478409,0,0,0,0,100000,50000,0,20000,0,0,226974,0,885383,72823,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",169662,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.03,13.99,"BBL",115,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.07,20.18 "Coffeyville City o",3892,1999,"COFFEYVILLE","STEAM","01/01/01","01/01/73",56985,55900,4013,23,68578900,0,0,0,0,0,0,57285,2419645,0,0,0,0,0,1146750,0,0,0,8610,0,0,3632290,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MMBTU",938070,1000,2.25,2.58,2.58,0.03,1368,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Steam","01/01/00","01/01/64",11125,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,68864,7301,41,105,51389,127700,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Diesel","01/01/48","01/01/78",13250,45933,1719,6,7081208,0,0,0,0,0,0,40423,214682,0,0,0,0,37863,0,0,0,12739,0,71418,0,377125,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",65604,9530000,2.84,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1725,126000,17.7,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Birdsall","Steam-Gas","01/01/53","01/01/57",62500,4500,1717,4,20716000,10761,2593301,11384249,13988311,224,0,67716,1180669,0,107787,0,0,227078,88988,0,31363,89311,290603,224308,38374,2346197,113,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",412714,806,2.83,2.83,3.52,0.06,16212,"GALLONS",22000,137420,0.11,0.11,0.81,0.01,16212 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Drake","Steam-Gas","01/01/25","01/01/74",257300,256000,8760,106,1484262000,2725551,23014851,80547185,106287587,413,0,1059853,25816108,0,1094453,0,0,3228406,1184954,0,462905,237248,4111443,1735831,152472,39083673,26,"TONS",769313,10914,29.13,31.49,1.44,0.01,11585,"MCF",494125,808,2.73,2.73,3.38,0.03,11585,"BARRELS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Nixon","Steam-Gas","01/01/80","01/01/80",207000,214000,6081,81,1117841000,5059222,39785705,107090082,151935009,734,0,969721,11571054,0,779121,0,0,1343687,1057607,0,489855,218501,3309067,2974204,146609,22859426,20,"TONS",538337,10432,18.31,18.84,0.9,0,10120,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",13952,136738,24.87,24.87,4.33,0.04,10120 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"CTS","Gas","01/01/99","01/01/99",71660,73000,458,0,22292000,418573,123167,32084223,32625963,455,0,0,715385,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,26204,0,741589,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",291394,983,2.89,2.87,2.92,0.03,12852,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbia City of",4045,1999,,"Steam/Gas T","01/01/10","01/01/70",86000,226000,8760,46,62152000,115894,3578025,15986526,19680445,229,5320808,43503,2133251,0,531664,0,0,967929,376491,0,170114,28005,512239,452108,0,5215304,84,"Tons",37319,13265,53.83,53.69,2.02,3.22,15930,"Mcf",34179,0,3.64,3.64,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbus City of",4065,1999,"O'Shaughnessy",,,,5000,5000,0,1,5860000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,49898,0,0,0,0,0,2864,0,52762,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Concord City of",4150,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,545243,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Connecticut Mun Elec Engy Coop",4180,1999,"Millstone Unit 3","Nuclear (e)","01/01/86","01/01/86",1253100,1164700,7329,933,8277624400,0,20415627,29930688,50346315,40,0,324496,363329,24201,162455,0,0,48209,296706,13608,313554,74201,315415,228127,1354,2165655,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Wansley 1 & 2","Coal fired","01/01/76","01/01/78",22220,0,0,0,149590620,0,0,9113036,9113036,410,28304,29233,2186381,0,24950,0,0,15863,81536,0,42895,19710,138435,167350,13819,2720172,18,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Scherer 1 & 2","Coal fired","/ /","01/01/84",22680,0,0,0,144814966,0,0,13467749,13467749,594,50818,27106,2605498,0,25617,0,0,15303,77539,0,34949,22981,256897,16076,11927,3093893,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Denton City of",5063,1999,"SPENCER PLANT","STEAM","01/01/55","01/01/73",179000,259100,11980,36,305539695,0,0,0,0,0,0,233373,9138796,0,348227,0,0,468112,432003,0,71604,11794,211613,467529,210327,11593378,38,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3800668,1,2.24,2.24,2.24,2.99,12.43,"BBl",0,139.68,7.82,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Willamette","Steam","01/01/31","01/01/50",25000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1189332,1189332,48,0,0,260,0,1204,0,0,-975,0,0,0,0,0,5095,7459,13043,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Energy Center","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",51200,41000,0,0,192829000,1280,320371,7521672,7843323,153,0,13058,1366594,0,0,0,0,261785,0,0,0,94,0,127793,0,1769324,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,321587,0,2.51,0,0,0,2495.24,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"ANIMAS","STEAM-COMBI","01/01/55","01/01/94",32180,28000,7808,14,170805000,5968,1109574,25033191,26148733,813,0,70145,3611891,0,225548,0,0,460952,226694,0,122984,0,217797,1021413,38103,5995527,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1668856,1013,2.13,2.13,2.1,0.02,9897,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"SAN JUAN","STEAM-COAL","/ /","/ /",4300042200,43000,7919,10,293222700,0,5471749,62874731,68346480,0,0,71242,5641682,0,114021,0,0,120758,93838,131,62021,34762,382623,77158,65298,6663534,23,"TONS",167448,9421,32.33,32.33,1.72,0.01,10774,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Fayetteville Public Works Comm",6235,1999,"Butler-Warner Gen PtP","Gas-Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/88",303400,276500,1134,33,0,749336,5123088,100277060,106149484,350,4108529,0,-6665,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,292639,-141172,144802,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1724674,1046,2.72,2.72,2.6,0.03,12249.5,"Barrels",4,138800,27.15,27.87,4.78,0.06,13375.25 "Fort Pierce Utilities Auth",6616,1999,"Steam","Steam","01/01/21","01/01/89",120011,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,564929,6990,0,231196,0,0,428922,138247,0,21508,56082,204594,1437831,87424,3177723,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #1","Internal Co",,"01/01/64",13190,0,0,9,2066120,5022,1113459,3036221,4154702,315,51721,42612,209909,0,0,0,0,518539,0,0,0,79604,0,0,0,850664,412,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",293755,138788,0.81,0.68,0.18,0.97,14.88 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #2","Internal Co","1/1/1968","01/01/73",37390,57000,1,9,1277200,1827,3178208,8088951,11268986,301,0,52596,205053,0,0,0,0,634322,0,28573,0,101784,0,0,0,1022328,800,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",319336,138788,0.86,0.64,0.13,0.16,9.2 "Fremont City of",6779,1999,"Wright","Steam","01/01/56","01/01/76",132700,83390,8760,47,336075,202231,5905920,42850719,48958870,369,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0