Sample records for white river dome

  1. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  2. Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

  3. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

  4. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  5. Impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Kirk, B.L.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a series of analyses of the magnitude and biological significance of the impingement of white perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Generating Station and other Hudson River power plants. Included in these analyses were evaluations of: (1) two independent lines of evidence relating to the magnitude of impingement impacts on the Hudson River white perch population; (2) the additional impact caused by entrainment of white perch; (3) data relating to density-dependent growth among young-of-the-year white perch; (4) the feasibility of performing population-level analyses of impingement impacts on the white perch populations of Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River; and (5) the feasibility of using simple food chain and food web models to evaluate community-level effects of impingement and entrainment. Estimated reductions in the abundances of the 1974 and 1975 white perch year classes, caused by impingement and entrainment, were high enough that the possibility of adverse long-term effects cannot be excluded.

  6. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. White River Junction, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) ContributorRiver

  8. Dredging as remediation for white phosphorus contamination at Eagle River Flats, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.R.; Collins, C.M.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eagle River Flats impact area is a Ft. Richardson Superfund site. It is a salt marsh that is contaminated with white phosphorus (WP), and remediation of sediments in permanently ponded areas may require dredging. A remotely piloted dredging system was designed, constructed, and deployed at the Flats as part of the overall site remediation feasibility study. Experience gained over two years of engineering study and contract operation indicates that, although feasible and effective, this alternative is slow, difficult, and very expensive.

  9. Modeling power-plant impacts on multipopulation systems: application of loop analysis to the Hudson River white perch population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The white perch population of the Hudson River suffers unusually high mortality due to impingement and entrainment at power plants. The long-term consequences of this mortality for the Hudson River ecosystem depend in part on interactions between the white perch population and its prey, competitors, and predators, many of which are themselves subject to mortality at power plants. Size multipopulation models were analyzed, using a technique known as loop analysis, to determine how patterns of interaction affect population responses to stress and to identify the parameters that have the greatest influence on those responses. These theoretical results, together with information on life history and vulnerability to power plants for Hudson River fish and macroinvertebrate populations, were used to assess the likely effects of power plant mortality on the white perch population and its prey, competitors, and predators. The results suggest that effects of interactions with other populations are insufficient to offset the effects of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. The results also suggest that if mortality imposed by power plants does cause a substantial decline in the white perch population, then piscivore populations in the Hudson River should not be noticeably affected, a complementary increase in the abundance of competitors that are relatively invulnerable to power plants should occur, and a shift in the distribution of biomass within the white perch population toward the older age classes should occur.

  10. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rien, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2004 through March 2005 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  11. White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  12. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

  13. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  14. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  15. Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................. 58 1 CHAPTER I 2. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background Teapot Dome field, also known as Naval Petroleum Reserve #3 (NPR-3) is located in the southwest portion of the Powder River Basin, 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming... through the reservoir, precipitates such as gypsum can form.5 12 CHAPTER III 2. GEOLOGY REVIEW 3.1 Introduction Teapot Dome also known as the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) is located in central Wyoming, near...

  16. Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D. [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico)] [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico); Huq, M.V. [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States)] [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States); Meyers-Schone, L.J. [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany)] [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.] [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Stout, J.G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)] [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

  17. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rien, Thomas A.; Beiningen, Kirk T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state, and tribal fisheries entities to determine (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Colombia and Snake rivers.

  18. Columbia River White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus) Early Life History and Genertics Study, August 1, 1984 to December 31, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, Ernest L.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on Columbia River white sturgeon has been directed at their early life history as it may apply to production and enhancement strategies for management of the species. The river environment in which sturgeon historically migrated, spawned, and reared has changed through development. Habitat changes are expected to precipitate genetic changes in the fish, as well as reduce the fitness in populations. Genetic analysis of samples taken from various locations over the length of the Columbia River have indicated that observed gene frequencies in all areas sampled were not in Hardy-Weinburg equilibrium, which could suggest that the general population is experiencing perturbation in the system. Analysis thus far has exposed few differences between samples from the lower, middle, and upper portions of the system. Allelic differences were identified in fish from the Roosevelt Lake, which may be evidence of unique characteristics among fish from that general area.

  19. Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

    1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

  20. Third report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D. [and others] [and others

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. The BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs at ORNL. These are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL). The investigation of contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system was originally a task of the BMAP but, in 1988, was incorporated into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation for the Clinch River, a separate study to assess offsite contamination from all three Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge.

  1. Lava Dome | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy DevelopmentLaurentian Energy Authority Jump to:Dome

  2. Dome Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling FarmCenter,Dolliver, Iowa:Dome Tech Jump

  3. Rhonda Whiting Bill Bradbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Libby Dam operations on the Kootenai River white sturgeon. In August 2009 the Tribe submitted a Master natural recruitment failure and uncertain prospects for restoration of successful natural recruitment

  4. Geothermal studies of seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report defines and compares the geothermal environments of eight selected Gulf Coast salt domes. The thermal regimes in and around Gulf Coast salt domes are not well documented. The data base used for this study is an accumulation of bottom-hole temperature readings from oil and gas exploration wells and temperature logs run for the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. The bottom-hole tempreatures were corrected in order to estimate the actual geothermal environments. Prior thermal studies and models indicate temperatures in and around salt domes are elevated above the norm by 1/sup 0/F to 25/sup 0/F. Using existing geothermal data and accepted theory, geothermal gradients for the selected domes and surrounding sediments were estimated. This study concludes that salt domes within a given basin have similar geothermal gradients, but that the basins differ in average geothermal gradients. This relationship is probably controlled by deep basement structural trends. No evidence of residual heat of emplacement was found associated with any of the selected domes.

  5. White Sturgeon Bibliography, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fickeisen, Duane H. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA)

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography presents citations to the majority of published materials on white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). The purpose was to assist in planning and implementing research on white sturgeon in the Columbia River system. (ACR)

  6. Radar investigation of the Hockley salt dome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hluchanek, James Andrew

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Geophysics RADAR INVESTIGATION OF THE HOCKLEY SALT DOME A Thesis by UAMES ANDREW HLUCHANEK A'pproved as to style and content by: (Head of Departme t ? Member) May 1. 973 ABSTRACT Radar investigation of the Hockley Salt Dome. . (Nay, 1973) James... Andrew Hluchanek, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Robert R. Unterberger Radar probing through salt was accomplished at 17 radar stations established in the United Salt Company mine at Hockley, Texas. The top of the salt dom is mapped...

  7. Borehole locations on seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simcox, A.C.; Wampler, S.L.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is designed as an inventory of all wells known to have been drilled within a five-mile radius of each of seven salt domes within the Interior Salt Basin in east Texas, northern Louisiana and Mississippi. There are 72 boreholes that entered salt above an elevation of -3000 feet mean sea level. For these, details of location, drilling dates, depth of casing and cement, elevation of top of caprock and salt, etc., are given on tables in the appendix. Of the seven domes, Oakwood has the largest number of boreholes, thirty-eight (including two sidetracked wells) that enter the salt stock above -3000 feet mean sea level; another dome in northeast Texas, Keechi, has eight; in northern Louisiana, Rayburn's has four and Vacherie has five; in southern Mississippi, Cypress Creek has seven, Lampton has one, and Richton has nine. In addition, all wells known outside the supra-domal area, but within a five-mile radius of the center of the 7 domes are separately catalogued.

  8. Holocene lahars and their byproducts along the historical path of the White River between Mount Rainier and Seattle: Geological Society of America Field Trip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T A; Zehfuss, P H; Atwater, B F; Vallance, J W; Brenniman, H

    2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay-poor lahars of late Holocene age from Mount Rainier change down the White River drainage into lahar-derived fluvial and deltaic deposits that filled an arm of Puget Sound between the sites of Auburn and Seattle, 110-150 km downvalley from the volcano's summit. Lahars in the debris-flow phase left cobbly and bouldery deposits on the walls of valleys within 70 km of the summit. At distances of 80-110 km, transitional (hyperconcentrated) flows deposited pebbles and sand that coat terraces in a gorge incised into glacial drift and the mid-Holocene Osceola Mudflow. On the broad, level floor of the Kent valley at 110-130 km, lahars in the runout or streamflow phase deposited mostly sand-size particles that locally include the trunks of trees probably entrained by the flows. Beyond 130 km, in the Duwamish valley of Tukwila and Seattle, laminated andesitic sand derived from Mount Rainier built a delta northward across the Seattle fault. This distal facies, warped during an earthquake in A.D. 900-930, rests on estuarine mud at depths as great as 20 m. The deltaic filling occurred in episodes that appear to overlap in time with the lahars. As judged from radiocarbon ages of twigs and logs, at least three episodes of distal deposition postdate the Osceola Mudflow. One of these episodes occurred about 2200-2800 cal yr B.P., and two others occurred 1700-1000 cal yr B.P. The most recent episode ended by about the time of the earthquake of A.D. 900-930. The delta's northward march to Seattle averaged between 6 and 14 m/yr in the late Holocene.

  9. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSARDevelopmentalEfficiency | DepartmentSavannahDecommissioning |

  10. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  11. Identifying suitable "piercement" salt domes for nuclear waste storage sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehle, R.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Piercement salt domes of the northern interior salt basins of the Gulf of Mexico are being considered as permanent storage sites for both nuclear and chemically toxic wastes. The suitable domes are stable and inactive, having reached their final evolutionary configuration at least 30 million years ago. They are buried to depths far below the level to which erosion will penetrate during the prescribed storage period and are not subject to possible future reactivation. The salt cores of these domes are themselves impermeable, permitting neither the entry nor exit of ground water or other unwanted materials. In part, a stable dome may be recognized by its present geometric configuration, but conclusive proof depends on establishing its evolutionary state. The evolutionary state of a dome is obtained by reconstructing the growth history of the dome as revealed by the configuration of sedimentary strata in a large area (commonly 3,000 square miles or more) surrounding the dome. A high quality, multifold CDP reflection seismic profile across a candidate dome will provide much of the necessary information when integrated with available subsurface control. Additional seismic profiles may be required to confirm an apparent configuration of the surrounding strata and an interpreted evolutionary history. High frequency seismic data collected in the near vicinity of a dome are also needed as a supplement to the CDP data to permit accurate depiction of the configuration of shallow strata. Such data must be tied to shallow drill hole control to confirm the geologic age at which dome growth ceased. If it is determined that a dome reached a terminal configuration many millions of years ago, such a dome is incapable of reactivation and thus constitutes a stable storage site for nuclear wastes.

  12. A mechanical model of early salt dome growth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Frank Albert

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    salt and the upper layer representing the overlying sediment, is used to study the mechanics of growth in the early stages of salt dome formation. Three cases of this model, each representing a particular rate of removal of the surface topography..., are examined to determine which case best fits observations of salt domes in East Texas, Northwest Germany, and the North Sea. These observations include the spacing and growth rate of the dome and the amount of deformation of the sediments above the dome...

  13. Radar investigation of the Cote Blanche salt dome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Robert Donald

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE COTE BLANCHE SALT DOME. Geology of the Cote Blanche Salt-Dome Azea. . Economic History of the Cote BLanche Salt-Dome Azea, Salt. . Oil and gas. III. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION. . . Radar Speed in Air and in Salt. . . Velocity...' zznd i'r. mzznz 1959) . The east, south, end west flanks are nearly vertical. However, the north side oi the dome is characterised by a massive overhang. A well drilled by Shell Oil Company, Caffrey No. 1, confirmed the presence of a minimum of 3300...

  14. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long Valley Caldera, East-Central California, USA, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  15. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

  16. Salt dome gas storage solves curtailment threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, J.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 1981, Valero Transmission Co. (San Antonio, TX) opened two salt-dome storage caverns with a combined capacity of 5 billion CF (1.5 billion of cushion gas, 3.5 of working gas). The facility's maximum deliverability is 400 million CF/day for 9 days; when two more caverns are finished in late 1982, the $55 million complex will be able to sustain that level for 18 days, making Valero less dependent on linepacking and spot sales to avoid curtailing deliveries to its customers.

  17. UPWELLING IN THE COSTA RICA DOME BY KLAUS WYRTKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This current, the Costa Rica Coastal Current, and parts of the North Equatorial Current form a cyclonic circu'the horizontal circula~ion. The upwelling in the dome is caused by the cyclonic flow around the dome. When survey a deep-reaching" eddy transporting lOX 1018 cm.a/sec. "appeared to be separated and to drift north

  18. White Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Steven Chu discusses the benefits of switching to white roofs and light colored pavements.

  19. Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Internal Geology and...

  20. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  1. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  2. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  3. A mechanical model of early salt dome growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Frank Albert

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) December 1988 A Mechanical Analysis of Early Salt Dome Growth. (December 1988) Frank Albert Irwin, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Raymond C. Fletcher A two-layer superposition model, the lower layer representing... of the sediments results in growth rates much higher than those observed. Analysis of the case with a diffusivity of 104m2/Ka agrees with all observa- tions. A range of diffusivities which will produce a realistic salt dome model is then determined. The lower...

  4. WA_96_004_GE_CORPORATE_RESEARCH_and_DEVELOPMENT_Waiver_of_Dome...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RATERESEARCHandDEVELOPMENTWaiverofDome.pdf More Documents & Publications WA1993012GENERALELECTRICCOMPANY--CORPORATERESEARCHAND.pdf WA1994013GENERALELECTRICCOMPANY...

  5. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  6. Site testing for submillimetre astronomy at Dome C, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremblin, P; Schneider, N; Durand, G Al; Ashley, M C B; Lawrence, J S; Luong-Van, D M; Storey, J W V; Durand, G An; Reinert, Y; Veyssiere, C; Walter, C; Ade, P; Calisse, P G; Challita, Z; Fossat, E; Sabbatini, L; Pellegrini, A; Ricaud, P; Urban, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years a major effort has been put into the exploration of potential sites for the deployment of submillimetre astronomical facilities. Amongst the most important sites are Dome C and Dome A on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Chajnantor area in Chile. In this context, we report on measurements of the sky opacity at 200 um over a period of three years at the French-Italian station, Concordia, at Dome C, Antarctica. We also present some solutions to the challenges of operating in the harsh polar environ- ment. Dome C offers exceptional conditions in terms of absolute atmospheric transmission and stability for submillimetre astron- omy. Over the austral winter the PWV exhibits long periods during which it is stable and at a very low level (0.1 to 0.3 mm). Higher values (0.2 to 0.8 mm) of PWV are observed during the short summer period. Based on observations over three years, a transmission of around 50% at 350 um is achieved for 75% of the time. The 200-um window opens with a typical transmission...

  7. 2012 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The White Book is a planning analysis produced by BPA that informs BPA of its load and resource conditions for sales and purchases. The White Book provides a 10-year look at the expected obligations and resources in the Federal system and PNW region. The White Book is used as a planning tool for the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty) studies, as an information tool for customers and regional interests, and as a publication of information utilized by other planning entities for their analyses. The White Book is not used to guide day-to-day operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) or determine BPA revenues or rates.

  8. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  9. Glacier geophysical studies at Taylor Dome: Your three

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, D.L.; Waddington, E.D. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Taylor Dome is the site of an ongoing ice core/paleoclimate project. The main activities of the 1992-1993 season included surveys by ground-based optical methods, surveys using satellite receivers, radio-echo sounding of bedrock topography, and depositional environment characterization. Monitoring continued of accumulation rate and three cores were sampled to detect the depths of atmospheric nuclear test fallout products. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

  11. Methyl chloride variability in the Taylor Dome ice core during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhulst, Kristal R; Aydin, Murat; Saltzman, Eric S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Taylor Dome ice core during the Holocene Kristal R.2005GB002680. Lee-Taylor, J. , and K. R. Redeker (2005),

  12. Draft environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified the Richton dome site as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geo

  13. Salt tectonism and seismic stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in the Destin Dome Region, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Grant

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Norphlet Formation (Bearden and Mink, 1989). Comprehensive high-quality multifold seismic reflection data have not previously been available for detailed seismic stratigraphic analysis in the Destin Dome region. Establishment of a seismic stratigraphic... DD-2 Destin Dome Exxon 162 17 938 P, V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-3 Destin Dome Sun Oil 166 17 608 P, V, G, S, SP, D DD-4 Destin Dome Gulf 360 20 988 P, V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-5 Destin Dome Chevron 422 22 222 V, G, S, SP, R, D DD-6 Destin Dome Sohio...

  14. Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Price

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two classes of natural solid media (glacial ice and salt domes) are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy >1e18 eV. Though insensitive to 1e11 to 1e16 eV neutrinos for which observatories (e.g., AMANDA and IceCube) that utilize optical Cherenkov radiation detectors are designed, radio and acoustic methods are suited for searches for the very low fluxes of neutrinos with energies >1017 eV. This is because, due to the very long attenuation lengths of radio and acoustic waves in ice and salt, detection modules can be spaced very far apart. In this paper, I calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of frequency and grain size for acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes and show that experimental measurements on laboratory samples and in glacial ice and salt domes are consistent with theory. For South Pole ice with grain size 0.2 cm at -51 degrees C, scattering lengths are calculated to be 2000 km and 25 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz, respectively, and the absorption length is calculated to be 9 km at frequencies above 100 Hz. For NaCl (rock salt) with grain size 0.75 cm, scattering lengths are calculated to be 120 km and 1.4 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz, and absorption lengths are calculated to be 30,000 km and 3300 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz. Existing measurements are consistent with theory. For ice, absorption is the limiting factor; for salt, scattering is the limiting factor.

  15. Carbon dioxide source development, northeast Jackson Dome, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studlick, J.R.J.; Shew, R.D.; Basye, G.L.; Ray, J.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot conducted at Little Creek field Mississippi, in the 1970s indicated that the injection of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) could lead to the successful recovery of additional oil reserves even after waterflood operations. It was realized early that a large volume of CO/sub 2/ would be required for enhanced oil recovery operations Little Creek and other prospective fields. Shell's search for CO/sub 2/ in the area began in the early 1970s. Exploratory drilling for hydrocarbons as early as 1950 had indicated high concentrations of CO/sub 2/ present in central Mississippi. These occur in salt-generated structures north and east of the intrusive Jackson igneous dome; the area is therefore termed the N.E. Jackson Dome Source Area. CO/sub 2/ generation is believed to have occurred by the thermal metamorphism associated with the intrusion of Jurassic-age carbonates. The CO/sub 2/ migrated updip and is concentrated in the Buckner, Smackover, and Norphlet Formations at depths of 14,000 to 17,000 ft. The objectives are sandstones and dolomites that are interpreted as dune and sabkha deposits. Reservoir quality is variable (abundant illite locally in the Norphlet and highly compacted sandstones in the Buckner) but generally good. Rates of 20 MMCFGD have been tested from these wells. Many salt-related structures have been defined in the source area by seismic data. Leasing began in 1973 and drilling in 1977. Eight structures have been tested, with all but one encountering commercial CO/sub 2/ accumulations. Shell has drilled 15 wells (13 successful, 1 junked and abandoned, and 1 dry hole) on 640- and 1280-ac spacing. Gas compositions vary: Smackover CO/sub 2/ is sour and will require treatment, whereas the Buckner and Norphlet sands contain sweet and semisweet CO/sub 2/, respectively. Industry reserves in N.E. Jackson Dome exceed 6 tcf of gas.

  16. White Paper

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley NickellApril 16, 2008 TBD-0075 -In the Matter 1 White Paper

  17. Field Survey of Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Miller, Terence Holland

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Safety (DOE/HS-10), requested that National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management directorate (NSTec/EM) perform a field survey of the Cactus Crater Storage Facility (Runit Dome), similar to past surveys conducted at their request. This field survey was conducted in conjunction with a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission on Runit Island in the Enewetak Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). The survey was strictly a visual survey, backed up by digital photos and a written description of the current condition.

  18. Cold domes over the warm pool: a study of the properties of cold domes produced by mesoscale convective systems during TOGA COARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caesar, Kathy-Ann Lois

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are known to cool the subcloud layer by the introduction of penetrative downdrafts to the surface, resulting in the formation of cold domes (also known as cold pools). Five MCSs sampled during the Tropical Ocean...

  19. Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical,CNRS - Université d'Orleans, 45067 Orleans 2, France Abstract In SE China, a Mesozoic granitic dome coeval and granitic gneisses, and the E­W-trending Late-Paleozoic­Mesozoic Pingxiang and Anfu basins are located along

  20. Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a, , Anne Academy of Sciences (RCAG), P.O. Box 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o-wave splitting upper mantle Mongolia Hangay dome Siberian craton Bogd fault Mongolia represents the northernmost

  1. Restoration of cross sections above intrusive salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, R.C.; Groshong, R.H. Jr. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of bed-length restoration to the sequence above a vertical intrusion of salt was tested on an experimental model that included deposition of units during uplift. Restoration of the model resulted in an apparently unbalanced cross section due to excess bed length in the pre-growth interval. The excess bed length was due to significant internal strain. For a correct restoration, it is thus important to distinguish between the growth and pre-growth sequences. The thinning index, which quantifies the thinning onto the uplift, aids in making this distinction. A thinning index vs. depth curve has a sharp inflection at the top of the pre-growth sequence. The pre-growth sequence is restored by area balancing. The growth sequence deforms mainly by formation of a crestal graben, with little other strain. Sequential restoration of growth intervals shows the growth history of the dome. When applied to the Pool Creek salt dome from the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the methods developed for the model served to separate the pre-growth from the growth sequence and to indicate a growth history of vertical intrusion changing through time to vertical intrusion plus regional extension.

  2. Petroleum storage potential of the Chacahoula salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magorian, T.R. (Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (USA)); Neal, J.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chacahoula salt dome, eight miles southwest of Thibodaux, LA, could be solution mined to create caverns for storing as much as 500 million barrels (MMB) of crude oil, should the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) require additional storage volume. The salt mass geometry is confirmed by more than 50 oil wells, and also from previous exploratory drilling for sulphur. Top of salt occurs at {minus}1100 ft, and some 1300 acres exist within the {minus}2000 ft salt contour. Frasch mining of 1.35 million long tons of sulphur caused the surface to subside about one foot on the northeastern part of the dome. Creep-induced subsidence averaging {approximately}2.7 ft over 30 yrs is estimated for a 200 MMB cavern array, which would require perimeter diking to control localized perennial flooding. Earthquakes approaching intensity MM 6 have occurred nearby and are expected to recur on the order of {approximately}100 yrs but would not affect cavern stability. Additional study of brine disposal methods and hurricane surge probabilities are needed to establish design parameters and cost estimates for storage. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

  4. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  5. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  6. Ice Dome Construction for Large Scale Habitats on Atmosphereless Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Stefan Harsan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest difficulties that space exploration faces is the lack of technology necessary to establish large volumes of habitable spaces on site. Both transporting the pre-built enclosures or transporting the equipment necessary for building them on site from conventional materials face the same enormous problem: the need to transport huge quantities of material into space, which is technically close to impossible. The current paper, explores the possibility and one approach of building these large spaces from an alternative material, water ice, a material that is a prerequisite for any settlement. The feasibility of dome shaped, pressurized, water ice buildings is analyzed from a structural integrity point of view and the possibility of building them with a technique using water sublimation and deposition onto a thin plastic film, a process which requires extremely little construction equipment with respect to the resulting habitable space.

  7. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy SmallImplementing J-F-1 SECTION JtheNEWMR.Y : H-Area Tank FarmAmerican

  8. Gravity and seismic reflection studies over the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, Grimes and Brazos Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordero Ardila, Vladimir Francisco

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and not com- pletely understood f orm. The study of salt domes is important because: (1) more than four-fift'ns or all oil and gas accumulations in fields in the Gulf Coast province have been geologically affected by the growth of the salt domes (Halbouty... to obtain a Bouguer anomaly map of the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, (2) a seismic reflection study in order to obtain a seismic section of the area of investigation, and (3) an analysis and interpretation of these studies to obtain a reasonable model...

  9. Structural constraints on the exhumation of the Tso Morari Dome, NW Himalaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Ryan J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tso Morari culmination in the Ladakh region of northwest India is a large (>3,000 km²) structural dome cored by coesite-bearing rocks of Indian continental crustal affinity. As one of only two localities in the Himalaya ...

  10. EIS-0010: Strategic Petroleum Reserves, Sulphur Mines Salt Dome, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves prepared this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of the proposed storage of 24 million barrels of crude oil at the Sulphur Mines salt dome located in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, including construction and operation impacts.

  11. Variability of bottom water domes and geostrophic currents in the eastern Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottlieb, Erik S

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entering Georges Bas- in, the slope water mixes with the endemic, less-dense bottom water (Hopkins and Gar- field, 1979). The newly formed bottom water accumulates in Georges Basin, resulting in an upward doming of the interface (found between 50 and 200...VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MAINE A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GQTTLIEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  12. An investigation of the subsurface Bouguer anomaly in the vicinity of shallow salt domes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, William Charles

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'itted to the anomaly data in vertical profiles. Analysis of the anomalous vertical gravity gradients indicates that such gradients are too minute for purposes of salt dome exploration. However, calculations of the Bouguer anomaly reveal data which would be easily... detected in the field and amenable to geological interpretation. The empirical curves are fourd to be useful in estimating the Bouguer anomaly for salt domes not explicitly represented by the models. ACKNONLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to express his...

  13. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  14. Percutaneous Ethanol Injection via an Artificially Induced Right Hydrothorax for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Hepatic Dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kume, Akimichi, E-mail: kumea@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nimura, Yuji; Kamiya, Junichi; Nagino, Masato; Kito, Yasushi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550, Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery (Japan)

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the efficacy of sonographically (US) guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) via an artificially induced right hydrothorax (transthoracic PEI) to treat US-invisible hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the hepatic dome. Five cirrhotic patients with US-invisible HCC in the hepatic dome, who were poor surgical candidates, underwent transthoracic PEI. An artificial right hydrothorax was created by instilling 500 ml saline, and absolute ethanol was injected transhydrothoracically into the hepatic dome lesion under local anesthesia. The success and complications were assessed radiologically. The patients were followed up serologically and radiologically for 12-44 (mean 28.4) months. Twenty-five hydrothoraces were induced. All hydrothoraces enabled US visualization of the entire hepatic dome. Eight of the nine small lesions were treated successfully by the treatment. Two of the three local recurrences were eradicated by repeat transthoracic PEI. One large lesion was treated by a combination of transthoracic and regular PEI. The only complication was one clinically insignificant pneumothorax. Induction of a right hydrothorax is feasible and safe. The hydrothorax enables US visualization of the entire hepatic dome and permits US-guided PEI for HCC in the hepatic dome that otherwise would not be possible.

  15. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad, E-mail: Sabaeian@scu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, 61357-43135 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  16. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  17. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  18. Flattening Scientific CCD Imaging Data with a Dome Flat Field System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Marshall; D. L. DePoy

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the flattening of scientific CCD imaging data using a dome flat field system. The system uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to illuminate a carefully constructed dome flat field screen. LEDs have several advantages over more traditional illumination sources: they are available in a wide range of output wavelengths, are inexpensive, have a very long source lifetime, and are straightforward to control digitally. The circular dome screen is made of a material with Lambertian scattering properties that efficiently reflects light of a wide range of wavelengths and incident angles. We compare flat fields obtained using this new system with two types of traditionally-constructed flat fields: twilight sky flats and nighttime sky flats. Using photometric standard stars as illumination sources, we test the quality of each flat field by applying it to a set of standard star observations. We find that the dome flat field system produces flat fields that are superior to twilight or nighttime sky flats, particularly for photometric calibration. We note that a ratio of the twilight sky flat to the nighttime sky flat is flat to within the expected uncertainty; but since both of these flat fields are inferior to the dome flat, this common test is not an appropriate metric for testing a flat field. Rather, the only feasible and correct method for determining the appropriateness of a flat field is to use standard stars to measure the reproducibility of known magnitudes across the detector.

  19. Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

  20. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  1. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

  2. Submillimetre/TeraHertz Astronomy at Dome C with CEA filled bolometer array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Minier; Gilles Durand; Pierre-Olivier Lagage; Michel Talvard; Tony Travouillon; Maurizio Busso; Gino Tosti

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Submillimetre/TeraHertz (e.g. 200, 350, 450 microns) astronomy is the prime technique to unveil the birth and early evolution of a broad range of astrophysical objects. A major obstacle to carry out submm observations from ground is the atmosphere. Preliminary site testing and atmospheric transmission models tend to demonstrate that Dome C could offer the best conditions on Earth for submm/THz astronomy. The CAMISTIC project aims to install a filled bolometer-array camera with 16x16 pixels on IRAIT at Dome C and explore the 200-$\\mu$m windows for potential ground-based observations.

  3. Moraine chronosequence of the Donnelly Dome region, Alaska A. Matmon a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    GEOLOGIC Inc., PO Box 52, 12021 Middle Bay Drive, Kodiak, AK 99615, USA d Department of Geology and SchoolMoraine chronosequence of the Donnelly Dome region, Alaska A. Matmon a, , J.P. Briner b , G. Carver, Jerusalem 91904, Israel b Department of Geology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA c CARVER

  4. UPb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and Ttd history of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    U­Pb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and T­t­d history of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet M.C. Quigley a al., 2004; Aoya et al., 2005, 2006; Quigley et al., 2006; Lee et al., 2006). Several workers have

  5. Ar thermochronology of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet: Implications for tectonic evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    of the North Himalayan gneiss domes Mark Quigley a,, Yu Liangjun b , Liu Xiaohan b , Christopher J.L. Wilson: +61 3 8344 7761. E-mail address: m.quigley2@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au (M. Quigley). 0040-1951/$ - see front

  6. Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon...

  7. Architecture is frozen music. Bragdon This publication accompanies the traveling exhibition Pulse Dome Project: Art &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    a form of sustainable architecture that was in harmony with natural processes--a structure he calledpulse dome #12;Architecture is frozen music. Bragdon #12;This publication accompanies the traveling architecture, wombs, and such natural forms as caves, tunnels, and volcanoes to learn what had been done

  8. Carboniferous tectonic history of the eastern flank of the Ozark dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed geologic mapping in southwestern Illinois and southeastern Missouri indicates that the eastern flank of the Ozark dome was a low positive area throughout Carboniferous (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) time. Rock units of this age consistently thin onto the flank of the dome, and are punctuated by numerous disconformities. Effects of shoaling are prominent in Chesterian strata, which change from dominantly subtidal in the proto-Illinois basin to shallow subtidal, intertidal and supratidal on the flank of the dome. Although the dome probably was exposed subaerially for much of Carboniferous time, it contributed little sediment eastward. The exposed rocks were largely carbonates, which weathered by solution. Several long-lived basement structures on the east flank of the Ozarks were active during the Carboniferous. Chief among them were the Lincoln and Waterloo-Dupo anticlines, the Du Quoin monocline, and the Ste. Genevieve fault zone. All are high-angle reverse faults that strike north to northwest, and are overlain by sharp folds in sedimentary cover. Major displacements took place in late Valmeyeran to Atokan time, and addition deformation occurred in Desmoinesian through post-Pennsylvanian time. The compressional deformation probably is a product of the Ouachita orogeny.

  9. Overcoming the Boundary Layer Turbulence at Dome C: Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics versus Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Overcoming the Boundary Layer Turbulence at Dome C: Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics versus Tower T the boundary layer: mounting a telescope on a tower that physically puts it above the turbulent layer such a goal, two solutions can be proposed. The most intuitive one is to place a telescope on a tower

  10. Supplemental DOME Documentation for Researchers with Bricks Version 1.6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , the script /diesel/init.pl is executed. This is DOME's bootstrap script; it configures the brick, starts address so that it can be inherited by a VM. o Start a process to manage the 3G modem (/diesel/bustracker3gx.py). #12;2 o Start the gpsd daemon. o Start a process to install any updates (/diesel

  11. Beryllium-10 in the Taylor Dome ice core: Applications to Antarctic glaciology and paleoclimatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steig, E.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An ice core was drilled at Taylor dome, East Antarctica, reaching to bedrock at 554 meters. Oxygen-isotope measurements reveal climatic fluctuations through the last interglacial period. To facilitate comparison of the Taylor Dome paleoclimate record with geologic data and results from other deep ice cores, several glaciological issues need to be addressed. In particular, accumulation data are necessary as input for numerical ice-flow-models, for determining the flux of chemical constituents from measured concentrations, and for calculation of the offset in age between ice and trapped air in the core. The analysis of cosmogenic beryllium-10 provides a geochemical method for constraining the accumulation-rate history at Taylor Dome. High-resolution measurements were made in shallow firn cores and snow pits to determine the relationship among beryllium-10 concentrations, wet and dry deposition mechanisms, and snow-accumulation rates. Comparison between theoretical and measured variations in deposition over the last 75 years constrains the relationship between beryllium-10 deposition and global average production rates. The results indicate that variations in geomagnetically-modulated production-rate do not strongly influence beryllium-10 deposition at Taylor Dome. Although solar modulation of production rate is important for time scales of years to centuries, snow-accumulation rate is the dominant control on ice-core beryllium-10 concentrations for longer periods. Results show that the Taylor Dome core can be used to provide new constraints on regional climate over the last 130,000 years, complementing the terrestrial and marine geological record from the Dry Valley, Transantarctic Mountains and western Ross Sea.

  12. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  13. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake River between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. A total of 13,785 hours of setline effort and 389 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1998. Of the 278 white sturgeon captured in the Snake River, 238 were marked for future identification. Three sturgeon were captured in the Salmon River and none were captured in the Clearwater River. Since 1997, 6.9% of the tagged fish have been recovered. Movement of recaptured white sturgeon ranged from 98.5 kilometers downstream to 60.7 kilometers upstream, however, less than 25% of the fish moved more than 16 kilometers (10 miles). In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 51.5 cm to 286 cm and averaged 118.9 cm. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 37% since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River.

  14. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Heigold, P.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  15. Imaging dipping sediments at a salt dome flank -VSP seismic interferometry and reverse-time Rongrong Lu*, Mark Willis, Xander Campman, Jonathan Ajo-Franklin, M. Nafi Toksz, ERL, MIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Imaging dipping sediments at a salt dome flank - VSP seismic interferometry and reverse We present results of applying seismic interferometry to image dipping sediments abutting a salt dome overhanging salt dome. The sediment reflectors in the model dip up towards the salt dome flank. To process

  16. The origin of the structural depression above Gulf coast salt domes with particular reference to Clay Creek dome, Washington County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Alfred Norman

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek, indioatos that the ~ ouroe layer is at least 17, 000 feet below the surfaoe and is older than F. E. Heath, J. A. Waters, and W. B. Ferguson, op. oit. c p, A3. 8, C. W. Saith, "Gulf Coast Oil Fields", The World Oil, Vol. 130, Eo, 7 {June, 1950... information on salt dome geology published sinoe 1936. However, muoh of the pertinent literature since that date consists of field development data with little to no discussion of struotural prooesses ~ An impsrtant exoeption to this apparently diminished...

  17. EIS-0029: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Texoma Group Salt Domes, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana and Jefferson County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which could occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of four proposed candidate sites in the Texoma Group of salt domes.

  18. 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study: The White Book.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

  19. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Reactor Building Dome Upper Surfaces, Rancho Saco Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade C. Adams

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a confirmatory survey of the upper structural surfaces of the Reactor Building Dome at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (RSNGS) performed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the NRC. Also includes results of interlaboratory comparison analyses on several archived soil samples that would be provided by RSNGS personnel. The confirmatory surveys were performed on June 7 and 8, 2006.

  20. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  1. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  2. Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

  3. Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

  4. ASTRO-H White Paper - White Dwarf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukai, K; Harayama, A; Hayashi, T; Ishida, M; Long, K S; Terada, Y; Tsujimoto, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interacting binaries in which a white dwarf accretes material from a companion --- cataclysmic variables (CVs) in which the mass loss is via Roche-lobe overflow, and symbiotic stars in which the white dwarf captures the wind of a late type giant --- are relatively commonplace. They display a wide range of behaviors in the optical, X-rays, and other wavelengths, which still often baffles observers and theorists alike. They are likely to be a significant contributor to the Galactic ridge X-ray emission, and the possibility that some CVs or symbiotic stars may be the progenitors of some of the Type Ia supernovae deserves serious consideration. Furthermore, these binaries serve as excellent laboratories in which to study physics of X-ray emission from high density plasma, accretion physics, reflection, and particle acceleration. ASTRO-H is well-matched to the study of X-ray emission from many of these objects. In particular, the excellent spectral resolution of the SXS will enable dynamical studies of the X-ray e...

  5. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  6. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

  7. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

  8. White River Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor

  9. White River Valley El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155)

  10. The Thermal Environment of the Fiber Glass Dome for the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Verdoni; C. Denker; J. R. Varsik; S. Shumko; J. Nenow; R. Coulter

    2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Solar Telescope (NST) is a 1.6-meter off-axis Gregory-type telescope with an equatorial mount and an open optical support structure. To mitigate the temperature fluctuations along the exposed optical path, the effects of local/dome-related seeing have to be minimized. To accomplish this, NST will be housed in a 5/8-sphere fiberglass dome that is outfitted with 14 active vents evenly spaced around its perimeter. The 14 vents house louvers that open and close independently of one another to regulate and direct the passage of air through the dome. In January 2006, 16 thermal probes were installed throughout the dome and the temperature distribution was measured. The measurements confirmed the existence of a strong thermal gradient on the order of 5 degree Celsius inside the dome. In December 2006, a second set of temperature measurements were made using different louver configurations. In this study, we present the results of these measurements along with their integration into the thermal control system (ThCS) and the overall telescope control system (TCS).

  11. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)] [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  13. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

  14. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

  15. Hydrothermal alteration at the Panorama Formation, North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Walter, Malcolm R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne hyperspectral remote sensing dataset was obtained of the North Pole Dome region of the Pilbara Craton in October 2002. It has been analyzed for indications of hydrothermal minerals. Here we report on the identification and mapping of hydrothermal minerals in the 3.459 Ga Panorama Formation and surrounding strata. The spatial distribution of a pattern of subvertical pyrophyllite rich veins connected to a pyrophyllite rich palaeohorizontal layer is interpreted to represent the base of an acid-sulfate epithermal system that is unconformably overlain by the stromatolitic 3.42 Ga Strelley Pool Chert.

  16. DUSEL Theory White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Raby; T. Walker; K. S. Babu; H. Baer; A. B. Balantekin; V. Barger; Z. Berezhiani; A. de Gouvea; R. Dermisek; A. Dolgov; P. Fileviez Perez; G. Gabadadze; A. Gal; P. Gondolo; W. Haxton; Y. Kamyshkov; B. Kayser; E. Kearns; B. Kopeliovich; K. Lande; D. Marfatia; R. N. Mohapatra; P. Nath; Y. Nomura; K. A. Olive; J. Pati; S. Profumo; R. Shrock; Z. Tavartkiladze; K. Whisnant; L. Wolfenstein

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The NSF has chosen the site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to be in Lead, South Dakota. In fact, the state of South Dakota has already stepped up to the plate and contributed its own funding for the proposed lab, see http://www.sanfordlaboratoryathomestake.org/index.html. The final decision by NSF for funding the Initial Suite of Experiments for DUSEL will be made early in 2009. At that time the NSF Science Board must make a decision. Of order 200 experimentalists have already expressed an interest in performing experiments at DUSEL. In order to assess the interest of the theoretical community, the Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics (CCAPP) at The Ohio State University (OSU) organized a 3-day DUSEL Theory Workshop in Columbus, Ohio from April 4 - 6, 2008. The workshop focused on the scientific case for six proposed experiments for DUSEL: long baseline neutrino oscillations, proton decay, dark matter, astrophysical neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay and N-Nbar oscillations. The outcome of this workshop is the DUSEL Theory White paper addressing the scientific case at a level which may be useful in the decision making process for policy makers at the NSF and in the U.S. Congress. In order to assess the physics interest in the DUSEL project we have posted the DUSEL Theory White paper on the following CCAPP link http://ccapp.osu.edu/whitepaper.html . Please read the white paper and, if you are interested, use the link to show your support by co-signing the white paper.

  17. An analysis of research procedures used during the restoration of the dome of the Texas State Capitol, Austin, 1989 to 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hocker, Emma Elizabeth

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the exterior of the building. One of the least accessible areas proved to be the dome. This thesis examines the archival and physical research procedures undertaken to determine the condition of the dome, how this information was used, and what discrepancies...

  18. Dome takes a 20% interest in the Arctic pilot project to move LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, B.; Bell, J.

    1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    According to B. Richards of Dome Petroleum Ltd., Dome's interest will be shared with its partially owned subsidiary, Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Ltd. According to J. Bell of Petro-Canada, the operator for the Arctic project, negotiations are under way with Tenneco Inc. for gas sales of up to 225 million cu ft/day to begin in 1985-86. At first, two tankers would ship LNG to a delivery terminal at an as yet unselected site on Canada's east coast, but by 1992, nine ships capable of delivering 1.23 billion cu ft/day of LNG, could be in service. The U.S. and European potential LNG markets amounts to 3-4 trillion cu ft/yr and 3.5-4 trillion cu ft/yr, respectively. Petro-Canada also supports the Polar Gas Ltd. project to lay a gas pipeline from the Arctic Islands and Mackenzie Delta to the south; the projects are not considered to be in competition.

  19. Potential radiological exposure rates resulting from hypothetical dome failure at Tank W-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main plant area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contains 12 buried Gunite tanks that were used for the storage and transfer of liquid radioactive waste. Although the tanks are no longer in use, they are known to contain some residual contaminated sludges and liquids. In the event of an accidental tank dome failure, however unlikely, the liquids, sludges, and radioactive contaminants within the tank walls themselves could create radiation fields and result in above-background exposures to workers nearby. This Technical Memorandum documents a series of calculations to estimate potential radiological exposure rates and total exposures to workers in the event of a hypothetical collapse of a Gunite tank dome. Calculations were performed specifically for tank W-10 because it contains the largest radioactivity inventory (approximately half of the total activity) of all the Gunite tanks. These calculations focus only on external, direct gamma exposures for prescribed, hypothetical exposure scenarios and do not address other possible tank failure modes or routes of exposure. The calculations were performed with established, point-kernel gamma ray modeling codes.

  20. Development and Calibration of New 3-D Vector VSP Imaging Technology: Vinton Salt Dome, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt J. Marfurt; Hua-Wei Zhou; E. Charlotte Sullivan

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vinton salt dome is located in Southwestern Louisiana, in Calcasieu Parish. Tectonically, the piercement dome is within the salt dome minibasin province. The field has been in production since 1901, with most of the production coming from Miocene and Oligocene sands. The goal of our project was to develop and calibrate new processing and interpretation technology to fully exploit the information available from a simultaneous 3-D surface seismic survey and 3-C, 3-D vertical seismic profile (VSP) survey over the dome. More specifically the goal was to better image salt dome flanks and small, reservoir-compartmentalizing faults. This new technology has application to mature salt-related fields across the Gulf Coast. The primary focus of our effort was to develop, apply, and assess the limitations of new 3-C, 3-D wavefield separation and imaging technology that could be used to image aliased, limited-aperture, vector VSP data. Through 2-D and 3-D full elastic modeling, we verified that salt flank reflections exist in the horizontally-traveling portion of the wavefield rather than up- and down-going portions of the wavefield, thereby explaining why many commercial VSP processing flow failed. Since the P-wave reflections from the salt flank are measured primarily on the horizontal components while P-wave reflections from deeper sedimentary horizons are measured primarily on the vertical component, a true vector VSP analysis was needed. We developed an antialiased discrete Radon transform filter to accurately model P- and S-wave data components measured by the vector VSP. On-the-fly polarization filtering embedded in our Kirchhoff imaging algorithm was effective in separating PP from PS wave images. By the novel application of semblance-weighted filters, we were able to suppress many of the migration artifacts associated with low fold, sparse VSP acquisition geometries. To provide a better velocity/depth model, we applied 3-D prestack depth migration to the surface data. The reflector dip calculated from these images were used to further constrain the depth images from the less well sampled VSP data. In spite of the above technical success, we were less than pleased with our final VSP images. Since no extra sources are used, simultaneous recording of the surface and VSP data were believed to provide a cost-effective means to acquire 3-D VSP data. However, the subsurface sampling associated with the VSP is quite different from that associated with the surface seismic data. After our analysis, we find that considerable shot infill would result in a better, unaliased subsurface image. We were able to ascertain that the subsurface illuminated by the VSP was extremely small, with the PS image being even smaller than the PP image. One-way wave equation extrapolators do not work well for the VSP geometry, where we wish to extrapolate energy sideways (from the VSP well towards and away from the salt dome) as well as vertically (away from the shots on the earth surface). Merging separately-generated images proved to be both cumbersome and error-prone. Alternative, advanced multiarrival traveltime calculations that we obtained from research colleagues at other institutions could not be easily modified to image rays that had an upgoing component. In the end, we used a simpler first-arrival Eikonal-based traveltime algorithm with its well-known limitations. While the surface acquisition using radial receiver lines and concentric shot lines provided good illumination of the salt dome, this unconventional geometry proved to be particularly difficult to process using commercial software, where the lack of ''shot lines'' and ''receiver lines'' necessary for dip filtering, residual statics, and residual velocity analysis proved to be nearly intractable. We also learned that while commercial software available at UH works well for a bootstrapped velocity model computed from the seismic data alone, it was severely limited in its ability to include the dense well control available at Vinton Dome. To more accurately estimate velocities, we develope

  1. Pecos River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

  2. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  3. Sandia Energy - Jonathan White

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPowerHighlights -IgalJeremyFeaturedWhite

  4. Platte River Cooperative Agreement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY, CO, DOE...

  5. Conductive incubation and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite-greenstone terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Conductive incubation and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite August 2003; accepted 24 October 2003; published 27 January 2004. [1] The Archean East Pilbara Granite duration, following the burial of radiogenic granitic crust beneath the accumulated greenstone pile

  6. EIS-0021: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Seaway Group Salt Domes, Brazoria County, Texas (also see EIS-0075-S and EIS-0029)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office developed this statement to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Seaway Group of salt domes.

  7. Triaxial creep measurements on rock salt from the Jennings dome, Louisiana, borehole LA-1, core {number_sign}8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wawersik, W.R.; Zimmerer, D.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tejas Power Company requested that facilities in the Rock Mechanics Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories be used to assess the time-dependent properties of rock salt from the Jennings dome in Acadia Parish, Louisiana. Nominally 2.5-inch diameter slat core from borehole LA-1, core 8 (depth 3924.8 to 3837.8 ft; 1196.8--1197.1 m) was provided to accomplish two tasks: (1) Using the smallest possible number of experiments, evaluate the tendency of Jennings salt to undergo time-dependent deformation (creep) under constant applied stresses, and compare the creep of Jennings salt with creep data for rock salt from other locations. (2) Assess the applicability of published laboratory-derived creep properties for rock salt from several bedded and domal sites in finite element analyses concerning the design of new gas storage caverns in the Jennings dome. The characterization of Jennings salt followed the same strategy that was applied in earlier laboratory experiments on core from the Moss Bluff dome near Houston, Texas. This report summarizes the relevant details of five creep experiments on a sample from depth 3927.5 ft, the results obtained, and how these results compared with laboratory creep measurements gathered on rock salt from other locations including the West Hackberry, Bryan Mound and Moss Bluff domes. The report also considers the estimates of specific creep parameters commonly used in numerical engineering design analyses.

  8. Geologic technical assessment of the Richton salt dome, Mississippi, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical assessment and remodeling of existing data indicates that the Richton salt dome, located in southeastern Mississippi, appears to be a suitable site for expansion of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The maximum area of salt is approximately 7 square miles, at a subsurface elevation of about -2000 ft, near the top of the salt stock. Approximately 5.8 square miles of this appears suitable for cavern development, because of restrictions imposed by modeled shallow salt overhang along several sides of the dome. The detailed geometry of the overhang currently is only poorly understood. However, the large areal extent of the Richton salt mass suggests that significant design flexibility exists for a 160-million-barrel storage facility consisting of 16 ten-million-barrel caverns. The dome itself is prominently elongated from northwest to southeast. The salt stock appears to consist of two major spine features, separated by a likely boundary shear zone trending from southwest to northeast. The dome decreases in areal extent with depth, because of salt flanks that appear to dip inward at 70-80 degrees. Caprock is present at depths as shallow as 274 ft, and the shallowest salt is documented at -425 ft. A large number of existing two-dimensional seismic profiles have been acquired crossing, and in the vicinity of, the Richton salt dome. At least selected seismic profiles should be acquired, examined, potentially reprocessed, and interpreted in an effort to understand the limitations imposed by the apparent salt overhang, should the Richton site be selected for actual expansion of the Reserve.

  9. Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Thoms, R.L. [AGM, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P. [Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

  10. Dome-like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, Ruslan; Cho, Kyuil; Kim, Hyong June; Tanatar, Makariy

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''.more »This trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.« less

  11. C-105 heel pit removed and C-105 dome cut paves way for new retrieval technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, Thomas C.; Sutey, Michael J.

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For just the second time, crews have cut a hole in the top of an active radioactive waste storage tank at Hanford. Workers began cutting a 55-inch hole in the top of Tank C-105 last Tuesday night on graveyard shift, completing the cut early Wednesday. The hole will allow for installation of the Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) Vacuum into the tank. The cut was made through 17 inches of concrete and rebar using the newly developed rotary-core cutting system, which uses a laser-guided steel canister with teeth on the bottom to drill a round hole into the tank dome. The project was completed safely and successfully in a high-rad area without contamination or significant dose to workers.

  12. Dome-like variation of the superconducting gap anisotropy in Fe-based superconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Cho, Kyuil [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Kim, Hyong June [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Tanatar, Makariy [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments performed on different iron-based superconductors suggest a variety of possible structures of the superconducting energy gap, both nodeless and nodal. To understand the pairing mechanisms, it is important to identify common features in the behavior of different materials. Measurements of the temperature - dependent London penetration depth provide important information on the structure of the superconducting gap. We show that despite significant differences between different iron - based superconductors, there is a universal trend: the gap is least anisotropic at the optimal doping and its anisotropy increases upon the departure towards underdoped and overdoped ends of the ''superconducting dome''. This trend is not related to the presence of the long-range magnetic order in the underdoped state.

  13. ON THE NATURE OF RECONNECTION AT A SOLAR CORONAL NULL POINT ABOVE A SEPARATRIX DOME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontin, D. I. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Priest, E. R. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Galsgaard, K., E-mail: dpontin@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We consider magnetic reconnection at an isolated coronal null point whose fan field lines form a dome structure. Using analytical and computational models, we demonstrate several features of spine-fan reconnection at such a null, including the fact that substantial magnetic flux transfer from one region of field line connectivity to another can occur. The flux transfer occurs across the current sheet that forms around the null point during spine-fan reconnection, and there is no separator present. Also, flipping of magnetic field lines takes place in a manner similar to that observed in the quasi-separatrix layer or slip-running reconnection.

  14. Characterizing the Weeks Island Salt Dome drilling of and seismic measurements from boreholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.; Harding, R.S.; Jacobson, R.D.; Finger, J.T.; Keefe, R.; Neal, J.T.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sinkhole 36 ft across, 30 ft deep was first observed in the alluvium over the Weeks Island Salt Dome (salt mine converted for oil storage by US Strategic Petroleum Reserve) May 1992. Four vertical, two slanted boreholes were drilled for diagnostics. Crosswell seismic data were generated; the velocity images suggest that the sinkhole collapse is complicated, not a simple vertical structure. The coring operation was moderately difficult; limited core was obtained through the alluvium, and the quality of the salt core from the first two vertical wells was poor. Core quality improved with better bit selection, mud, and drilling method. The drilling fluid program provided fairly stable holes allowing open hole logs to be run. All holes were cemented successfully (although it took 3 attempts in one case).

  15. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  16. SECOQC Business White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solange Ghernaouti-Helie; Igli Tashi; Thomas Laenger; Christian Monyk

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In contemporary cryptographic systems, secret keys are usually exchanged by means of methods, which suffer from mathematical and technology inherent drawbacks. That could lead to unnoticed complete compromise of cryptographic systems, without a chance of control by its legitimate owners. Therefore a need for innovative solutions exists when truly and reliably secure transmission of secrets is required for dealing with critical data and applications. Quantum Cryptography (QC), in particular Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) can answer that need. The business white paper (BWP) summarizes how secret key establishment and distribution problems can be solved by quantum cryptography. It deals with several considerations related to how the quantum cryptography innovation could contribute to provide business effectiveness. It addresses advantages and also limitations of quantum cryptography, proposes a scenario case study, and invokes standardization related issues. In addition, it answers most frequently asked questions about quantum cryptography.

  17. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

  18. White Bear Lake Conservation District (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the White Bear Lake Conservation District, which has the authority to set water and land use regulations for the area around White Bear Lake.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: White Light Creation Architectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Creation Architectures White Light Creation Architectures Overview of SSL White Light Creation Architectures The entire spectral range of visible light can be...

  20. Lori Ann White | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lori Ann White About Us Lori Ann White - Science Writer, SLAC Office of Communications Most Recent President Obama Honors Sidney Drell with National Medal of Science February 4...

  1. Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

  2. Saving a Dwindling River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

  3. EIS-0024: Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Capline Group Salt Domes, Iberia, Napoleonville, Weeks Island Expansion, Bayou Choctaw Expansion, Chacahoula- Iberia, Iberville, and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserves developed this EIS to analyze the environmental impacts which would occur during site preparation and operation of oil storage facilities at each of five proposed candidate sites in the Capline Group of salt domes.

  4. Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

  5. White Grubs in Texas Turfgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.; Biles, Stephen; Mott, Dale

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    White grubs are the larval stage of insects commonly known as May or June beetles. A few species commonly damage turfgrass and other cultivated plants. This publication includes biological and management information....

  6. Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only limited information for structural modeling needed to evaluate the integrity and safety of the proposed cavern field. This study should be augmented with more extensive testing. This report documents a series of test methods, philosophies, and empirical relationships, etc., that are used to define and extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Richton salt. This understanding could be used in conjunction with planned further studies or on its own for initial assessments.

  7. Key word:Daylight Factor Window Wall Ratio Pendentive dome Lighting design Tropical region Architecture and Interior design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Mazloomi

    Abstract: Daylighting design plays important role in architecture of religious buildings such as churches and mosques where pendentive dome construction is frequently used. In daylighting design, many designers face difficulty in estimating the interior share of light which is usually expressed by daylight factor due to complexity of interior form. This study aims to provide designers with a rather high precision rule of thumb for average daylight factor in pendentive dome building. Thus, it investigates the Daylight Factor [DF] distribution of such buildings with reference to the tropics. It takes the Window Wall Ratio [WWR] into account and seeks its influence on daylight factor. By a 12 X 12 points grid, it examines five different ratios including 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 on DF of the floor beneath the dome. The results endorse the direct relation of WWR and DF. The least WWR equal to 0.1 yields an average DF of 0.55 % while the greatest WWR of 0.5 yields in average DF of 2.56%. The intermediate WWR in steps of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 correspond to 1.04, 1.56 and 2.07 percent respectively. As a relatively precise rule of thumb, any increment in consequent steps of WWR with 0.1 intervals results in 0.5 % increase in DF. This can be employed by architects and interior designers for lighting design of pendentive dome buildings in tropical region.

  8. River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

  9. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  10. In situ radioglaciological measurements near Taylor Dome, Antarctica and implications for UHE neutrino astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Besson; J. Jenkins; S. Matsuno; J. Nam; M. Smith; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; P. W. Gorham; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiowave detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions requires an understanding of the radiofrequency (RF) response of cold polar ice. We herein report on a series of radioglaciological measurements performed approximately 10 km north of Taylor Dome Station, Antarctica from Dec. 6, 2006 - Dec. 16, 2006. Using RF signals broadcast from: a) an englacial discone, submerged to a depth of 100 meters and broadcasting to a surface dual polarization horn receiver, and b) a dual-polarization horn antenna on the surface transmitting signals which reflect off the underlying bed and back up to the surface receiver, we have made time-domain estimates of both the real (index-of-refraction) and imaginary (attenuation length) components of the complex ice dielectric constant. We have also measured the uniformity of ice response along two orthogonal axes in the horizontal plane. We observe a wavespeed asymmetry of order 0.1%, projected onto the vertical propagation axis, consistent with some previous measurements, but somewhat lower than others.

  11. In situ radioglaciological measurements near Taylor Dome, Antarctica and implications for UHE neutrino astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, D; Matsuno, S; Nam, J; Smith, M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiowave detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions requires an understanding of the radiofrequency (RF) response of cold polar ice. We herein report on a series of radioglaciological measurements performed approximately 10 km north of Taylor Dome Station, Antarctica from Dec. 6, 2006 - Dec. 16, 2006. Using RF signals broadcast from: a) an englacial discone, submerged to a depth of 100 meters and broadcasting to a surface dual polarization horn receiver, and b) a dual-polarization horn antenna on the surface transmitting signals which reflect off the underlying bed and back up to the surface receiver, we have made time-domain estimates of both the real (index-of-refraction) and imaginary (attenuation length) components of the complex ice dielectric constant. We have also measured the uniformity of ice response along two orthogonal axes in the horizontal plane. We observe a wavespeed asymmetry of order 0.1%, projected onto the vertical propagation axis, consistent with some previ...

  12. Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

  13. Pink/White (ladies' only) Light Blue/White (ladies' only)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Pink/White (ladies' only) Light Blue/White (ladies' only) White/Stone Dill/Dark Green Slate Blue/Heather, Dill/Dark Green, Navy/White, Red/ Black, Slate Blue/Navy, Stone/Fawn, White/Stone. Sizes: S-XL, XXL/Stone Men's Colors: Black, Slate Blue/Navy, Stone/Fawn, White/Stone. Sizes: Order your official Natural Pale

  14. Astrophysics of white dwarf binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Nelemans

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    White dwarf binaries are the most common compact binaries in the Universe and are especially important for low-frequency gravitational wave detectors such as LISA. There are a number of open questions about binary evolution and the Galactic population of white dwarf binaries that can be solved using gravitational wave data and at the same time, our ever improving knowledge about these binaries will help to predict the signals that can be expected for LISA. In addition a number of white dwarf binaries will serve as verification sources for the instrument. I will discuss these issues and report recent, surprising, developments in this field. Finally I report calculations about the feasibility of complementary electro-magnetic observations which unfortunately cannot reproduce the optimistic results of Cooray et al. (2004).

  15. White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Series of white papers from the U.S....

  16. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  17. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  18. WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    the socio-economic effects of drought. Strategic Goals Following the findings and recommendations from two (outside of agriculture) · Few "disaster" declarations · Not even a unified roster of drought eventsWESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER Tracking Socioeconomic Impacts of Drought with Rapid Analytics

  19. White Wind Farms Strategic Communications Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Gina; Noulles, Mary; James, Jessica

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    White Wind Farms is a small, startup Kansas winery located in Paola. The goal of this project was to develop a strategic marketing communications plan to assist in the growth and development of the White Wind Farms brand..

  20. Magnetic field topology of accreting white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Reinsch; Fabian Euchner; Klaus Beuermann; Stefan Jordan

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report first results of our systematic investigation of the magnetic field structure of rotating single magnetic white dwarfs and of white dwarfs in magnetic cataclysmic variables. The global magnetic field distributions on the isolated white dwarf HE1045-0908 and the accreting white dwarfs in EF Eri and CP Tuc have been derived from phase-resolved flux and polarization spectra obtained with FORS1 at the ESO VLT using the systematic method of Zeeman tomography.

  1. Inside the White House: Solar Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Go inside the White House and learn about the installation of solar panels on the roof of the residence.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy of a Mars analogue environment at the North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Cudahy, Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible and near infrared (VNIR) to shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral dataset of the Early Archaean North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, has been analysed for indications of hydrothermal alteration. Occurrence maps of hydrothermal alteration minerals were produced. It was found that using a spatial resolution on the ground of approximately 5 m and spectral coverage from 0.4 to 2.5 mm was sufficient to delineate several hydrothermal alteration zones and associated veins, including phyllic, serpentinitic and chloritic alteration. These results suggest this level of spectral and spatial resolution would be ideal for localising shallow epithermal activity, should such activity have existed, on the surface of Mars.

  3. Bruce A. Measure Rhonda Whiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenth Annual Report to Northwest Governors on Fish and Wildlife Expenditures of the Bonneville Power Administration. PROPOSED ACTION: Approve the final version of the report on Fiscal Year 2010 expenditures has reported to the Northwest governors on Bonneville's expenditures to implement the Columbia River

  4. Joan M. Dukes Rhonda Whiting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Report to Northwest Governors on Fish and Wildlife Expenditures of the Bonneville Power Administration, with any changes approved by the Council at this meeting. PROPOSED ACTION: The public comment on Bonneville's expenditures to implement the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The purpose

  5. Composition of White Lead and Paints.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    33-1208-5m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 8TATIONS. BULLETIN NO. 114 NOVEMBER, 1908. Composition of White lead and Paints. G. S. FRAPS, PH. D,, Chemist. POSTOFFICE : COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. AUSTIY, TEXAS: VON BOECKMANN... of White Lead Sold in Texas ............................... 7 Composition of Outside White Paints .................................... S Other Paints...

  6. Bayesian surface estimation for white light interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamprecht, Fred A.

    .hamprecht@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de). 1 #12;The development of white light interferometers for industry was first guidedBayesian surface estimation for white light interferometry Michael Hissmann Fred A. Hamprecht 2004/07/05 Abstract In conventional white light interferometry (WLI) surface estimation, data acquisition is followed

  7. 1999 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA’s Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem.

  8. 1998 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: 1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and 2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. The load forecast is derived by using economic planning models to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA’s Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit 1) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The 1998 study uses the same economic forecast used for the 1997 study. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads.

  9. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

  10. Performance Limitations of Linear Systems over Additive White Noise Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yiqian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control over additive white noise channels . . . . . . . 1.3Additive white noise channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Angaussian systems over additive gaussian wireles fading

  11. Mammals of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O.; Gentry, J.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, The Forbearer Census'' and White-tailed Deer Studies''. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master's theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.

  12. Mammals of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O.; Gentry, J.B.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, ``The Forbearer Census`` and ``White-tailed Deer Studies``. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master`s theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.

  13. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  14. Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

  15. P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

  16. Bull Trout Population Assessment in the Columbia River Gorge : Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Jim; McPeak, Ron

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarized existing knowledge regarding the known distribution of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) across four sub-basins in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington. The Wind River, Little White Salmon River, White Salmon River, and the Klickitat River sub-basins were analyzed. Cold water is essential to the survival, spawning, and rearing of bull trout. We analyzed existing temperature data, installed Onset temperature loggers in the areas of the four sub-basins where data was not available, and determined that mean daily water temperatures were <15 C and appropriate for spawning and rearing of bull trout. We snorkel surveyed more than 74 km (46.25 mi.) of rivers and streams in the four sub-basins (13.8 km at night and 60.2 km during the day) and found that night snorkeling was superior to day snorkeling for locating bull trout. Surveys incorporated the Draft Interim Protocol for Determining Bull Trout Presence (Peterson et al. In Press). However, due to access and safety issues, we were unable to randomly select sample sites nor use block nets as recommended. Additionally, we also implemented the Bull Trout/Dolly Varden sampling methodology described in Bonar et al. (1997). No bull trout were found in the Wind River, Little White Salmon, or White Salmon River sub-basins. We found bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat drainage of the Klickitat River Sub-basin. Bull trout averaged 6.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in Trappers Creek, 2.6 fish/100m{sup 2} on Clearwater Creek, and 0.4 fish/100m{sup 2} in Little Muddy Creek. Bull trout was the only species of salmonid encountered in Trappers Creek and dominated in Clearwater Creek. Little Muddy Creek was the only creek where bull trout and introduced brook trout occurred together. We found bull trout only at night and typically in low flow regimes. A single fish, believed to be a bull trout x brook trout hybrid, was observed in the Little Muddy Creek. Additional surveys are needed in the West Fork Klickitat and mainstem Klickitat to determine the distribution of bull trout throughout the drainage and to determine the extent of hybridization with brook trout.

  17. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  18. Muddy River Restoration Project Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

  19. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM NERANG RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ALERT System The Nerang River ALERT flood warning system was completed in the early 1990's as a coFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NERANG RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Nerang ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins

  1. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  2. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  3. Rainfall-River Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

  4. Soluble and insoluble lithium dust in the EPICA DomeC ice core--Implications for changes of the East Antarctic dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    Soluble and insoluble lithium dust in the EPICA DomeC ice core--Implications for changes Editor: G.D. Price Available online 16 March 2007 Abstract Continental dust impurities in Antarctic ice with special emphasis on the lithium (Li) content of dust. We obtained two complementary Li-records using a new

  5. Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment We consider coupled subsurface flow and transport within a vertical cross section of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment ­ B ­ We consider coupled subsurface flow). (1) How is the conductive temperature distribution affected by the thermal conductivity of the salt in the simulation? In particular, compare the flow direction along the salt flanks. #12;Model domain No vertical

  6. Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stratton Ridge salt dome is a large salt diapir located only some ten miles from the currently active Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site at Bryan Mound, Texas. The dome is approximately 15 miles south-southwest of Houston. The Stratton Ridge salt dome has been intensively developed, in the desirable central portions, with caverns for both brine production and product storage. This geologic technical assessment indicates that the Stratton Ridge salt dome may be considered a viable, if less-than-desirable, candidate site for potential expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Past development of underground caverns significantly limits the potential options for use by the SPR. The current conceptual design layout of proposed caverns for such an expansion facility is based upon a decades-old model of salt geometry, and it is unacceptable, according to this reinterpretation of salt dome geology. The easternmost set of conceptual caverns are located within a 300-ft buffer zone of a very major boundary shear zone, fault, or other structural feature of indeterminate origin. This structure transects the salt stock and subdivides it into an shallow western part and a deeper eastern part. In places, the distance from this structural boundary to the design-basis caverns is as little as 150 ft. A 300-ft distance from this boundary is likely to be the minimum acceptable stand-off, from both a geologic and a regulatory perspective. Repositioning of the proposed cavern field is possible, as sufficient currently undeveloped salt acreage appears to be available. However, such reconfiguration would be subject to limitations related to land-parcel boundaries and other existing infrastructure and topographic constraints. More broadly speaking, the past history of cavern operations at the Stratton Ridge salt dome indicates that operation of potential SPR expansion caverns at this site may be difficult, and correspondingly expensive. Although detailed information is difficult to come by, widely accepted industry rumors are that numerous existing caverns have experienced major operational problems, including salt falls, sheared casings, and unintended releases of stored product(s). Many of these difficulties may be related to on-going differential movement of individual salt spines or to lateral movement at the caprock-salt interface. The history of operational problems, only some of which appear to be a matter of public record, combined with the potential for encountering escaped product from other operations, renders the Stratton Ridge salt dome a less-than-desirable site for SPR purposes.

  7. Coastal ocean variability off the coast of Taiwan in response to typhoon Morakot : river forcing, atmospheric forcing, and cold dome dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Jennifer Jacobs

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean is a complex, constantly changing, highly dynamical system. Prediction capabilities are constantly being improved in order to better understand and forecast ocean properties for applications in science, industry, ...

  8. Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory...................................................................... 8 Sound from Wind Turbines .............................................................................................. 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound

  9. Gaia - A White Dwarf Discovery Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Jordan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gaia data will help to improve the construction of a luminosity function for the disk and the halo and will provide a more accurate determination of the age of our solar neighborhood. Moreover, reliable stellar dynamical investigations of the disk and halo components will be possible. For the first time it will be possible to test the mass-radius relation of white dwarfs in great detail. Moreover, more accurate masses of magnetic and cool white dwarfs can be expected. Gaia is also expected to discover many new pulsating white dwarfs. The Gaia measurements can also complement the measurements of gravitational waves from close white dwarf binaries with Lisa.

  10. On Powers of Gaussian White Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, A V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical Gaussian white noise in communications and signal processing is viewed as the limit of zero mean second order Gaussian processes with a compactly supported flat spectral density as the support goes to infinity. The difficulty of developing a theory to deal with nonlinear transformations of white noise has been to interpret the corresponding limits. In this paper we show that a renormalization and centering of powers of band-limited Gaussian processes is Gaussian white noise and as a consequence, homogeneous polynomials under suitable renormalization remain white noises.

  11. White Etch Areas: Metallurgical Characterization and Atomistic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Atomistic Modeling Presented by R. Scott Hyde of Timken Company at the 2014 Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar Timken Hyde White Etch Areas ANL Presentation Oct 2014...

  12. White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinton, Jim

    White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. #12;CO white dwarf accretes, either from companion, or from disk after merger. As it approaches maximum mass, C fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. SN Ia

  13. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  14. ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

  15. ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future - creating a low carbon economy and consumers. And we stand up for fair and open markets in the UK, Europe and the world. #12;Our energy future ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future - creating a low carbon economy 1 Foreword

  16. NEW WHITE KIDNEY BEAN for Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW from MSU Snowdon NEW WHITE KIDNEY BEAN for Michigan Michigan State University Extension Bulletin E-3184 December 2012 SNOWDON is a new large- seeded white kidney bean variety from Michigan State bush growth habit. Snowdon is resistant to strains of bean rust, anthracnose and bean common mosaic

  17. Seismology of Accreting White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Arras; Dean Townsley; Lars Bildsten

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsation modes have recently been observed in a handful of white dwarf (WD) primaries of cataclysmic variables, allowing an interesting new probe into the structure of accreting WD's. We briefly discuss the seismology of these objects, how stellar properties may be inferred from the observed mode frequencies, and mode driving mechanisms. For one pulsator, GW Lib, we have shown that a WD mass $M=1.05 M_\\odot$ and accreted envelope mass $M_{\\rm env}=0.4\\times 10^{-4} M_\\odot$ give the best match to the observed pulsation periods. A first exploration of mode driving favors $T_{\\rm eff} = 14 000 K$ and a massive WD, but more work is necessary.

  18. Dyson Spheres around White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semiz, ?brahim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical structure that an advanced civilization might build around a star to intercept all of the star's light for its energy needs. One usually thinks of it as a spherical shell about one astronomical unit (AU) in radius, and surrounding a more or less Sun-like star; and might be detectable as an infrared point source. We point out that Dyson Spheres could also be built around white dwarfs. This type would avoid the need for artificial gravity technology, in contrast to the AU-scale Dyson Spheres. In fact, we show that parameters can be found to build Dyson Spheres suitable --temperature- and gravity-wise-- for human habitation. This type would be much harder to detect.

  19. Object technology: A white paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, S.R.; Arrowood, L.F.; Cain, W.D.; Stephens, W.M.; Vickers, B.D.

    1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Object-Oriented Technology (OOT), although not a new paradigm, has recently been prominently featured in the trade press and even general business publications. Indeed, the promises of object technology are alluring: the ability to handle complex design and engineering information through the full manufacturing production life cycle or to manipulate multimedia information, and the ability to improve programmer productivity in creating and maintaining high quality software. Groups at a number of the DOE facilities have been exploring the use of object technology for engineering, business, and other applications. In this white paper, the technology is explored thoroughly and compared with previous means of developing software and storing databases of information. Several specific projects within the DOE Complex are described, and the state of the commercial marketplace is indicated.

  20. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  3. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  4. South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

  5. Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

  6. An Estimate of White Sharks off Central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapple, Taylor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    edge of a great white shark’s infamous dorsal fin is like aof the dorsal fin of a great white shark. (Credit: Stanford

  7. appearing white matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model of cortical computation: CAM 12 Ballard, Dana H. 3 Is Galactic Dark Matter White ? Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We calculate the expected white dwarf luminosity...

  8. altered white matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model of cortical computation: CAM 12 Ballard, Dana H. 3 Is Galactic Dark Matter White ? Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We calculate the expected white dwarf luminosity...

  9. attenuate white matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model of cortical computation: CAM 12 Ballard, Dana H. 2 Is Galactic Dark Matter White ? Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We calculate the expected white dwarf luminosity...

  10. White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Federal Government White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

  11. accreting white dwarf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Accreting White Dwarfs Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae are explosions in accreting white dwarfs, but the exact...

  12. accreting white dwarfs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Accreting White Dwarfs Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae are explosions in accreting white dwarfs, but the exact...

  13. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)...

  14. Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - October 2011 October 2011 Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene...

  15. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

  16. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

  17. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014...

  18. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the- EnergyGreat-River

  19. EIS-0075: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Phase III Development, Texoma and Seaway Group Salt Domes (West Hackberry and Bryan Mound Expansion, Big Hill Development) Cameron Parish, Louisiana, and Brazoria and Jefferson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Also see EIS-0021 and EIS-0029. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Office developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of expanding the existing SPR storage capacity from 538 million to 750 million barrels of storage and increasing the drawdown capability from 3.5 million to 4.5 million barrels per day. This EIS incorperates two previously issued EISs: DOE/EIS-0021, Seaway Group of Salt Domes, and DOE/EIS-0029, Texoma Group of Salt Domes.

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM HAUGHTON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment and enables moreFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Flooding Flood Forecasting Local Information Haughton ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins

  1. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BURDEKIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment below the DamFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURDEKIN RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Local Information Burdekin ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings

  2. Imaging planets around nearby white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Burleigh; F. J. Clarke; S. T. Hodgkin

    2002-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that Jovian planets will survive the late stages of stellar evolution, and that white dwarfs will retain planetary systems in wide orbits (>5AU). Utilising evolutionary models for Jovian planets, we show that infra-red imaging with 8m class telescopes of suitable nearby white dwarfs should allow us to resolve and detect companions >3Mjup. Detection of massive planetary companions to nearby white dwarfs would prove that such objects can survive the final stages of stellar evolution, place constraints on the frequency of main sequence stars with planetary systems dynamically similar to our own and allow direct spectroscopic investigation of their composition and structure.

  3. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  4. 2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On Wednesday, December 3, President Obama will host the 2014 White House Tribal Nations Conference at the Capital Hilton in Washington, DC. The conference will provide leaders from the 566...

  5. Merging White Dwarfs and Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kerkwijk, Marten H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermonuclear supernovae result when interaction with a companion reignites nuclear fusion in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, causing a thermonuclear runaway, a catastrophic gain in pressure, and the disintegration of the whole white dwarf. It is usually thought that fusion is reignited in near-pycnonuclear conditions when the white dwarf approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. I briefly describe two long-standing problems faced by this scenario, and our suggestion that these supernovae instead result from mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, including those that produce sub-Chandrasekhar mass remnants. I then turn to possible observational tests, in particular those that test the absence or presence of electron captures during the burning.

  6. Strategic Facility Management: A White Paper

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This white paper provides information on the SFP process, its requirements and benefits, and gives a facility manager the basic tools to launch and successfully complete a SFP for the supported organization.

  7. Antonia White: no role for women writers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Amanda Beth

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    books; and Jeanne Flood and Nary Lynn Broe explore White's dramatization of her relationship with her father, which they characterize as Oedipal/incestuous. Flood in particular makes some interesting comments regarding the attitude of fathers toward...

  8. NGNP High Temperature Materials White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew Lommers; George Honma

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper is one in a series of white papers that address key generic issues of the combined construction and operating license (COL) pre-application program key generic issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant reactor using the prismatic block fuel technology. The purpose of the pre-application program interactions with the NRC staff is to reduce the time required for COL application review by identifying and addressing key regulatory issues and, if possible, obtaining agreements for their resolution

  9. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

  10. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    planting saltcedar for stream bank erosion control along such rivers as the Pecos River in New Mexico. The plant has spread down the Pecos River into Texas and is now known to occur along the river south of Interstate 10. More recently the plant has become...

  11. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oregon and Washington stream temperature data Figure 4 and 5. Herman Creek (Oxbow Hatchery): 7-Day Moving.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

  12. Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

  13. Case Studies in River Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

  14. Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act establishes the Niobrara Council, to assist in all aspects of the management of the Niobrara scenic river corridor and promulgate rules and regulations related to the preservation of the...

  15. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  16. Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Shen, Yaogen [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d?>?1.4?nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0?eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d???1.4?nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

  17. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  18. Revised results for geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton Salt Dome.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a revision of SAND2009-0852. SAND2009-0852 was revised because it was discovered that a gage used in the original testing was mis-calibrated. Following the recalibration, all affected raw data were recalculated and re-presented. Most revised data is similar to, but slightly different than, the original data. Following the data re-analysis, none of the inferences or conclusions about the data or site relative to the SAND2009-0852 data have been changed. A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only limited information for structural modeling needed to evaluate the integrity and safety of the proposed cavern field. This study should be augmented with more extensive testing. This report documents a series of test methods, philosophies, and empirical relationships, etc., that are used to define and extend our understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Richton salt. This understanding could be used in conjunction with planned further studies or on its own for initial assessments.

  19. Efficient White SSL Component for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean Evans

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cree has developed a new, high-efficiency, low-cost, light emitting diode (LED) module that should be capable of replacing standard, halogen, fluorescent and metal halide lamps based on the total cost of ownership. White LEDs are produced by combining one or more saturated color LEDs with a phosphor or other light down-converting media to achieve white broad-band illumination. This two year project addressed LED chip, package and phosphor efficiency improvements to establish a technology platform suitable for low-cost, high-efficiency commercial luminaires. New phosphor materials with improved quantum efficiency at 'real-life' operating conditions were developed along with new package technology to improve the efficiency of warm white LED modules compared to the baseline technology. Specifically, Cree has successfully demonstrated warm white LED modules providing 540 lumens at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3000 K. The LED module had an efficacy of 102.8 lumens per watt (LPW) using 1 mm2 chips biased at 350 mA - a 27% improvement over the technology at project start (81 LPW at 3000K). The white modules also delivered an efficacy of 88 LPW at elevated junction temperatures of 125 C. In addition, a proof-of-concept 4-inch downlight luminaire produced a flux of 1183 lumens at a CCT of 2827 K and a color rendering index (CRI) of 80 using this project's phosphor developments.

  20. White flight or flight from poverty?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jego, C; Jego, Charles; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of White flight is often illustrated by the case of Detroit whose population dropped from 1.80 million to 0.95 million between 1950 and 2000 while at the same time its Black and Hispanic component grew from 30 percent to 85 percent. But is this case really representative? The present paper shows that the phenomenon of White flight is in fact essentially a flight from poverty. As a confirmation, we show that the changes in White or Black populations are highly correlated which means that White flight is always paralleled by Black flight (and Hispanic flight as well). This broader interpretation of White flight accounts not only for the case of northern cities such as Cincinnati, Cleveland or Detroit, but for all population changes at county level, provided the population density is higher than a threshold of about 50 per square-kilometer which corresponds to moderately urbanized areas (as can be found in states like Indiana or Virginia for instance).

  1. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

  2. Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system inundation from storms, hurricanes, and tsunamis [Tornqvist et al., 2007; Blum and Roberts, 2009; Jerolmack

  3. Lake Roosevelt White Sturgeon Recovery Project : Annual Progress Report, January 2003 – March 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Matthew D.; McLellan, Jason G. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes catch data collected from white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in Lake Roosevelt during limited setlining and gill netting activities in the fall of 2003, and documents progress toward development of a U.S. white sturgeon conservation aquaculture program for Lake Roosevelt. From 27-30 October, 42 overnight small mesh gill net sets were made between Marcus and Northport, WA for a total catch of 15 juvenile white sturgeon (275-488 mm FL). All sturgeon captured were of Canadian hatchery origin. These fish had been previously released as sub-yearlings into the Canadian portion (Keenleyside Reach) of the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River during 2002 and 2003. Most sturgeon (n=14) were caught in the most upstream area sampled (Northport) in low velocity eddy areas. Five fish exhibited pectoral fin deformities (curled or stunted). Growth rates were less than for juvenile sturgeon captured in the Keenleyside Reach but condition factor was similar. Condition factor was also similar to that observed in juvenile sturgeon (ages 1-8) captured in the unimpounded Columbia River below Bonneville Dam between 1987-92. From 10-14 November, 28 overnight setline sets were made in the Roosevelt Reach between the confluence of the Spokane River and Marcus Island for a total catch of 17 white sturgeon (94-213 cm FL). Catch was greatest in the most upstream areas sampled, a distribution similar to that observed during a WDFW setline survey in Lake Roosevelt in 1998. The mean W{sub r} index of 110% for fish captured this year was higher than the mean W{sub r} of 91% for fish captured in 1998. Excellent fish condition hindered surgical examination of gonads as lipid deposits made the ventral body wall very thick and difficult to penetrate with available otoscope specula. Acoustic tags (Vemco model V16 coded pingers, 69 kHz, 48-month life expectancy) were internally applied to 15 fish for subsequent telemetry investigations of seasonal and reproductively motivated movements. In August 2003, three Vemco VR2 fixed station acoustic receivers, supplied by the UCWSRI Transboundary Telemetry Project, were deployed in the vicinities of Kettle Falls Bridge, Marcus Island, and Northport, WA. Data downloaded from these receivers through December 2003 confirmed the findings of a previous telemetry study that the Marcus area is an important overwintering habitat for white sturgeon. On 18 February 2004, juvenile white sturgeon (n=2,000) were transported from Kootenay Sturgeon Hatchery in British Columbia to WDFW Columbia Basin Hatchery (CBH) in Moses Lake, WA. Fish were reared at CBH to approximately 30 g and individually outfitted with PIT tags and scute marked. On 11 May 2004, fish were released into Lake Roosevelt in the vicinities of Kettle Falls Bridge, North Gorge, and Northport.

  4. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

  5. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDYof the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas,

  6. White House Forum on Minorities in Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the White House Forum on Minorities in Energy, Secretary Moniz honored the Ambassadors of the Minorities in Energy Initiative -- senior-level leaders dedicated to advancing underrepresented groups in the energy sector. Panel discussions at the event covered a wide range of issues including increasing participation in STEM fields by minorities and engaging communities in energy and climate issues.

  7. Business-driven security White paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2008 Business-driven security White paper Take a holistic approach to business-driven security. #12;Take a holistic approach to business-driven security. 2 Overview Today's corporate leaders face multiple challenges, including the need to innovate in extremely competitive business climates

  8. Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

  9. White Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the international fusion program, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is now halfwayWhite Paper on Magnetic Fusion Program Strategies Prepared for The President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology Prepared by David E. Baldwin Senior Vice President for Fusion General

  10. California White Shark Abundance SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    of shark fins, white sharks were attracted to the6 research vessel using a 1 m long seal-shaped decoy the dorsal fin emerged,14 high-resolution photographs were taken with a Nikon D40X or D90 (55-200 mm lens15, dorsal fin photographs20 were recorded from the high-definition video. Once the appropriate data were

  11. PO Box 2349 White Salmon, WA 98672

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PO Box 2349 White Salmon, WA 98672 509.493.4468 www.newbuildings.org COMMERCIAL ROOFTOP HVAC ENERGY from utility-sponsored field service measures on small (typically 3-10 tons) commercial rooftop unitary utility-funded RTU service programs. New Buildings Institute (NBI) staff has been managing the research

  12. Platform for Hybrid Cloud Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Platform for Hybrid Cloud Technical White Paper Published: September 2013 (updated) Applies to: SQL Server and Windows Azure Summary: Cloud computing brings a new paradigm shift in computing in the cloud with greater scale and flexibility. Microsoft SQL Server runs very well in the cloud environment

  13. White paper IBM Global Services Government Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White paper IBM Global Services Government Solutions IBM Smarter City Solutions on Cloud #12;2 IBM Smarter City Solutions on Cloud Contents 2 Disclaimer 2 Executive summary 3 Challenges faced by governments today 4 Cloud: How city managers can lower costs and improve services 9 Defining a smarter city 10

  14. IBM Software Thought Leadership White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Software Thought Leadership White Paper August 2011 Transforming software delivery with cloud #12;2 Transforming software delivery with cloud Contents 2 Cloud: An opportunity 2 Increasing pressure and centralizing ALM and developer desktops 5 Concluding thoughts on the cloud Cloud: An opportunity The world

  15. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  16. Influences on Mercury Bioaccumulation Factors for the Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) are a regulatory instrument designed to reduce the amount of mercury entering a water body and ultimately to control the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish. TMDLs are based on a BAF (bioaccumulation factor), which is the ratio of methyl mercury in fish to dissolved methyl mercury in water. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous methyl mercury samples collected at a number of locations and over several seasons in a 118 km reach of the Savannah River demonstrated that species specific BAFs varied by factors of three to eight. Factors contributing to BAF variability were location, habitat and season related differences in fish muscle tissue mercury levels and seasonal differences in dissolved methyl mercury levels. Overall (all locations, habitats, and seasons) average BAFs were 3.7 x 106 for largemouth bass, 1.4 x 106 for sunfishes, and 2.5 x 106 for white catfish. Inaccurate and imprecise BAFs can result in unnecessary economic impact or insufficient protection of human health. Determination of representative and precise BAFs for mercury in fish from large rivers necessitates collecting large and approximately equal numbers of fish and aqueous methyl mercury samples over a seasonal cycle from the entire area and all habitats to be represented by the TMDL.

  17. White light emitting diode as liquid crystal display backlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon, Chian Myau

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of high brightness (white) light emitting diode (LED) is considered as a real threat to the current lighting industry in various applications. One of the most promising sectors would be using white LED to ...

  18. EIS-0376: White Wind Farm Brookings County, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by Western to interconnect its proposed White Wind Farm Project (Project) to Western’s transmission system at the existing White...

  19. VBH-0068- In the Matter of Ronald D. White

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision involves a complaint filed by Ronald D. White (White or “Complainant”) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708....

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

  1. Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

  2. An Inside Look at River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

  3. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

  4. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  5. Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

  6. River System Hydrology in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

  7. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  8. South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River J. Michael Jess Platte, and Arkansas rivers, for example, have been resolved through litigation brought before the U and Kansas are examples. In the Platte River watershed the State of Nebraska has experience allocating water

  9. Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior to and Following Elevated Flows in the Central Platte River, Spring 2008 Flows in the Central Platte River, Nebraska, Spring 2008 By Paul J. Kinzel Prepared in cooperation

  10. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  11. Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain: an analysis. Historical ecology of the lower Santa Clara River,Ventura River, and Oxnard Plain: an analysis of terrestrial layers are available on SFEI's website, at www.sfei.org/projects/VenturaHE. Permissions rights for images

  12. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At White Mountains Area (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  14. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  15. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  16. Spectral modeling of gaseous metal disks around DAZ white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnstedt, Jürgen

    been found at G29-38, the hypothesis was put forward that a dust cloud around the white dwarf causesSpectral modeling of gaseous metal disks around DAZ white dwarfs Klaus Werner, Thorsten Nagel for the first non-LTE modeling of gaseous metal disks around single DAZ white dwarfs recently discovered by G

  17. METHODS AND APPLICATIONS White and green screening with circular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regan, Lynne

    METHODS AND APPLICATIONS White and green screening with circular polymerase extension cloning frustrating. Here, we present a stream- lined cloning strategy that incorporates a powerful white and green, or substitution libraries. Keywords: GFP; blue-white screening; circular polymerase extension cloning; Phusion

  18. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River estuary was a high-energy environment dominated by physical forces, with extensive sand Riddell November 28, 2000 ISAB 2000-5 #12;ISAB 2000-5 Estuary Report i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Northwest to an informed response to the Council. Consequently, this report has been prepared as a preliminary reply

  19. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  20. SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

  1. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated in the package may cause a deterioration of encapsulant materials, affecting the performance of both the LED die and phosphor, leading to a decrease in the luminous efficacy over lifetime. Recent studies from research groups at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that, under the condition to obtain a white light, about 40% of the light is transmitted outward of the phosphor layer and 60% of the light is reflected inward.1,2 It is claimed that using scattered photon extraction (SPE) technique, luminous efficacy is increased by 60%. In this project, a transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor was used to replace the powdered phosphor layer. In the normal pcLED package, the powdered phosphor is mixed with silicone either to be deposited on the top of LED die forming a chip level conversion (CLC) white LED or to be casted in the package forming a volume conversion white LED. In the monolithic phosphors there are no phosphor powder/silicone interfaces so it can reduce the light scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is inserted in the white LED package between the blue LED die and phosphor layer. It will selectively transmit the blue light from the LED die and reflect the phosphor's yellow inward emission outward. The two technologies try to recover backward light to the outward direction in the pcLED package thereby improving the package extraction efficiency.

  2. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  3. The hydraulic jump as a white hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  4. Low Voltage White Phosphorescent OLED Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and its research partners at Princeton University and the University of Southern California have succeeded in developing a white phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) that achieved a record efficiency of 20 lumens per watt. This achievement is the result of the team's collaborative efforts to increase the efficiency of PHOLED lighting by focusing on two critical factors: lowering the drive voltages and increasing the amount of light extracted.

  5. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  6. Discovery of a peculiar DQ white dwarf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Carollo; S. T. Hodgkin; A. Spagna; R. L. Smart; M. G. Lattanzi; B. J. McLean; D. J. Pinfield

    2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a new carbon rich white dwarf that was identified during a proper motion survey for cool white dwarfs based on photographic material used for the construction of the Guide Star Catalog II. Its large proper motion (0.48 arcsec/yr) and faint apparent magnitude (V = 18.7) suggest a nearby object of low luminosity. A low-resolution spectrum taken with the William Herschel Telescope clearly shows strong C2 Deslandres-d'Azambuja and Swan bands, which identify the star as a DQ white dwarf. The strength of the Deslandres-d'Azambuja bands and the depression of the continuum in the Swan-band region are signs of enhanced carbon abundance for the given Teff. Comparison of our spectrophotometric data to published synthetic spectra suggests 6000 K < Teff < 8000 K although further analysis with specialized synthetic models appear necessary to derive both Teff and chemical composition. Finally, the range of spatial velocity estimated for this object makes it a likely member of the halo or thick disk population.

  7. Cooling Models for Old White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brad M. S. Hansen

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new white dwarf cooling models which incorporate an accurate outer boundary condition based on new opacity and detailed radiative transfer calculations. We find that helium atmosphere dwarfs cool considerably faster than has previously been claimed, while old hydrogen atmosphere dwarfs will deviate significantly from black body appearance. We use our new models to derive age limits for the Galactic disk. We find that the Liebert, Dahn & Monet (1988) luminosity function yields an age of only 6 Gyr if it is complete to stated limits. However, age estimates of individual dwarfs and the luminosity function of Oswalt et al (1995) are both consistent with disk ages as large as \\sim 11 Gyr. We have also used our models to place constraints on white dwarf dark matter in Galactic halos. We find that previous attempts using inadequate cooling models were too severe and that direct detection limits allow a halo that is 11 Gyr old. If the halo is composed solely of helium atmosphere dwarfs, the lower age limit is only 7.5 Gyr. We also demonstrate the importance of studying the cooling sequences of white dwarfs in Globular clusters.

  8. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lechel, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  9. SDI: Solar Dome Instrument for Solar Irradiance Monitoring Tao Liu1, Ankur U. Kamthe1, Varick L. Erickson1, Carlos F. M. Coimbra2 and Alberto E. Cerpa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    SDI: Solar Dome Instrument for Solar Irradiance Monitoring Tao Liu1, Ankur U. Kamthe1, Varick L data for ground solar irradiance (direct normal and global irradiance) is a major obstacle for the de- velopment of adequate policies to promote and take advan- tage of existing solar technologies. Although

  10. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  11. Daily movements of female white-tailed deer relative to parturition and breeding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gino J. D'Angelo; Christopher E. Comer; John C. Kilgo; Cory D. Drennan; David A. Osborn; Karl V. Miller

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: To assess how white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herd demographics influence reproductive behaviors, we examined 24-h diel movements of female whitetailed deer relative to parturition and breeding in a low-density population with a near even sex ratio at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina. We conducted a series of intensive, 24-h radio-tracking periods of 13 females during spring and fall 2002. We compared daily range (ha), rate of travel (m/h), and distance between extreme daily locations (m), among the periods of pre-parturition and post-parturition and pre-, peak-, and post-rut. From pre-parturition to post-parturition, we observed decreases in diel range size (�¢����38.2%), distance between extreme diel locations (�¢����17.0%), and diel rate of travel (�¢����18.2%). Diel range size, distance between extreme diel locations, and diel rate of travel during the pre-rut and rut exceeded those observed during post-rut. We further identified substantial increases in mobility during 12 24-h diel periods for eight females during our fall monitoring. Our data suggest that female white-tailed deer reduce mobility post-fawning following exaggerated movements during pre-parturition. Furthermore, despite a near equal sex ratio, estrous does may be required to actively seek potential mates due to low population density.

  12. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  13. Search for Higgs shifts in white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Onofrio; Gary A. Wegner

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for differential shifts between electronic and vibronic transitions in carbon-rich white dwarfs BPM 27606 and Procyon B. The absence of differential shifts within the spectral resolution and taking into account systematic effects such as space motion and pressure shifts allows us to set the first upper bound of astrophysical origin on the coupling between the Higgs field and the Kreschmann curvature invariant. Our analysis provides the basis for a more general methodology to derive bounds to the coupling of long-range scalar fields to curvature invariants in an astrophysical setting complementary to the ones available from high-energy physics or table-top experiments.

  14. White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird, Idaho: Energy Resources JumpMeadow Lake, NewWhite

  15. White Oak Builders | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird, Idaho: Energy Resources JumpMeadow Lake, NewWhiteBuilders

  16. Whiting, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird, Idaho: Energy ResourcesOhio:Whitestown,Whiting, Vermont:

  17. Sandia Energy - White Light Creation Architectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware HometdheinrWater/Energy NexusWhite

  18. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youTheWSRC-TR-97-0100WHITE LED WITH HIGH PACKAGE

  19. Technical White Papers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergyTeam CumberlandFebruary 2010Rulemaking |White

  20. White Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraphWellton-MohawkWesternwishWhirlpoolWhite

  1. White House | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraphWellton-MohawkWesternwishWhirlpoolWhiteHouse

  2. New Efficiency Record Achieved for White OLED Device

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Osram Opto-Semiconductors, Inc. has successfully demonstrated a white organic light emitting diode (OLED) with a record efficiency of 25 lumens per watt, the highest known efficiency achieved to date for a polymer-based white OLED. The 25 LPW cool-white-emitting device was produced by applying a standard external inorganic phosphor to Osram's record-breaking blue-emitting phosphorescent polymer device with a peak luminous efficacy of 14 LPW.

  3. Recent Developments in Quantum White Noise Calculus: Quantum White Noise Derivatives and Implementation Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obata, Nobuaki

    ) is defined by . . (H) = { = (fn) ; fn Hn , 2 = n=0 n!|fn|2 0 ) ), respectively. (The pair {at, a t ; t T } is called the quantum white noise on T .) Definition Given l,m (E(l+m,m (E(l+m) ) , where the right-hand side converges

  4. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  5. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    employee Matthew Gay uses critical electronic rounds to take a reading at the Savannah River National Laboratory. In one Continuous Improvement initiative, SRNS switched to...

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  8. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) More Documents & Publications PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite...

  9. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  10. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  11. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  12. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  13. South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

  14. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

  15. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  16. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  17. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  18. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: river current energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  20. Food and Drug Administration White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardshi...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Stewardship and Cost Savings FEMP ESPC Success Story on water conservation and green energy at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) White Oak Campus....

  1. 21st Century Truck Partnership - Roadmap and Technical White...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Appendix containing supporting information to the 21st Century Partnership's Roadmap and Technical White Papers (21CTP-003). 21ctproadmapappendix2007.pdf More Documents &...

  2. White Creek and Nine Canyon wind farms Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additional wind storage and shaping services. Since these White Creek and Nine Canyon wind farms December 2006 2 Bonne ville Power Administration DOEBP-3770 November 2006...

  3. ancli white papers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the interior Simitev, Radostin D 120 Computational Modeling and the Experimental Plasma Research Program A White Paper Submitted to the FESAC Subcommittee Plasma Physics and...

  4. The White House's Week of Making | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as advanced manufacturing and technology. Last year, the Energy Department's Albert Einstein Teaching Fellowship responded to the White House's Maker call to action by announcing...

  5. White House Announces New Executive Order To Reduce Greenhouse...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the next decade (from 2008 levels) and increase the share of electricity the federal government consumes from renewable sources to 30%. According to the White House, the...

  6. White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters White House Council of Economic Advisers and...

  7. ESPC Success Story - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (FDA) White Oak Campus espcsswhiteoak.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Savings Performance Contract Success Stories ESPC Sucess Story - Harold Washington...

  8. Investigations of Bearing Failures Associated with White Etching...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Bearing Failures Associated with White Etching Areas (irWEAs) in Wind Turbine Gearboxes Presented by Bob Errichello of GEARTECH at the Wind Turbine Tribology...

  9. Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Results in the European Union Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results...

  10. Cooking Up New Nanoribbons to Make Better White LEDs | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    appealing white phosphors based on LEDs. The materials combine the rare-earth element europium with aluminum oxide to form europium aluminate nanoribbons. Powders of europium oxide...

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  12. Theory of Neutrinos: a White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohapatra, R.N.; Antusch, S.; Babu, K.S.; Barenboim, G.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Davidson, S.; de Gouvea, A.; de Holanda, P.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Grossman, Y.; Joshipura, A.; Kayser,; Kersten, J.; Keum, Y.Y.; King, S.F.; Langacker, P.; Lindner, M.; Loinaz, W.; Masina, I.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanty, S.; /Maryland U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Southampton U. /Oklahoma

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ''The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report [1] provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

  13. Theory of neutrinos: A White paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohapatra, R.N.; Antusch, S.; Babu, K.S.; Barenboim, G.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Davidson, S.; de Gouvea, A.; de Holanda, P.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Grossman, Y.; Joshipura, A.; Kayser,; Kersten, J.; Keum, Y.Y.; King, S.F.; Langacker, P.; Lindner, M.; Loinaz, W.; Masina, I.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanty, S.; /Maryland U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Southampton U. /Oklahoma

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ''The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report [1] provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

  14. Theory of Neutrinos: A White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Mohapatra; S. Antusch; K. S. Babu; G. Barenboim; M. -C. Chen; S. Davidson; A. de Gouvea; P. de Holanda; B. Dutta; Y. Grossman; A. Joshipura; B. Kayser; J. Kersten; Y. Y. Keum; S. F. King; P. Langacker; M. Lindner; W. Loinaz; I. Masina; I. Mocioiu; S. Mohanty; H. Murayama; S. Pascoli; S. T. Petcov; A. Pilaftsis; P. Ramond; M. Ratz; W. Rodejohann; R. Shrock; T. Takeuchi; T. Underwood; L. Wolfenstein

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ``The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

  15. Freak waves in white dwarfs and magnetars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabry, R. [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Moslem, W. M. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report properties of ion acoustic freak waves that propagate in a plasma composed of warm ions and ultrarelativistic electrons and positrons. The dynamics of the nonlinear freak waves is governed by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The possible region for the freak waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of white dwarfs and magnetars corona. It is found that for low wave number, the nonlinear ion-acoustic wave packets are structurally stable in magnetars corona than in white dwarfs. However, for large wave numbers the situation is opposite. The critical wave number threshold (k{sub c}), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, is defined for both applications. It is seen that near to k{sub c} the freak wave amplitude becomes high, but it decreases whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. For the wave numbers close to k{sub c}, the increase of the unperturbed density ratio of positrons-to-electrons ({beta}) would lead to increase the freak wave amplitude, but for larger wave numbers the amplitude decreases with the increase of {beta}.

  16. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  17. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  18. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  19. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Savannah River Field Office Savannah River Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report...

  20. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  1. alligator rivers region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  2. aliakmon river greece: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  3. allegheny river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  4. almendares river havana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  5. amu dar river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  6. amazon river system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use in indigenous and Colonist Communities of the Palcazu Basin, Peruvian Amazon McClain, Michael 159 Charlotte, Manatee River, Sarasota, Hardee, and Peace River Soil Biology...

  7. Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm...

  8. Preliminary Notice of Violation,Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC - WEA-2012-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC - WEA-2010-05...

  9. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site Apps. Accreditation Boundary PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution IBARS Srs Site...

  10. John C. Barnes of Savannah River Operations named 2012 Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    right, discusses a transuranic (TRU) waste container with Charles Fairburn of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. The TRU waste container was repackaged in the Savannah River Site...

  11. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

  12. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Field Office Tritium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Site (SRS) tritium facilities implemented at the activity-level by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC and its subcontractors. The review was performed by the...

  13. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Salt...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Startup Test Plans - June 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste...

  14. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

  15. Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates 10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear...

  16. Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning...

  17. Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and...

  18. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Savannah River National Laboratory - January 2012 January 2012 Follow-up Review of...

  19. assessment columbia river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and disturbances may be ineffective are being spent in the United States on river and stream restoration projects. In the Columbia River basin Montgomery, David R. 311 A...

  20. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER...

  1. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

  2. Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional Laboratory Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional Laboratory January 28, 2015 -...

  3. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...

  4. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site...

  5. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

  6. Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomicSavannah River

  7. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0InputYear Jan FebtotalRiver

  8. Caney River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind IICaney River Jump to: navigation,

  9. Electrophoretic Deposition of Highly Efficient Phosphors for White Solid State Lighting using near UV-Emitting LEDs /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jae Ik

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application in white light emitting diode,” J. Mater. Res. ,phosphors for white light emitting diodes (LEDs)”, 220 thconverted white light emitting diodes by electrophoretic

  10. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  11. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enables. Flood ALERT System The initial Ipswich Creeks ALERT flood warning system was completed in the earlyFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH This brochure describes the flood warning

  12. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  13. RiverFalls,Wisconsin SolarinSmall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), which services approximately 5,800 customers, the largest being UW-RF.ii Together, the utility are solar (most are biogas and wind), the program has helped to raise awareness and interest in renewable energy within the community.v Bringing Solar to River Falls The success of the River Falls Renewable

  14. Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan (WPP) began in November 2009 upon acceptance of the WPP by EPA. The primary goals of implementing the plan are to improve the health of the Pecos River watershed and instream water quality...

  15. Restoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , the first-ever comprehensive database of more than 37,000 stream and restoration projects nationwideRestoring our Rivers By Bridget Avila Maryland has the largest number of river restoration projects restoration and conservation. On a sweltering July afternoon, an assortment of men and women clad in T

  16. California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

  17. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  18. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

  19. 2013 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2013 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (2013 White Book) is BPA's latest projection of the Pacific Northwest regional retail loads, contract obligations, contract purchases, and resource capabilities. The 2013 White Book is a snapshot of conditions as of October 1, 2013, documenting the loads and resources for the Federal system and region for the 10-year study period OY 2014 through 2023. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). Starting with the 2012 White Book, BPA changed the annual production schedule for future White Books. BPA is scheduled to publish a complete White Book, which includes a Federal System Needs Assessment analysis, every other year (even years). In the odd-numbered years, BPA will publish a biennial summary update (Supplement) that only contains major changes to the Federal System and Regional System analyses that have occurred since the last White Book. http://www.bpa.gov/power/pgp/whitebook/2013/index.shtml.

  20. Chaos expansion of heat equations with white noise potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yaozhong

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The asymptotic behavior as t --> infinity of the solution to the following stochastic heat equations [GRAPHICS] is investigated, where w is a space-time white noise or a space white noise. The use of lozenge means that the stochastic integral of 10...

  1. Short Communication Cytogenetics of Hispanic and White Children with Acute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Short Communication Cytogenetics of Hispanic and White Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites. Among B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, the percentage, interestingly, Hispanics are reported to have a higher incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than non

  2. WHITING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Rising to the Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    to knowledge, engineering human health, and improving global well-being and security. To support1 2 WHITING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Rising to the Challenge: The Campaign for Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering Wyman Park Building, Suite 400 3400 North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218

  3. Original article Effects of tropospheric ozone on white clover plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effects of tropospheric ozone on white clover plants exposed in open-top chambers concentration in a large part of Europe is high enough to cause visible injury to sensitive plants and several site are evaluated using white clover plants. Plants were exposed to the air and sprayed with water

  4. EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF WHITE BASS IN LAKE POINSETT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOUTH DAKOTA a1/-F c ) o o ~ 0 EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF WHITE BASS IN LAKE POINSETT South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501 OF WHITE BASS IN LAKE POINSETT 1999 Statewide Fisheries Investigations Completion Report by H. Denise Beck

  5. Hillenbrand, Slesnick & White. Spitzer Cycle 1 Proposal 1 Scientific Justification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillenbrand, Lynne

    Hillenbrand, Slesnick & White. Spitzer Cycle 1 Proposal 1 Scientific Justification Young Brown (cloud-core fragmentation, collapse, and subsequent accretion of material onto a hydrostatic core). Most accretion (e.g. White & Basri 2003; Muzerolle et al. 2003) onto proto-brown dwarf photospheres which occurs

  6. www.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and missile launch, tracking, and recovery · Nuclear effects testing · High-speed sled track · Directed energy weapons testing · Climatic and dynamic environments testing · Atmospheric research · Electronicwww.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES SUMMARY White Sands Test Facility (WSTF

  7. a microsoft white paper Drilling for new Business Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Phil

    a microsoft white paper Drilling for new Business Value How innovative oil and gas companies Perez, Enterprise Architect, Microsoft #12;a microsoft white paper Drilling for new B usiness Value 2 for new B usiness Value 3 executive summary as the buzz about big data makes the leap from technology

  8. think.change.do White (UTS-logo-Title-Negative)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    2 think.change.do White (UTS-logo-Title-Negative) colour (UTS-logo-Title-321) Black (UTS-logo-NoTitle-Black) White (UTS-logo-NoTitle-Negative) colour (UTS-logo-NoTitle-321) UtS acronym with colon The UTS acronym

  9. The Spanish Square Kilometre Array White Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, J A Acosta; Alberdi, A; Alcolea, J; Alfaro, E J; Alonso-Herrero, A; Anglada, G; Arnalte-Mur, P; Ascasibar, Y; Ascaso, B; Azulay, R; Bachiller, R; Baez-Rubio, A; Battaner, E; Blasco, J; Brook, C B; Bujarrabal, V; Busquet, G; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C; Casares, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Colina, L; Colomer, F; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; del Olmo, A; Desmurs, J-F; Diego, J M; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R; Estalella, R; Fernandez-Soto, A; Florido, E; Font, J; Font, J A; Fuente, A; Garcia-Burillo, S; Garcia-Benito, R; Garcia-Lorenzo, B; de Paz, A Gil; Girart, J M; Goicoechea, J R; Gomez, J F; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Gonzalez-Serrano, J I; Gorgas, J; Gorosabel, J; Guijarro, A; Guirado, J C; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Herrero-Illana, R; Hu, Y-D; Huelamo, N; Huertas-Company, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Jeong, S; Jimenez-Serra, I; Knapen, J H; Lineros, R A; Lisenfeld, U; Marcaide, J M; Marquez, I; Marti, J; Marti, J M; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Martin-Pintado, J; Marti-Vidal, I; Masegosa, J; Mayen-Gijon, J M; Mezcua, M; Mimica, S/ Migliari P; Moldon, J; Morata, O; Negueruela, I; Oates, S R; Osorio, M; Palau, A; Paredes, J M; Perea, J; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Perez-Montero, E; Perez-Torres, M A; Perucho, M; Planelles, S; Pons, J A; Prieto, A; Quilis, V; Ramirez-Moreta, P; Almeida, C Ramos; Rea, N; Ribo, M; Rioja, M J; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Ros, E; Rubiño-Martin, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Sabater, J; Sanchez, M A P; Usero, A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Vidal-Garcia, A; Vielva, P; Vilchez, J; Zhang, B-B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 119 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.

  10. Heat Equations with Fractional White Noise Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y. [Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, 405 Snow Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-2142 (United States)], E-mail: hu@math.ukans.edu

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the following stochastic heat equations: ({partial_derivative}u{sub t}(x))/({partial_derivative}t=1/2 u{sub t}(x)+{omega}{sup H}.u{sub t}(x)), x element of {sup d}, t>0, where w{sup H} is a time independent fractional white noise with Hurst parameter H=(h{sub 1}, h{sub 2},..., h{sub d}) , or a time dependent fractional white noise with Hurst parameter H=(h{sub 0}, h{sub 1},..., h{sub d}) . Denote | H | =h{sub 1}+h{sub 2}+...+h{sub d} . When the noise is time independent, it is shown that if 1/2 d-1 , then the solution is in L{sub 2} and the L{sub 2} -Lyapunov exponent of the solution is estimated. When the noise is time dependent, it is shown that if 1/2 d- 2 /( 2h{sub 0}-1 ) , the solution is in L{sub 2} and the L{sub 2} -Lyapunov exponent of the solution is also estimated. A family of distribution spaces S{sub {rho}} , {rho} element of RR , is introduced so that every chaos of an element in S{sub {rho}} is in L{sub 2} . The Lyapunov exponents in S{sub {rho}} of the solution are also estimated.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12 Holman White PM Conference 2010 Rev...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PowerPoint - 12 Holman White PM Conference 2010 Rev 2 revised Microsoft PowerPoint - 12 Holman White PM Conference 2010 Rev 2 revised Microsoft PowerPoint - 12 Holman White PM...

  12. Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE (information may be distributed without restriction, subject to copyright controls.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    the event for their gain. The Threats: Internet watch groups and cyber security experts have already potential cyber threats please visit the Center for Internet Security website at CISecurity.org. #12;Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE (information may be distributed without

  13. Larviculture of native white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus, and exotic white shrimp, P. vannanmei at Continental Fisheries, Limited, Panama City, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranyakananda, Porcham

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARVICULTURE OF NATIVE WHITE SHRIMP, Penaeus setiferus, AND EXOTIC WHITE SHRIMP, P. vannamei, AT CONTINENTAL FISHERIES. LIMITED. PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Internship Report by PORCHAM ARANYAKANANDA Submitted to the Department of Wildlife..., AT CONTINENTAL FISHERIES, LIMITED, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Internship Report by PORCHAM ARANYAKANANDA Approved as to style and content by ( Chairman of Committee ) ( Member ) ( Member ) ABSTRACT Larviculture of native wnite snrimp, penaeus setiferus...

  14. Lead isotopic evidence for synextensional lithospheric ductile flow in the Colorado River extensional corridor, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuerbach, Daniel L.; Reagan, Mark K.; Faulds, James E.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    -RELATED LAVAS 46- Th/U=15 ......... 3:: __.:.:. Th/U=4  42 . ,-, : ....... . ,.,:,..  , ::.;. :I ' ....-,.--: -.7 :-:. 34 I I I õ g 23 27 3 ZOpb/ZO4pb iBor 2. Fields showing the relationship of present day oPbflo4pb to oPbflo4pb... the geochemistry of lavas from the northern Colorado River extensional corridor, we combine new data in Table I with previously published geochronologic and geochemical data from the central Black Mountains [Faulds et al., 1995; Metcalf et al., 1995] and White...

  15. Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

  16. ScienceEducation.gov Featured on the new White House Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of Public Affairs The White House recently posted ScienceEducation.gov (beta version) to its Innovations Gallery - a part of the White House Open Government...

  17. Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, a Top White House National Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, a Top White House National Security Council Official, Confirmed as Deputy Secretary of Department of Energy Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, a Top White...

  18. Responding to the Risk of White Shark Attack Updated Statistics, Prevention, Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    477 CHAPTER 31 Responding to the Risk of White Shark Attack Updated Statistics, Prevention, Control ................................................................................................................................... 478 White Shark Attack Statistics........................................................................................................ 479 Definition of Shark Attack

  19. White Kids: Identity Construction, Critical Mass, and Symbolic Exclusion in High School Cliques and other Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lueck, Kerstin; Steffen, Hayley

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. (1997). The social construction of Whiteness. In R.bre White Kids: Identity Construction, Critical Mass, andKeywords: Identity Construction, Symbolic Exclusion,

  20. age-related white matter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    According to this hypothesis, ... Tsenkina, Yanina 2013-07-06 4 Is Galactic Dark Matter White ? Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We calculate the expected white dwarf luminosity...

  1. Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Annual Tour Ready to Explore New Mexico's Lower Pecos River By Steve Ress The itinerary is set and the seats have been filled for an early June bus tour to New Mexico's lower Pecos River basin compacts on Nebraska's Republican River and New Mexico's Pecos River to see what can be learned from

  2. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary Report- February 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site

  3. River Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and hydraulic parameters and input values that will be used in river modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by PNNL for DOE. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. The module is based on the legacy code for the Modular Aquatic Simulation System II (MASS2), which is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged model that provides the capability to simulate the lateral (bank-to-bank) variation of flow and contaminants. It simulates river hydrodynamics (water velocities and surface elevations), sediment transport, contaminant transport, biotic transport, and sediment-contaminant interaction, including both suspended sediments and bed sediments. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River. MASS2 requires data on the river flow rate, downstream water surface elevation, groundwater influx and contaminants flux, background concentrations of contaminants, channel bathymetry, and the bed and suspended sediment properties. Stochastic variability for some input parameters such as partition coefficient (kd) values and background radionuclide concentrations is generated by the Environmental Stochastic Preprocessor. River flow is randomized on a yearly basis. At this time, the conceptual model does not incorporate extreme flooding (for example, 50 to 100 years) or dam removal scenarios.

  4. The Revival of White Holes as Small Bangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon Retter; Shlomo Heller

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are extremely dense and compact objects from which light cannot escape. There is an overall consensus that black holes exist and many astronomical objects are identified with black holes. White holes were understood as the exact time reversal of black holes, therefore they should continuously throw away material. It is accepted, however, that a persistent ejection of mass leads to gravitational pressure, the formation of a black hole and thus to the "death of while holes". So far, no astronomical source has been successfully tagged a white hole. The only known white hole is the Big Bang which was instantaneous rather than continuous or long-lasting. We thus suggest that the emergence of a white hole, which we name a 'Small Bang', is spontaneous - all the matter is ejected at a single pulse. Unlike black holes, white holes cannot be continuously observed rather their effect can only be detected around the event itself. Gamma ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the universe. Long gamma-ray bursts were connected with supernova eruptions. There is a new group of gamma-ray bursts, which are relatively close to Earth, but surprisingly lack any supernova emission. We propose identifying these bursts with white holes. White holes seem like the best explanation of gamma-ray bursts that appear in voids. We also predict the detection of rare gigantic gamma-ray bursts with energies much higher than typically observed.

  5. A Very Low-Luminosity, Very Cool, DC White Dwarf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh Harris; Conard Dahn; Frederick Vrba; Arne Henden; James Liebert; Gary Schmidt; Neill Reid

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The star LHS 3250 is found to be a white dwarf at a distance of 30 pc. Its absolute magnitudes (M_V = 15.72; M_bol = 16.2) put it among the least-luminous white dwarfs known. Its optical spectrum shows no features, indicating it has a DC classification, and it shows no detectable polarization, indicating it does not have a very strong magnetic field. However, its broadband colors show it to have a unique spectral energy distribution, and it stands out from all other stars in BVI and other broadband photometric surveys. We discuss these properties, and conclude that LHS 3250 must be an extremely cool white dwarf with strong collision-induced absorption at red-infrared wavelengths from molecular hydrogen, in accord with models for very cool white dwarf atmospheres. If so, it is the first such star known, and the first star to provide observational evidence supporting these models. It suggests that other very cool white dwarfs, both halo white dwarfs and the oldest disk white dwarfs, also may have colors affected by similar absorption. The atmospheric composition of LHS 3250 is not known, and therefore its temperature is poorly determined. It may be a helium-core star with a mass 0.3-0.45 M_solar and a product of mass-transfer in a close binary system. However, until its temperature is better known, its mass and age remain uncertain.

  6. Near-Infrared Photometric Analyses of White Dwarf Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -E. Tremblay; P. Bergeron

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the available near- and mid- infrared photometry data sets for white dwarfs from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Point Source Catalog and the Spitzer Space Telescope. These data sets have been widely used to search for white dwarfs with an infrared excess as well as to characterize the atmosphere of cool white dwarfs. We evaluate the reliability of the 2MASS photometry by performing a statistical comparison with published JHK CIT magnitudes, and by carrying out a detailed model atmosphere analysis of the available photometry. We then present a critical examination of various results published in the literature including data from the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  7. The Torino Observatory Parallax Program: White Dwarf Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Smart; M. G. Lattanzi; B. Bucciarelli; G. Massone; R. Casalegno; G. Chiumiento; R. Drimmel; L. Lanteri; F. Marocco; A. Spagna

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present parallax determinations for six white dwarf candidates in the Torino Observatory Parallax Program. The absolute parallaxes are found with precisions at the 2-3 milliarcsecond level. For WD 1126+185 we find a distance incompatible with being a white dwarf, implying an incorrect classification. For WD 2216+484 we find our distance is consistent with a simple DA white dwarf rather than a composite system as previously proposed in the literature. In general it is found that the published photometric distance is an overestimate of the distance found here.

  8. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  9. River Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in fiscal year 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River.

  10. Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State aims to preserve and protect Minnesota rivers and adjacent lands with outstanding scenic, recreational, natural, historical, scientific and similar values. Chapter 103F defines...

  11. White dwarf masses in cataclysmic variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijnen, T P G; Schreiber, M R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The white dwarf (WD) mass distribution of cataclysmic variables (CVs) has recently been found to dramatically disagree with the predictions of the standard CV formation model. The high mean WD mass among CVs is not imprinted in the currently observed sample of CV progenitors and cannot be attributed to selection effects. Two possibilities have been put forward: either the WD grows in mass during CV evolution, or in a significant fraction of cases, CV formation is preceded by a (short) phase of thermal time-scale mass transfer (TTMT) in which the WD gains a sufficient amount of mass. We investigate if either of these two scenarios can bring theoretical predictions and observations into agreement. We employed binary population synthesis models to simulate the present intrinsic CV population. We incorporated aspects specific to CV evolution such as an appropriate mass-radius relation of the donor star and a more detailed prescription for the critical mass ratio for dynamically unstable mass transfer. We also imp...

  12. The Binary White Dwarf LHS 3236

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Hugh; Dupuy, Trent; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry; Hartkopf, William; Ireland, Michael; Leggett, Sandy; Levine, Stephen; Liu, Michael; Luginbuhl, Christian; Monet, Alice; Stone, Ronald; Subasavage, John; Tilleman, Trudy; Walker, Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The white dwarf LHS 3236 (WD1639+153) is shown to be a double-degenerate binary, with each component having a high mass. Astrometry at the U.S. Naval Observatory gives a parallax and distance of 30.86 +/- 0.25 pc and a tangential velocity of 98 km/s, and reveals binary orbital motion. The orbital parameters are determined from astrometry of the photocenter over more than three orbits of the 4.0-year period. High-resolution imaging at the Keck Observatory resolves the pair with a separation of 31 and 124 mas at two epochs. Optical and near-IR photometry give a set of possible binary components. Consistency of all data indicates that the binary is a pair of DA stars with temperatures near 8000 and 7400 K and with masses of 0.93 and 0.91 M_solar; also possible, is a DA primary and a helium DC secondary with temperatures near 8800 and 6000 K and with masses of 0.98 and 0.69 M_solar. In either case, the cooling ages of the stars are ~3 Gyr and the total ages are <4 Gyr. The combined mass of the binary (1.66--1....

  13. The binary white dwarf LHS 3236

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice K. B.; Stone, Ronald C.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; Walker, Richard L. [US Naval Observatory, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-8521 (United States); Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Hartkopf, William I. [US Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Ireland, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, New South Wales, NSW 2109 (Australia); Leggett, S. K., E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The white dwarf LHS 3236 (WD1639+153) is shown to be a double-degenerate binary, with each component having a high mass. Astrometry at the U.S. Naval Observatory gives a parallax and distance of 30.86 ± 0.25 pc and a tangential velocity of 98 km s{sup –1}, and reveals binary orbital motion. The orbital parameters are determined from astrometry of the photocenter over more than three orbits of the 4.0 yr period. High-resolution imaging at the Keck Observatory resolves the pair with a separation of 31 and 124 mas at two epochs. Optical and near-IR photometry give a set of possible binary components. Consistency of all data indicates that the binary is a pair of DA stars with temperatures near 8000 and 7400 K and with masses of 0.93 and 0.91 M {sub ?}; also possible is a DA primary and a helium DC secondary with temperatures near 8800 and 6000 K and with masses of 0.98 and 0.69 M {sub ?}. In either case, the cooling ages of the stars are ?3 Gyr and the total ages are <4 Gyr. The combined mass of the binary (1.66-1.84 M {sub ?}) is well above the Chandrasekhar limit; however, the timescale for coalescence is long.

  14. Water Integration Project Science Strategies White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan K. Yonk

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper has been prepared to document the approach to develop strategies to address Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) science and technology needs/uncertainties to support completion of INEEL Idaho Completion Project (Environmental Management [EM]) projects against the 2012 plan. Important Idaho Completion Project remediation and clean-up projects include the 2008 OU 10-08 Record of Decision, completion of EM by 2012, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tanks, INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility, and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. The objective of this effort was to develop prioritized operational needs and uncertainties that would assist Operations in remediation and clean-up efforts at the INEEL and develop a proposed path forward for the development of science strategies to address these prioritized needs. Fifteen needs/uncertainties were selected to develop an initial approach to science strategies. For each of the 15 needs/uncertainties, a detailed definition was developed. This included extracting information from the past interviews with Operations personnel to provide a detailed description of the need/uncertainty. For each of the 15 prioritized research and development needs, a search was performed to identify the state of the associated knowledge. The knowledge search was performed primarily evaluating ongoing research. The ongoing research reviewed included Environmental Systems Research Analysis, Environmental Management Science Program, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, Inland Northwest Research Alliance, United States Geological Survey, and ongoing Operations supported projects. Results of the knowledge search are documented as part of this document.

  15. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRAMASSIVE PULSATING WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermes, J. J.; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Harrold, Samuel T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kepler, S. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gianninas, A. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We announce the discovery of the most massive pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf (WD) ever discovered, GD 518. Model atmosphere fits to the optical spectrum of this star show it is a 12, 030 {+-} 210 K WD with a log g =9.08 {+-} 0.06, which corresponds to a mass of 1.20 {+-} 0.03 M{sub Sun }. Stellar evolution models indicate that the progenitor of such a high-mass WD endured a stable carbon-burning phase, producing an oxygen-neon-core WD. The discovery of pulsations in GD 518 thus offers the first opportunity to probe the interior of a WD with a possible oxygen-neon core. Such a massive WD should also be significantly crystallized at this temperature. The star exhibits multi-periodic luminosity variations at timescales ranging from roughly 425 to 595 s and amplitudes up to 0.7%, consistent in period and amplitude with the observed variability of typical ZZ Ceti stars, which exhibit non-radial g-mode pulsations driven by a hydrogen partial ionization zone. Successfully unraveling both the total mass and core composition of GD 518 provides a unique opportunity to investigate intermediate-mass stellar evolution, and can possibly place an upper limit to the mass of a carbon-oxygen-core WD, which in turn constrains Type Ia supernovae progenitor systems.

  16. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions.

  17. The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. J.

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-44 1973 The Ecology of the Navasota River, Texas By: William J. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 44 Texas A&M University System...

  18. Math 360 Sample Project: River Crossing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linner, Anders

    corresponding to the east-west difference between the entry and the exit points at the river. Assume the crossing is from north to south, so g is positive if the exit point is east of the entry point

  19. Think water : reconditioning the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Kazuyo, 1969-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to link water, history and culture through architectural and urban design by researching the potential for the rejuvenation of a neglected industrial site at the edge of a river. The Malden ...

  20. The Ecohydrology of South American Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Michael

    The Ecohydrology of South American Rivers and Wetlands edited by Michael E. McClain Department research integrating the physical processes of hydrology with the biological processes of ecology. Together

  1. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  2. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  3. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  4. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Distributed Solar Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special...

  5. Microsoft Word - CX_Okanogan_River.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confederated Tribes for the purchase of two parcels of land along the Okanogan River. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2007-224-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

  6. Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership. The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of land on the north side of the Columbia River in Cowlitz County, Wash., to protect fish habitat. An additional 75 acres of land will be donated by the Port of Longview. BPA...

  7. Clinch River MRS Task Force Recommendations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clinch River HRS Task Force was appointed in July 1985 by the Roane County Executive and the Oak Ridge City Council to evaluate the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility proposed by the...

  8. Radionuclide transport in the Yenisei River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Vakulovsky; E. G. Tertyshnik; A. I. Kabanov

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data characterizing the pollution of the Yenisei River (water and bottom sediment) by radionuclide resulting from the use of the river water for cooling industrial reactors in the Mining-Chemical Complex are presented. Studies have been made of the contamination of the river during the period when reactors with direct flow cooling were used and after these were shut down. Distinctive features of the migration of radionuclide in the Yenisei are noted, in particular, their distribution between the solid and liquid phases. The amounts of 137Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn, and 152Eu in the channel are determined from the effluent discharge site to Dudinka port. The rate of continuous self removal of 137Cs is estimated to be 0.19 1/year, corresponding to a half purification time of 3.6 years for a 600 km long segment of the river bed.

  9. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W. [ed.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. An attempt also has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs.

  10. Flint River Drought Protection Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Flint River Drought Protection Act is to maintain in-stream flow in times of drought by providing incentives for farmers to take acres out of irrigation. It allows Environmental...

  11. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help its residential members increase the energy efficiency of their homes. Loans up to $10,000 are available for...

  12. Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Voorhis, David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  14. Columbia River Component Data Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Hulstrom

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Data Gap Analysis report documents the results of a study conducted by Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) to compile and reivew the currently available surface water and sediment data for the Columbia River near and downstream of the Hanford Site. This Data Gap Analysis study was conducted to review the adequacy of the existing surface water and sediment data set from the Columbia River, with specific reference to the use of the data in future site characterization and screening level risk assessments.

  15. White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages...

  16. Statement from the White House Press Secretary on the Ongoing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary Our thoughts and our prayers remain with the people of Japan. The President has been kept fully briefed on developments and the response...

  17. MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous...

  18. White House Solar Champions of Change- Watch Now

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 17, 2014 the White House honored solar energy deployment Champions of Change from across the United States. The honorees include several current and former SunShot awardees.

  19. Española students invited to White House Science Fair

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2015 All Issues submit Espaola students invited to White House Science Fair Team selected from among 40,000 competitors May 1, 2015 Sixth-graders Casandra Dauz, Jos...

  20. Advances in Chip Technology, Packaging Enable White LED Breakthroughs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Significant advances in chip technology have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with record efficacies as high as 74 lumens per watt - on par with...

  1. White County REMC- Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    White County REMC offers incentives for the purchase and installation of energy efficient heat pumps. Air-source heat pumps are eligible for a rebate of $300, while geothermal heat pumps are...

  2. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In case you missed it, last Thursday's White House Solar Champions of Change and Solar Summit shed a spotlight on all the amazing work that solar innovators around country are...

  3. White Papers Submitted to the Technology Innovation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    White Papers Submitted to the Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology was established laboratories and nonprofit research institutions, to support, promote, and accelerate innovation in the U

  4. Jonathan White, Dale Thompson University of ArkansasMotivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Dale R.

    DANIEL 13. JACKSON KAREN PAUL 14. WHITE BETTY MARK 15. HARRIS HELEN DONALD 16. MARTIN SANDRA GEORGE 17 line. Offset Name Ranges 1 AAAAAAAAA ALI 2 ALICEA ANDERSON 3 ANDERTON AVERETT Results The method

  5. NextSTEPS White Paper: Three Routes Forward for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    NextSTEPS White Paper: Three Routes Forward for Biofuels: Incremental, Transitional, and Leapfrog NOT CITE #12;Three Routes Forward for Biofuels: Incremental, Transitional, and Leapfrog 2 Contents ......................................................................................................................................12 1.a. The Need for Low Carbon Biofuels

  6. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Association of White Matter Hyperintensity Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Association of White Matter Hyperintensity Volume With Decreased Cognitive was restricted to the study of older in- dividuals, limiting our understanding of the full impact of WMH

  7. White organic light-emitting diodes: Status and perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reineke, Sebastian; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ultra-thin, large-area light sources made from organic semiconductor materials. Over the last decades, much research has been spent on finding the suitable materials to realize highly efficient monochrome and white OLEDs. With their high efficiency, color-tunability, and color-quality, white OLEDs are emerging to become one of the next generation light sources. In this review, we discuss the physics of a variety of device concepts that are introduced to realize white OLEDs based on both polymer and small molecule organic materi als. Owing to the fact that about 80 % of the internally generated photons are trapped within the thin-film layer structure, we put a second focus on reviewing promising concepts for improved light outcoupling.

  8. Lab White Paper Hitachi Unified Compute Platform (UCP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Architectures for Private Clouds By Kerry Dolan, Lab Analyst February 2014 This ESG Lab White Paper Reference Architecture for Private Clouds 2 © 2014 by The Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights? ....................................................................................................................... 4 Microsoft Private Cloud Fast Track

  9. astro2010 science white: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Astro2010 White Paper Coronal "Dark Energy" and SolarStellar Activity Physics Websites Summary: and atmospheric heating....

  10. White organic light-emitting diodes: Status and perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reineke, Sebastian

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ultrathin, large-area light sources made from organic semiconductor materials. Over the past decades, much research has been spent on finding suitable materials to realize ...

  11. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

  12. RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

  13. Greening of the White House: Six year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The White House, which recently celebrated its 200th birthday, has a long tradition of demonstrating technological innovation. In keeping with that tradition, President Clinton announced the Greening of the White House Initiative on Earth Day 1993. The initiative improves the energy and environmental performance of the White House complex by identifying opportunities to reduce waste, lower energy use, and make an appropriate use of renewable resources, all while improving indoor air quality and building comfort. This report on President Clinton's legacy of greening at the White House summarizes progress made to date and gives an overview of new opportunities identified during the past year. It also includes an environmental history of the White House and a short tour of the buildings that make up the White House complex. Over the past five years, this initiative has involved hundreds of dedicated people from both within and outside government. A description of how they worked together to develop and implement the Greening Plan is also included in this report.

  14. Ages of White Dwarf-Red Subdwarf Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hektor Monteiro; Wei-Chun Jao; Todd Henry; John Subasavage; Thom Beaulieu

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide the first age estimates for two recently discovered white dwarf-red subdwarf systems, LHS 193AB and LHS 300AB. These unusual systems provide a new opportunity for linking the reliable age estimates for the white dwarfs to the (measurable) metallicities of the red subdwarfs. We have obtained precise photometry in the $V_{J}R_{KC}I_{KC}JH$ bands and spectroscopy covering from 6000\\AA to 9000\\AA for the two new systems, as well as for a comparison white dwarf-main sequence red dwarf system, GJ 283 AB. Using model grids available in the literature, we estimate the cooling age as well as temperature, surface gravity, mass, progenitor mass and {\\it total} lifetimes of the white dwarfs. The results indicate that the two new systems are probably ancient thick disk objects with ages of at least 6-9 Gyr. We also conduct searches of red dwarf and white dwarf compendia from SDSS data and the L{\\'e}pine Shara Proper Motion (LSPM) catalog for additional common proper motion white dwarf-red subdwarf systems. Only seven new candidate systems are found, which indicates the rarity of these systems.

  15. Pulsational Instabilities in Accreting White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Arras; Dean M. Townsley; Lars Bildsten

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) The Cataclysmic Variable (CV) population harbors a diverse range of donor stars and accreting white dwarfs (WDs). A range of WD masses is expected, from low mass Helium core WDs, to massive WDs which have previously accreted at rates high enough for Hydrogen to burn steadily. Furthermore, a wide range of Helium enrichment is expected in the accreted material depending on the degree to which the donor star is evolved. We investigate the impact of this diversity on the range of effective temperatures ($T_{\\rm eff}$) for which g-modes are unstable. The critical $T_{\\rm eff}$ below which modes are unstable ("blue edge") depends on both surface gravity, $g$, and He abundance, $Y$. The Hydrogen/first Helium ionization instability strip is more sensitive to $g$ than $Y$. We find that (for solar composition envelopes), relative to a fiducial WD mass $0.6 M_\\odot$, the blue edge for a $0.4 M_\\odot$ He core WD shifts downward by $\\approx 1000 {\\rm K}$, while that for a massive $\\approx 1.2 M_\\odot$ WD shifts upward by $\\approx 2000 {\\rm K}$. The second Helium ionization instability strip exhibits strong dependences on both $g$ and $Y$. Surprisingly, increasing $Y$ by only 10% relative to solar creates an instability strip near $15,000 {\\rm K}$. Hence CV's below the period gap with evolved donor stars of $Y\\ga 0.4$ may have an "intermediate" instability strip well outside of the isolated DA and DB variables. This "intermediate" instability strip also occurs for low mass He WD with solar composition envelopes. The lack of pulsations in CV's with $T_{\\rm eff}$ in the pure Hydrogen ZZ Ceti instability strip is also easily explained.

  16. Contribution of White Dwarfs to Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted von Hippel

    1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a literature search through 31 July 1997 of white dwarfs (WDs) in open and globular clusters. There are 36 single WDs and 5 WDs in binaries known among 13 open clusters, and 340 single WDs and 11 WDs in binaries known among 11 globular clusters. From these data I have calculated WD mass fractions for four open clusters (the Pleiades, NGC 2168, NGC 3532, and the Hyades) and one globular cluster (NGC 6121). I develop a simple model of cluster evolution that incorporates stellar evolution but not dynamical evolution to interpret the WD mass fractions. I augment the results of my simple model with N-body simulations incorporating stellar evolution (Terlevich 1987; de la Feunte Marcos 1996; Vesperini & Heggie 1997). I find that even though these clusters undergo moderate to strong kinematical evolution the WD mass fraction is relatively insensitive to kinematical evolution. By comparing the cluster mass functions to that of the Galactic disk, and incorporating plausibility arguments for the mass function of the Galactic halo, I estimate the WD mass fraction in these two populations. I assume the Galactic disk is ~10 Gyrs old (Winget et al. 1987; Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996) and that the Galactic halo is ~12 Gyrs old (Reid 1997b; Gratton et al. 1997; Chaboyer et al. 1998), although the WD mass fraction is insensitive to age in this range. I find that the Galactic halo should contain 8 to 9% (alpha = -2.35) or perhaps as much as 15 to 17% (alpha = -2.0) of its stellar mass in the form of WDs. The Galactic disk WD mass fraction should be 6 to 7% (alpha = -2.35), consistent with the empirical estimates of 3 to 7% (Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996). (abridged)

  17. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most

  18. Hydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river M. Fette & C. Weber # Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2006 Abstract Despite the numerous benefits of hydropower production. Hydropeaks, caused by short-term changes in hydropower operation, result in a negative impact on both habitat

  19. Entrainment sampling at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Savannah River water intakes (1991)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling water for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) L-Reactor, K-Reactor, and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pumphouses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water. They are passed through the reactor heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degree}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is presumably 100%. Apart from a small pilot study conducted in 1989, ichthyoplankton samples have not been collected from the vicinity of the SRS intake canals since 1985. The Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) resume ichthyoplankton sampling for the purpose of assessing entrainment at the SRS Savannah River intakes. This request is due to the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River. The following scope of work presents a sampling plan that will collect information on the spatial and temporal distribution of fish eggs and larvae near the SRS intake canal mouths. This data will be combined with information on water movement patterns near the canal mouths in order to determine the percentage of ichthyoplankton that are removed from the Savannah River by the SRS intakes. The following sampling plan incorporates improvements in experimental design that resulted from the findings of the 1989 pilot study. 1 fig.

  20. A COMPREHENSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF DB WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, P.; Wesemael, F.; Dufour, Pierre; Beauchamp, A.; Hunter, C.; Gianninas, A.; Limoges, M.-M.; Dufour, Patrick; Fontaine, G. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saffer, Rex A. [Strayer University, 234 Mall Boulevard, Suite G-50, King of Prussia, PA 19406 (United States); Ruiz, M. T. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Liebert, James, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: wesemael@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gianninas@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: limoges@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: alain.beauchamp@fti-ibis.com, E-mail: chris.hunter@yale.edu, E-mail: rex.saffer@strayer.edu, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of 108 helium-line (DB) white dwarfs based on model atmosphere fits to high signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy. We derive a mean mass of 0.67 M{sub sun} for our sample, with a dispersion of only 0.09 M{sub sun}. White dwarfs also showing hydrogen lines, the DBA stars, comprise 44% of our sample, and their mass distribution appears similar to that of DB stars. As in our previous investigation, we find no evidence for the existence of low-mass (M < 0.5 M{sub sun}) DB white dwarfs. We derive a luminosity function based on a subset of DB white dwarfs identified in the Palomar-Green Survey. We show that 20% of all white dwarfs in the temperature range of interest are DB stars, although the fraction drops to half this value above T{sub eff} {approx} 20,000 K. We also show that the persistence of DB stars with no hydrogen features at low temperatures is difficult to reconcile with a scenario involving accretion from the interstellar medium, often invoked to account for the observed hydrogen abundances in DBA stars. We present evidence for the existence of two different evolutionary channels that produce DB white dwarfs: the standard model where DA stars are transformed into DB stars through the convective dilution of a thin hydrogen layer and a second channel where DB stars retain a helium atmosphere throughout their evolution. We finally demonstrate that the instability strip of pulsating V777 Her white dwarfs contains no non-variables, if the hydrogen content of these stars is properly accounted for.

  1. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  2. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  3. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  4. Hydrologic assessment, Eastern Coal Province, Area 23, Alabama: Black Warrior River; Buttahatchee River; Cahaba River; Sipsey River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, J.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area 23 is located at the southern end of the Eastern Coal Province, in the Mobile River basin, includes the Warrior, Cahaba, and edges of the Plateau coal fields in Alabama, and covers an area of 4716 square miles. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners and operators and consulting engineers by presenting information about existing hydrologic conditions and identification of sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text and illustrations on a single water-resources related topic. Area 23 is underlain by the Coker and Pottsville Formations and the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks. Area 23 has a moist temperate climate with an annual average rainfall of 54 inches and the majority of the area is covered by forest. The soils have a high erosion potential when the vegetative cover is removed. Use of water is primarily from surface-water sources as ground-water supplies generally are not sufficient for public supplies. The US Geological Survey operates a network of hydrologic data collection stations to monitor the streamflow and ground-water conditions. This network includes data for 180 surface-water stations and 49 ground-water observation wells. These data include rate of flow, water levels, and water-quality parameters. Hydrologic problems relating to surface mining are (1) erosion and sedimentation, (2) decline in ground-water levels, and (3) degradation of water quality. Decline in ground-water levels can occur in and near surface-mining areas when excavation extends below the static water level in the aquifer. This can cause nearby wells and springs to go dry. Acid mine drainage is a problem only adjacent to the mined area.

  5. Columbia River impact evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of past practices, four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. To accomplish the timely cleanup of the past-practice units, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), was signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). To support the Tri-Party Agreement, milestones were adopted. These milestones represent the actions needed to ensure acceptable progress toward Hanford Site compliance with CERCLA, RCRA, and the Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act of 1976. This report was prepared to fulfill the requirement of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-30-02, which requires a plan to determine cumulative health and environmental impacts to the Columbia River. This plan supplements the CERCLA remedial investigations/feasibility studies (RI/FS) and RCRA facility investigations/corrective measures studies (RFI/CMSs) that will be undertaken in the 100 Area. To support the plan development process, existing information was reviewed and a preliminary impact evaluation based on this information was performed. The purpose of the preliminary impact evaluation was to assess the adequacy of existing data and proposed data collection activities. Based on the results of the evaluation, a plan is proposed to collect additional data or make changes to existing or proposed data collection activities.

  6. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Clay

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  7. New River Geothermal Exploration (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    The New River Geothermal Exploration (DOE Award No. EE0002843) is located approximately 25km south of the Salton Sea, near town of Brawley in Imperial County and approximately 150km east of San Diego, California. A total of 182 MT Logger sites were completed covering the two separate Mesquite and New River grids. The data was collected over a frequency range of 320Hz to 0.001Hz with variable site spacing. A number of different inversion algorithms in 1D, 2D and 3D were used to produce resistivity-depth profiles and maps of subsurface resistivity variations over the survey area. For 2D inversions, a total of eighteen lines were constructed in east-west and north-south orientations crossing the entire survey area. For MT 3D inversion, the New River property was divided in two sub-grids, Mesquite and New River areas. The report comprises of two parts. For the first part, inversions and geophysical interpretation results are presented with some recommendations of the potential targets for future follow up on the property. The second part of the report describes logistics of the survey, survey parameters, methodology and the survey results (data) in digital documents. The report reviews a Spartan MT survey carried out by Quantec Geoscience Limited over the New River Project in California, USA on behalf of Ram Power Inc. Data was acquired over a period of 29 days from 2010/06/26 to 2010/07/24.

  8. A Critical Examination of Halo White Dwarf Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bergeron

    2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed analysis of halo white dwarf candidates is presented, which is based on model atmosphere fits to observed energy distributions built from photoelectric or photographic magnitudes. Most of the candidates identified in reduced proper motion diagrams are shown to be too warm (Teff > 5000 K) and most likely too young to be members of the galactic halo, while the tangential velocities of the cooler and thus older white dwarfs are shown to be entirely consistent with the disk population. The results suggest that some white dwarf stars born in the young disk may have high velocities with respect to the local standard of rest. Such objects could represent the remnants of donor stars from close mass-transfer binaries that produced type Ia supernovae via the single degenerate channel, or other scenarios suggested in the literature. Ongoing surveys that rely solely on reduced proper motion diagrams are likely to identify more of these high velocity young degenerates, rather than to unveil the old white dwarf population of the galactic halo. The importance of infrared photometry for studying extremely cool white dwarfs is also emphasized.

  9. EFFECTIVE HALF-LIFE OF CESIUM-137 IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Paller, M.; Baker, R.

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities into the SRS environment. However, only a relatively small number of pathways, most importantly {sup 137}Cs in fish and deer, have contributed significantly to doses and risks to the public. The “effective” half-lives (T{sub e}) of {sup 137}Cs (which include both physical decay and environmental dispersion) in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation and in fish and white-tailed deer from the SRS were estimated using long-term monitoring data. For 1974–2011, the T{sub e}s of {sup 137}Cs in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation were 17.0 years (95% CI = 14.2–19.9) and 13.4 years (95% CI = 10.8–16.0), respectively. These T{sub e}s were greater than in a previous study that used data collected only through 2005 as a likely result of changes in the flood regime of the Savannah River. Field analyses of {sup 137}Cs concentrations in deer collected during yearly controlled hunts at the SRS indicated an overall T{sub e} of 15.9 years (95% CI = 12.3–19.6) for 1965–2011; however, the T{sub e} for 1990–2011 was significantly shorter (11.8 years, 95% CI = 4.8–18.8) due to an increase in the rate of {sup 137}Cs removal. The shortest T{sub e}s were for fish in SRS streams and the Savannah River (3.5–9.0 years), where dilution and dispersal resulted in rapid {sup 137}Cs removal. Long-term data show that T{sub e}s are significantly shorter than the physical half-life of {sup 137}Cs in the SRS environment but that they can change over time. Therefore, it is desirable have a long period of record for calculating Tes and risky to extrapolate T{sub e}s beyond this period unless the processes governing {sup 137}Cs removal are clearly understood.

  10. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  11. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

  12. RETURN OF THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 5 Freshwater Habitats131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rivers of the world and also one of the most developed with ten major hydroelectric dams on the main the major hydroelectric projects and the owner-operator of each project. #12;RETURN OF THE RIVER - 2000

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), LLC, related to a Worker Fall from a Scaffold in the K-Area Complex at the Savannah River Site On November 9, 2012, the U.S. Department of...

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

  16. african ephemeral rivers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of this course, we have seen that certain aspects of the morphological behaviour of sand and gravel bed rivers, especially of the river bed in the main channel, can be...

  17. Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

  18. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  19. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  20. Power benefits of the lower Snake River dams - FACT SHEET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I n the 1960s and early 1970s, the federal government built four large dams on the Snake River. This is the last set of major dams to have been built in the Federal Columbia River...

  1. Fact Sheet - Myths & Facts about the lower Snake River dams ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Myths and facts about the lower Snake River dams MYTH: The four lower Snake River dams are low value. FACT: It costs about 5 per megawatt-hour to produce power at the dams. The...

  2. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the Salt Waste Processing Facility on October 6, 2009 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River Site Hand Injury at the...

  3. Wild and Scenic River Acts (Lower St. Croix Riverway)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The lower portion of the St. Croix River in Minnesota and Wisconsin is regulated under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Program. Most new residential, commercial, and industrial uses are...

  4. Floodplain River Foodwebs in the Lower Mekong Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Chouly

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics in tropical rivers undergo significant seasonal shifts and emphasizes that river food webs are altered by dams and flow regulation. Seston and benthic algae were the most important production sources supporting fish biomass during the dry season...

  5. Wekiva River and Wekiva Parkway Protection Acts (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wekiva River Protection Act directs the Orange, Lake, and Seminole Counties to emphasize the Wekiva River Protection Area in their planning efforts and regulations. Each county’s local...

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  7. Little Big Horn River Water Quality Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bad Bear, D.J.; Hooker, D. [Little Big Horn Coll., Crow Agency, MT (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Water Quality Project on the Little Big horn River during the summer of 1995. The majority of the summer was spent collecting data on the Little Big Horn River, then testing the water samples for a number of different tests which was done at the Little Big Horn College in Crow Agency, Montana. The intention of this study is to preform stream quality analysis to gain an understanding of the quality of selected portion of the river, to assess any impact that the existing developments may be causing to the environment and to gather base-line data which will serve to provide information concerning the proposed development. Citizens of the reservation have expressed a concern of the quality of the water on the reservation; surface waters, ground water, and well waters.

  8. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  9. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M. R.; Word, J. Q.; Barrows, E. S.; Mayhew, H. L.; Clark, D. R. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  10. River Protection Project (RPP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POHTO, R.E.

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document contains the training plan for dangerous waste management at River Protection Project TSD Units.

  11. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- August 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Commercial Grade Dedication Plans for the Safety Instrumented System at the Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Project

  12. Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 – 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US Forest Service - Annonymous,

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

  13. DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    awarded SRS management and operating contract includes operation of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  14. Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    150 miles of shoreline and hundreds of acres of marsh, mudflat, and shallow water habitats. The river

  15. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site- July 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project

  16. Washington Gas meets Patuxent River construction challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, C.A. (Washington Gas Light Co., Springfield, VA (United States))

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the installation of a new natural gas pipeline under the Patuxent River in Maryland. The installation process required the use of directional drilling technology to minimize environmental concerns. The paper describes the processes involved in selecting a crossing site, performing background archaeological and other environmental studies, and easement acquisition procedures. With regards to the actual construction, the paper discusses the welding and staging methods, design methods for the actual drilling, drilling equipment involved, and methods for pulling the pipelines back under the river.

  17. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  18. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  19. Biomagnification of organochlorines in Lake Erie white bass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, R.W.; Lazar, R.; Haffner, G.D. [Univ. of Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomagnification of HCB and PCBs was measured in a natural fish population of white bass (Morone chrysops) and their prey, emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides). It was observed that biomagnification occurred only for chemicals with an octanol/water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}) greater than 6.1. Hexachlorobenzene and PCB 52 did not biomagnify while PCBs 87, 138, and 180 showed significant biomagnification in Lake Erie white bass. Biomagnification factors increased proportionately with K{sub ow}, and it was concluded that high K{sub ow} chemicals were more important in the biomagnification process. Lipid proportions and chemical concentrations in prey fish (emerald shiner) and white bass intestinal contents were consistent with a fugacity model of chemical assimilation from food.

  20. Ecological Responses to Hydrogeomorphic Fluctuations in a Sand Bed Prairie River: River Complexity, Habitat Availability, and Benthic Invertebrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Brian James

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Rivers with stochastic precipitation have fauna that overcome unique challenges. Organisms surmount these challenges by using refugia. Research was conducted on the sand bed Kansas River (Kaw). I (a) quantified how the hydrology affects the Kaw...