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1

Pilot-Scale Gasification of Corn Stover, Switchgrass, Wheat Straw, and Wood: 1. Parametric Study and Comparison with Literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pilot-Scale Gasification of Corn Stover, Switchgrass, Wheat Straw, and Wood: 1. Parametric Study and Comparison with Literature ... Chemical Reviews (Washington, DC, United States) (2006), 106 (9), 4044-4098 CODEN: CHREAY; ISSN:0009-2665. ... A review of the primary measures for tar elimination in biomass gasification processes Biomass Bioenergy 2003, 24, 125– 140 ...

Daniel L. Carpenter; Richard L. Bain; Ryan E. Davis; Abhijit Dutta; Calvin J. Feik; Katherine R. Gaston; Whitney Jablonski; Steven D. Phillips; Mark R. Nimlos

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

KNIFE MILL COMMINUTION ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SWITCHGRASS, WHEAT STRAW, AND CORN STOVER AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Biomass preprocessing and pretreatment technologies such as size reduction and chemical preconditioning are aimed at reducing the cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Size reduction is an energy-intensive biomass preprocessing unit operation. In this study, switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover were chopped in an instrumented knife mill to evaluate size reduction energy and corresponding particle size distribution as determined with a standard forage sieve analyzer. Direct mechanical power inputs were determined using a dedicated data acquisition system for knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. A speed of 250 rpm gave optimum performance of the mill. Optimum feed rates for 25.4 mm screen and 250 rpm were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as the size reduction energy required to operate the knife mill plus that imparted to the biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy imparted to the biomass. For these conditions, total specific energies were 27.3, 37.9, and 31.9 MJ/Mg and effective specific energies were 10.1, 15.5, and 3.2 MJ/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These results demonstrated that biomass selection affects the size reduction energy, even for biomass with similar features. Second-order polynomial equations for the total specific energy requirement fitted well (R2 > 0.95) as a function of knife mill screen size, mass feed rate, and speed for biomass materials tested. The Rosin-Rammler equation fitted the cumulative undersize mass of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chop passed through ASABE sieves with high R2 (>0.983). Knife mill chopping of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover resulted in particle size distributions classified as 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for small knife mill screen sizes (12.7 to 25.4 mm) and distributions classified as 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for the large screen size (50.8 mm). Total and effective specific energy values per unit size reduction of wheat straw were greater compared to those for switchgrass. Corn stover resulted in reduced total and effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to wheat straw for the same operating conditions, but higher total specific energy per unit size reduction and lesser effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to switchgrass. Data on minimized total specific energy with corresponding particle spectra will be useful for preparing feed material with a knife mill for subsequent grinding with finer size reduction devices.

Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Clean energy can come from the sun. The energy in wind can make electricity. Bioenergy comes from plants we can turn into fuel. Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass We can use...

4

Utilization of Wheat Straw in Manufacture of Particleboard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wheat straw is one of the most abundant and cheap agricultural wastes, and it is estimated that about 250 million tons are produced annually in China. Wheat straw is predominantly disposed of by direct burning in open field due to lack of e?ective ... Keywords: wheat straw, particleboard, polyisocyanate, phenol formaldehyde

Peng Luo; Chuanmin Yang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Development of geothermally assisted process for production of liquid fuels and chemicals from wheat straw  

SciTech Connect

The effects of variations in autohydrolysis conditions on the production of fermentable sugars from wheat straw are investigated. Both the direct production of sugar from the autohydrolysis of hemicellulose and the subsequent yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose are considered. The principal parameters studied were time, temperature, and water/fiber weight ratio; however, the effects of adding minor amounts of phenol and aluminum sulfate to the autohydrolysis charge were also investigated. A brief study was made of the effects of two major parameters, substrate concentration and enzyme/substrate ratio, on the sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis of optimally pretreated straw. The efficiency with which these sugars could be fermented to ethanol was studied. In most cases experiments were carried out using distilled water; however, the effects of direct use of geothermal water were determined for each of the major steps in the process. An appendix to the body of the report describes the results of a preliminary economic evaluation of a plant designed to produce 25 x 10/sup 6/ gallons of ethanol per year from wheat straw using the best process conditions determined in the above work. Also appended are the results from a preliminary investigation of the applicability of autohydrolysis technology to the production of fermentable sugars from corn stover.

Murphy, V.G.; Linden, J.C.; Moreira, A.R.; Lenz, T.G.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wheat and corn prices and energy markets: spillover effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates volatility spillover across crude oil market and wheat and corn markets. The corn commodity is taken here to assess the impact of change in demand for biofuel on wheat market. Results of multivariate GARCH model show evidence of corn price volatility transmission to wheat market. Our results indicate that while shocks (unexpected news) in crude oil market have significant impact on volatility in wheat and corn markets, the effect of crude oil price changes on wheat and corn prices is insignificant. The impulse response analysis also indicates shocks in oil markets have permanent effect on wheat and corn price changes. This reveals the influence of future crude oil markets on global food price volatility. Also indicated that fertilisers markets influenced by own-shocks and shocks in oil markets. Thus, shocks in crude oil markets have direct and indirect effects (via fertilisers markets) on food commodity markets.

Ibrahim A. Onour; Bruno S. Sergi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project  

SciTech Connect

Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

Hess, J.R

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project  

SciTech Connect

Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

N /A

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from Sugar Wheat straw Variation Cultivar a b s t r a c t Optimizing cellulosic ethanol yield depends Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Decreasing the cost of producing cellulosic ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

10

Post-Harvest Processing Methods for Reduction of Silica and Alkali Metals in Wheat Straw  

SciTech Connect

Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950°C is desirable, corresponding to SiO2:K2O of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, %-solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

Thompson, David Neal; Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Shaw, Peter Gordon

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Grinding energy and physical properties of chopped and hammer-milled barley, wheat, oat, and canola straws  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, specific energy for grinding and physical properties of wheat, canola, oat and barley straw grinds were investigated. The initial moisture content of the straw was about 0.13–0.15 (fraction total mass basis). Particle size reduction experiments were conducted in two stages: (1) a chopper without a screen, and (2) a hammer mill using three screen sizes (19.05, 25.4, and 31.75 mm). The lowest grinding energy (1.96 and 2.91 kWh t-1) was recorded for canola straw using a chopper and hammer mill with 19.05-mm screen size, whereas the highest (3.15 and 8.05 kWh t-1) was recorded for barley and oat straws. The physical properties (geometric mean particle diameter, bulk, tapped and particle density, and porosity) of the chopped and hammer-milled wheat, barley, canola, and oat straw grinds measured were in the range of 0.98–4.22 mm, 36–80 kg m-3, 49–119 kg m-3, 600–1220 kg m-3, and 0.9–0.96, respectively. The average mean particle diameter was highest for the chopped wheat straw (4.22-mm) and lowest for the canola grind (0.98-mm). The canola grinds produced using the hammer mill (19.05-mm screen size) had the highest bulk and tapped density of about 80 and 119 kg m-3; whereas, the wheat and oat grinds had the lowest of about 58 and 88–90 kg m-3. The results indicate that the bulk and tapped densities are inversely proportional to the particle size of the grinds. The flow properties of the grinds calculated are better for chopped straws compared to hammer milled using smaller screen size (19.05 mm).

J.S. Tumuluru [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Biofuels and Renewable Energy Technologies Dept.; L.G. Tabil [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Y. Song [Shenyang Agricultural University (China). Coll. of Engineering; K.L. Iroba [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; V. Meda [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Antistaling properties of amylases, wheat gluten and CMC on corn tortilla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antistaling properties of enzymes (xylanase, bacterial maltogenic and conventional a-amylases), CMC and vital wheat gluten on corn tortillas were evaluated during storage for up to 21 days. Effect of storage time (0-21 days) and temperature (-40...

Bueso Ucles, Francisco Javier

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultivar Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark b Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark c Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, USA d Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University, 2710 University Drive, Richland, WA 99354, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history:

14

The effect of heat treatment on the digestibility of wheat gluten in a model food system containing wheat gluten, corn starch and corn oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ntestinal epithelium to free amino acids (8, 9). The bioavailability of am1no acids in a protein depends on the protein source, the type of processing it undergoes and the inter- actions between the protein and other diet components (10). If a protein... of the batter. The protein used was wheat gluten (Teklad Test Diets, Ma'dison, Wise. ), the fat, corn oil (ICN Nutritional Biochemicals, Cleveland, Ohio) and the carbohydrate, corn starch (United States Biochemical Corp. , 19 Cleveland, Ohio). The batter...

Fox, Debra Marie Ruzicka

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of long-term straw incorporation on the net global warming potential and the net economic benefit in a rice–wheat cropping system in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Straw incorporation has multiple effects on greenhouse gas emissions and soil productivity. However, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effects of long-term straw incorporation. An ongoing long-term straw incorporation experiment in a rice–wheat cropping system in China was established in 1990 and was used in the present study to evaluate the net global warming potential (NGWP) and the net economic benefit (NEB) of the straw return. The following four field treatments were included: a control (CK); N, P and K fertilization (NPK); fertilization plus a moderate rate of straw application (NPKS1); and fertilization plus a high rate of straw application (NPKS2). We calculated the increase in the soil organic carbon (SOC) and the straw-induced emissions of CH4 and N2O, which were expressed as the global warming potential (GWP) in units of CO2-equivalent (CO2-eq) at the 100-year scale. The straw-induced NEB was defined as the difference between the economic income, which was calculated by multiplying the increase in straw-induced crop grain yield by the grain price, and the economic loss was computed by multiplying the increase in straw-induced CO2-eq emissions by the carbon price. The results showed that long-term straw incorporation significantly increased the CH4 emissions and the topsoil SOC density. The GWP of the straw-induced CH4 emissions was 3.21–3.92 times that of the straw-induced SOC sequestration rate, suggesting that long-term direct straw incorporation in the rice–wheat systems worsens rather than mitigates the climate change. Additionally, continuous straw incorporation slightly enhanced the rice and wheat grain yields, contributing to the production of the NEB. We determined that under the current carbon price, ranging from 2.55 to 31.71 EUR per ton CO2-eq, the direct straw incorporation will produce a positive NEB, ranging from 156 to 658 RMB ha?1 year?1, if the grain yield prices do not fluctuate, which does not provide a significant incentive for farmers to change from their traditional direct straw incorporation pattern. Considering the other benefits that the straw application produced, such as improving soil fertility and the water retention capacity, we recommend that the government should establish an incentive for ecological compensation to encourage farmers to implement proper straw incorporation, such as composting straw under aerobic conditions before application.

Longlong Xia; Shuwei Wang; Xiaoyuan Yan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

VALIDATION OF FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE INDICES: FOULING/CORROSION EVALUATION OF MDF PARTICLEBOARD AND BLENDS WITH WHEAT STRAW BOARD  

SciTech Connect

Sauder Woodworking currently fires a large portion of all wood wastes in a boiler producing process steam. It is investigating using particleboard made from wheat straw in its manufacturing process and is concerned with the effects of the inorganics on its boiler. Wheat straw board contains higher ash contents and increased levels of potassium, creating concern over fouling characteristics in Sauder's tight boiler design. In addition, the wheat straw board contains high concentrations of chlorine, which may affect boiler tube corrosion when fired in combination with the particleboard wastes currently generated. Sauder has engaged the services of the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota to investigate the potential detrimental effects of firing blends containing wheat straw on boiler tube fouling and corrosion. Additional funding for this project was provided through the U.S. Department of Energy Jointly Sponsored Research Program (DOE JSRP) project ''Validation of Fireside Performance Indices'' to validate, improve, and expand the PCQUEST (Predictive Coal Quality Effects Screening Tool) program. The PCQUEST fuel database is constantly expanding and adding new fuels, for which the algorithms may need refinement and additional verification in order to accurately predict index values. A key focus is on performing advanced and conventional fuel analyses and adding these analyses to the PCQUEST database. Such fuels include coals of all ranks and origins, upgraded coals, petroleum coke, biomass and biomass-coal blends, and waste materials blended with coal. Since there are differences in the chemical and mineral form of the inorganic content in biomass and substantial differences in organic matrix characteristics, analysis and characterization methods developed for coal fuels may not be applicable. The project was seen to provide an excellent opportunity to test and improve the ability of PCQUEST to handle nontypical soil and biomass minerals.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Jay R. Gunderson; Donald P. McCollor

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for production of sugars for bio ethanol and an alkali free solid material for combustion in an incineration for 15 min, 18% of the hemicellulose and 5% of the cellulose were extracted. When 200 g straw glucose/100 g straw (~83% of the original cellulose) and 16 g xylose/100 g straw (~58% of the original

18

Wheat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wheat Wheat Nature Bulletin No. 746 march 7, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor WHEAT "Give us this day our daily bread. " That simple plea is included in the Lord' s Prayer because bread, made from wheat, was the "staff of life" in Palestine -- as it is for us today. Wheat bread is a source of energy that contains the food elements essential for the growth, health and upkeep of a human body. It is a staple food that is not only inexpensive but, uniquely, one which we never become tired of. The three most important grains used by mankind for food are wheat, rice, and Indian corn or maize. Next in importance are barley, rye, oats, and millet. The white races of people prize wheat far above any of the others. All seven -- known as cereal grains -- are the seeds of grasses descended from wild plants.

19

Effects of ammoniation of wheat straw and supplementation with soybean meal or broiler litter on feed intake and digestion in yearling Spanish goat wethers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight yearling Spanish wethers (29.6±1.10 kg initial BW) were used in an experiment with a 2×4 factorial arrangement of treatments and two simultaneous 4×4 Latin squares to determine effects on feed intake and digestion of supplementing wheat straw treated (ammoniated) with urea (T) or untreated (U) with soybean meal or broiler litter. Supplements were C (ground corn-based and fed at 0.64% BW, DM), S (C plus 0.25% BW of soybean meal) and LL and HL (C plus 0.5 or 1.0% BW of broiler litter). The N concentration was 0.4 and 2.3% and in vitro digestibility was 48 and 63% in U and T, respectively. There were no significant interactions between straw type and supplement treatment except for NDF digestion and digestible NDF intake. Ruminal fluid ammonia N concentration was greater for T than for U (P<0.05) but was not influenced by supplement treatment (4.1, 7.9, 5.1, 3.8, 11.7, 12.4, 10.8 and 15.6 mg/dl; S.E.=1.53); plasma urea N concentration was greater for T vs. U (P<0.05) and lowest among treatments (P<0.05) for C (7.8, 17.1, 16.5, 18.9, 21.5, 25.1, 28.6 and 26.6 mg/dl for U-C, U-S, U-LL, U-HL, T-C, T-S, T-LL and T-HL, respectively; S.E.=1.71). Straw DM intake was not influenced by supplement treatment and tended to be greater (P<0.13) for U vs. T (212, 261, 274, 277, 406, 404, 432 and 423 g per day for U-C, U-S, U-LL, U-HL, T-C, T-S, T-LL and T-HL, respectively; S.E.=24.6). Total OM intake ranked (P<0.05) Cwheat straw intake. Effects of ammoniation and N supplementation on digestible OM intake were additive, with greater magnitude of change via ammoniation than addition of soybean meal or broiler litter to a moderate level of a grain-based supplement.

G Abebe; R.C Merkel; G Animut; T Sahlu; A.L Goetsch

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of Geothermally Assisted Process for Production of Liquid Fuels and Chemicals from Wheat Straw  

SciTech Connect

Recently there has been much interest in developing processes for producing liquid fuels from renewable resources. The most logical long term approach in terms of economics derives the carbohydrate substrate for fermentation from the hydrolysis of cellulosic crop and forest residues rather than from grains or other high grade food materials (1,2). Since the presence of lignin is the main barrier to the hydrolysis of cellulose from lignocellulosic materials, delignification processes developed by the wood pulping industry have been considered as possible prehydrolysis treatments. The delignification process under study in our laboratory is envisioned as a synthesis of two recently developed pulping processes. In the first step, called autohydrolysis, hot water is used directly to solubilize hemicellulose and to depolymerize lignin (3). Then, in a second step known as organosolv pulping (4), the autohydrolyzed material is extracted with aqueous alcohol. A s shown in Figure 1, this process can separate the original lignocellulosic material into three streams--hemicellulose in water, lignin in aqueous alcohol, and a cellulose pulp. Without further mechanical milling, delignified cellulose can be enzymatically hydrolyzed at 45-50 C to greater than 80% theoretical yield of glucose using fungal cellulases (5, 6). The resulting glucose syrup can then be fermented by yeast to produce ethanol or by selected bacteria to produce acetone and butanol or acetic and propionic acids (7). One objection to such a process, however, is the large energy input that is required. In order to extend our supplies of liquid fuels and chemicals, it is important that the use of fossil fuels in any lignocellulosic conversion process be minimized. The direct use of geothermal hot water in carrying out the autohydrolysis and extraction operations, therefore, seems especially attractive. On the one hand, it facilitates the conversion of non-food biomass to fuels and chemicals without wasting fossil fuel; and on the other hand, it provides a means for ''exporting'' geothermal energy from the well site. The primary goal of the work discussed in this report was to investigate the effects of variations in autohydrolysis conditions on the production of fermentable sugars from wheat straw. In assessing the relative merits of various sets of conditions, we considered both the direct production of sugar from the autohydrolysis of hemicellulose and the subsequent yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The principal parameters studied were time, temperature, and water/fiber weight ratio; however, we also investigated the effects of adding minor amounts of phenol and aluminum sulfate to the autohydrolysis charge. Phenol was selected for study because it was reported (8) to be effective in suppressing repolymerization of reactive lignin fragments. Aluminum sulfate, on the other hand, was chosen as a representative of the Lewis acids which, we hoped, would catalyze the delignification reactions.

Murphy, V.G.; Linden, J.C.; Moreira, A.R.; Lenz, T.G.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dust suppression characteristics of mineral oil when applied to corn, wheat, or soybeans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). . . . . . . Percent of Dust Less Than 10 um (PLT10). . Percent of Dust Less Than 16 um (PLT16). . Mass of Dust Less Than 10 pr1 (NLT10). . Mass of Dust Less Than 16 qm (MLT16). . Retention Curves (RC). SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS. FUTURE RESEARCH. REFERENCES... OF THEIR RESPECTIVE GRAIN KERNELS. . SUMMARY OF THE MEAN PERCENT OF DUST LESS THAN 10 um (PLT10) VALUES OF CORN, WHEAT, AND SOYBEAN DUSTS ADHERING TO THE SURFACES OF THEIR RESPECTIVE GRAIN KERNELS. SUMMARY OF THE MEAN PERCENT OF DUST LESS THAN 16 um (PLT16...

Jones, David Don

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Corn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Corn Nature Bulletin No. 118 May 31, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CORN Corn, or maize, has never been found growing wild. Columbus found it being grown by the Carib Indians and called it " Mahiz". The Aztecs told Cortez it was a gift from their gods, but the Mayas and the Incas already had been growing corn for thousands of years. Teosinte, a coarse native Mexican grass, appears to be its closest relative and its origin was probably in Central or South America. Our first colonists planted seed obtained from the Indians and, "corn" being the English word for all grain, called this strange new plant "Indian corn". Without man' s help, corn soon would disappear. Each year the seed must be carefully selected, carefully planted, and the soil kept cultivated to remove competition from other plants. Modern scientific breeding has produced varieties remarkable for their rapid growth, uniform size and heavy yield.

23

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw ... ?-Cellulose was obtained from Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, Missouri). ... This evidence suggests that CHW pretreatment may produce bio-oil that is composed of a greater amount of sugars and furanics and fewer small molecules and may therefore be a viable option to modify the chemical composition of bio-oils. ...

Robert Lee Johnson; Shi-Shen Liaw; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Su Ha; Sean S.-Y. Lin; Armando G. McDonald; Shulin Chen

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

List of publications 1. Sun, L., Mller, B. and Schnrer, A. (2013) Biogas production from wheat straw community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

List of publications 1. Sun, L., Müller, B. and Schnürer, A. (2013) Biogas production from wheat biogas digesters. Biores. Technol. 132, 327­332 4. Manzoor, S., Müller, B., Niazi A., Bongcam-Rudloff E of syntrophic acetate- oxidising culture in biogas reactors exposed to increasing levels of ammonia. Applied

25

Ammonia and urea treatment of wheat straw and corn stover JP Fontenot E Gallo Llorente, JM Obamahinti, VG Allen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by ammoniation directly or by urea treatment, but the improvement appears to be greater for ammonia than urea

Boyer, Edmond

26

Field Experiments at McKinney Sub-Station and Wichita Falls Sub-Station with Wheat, Corn, Cotton, Grasses and Manures. Field Experiments at College Station with Corn, Cotton, Grasses, Peas and Manures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bryan, we must conc lude that stable manure, n id ph sphate and cotton seed hull ashes were used profitably. V. f the different methods used in the preparation of land for corn at McKinney, sub oiling to a depth of nine incl1es increased the yield....9; Bissell, 23.4; No. 75 , 22.3; A labama, 20 . 6; Nebraska, 21.7 ; Scott, 24.4; Purple Straw, 20.8 ; Leba non, 23.5; ou thern Amber, 22 ; McPherson, 21.3; Bear ded Kin g, 22; Hybr id No. 9, 20.5; Red May, 20 .5; Winter Green , 22; Russian , 23...

Connell, J. H.; Clayton, James

1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the greatest emphasis on the botany and general biology of wheat, including breeding and disease resistance, devoting 177 pages to these basic aspects of wheat. He then deals with the ... of the text dealing with the botany, for example, has to be at an elementary level and includes information that can be found in a number of standard books on ...

G. D. H. BELL

1965-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modifications of the Connecticut broiler ration: wheat vs. corn, varying levels of protein concentrates, vitamin, antibiotic, and arsonic acid supplementation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Five experiments in series, requiring a total of 3,000 chicks, were conducted to test modifications of and supplements to the Connecticut broiler ration. Wheat and/or… (more)

Casorso, Roy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. corn stover, wheat straw), herbaceous energy crops (for Corn Stover. Golden, Colorado: National Renewable Energy

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Transformations of 14C lignin cell walls of wheat by a fungus and by bacteria from the rumen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformations of 14C lignin cell walls of wheat by a fungus and by bacteria from the rumen MA but little is known about the fate of lignins. The aim of this work was to study the transformation of 14C lignins of wheat straw by ruminal bacteria and fungi. Cell walls of wheat straw apical internodes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Winter Weed Pressure in Winter Wheat Edward Davis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26 Wheat ** ** * Barley *** * * Oats *** ** Canola * * * Lentil * * ** Millet ** ** Corn Beyond PrePare Maverick (Field Bioassay) #12;LENTIL OAT PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY PowerFlex ROTATIONAL

Maxwell, Bruce D.

32

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 Wheat croissants,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 Wheat croissants, applesauce, straw- berry jam Fruit salad, celery 2 Lunch Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 Tomato soup, grilled cheese, kiwi, carrot sticks 2 Pizza, carrot

Liu, Taosheng

33

Texas Wheat Flows and Transportation Modes, 1975.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coast; Crop Reporting Districts 10-N and 10-5 - Rio Grande Plains; and Crop Reporting Districts 6 and 7 - Pecos-Plateau. Texas Wheat Production The location of wheat production in Texas is shown in Figure 3, and the 1968-1975 level of wheat... sorghum and corn production. In the Rolling Plains, primarily a wheat producing area, grain elevators received approxi- 5 mately 71 percent of their receipts in May and June. Approximately 82 percent of the grain receipts at Gulf Coast elevators were...

Fuller, Stephen; Paggi, Mechel; Engler, Dwayne

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Heat and Power Production from Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fact that from 1990 the burning of straw in the fields is no longer permitted has accelerated the development of efficient and reliable Danish heat and power plants using straw.

Lars Ravn-Jensen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

Owens Corning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWENS CORNING OWENS CORNING GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 900 19 TH STREET N.W. SUITE 250 WASHINGTON, DC 20006 202.639.6900 FAX: 202.639.0247 OWENS CORNING September 20, 2013 By email: expartecommunications@hq.doe.gov Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law Office of General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington DC 20585-0121 RE: Ex Parte Memo Dear Mr. Cohen: On Thursday, August 29, 2013, Julian Francis, VP & Managing Director Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public Affairs, and I met with David Lee, Jeremy Williams, and Mark Lessans

37

Research on High Efficient Straw Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a thorough study of straw gasification characteristics, domestic present status and prospects using thermodynamic theory based on fundamentals, methods and advanced technologies. The improved ...

Wang Hongli; Ma Yitai; Li Minxia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photo-Catalytic Degradation of Wastewater from Straw Pulp and Paper Mill by Fe2O3/UV/H2O2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine the photo catalytic degradation of real effluents from wheat straw pulp and paper mill by nano-Fe2O3 catalyst. Four different ferric oxide samples were synthesized by homogeneous precipitation of reflux at different ... Keywords: potocatalysis, ?-Fe2O3, efluent, COD

Aimei Li; Haizhen Yang; Yiren Zhu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Influence of light on labelling of wheat stem lignins using [U14C] phenylalanine or [O14CH3] sinapic acid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of light on labelling of wheat stem lignins using [U14C] phenylalanine or [O14CH3, 118, route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex, France In order to investigate the fate of lignin during lignin in the dark or in the light. Batches of 5 wheat-straw upper internodes (flowery stage) were

Boyer, Edmond

40

Potato Corn Chowder Ingredients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potato Corn Chowder Ingredients: 2 potatoes, peeled and diced 15 ounces sweet corn, drained 2 potatoes, cut into bite size pieces. Place in microwave safe bowl with lid. Add 1/4 cup of water and cover to remove sodium. 4. While potatoes are cooking, melt margarine in saucepan over medium heat and add flour

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Estimating Corn Grain Yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Background Moisture stress caused by drought will reduce corn grain yields by dis- rupting kernel development, lowering grade, and impeding grain fill. Kernel development of the corn plant is most affected by drought during early vegeta- tive growth stages... stages of development (V8 and V9) also cause the corn plant to develop fewer kernels and to abort developing pollen tubes and kernels. The result is fewer filled rows and fewer developed kernels within each row of an ear, and an overall reduction...

Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- Corn cobs -- Corn screenings -- Wood chips -- Straw--wheat, oats, rye, barley -- Alfalfa (not good% moisture when harvested. Corn stover, at the time of grain harvest, has a moisture content about twice that of grain. At the time of grain harvest, corn cobs have a moisture content 10-20 % greater than the moisture

43

FOOD PRESERVATION SERIES CornMichigan-grown corn is available  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that meat juices do not contaminate it. Keep in the refrigerator, away from raw meat so that meat juices do. Store corn in its husk in the refrigerator. For best flavor, eat soon after picking or buying corn. Use

44

Prediction of the digestible and metabolizable energy content of wheat milling by-products for growing pigs from chemical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thirty samples of wheat milling by-products (wheat bran, wheat middlings, wheat shorts, wheat red dog, wheat feed flour), collected from 11 flour mills, were fed to growing pigs to determine their digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) content and to establish equations for predicting their DE and ME content based on chemical analysis. The basal diet was based on corn and soybean meal while the other 30 experimental diets contained 290.4 g/kg wheat milling by-products added at the expense of corn and soybean meal. The 31 diets were fed to 96 growing pigs (BW = 61.9 ± 3.2 kg) according to a completely randomized design during two successive periods. During each period, the 30 experimental diets were fed to three pigs and the basal diet was fed to six pigs, resulting in 6 replications per experimental diet and 12 replications for the basal diet over the two periods. The chemical composition of the 30 samples was variable, and starch and fiber content had a strong negative correlation (r = ?0.96 to ?0.99 for CF and ADF, respectively). The DE content of wheat feed flour, wheat red dog, wheat shorts, wheat middlings and wheat bran averaged 17.4, 16.9, 15.2, 12.5 and 12.0 MJ/kg DM, respectively. From the stepwise regression analysis, a series of DE and ME prediction equations were generated. The best fit equations for wheat milling by-products were: DE (MJ/kg DM) = 19.2 ? (0.016×aNDF) with R2 = 0.94, RSD = 0.58 and Pcontent varied substantially and various correlated single predictors (aNDF, ash, CF, starch, etc.) can be used to accurately predict the DE and ME content when fed to growing pigs.

Q. Huang; C.X. Shi; Y.B. Su; Z.Y. Liu; D.F. Li; L. Liu; C.F. Huang; X.S. Piao; C.H. Lai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CORN STEEP LIQUOR IN MICROBIOLOGY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is a by-product of the corn wet-milling industry it would be insufficient...invention of much of the modern wet milling process, suggested corn steep liquor as a nutrient...general flowsheet of the corn wet-milling process; and to Dr. L...

R. Winston Liggett; H. Koffler

1948-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mechanical Harvesting of Corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Indian corn is the oldest food crop known in continental I and South America. When Columbus discovered America ;ears ago, he found in Cuba "a sort of grain they call Maiz which was well tosted, bak'd, dry'd and made into flour" (5). Thus... near Brownsville; from the Sabine on the east to El Paso on the west. Only one other crop-cotton- occupies a larger acreage in Texas. The largest acreages of corn are grown in the Blackland Prairie of Central Texas. Of the 254 counties in l...

Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Corn Hybrids for Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea....1 in 1941 to 74.5 percent in 1953. Most of the present acreage is devoted to the newer, better-adaptt hybrids-Texas 26, 28 and 30. These new hybrids usually outyield the older Texas hybrids h!. least 10 percent. Corn is one of the most important...

Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication tells producer about the hazards of wheat streak mosaic virus. It includes information on recognizing affected grain and on preventing infestation....

Morgan, Gaylon

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Retain current filters Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Video Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More See how organic materials like corn stover, wheat straw, and woody plants...

50

Education Toolbox Search | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Retain current filters Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More See how organic materials like corn stover, wheat straw, and woody plants...

51

Neutral Sugar Contents of Corn Gluten Meal and Corn Gluten Feed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutral Sugar Contents of Corn Gluten Meal and Corn Gluten Feed ... Corn gluten meal and corn gluten feed were supplied by Pekin Energy Company (Pekin, IL). ... It is not practical to determine the neutral carbohydrate composition of corn gluten feed that contains a changing percentage of defatted corn germ, so we used corn gluten feed that does not contain defatted corn germ from Pekin Energy. ...

Y. Victor Wu

1996-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wheat Pasture Poisoning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which had recovered from the initial attack. FRANK H. SIMS and H. R. CROOKSHANK* N THE WINTER WHEAT GRAZING AREA, MORE 1 particularly in the Texas and Oklahoma Pan- handles, a condition develops which is known Incally as wheat pasture poisoning when...

Crookshank, H. R.; Sims, Frank H.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Corn Earworm and Fall Armyworm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Flea Beetles... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Fall Armyworm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Southwestern Corn Borer...

Porter, Patrick; Cronholm, Gregory B.; Parker, Roy D.; Troxclair, Noel N.; Patrick, Carl D.; Biles, Stephen; Morrison, William P.

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Digestive utilization of different sources of supplemental protein by heifers grazing bermudagrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. (1991) found that a supplement of kg/d of corn gluten meal fed to a 300-kg steers receiving ammoniated wheat straw produced similar improvement in daily gain to a corn supplement fed at 2. 5 kg/d, even though steers supplemented with corn...

Cabello Cordova, Luis Carlos

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Occurrence and Biological Activity of Ferulate-Phytosterol Esters in Corn Fiber and Corn Fiber Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn fiber is a pericarp-rich fraction obtained during the processing of corn via “wetmilling.” Wet milling of corn is used by all companies that produce corn starch and corn sweeteners, and by many companies tha...

Robert A. Moreau; Michael J. Powell…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Corn Production in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 25- Apr. 10 High Plains (Irrigated) Apr. 10- May 1 'Shown as pounds per acre of nitrogen (N), phosphoric acid (P20;,) and potash (K-0), respectively. 'Shown as po1111ds pel- acre of 1iitroge11 (N). I DIGEST 1 Corn is one of the more..., the average yield usually fluctuated between 1.0 and 20 bushels per acre. Yields were slightly higher at the beginning of the century as a result of inherent soil fertility. With continued cropping, however, fertility and yields grad- ually declined...

Collier, Jesse W. (Jesse Wilton); Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effect of nanoclay and magnesium hydroxide on some properties of HDPE/wheat straw composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since natural fiber/polymer composites are increasingly used, the development of safe and environmental friendly flame retarding bio-based composites is of great importance. But this issue must maintain the me...

Yaghob Liany; Asghar Tabei; Mohammad Farsi; Mostafa Madanipour

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Yancheng Chuangneng Straw Electricity Generation Co Ltd Place Yancheng, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. Coordinates 33.583°, 113.983009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.583,"lon":113.983009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Process for the Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction of Corn Oil from Dry Milled Corn Germ and Enzymatic Wet Milled Corn Germ (E-Germ)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bench-scale aqueous enzymatic method was developed to extract corn oil from corn germ from either a commercial corn dry mill or corn germ from a newly-developed experimental enzymatic wet milling process (E-Ger...

Robert A. Moreau; Leland C. Dickey…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Staling in corn tortillas prepared from nixtamalized corn flour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of forming method and storage on starch and texture of corn tortillas were evaluated. Texture of tortillas was evaluated subjectively using rollability and crinkle methods and objectively using bending and extensibility methods on a texture...

Fernandez de Castro, Deborah Ann

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Novel Ethanol Fermentations from Sugar Cane and Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...30 April 1987 research-article Novel Ethanol Fermentations from Sugar Cane and Straw...desirable to produce bulk chemicals such as ethanol from renewable resources; the questions...and the resulting sugars would increase ethanol yields. A high-temperature fermentation...

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Protein-Enriched Spaghetti Fortified with Corn Gluten Meal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Protein-Enriched Spaghetti Fortified with Corn Gluten Meal ... Corn gluten meal was from Pekin Energy Co. (Pekin, IL). ...

Y. Victor Wu; Gary A. Hareland; Kathleen Warner

2001-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Al-Corn Clean Fuel Place Claremont, North Dakota Product Al-Corn is an ethanol plant located in Claremont, North Dakota, which is owned by local farmers and...

65

The future of coproducts from corn processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased demand for ethanol as a fuel additive has resulted in dramatic growth in ethanol production. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn kernel ...

Kent D. Rausch; Ronald L. Belyea

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Financial determinants of corn market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies the effects of the TNX ten-year treasury note, the crude oil light sweet, the denatured fuel ethanol, the S&P 500 Stock Index and the US dollar/yen exchange rate on the conditional mean and variance return of corn futures. It employs daily data from January 1, 2002 to August 31, 2009. Using the GJR-GARCH(1, 1) model, we provide empirical evidence of positive influence of bond, energy and capital market on corn market. There is also evidence that the volatility shocks of the US dollar/yen exchange rate have a positive impact on the conditional volatility of corn futures returns. Finally, the structural analysis of volatility with the GJR-GARCH model has shown that current volatility is more influenced by past volatility rather than by the previous day shocks.

Nikolaos Sariannidis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Deterioration of High-Moisture Corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbial reduction in stored and dry-milled corn infected with Southern Corn LeafBlight. Cereal Chem. 49:346-353...of aflatoxins in commerical supplies of corn and grain sorghum used for wet-milling. Cereal Sci. Today 16:153-155, 163...

Michael E. McMahon; Paul A. Hartman; Robert A. Saul; Lois H. Tiffany

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Life cycle GHG analysis of rice straw bio-DME production and application in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thailand is one of the leading countries in rice production and export; an abundance of rice straw, therefore, is left in the field nowadays and is commonly burnt to facilitate quick planting of the next crop. The study assesses the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of using rice straw for bio-DME production in Thailand. The analysis is divided into two scenarios of rice straw bio-DME utilization i.e. used as automotive fuel for diesel engines and used as LPG supplement for household application. The results reveal that that utilization of rice straw for bio-DME in the two scenarios could help reduce GHG emissions by around 14–70% and 2–66%, respectively as compared to the diesel fuel and LPG substituted. In case rice straw is considered as a by-product of rice cultivation, the cultivation of rice straw will be the major source of GHG emission contributing around 50% of the total GHG emissions of rice straw bio-DME production. Several factors that can affect the GHG performance of rice straw bio-DME production are discussed along with measures to enhance GHG performance of rice straw bio-DME production and utilization.

Thapat Silalertruksa; Shabbir H. Gheewala; Masayuki Sagisaka; Katsunobu Yamaguchi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip 50058 Product Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a 40m gallon (151.4m litre) bioethanol plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. References Tall Corn Ethanol LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC is a company located in Coon Rapids, Iowa . References ↑ "Tall Corn Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tall_Corn_Ethanol_LLC&oldid=352015" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

70

High Fermentable Corn Hybrids for the Dry-Grind Corn Ethanol Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biofuel corn ethanol helps provide a sustainable and secure non-petroleum source of energy. The dry-grind ethanol industry is the ... customer for about one-third of US-produced corn grain. Getting the most e...

Joel E. Ream; Ping Feng; Iñigo Ibarra…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Slagging Behavior of Straw and Corn Stover and the Fate of Potassium under Entrained-Flow Gasification Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was observed that, although the major part of the primarily siliceous native ash promptly forms a molten slag, much of the alkalis are evaporated into the syngas. ... Experiments were performed in an electrically heated atmospheric EF reactor [lab-scale combustion and gasification simulator (LCS)] equipped with a multi-stage gas burner that has been applied extensively in previous studies of PF combustion and gasification. ... However, deposition problems could arise when burning other coals, particularly coals with a high S or alkali metal content or a low content of ash. ...

Simon Leiser; Mariusz K. Cieplik; Ruben Smit

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Extrusion of corn for ethanol fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extrusion and conventional cooking of corn for ethanol production were compared. Extrusion processing requires less energy and water than conventional cooking methods. Optimal...

S. R. Korn; J. M. Harper

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Watergrass and Volunteer Sorghum Control in Corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was evaluated for 2 m, Table 1. In 1970, herbiddes were applied to flat ground and iaaorporcrted with a tandem disk, apt prowutely 1 month beh corn planting. Later, soil wqs bedded, the field preplant irrigated, cold corn planted in mdaturs. Under them... " Wiides applied and corn planted on May 20 %tan+ + 3 + 1.5 75 33 32 bHerbicidee applied and Excel+ E-56 corn planted on Aprz2S. Bladex 4 + 1.6 93 Avadex + 1.5 +1.5 . y Lasso 2+2 &. CGA 18762 1.6 ')lerbickles applied April 17, tandem disked twice...

Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.; Lavake, D.E.; Hollingsworth, Dale

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Oil recovery from condensed corn distillers solubles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Condensed corn distillers solubles (CCDS) contains more oil than dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), 20 vs. 12% (dry weight basis). Therefore, significant amount of… (more)

Majoni, Sandra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The influence of moisture content and cooking on the screw pressing and prepressing of corn oil from corn germ  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples of corn germ were obtained from a commercial corn wet mill (factory dried to about 3% moisture) and a commerical corn dry mill (undried, produced in the mill with about 13% moisture). The germ ... pressin...

Robert A. Moreau; David B. Johnston…

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Advancing Biorefining of Distiller's Grain and Corn Stover Blends...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advancing Biorefining of Distiller's Grain and Corn Stover Blends Advancing Biorefining of Distiller's Grain and Corn Stover Blends This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of...

77

Field evaluation of the availability for corn and soybean of phosphorus recovered as struvite from corn fiber processing for bioenergy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??FIELD EVALUATION OF THE AVAILABILITY FOR CORN AND SOYBEAN OF PHOSPHORUS RECOVERED AS STRUVITE FROM CORN FIBER PROCESSING FOR BIOENERGY A paper to be submitted… (more)

Thompson, Louis Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle Midwest fields, waiting to rot or be processed into ethanol. Interestingly, the National Corn Growers

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

79

CORN GERM: A VALUABLE PROTEIN FOOD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...per cent. of the crop by dry milling and distilling,2 and a yield...value of the proteins of the corn germ has not been studied by...Scientist, 31: 142, 1943. 2 Corn germ made by the wet-milling process, due to leaching with...

H. H. MITCHELL; JESSIE R. BEADLES

1944-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Heartland Corn Products | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Products Corn Products Jump to: navigation, search Name Heartland Corn Products Place Winthrop, Minnesota Zip 55396 Product Heartland Corn Products is farmer-owned cooperative that produces corn-derived ethanol. Coordinates 48.47373°, -120.177559° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.47373,"lon":-120.177559,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rockwell Automation - Owens Corning Teaming Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rockwell Automation Owens Corning Rockwell Automation Owens Corning 1201 S. Second Street 247 York Road Milwaukee, WI 53204 Guelph, Ontario N1E 3G4 Business: Industrial Automation Business: Textile / Fiber Nigel Hitchings Frank Peel Marketing Manager Electrical Support Specialist Phone: 508-357-8404 Phone: 519-823-7208 Email: nehitchings@ra.rockwell.com Email: frank.peel@owenscorning.com Owens Corning partners with Rockwell Automation to retrofit fans with VFDs, saving $67,000 annually Project Scope Owens Corning and Rockwell Automation installed Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) on one 125HP cooling fan and three 40HP recirculation fans at the Owens Corning Guelph Glass Plant. The VFDs were integrated with the existing Rockwell Automation programmable automation controller to collect

82

Demonstration Systems of Cooking Gas Produced by Crop Straw Gasifier for Villages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several demonstration systems were designed, built, tested and put into use in order to develop a new way of producing cooking gas from crop straw for villages by biomass gasification technology. A type of crop s...

L. Sun; Z. Z. Gu; D. Y. Guo; M. Xu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY) Hosein Shapouri*, U.S. Department of corn ethanol utilizing the latest survey of U.S. corn producers and the 2001 U.S. survey of ethanol to produce ethanol and byproducts. The results indicate that corn ethanol has a positive energy balance, even

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

84

REGULAR ARTICLE European corn borer injury effects on lignin, carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULAR ARTICLE European corn borer injury effects on lignin, carbon and nitrogen in corn tissues herbivores often stimulate lignin deposition in injured plant tissue, but it is not known whether corn (Zea (Bacillus thuringiensis) genetic modifica- tion is also reported to affect lignin in corn. This study

Beaudoin, Georges

85

September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

Noble, James S.

86

The role of acetyl xylan esterase in the solubilization of xylan and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw and giant reed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In lignocellulosic matrices, xylan is closely associated with the cellulose fibrils, ... and does to some extent cover the fiber surfaces, thereby limiting the access of cellulases to the cellulose surface [5...]...

Junhua Zhang; Matti Siika-aho; Maija Tenkanen; Liisa Viikari

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Degradation of untreated and anhydrous ammonia-treated wheat straw by two strains of rumen anaerobic fungi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulose and xylans of hemicel- luloses, but little is known about the specif- ic role of each species, the phloem and the parenchyma were slightly degraded and rhizoids were visible on the surface of the plant frag- ments. After 24 h the mass of rhizoids on the surface of the plant fragments was so large

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

89

Corn Plus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plus Plus Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn Plus Place Winnebago, Minnesota Product Farmer Coop which owns an Ethanol plant in Winnebago Mn. Coordinates 42.236095°, -96.472339° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.236095,"lon":-96.472339,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Quad County Corn Processors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quad County Corn Processors Quad County Corn Processors Jump to: navigation, search Name Quad County Corn Processors Place Galva, Iowa Zip 51020 Product Farmer owned corn processing facility management company. Coordinates 38.38422°, -97.537539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.38422,"lon":-97.537539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

2008 National dry mill corn ethanol survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emerging regulations require an examination of corn ethanol’s greenhouse gas emissions on a life cycle basis, including emissions from energy consumed at the plant level. However, ... data, we conducted a survey ...

Steffen Mueller

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Corn Drying: Modelling the Quality Degradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn is the second largest agricultural produce in ... (primarily towards the EEC). Thus, its wet-milling quality has become an important criterion since ... occurs just after harvesting. To preserve the wet-milling

F. Courtois; A. Lebert; J. C. Lasseran; J. J. Bimbenet

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Enzymatic Saccharification of Defatted Corn Germ*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial defatted germ from wet milled corn was efficiently saccharified by a crude enzyme...Aureobasidium...sp. with yields of up to 200 mg glucose, 140 mg xylose, and 130 mg arabinose per g germ. These yields...

Timothy D. Leathers

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to pH 4. 8. . 10 Sugar yield for various calcium hydroxide loadings. . . Progress of lime recovery by batch extraction of pretreated corn stover. 18 Sugar yields from Tween 80 loading experiment . 24 Conversion of glucan and xylan &om... Sugar yields for different enzyme loadings at 40 "C no Tween, with Tween 80, with Tween 20. 31 Sugar yield (40 'C, 100 h) as a function of enzyme loading 32 Conversions of corn stover glucan, xylan, and total sugars at different hydrolysis...

Kaar, William Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Influence of Climate on Composition of Corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. BULLETIN NO. 15, INFLUENCE OF CLIMATE ON COMPOSITION OF CORN. Digestibility of Southern Food Stuffs: COTTON SEED HULLS; CORN FODDER. ASH ANALYSES. ROASTED COTTON SEED. AGRICIJJ~TURAL AND MECHANICAL... COLLEGE OF TEXAS. A11 Bulletins of this Station are issued free. Anv one interested in any branch -of agricul- ture may have his name placed on our permanent mailing list, and secure future Gmbcrs, 1~ application to GEO. W. CURTIS DIRECTOR College...

Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill); Adriance, Duncan

1891-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Corn Wet Milling: Separation Chemistry and Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter focuses on the separation chemistry and technology of corn wet milling. The purpose of corn wet milling is to separate the kernel into its constituent chemical components. Wet milling processing begins with steeping whole kernel corn in an aqueous solution of sulfur dioxide and lactic acid (produced by microorganisms) at 50°C for 24–48 hours. The corn is then coarsely ground and the lipid-containing germ and fibrous hull portions are separated. After the remaining components are more finely ground, the starch and protein are separated using hydrocyclones, essentially continuous centrifuges; corn starch is slightly denser than corn protein. Germ is further processed into oil and the protein and fiber components are usually blended and used as animal feeds. The wet starch is either dried, chemically modified to change its functional properties, converted into intermediate-sized glucose polymers, or fully depolymerized into sugars. Starch is also often used as a raw ingredient for adjacent processing facilities that produce ethanol or other alcohols and other industrial chemicals.

David S. Jackson; Donald L. Shandera Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as rickets, scurvy, or beri-beri. Vitamin A was one of the first vitamins discovered. It occurs in large quantity in yellow corn, while little or none is founcl in white corn. For the purpose of this study, samples of corn grown at the various substations... such as rickets, scurvy, or beri-beri. Vitamin A was one of the first vitamins discovered. It occurs in large quantity in yellow corn, while little or none is founcl in white corn. For the purpose of this study, samples of corn grown at the various substations...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Life Cycle Assessment Study of Biopolymers (Polyhydroxyalkanoates) - Derived from No-Tilled Corn (11 pp)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn cultivation data are taken from 14 counties in the Corn Belt states of the United States ? ... Wisconsin. The environmental burdens associated with the corn wet milling process, in which dextrose, corn oil,...

Seungdo Kim; Bruce Dale

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Life Cycle Assessment of district heat production in a straw fired CHP plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to concerns about the sustainability of the energy sector, conversion of biomass to energy is increasing its hold globally. Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is being adopted as an analytical tool to assess the environmental impacts in the entire cycle of biomass production and conversions to different products. This study deals with the LCIA of straw conversion to district heat in a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant and in a district heating boiler (producing heat only). Environmental impact categories are Global Warming Potential (GWP), Acidification Potential (AP), aquatic and terrestrial Eutrophication Potential (EP) and Non-Renewable Energy (NRE) use. In the case of CHP, the co-produced electricity is assumed to displace the marginal Danish electricity mix. The current study showed that straw fired in the CHP plant would lead to a GWP of ?187 g CO2-eq, AP 0.01 m2 UES (un-protected ecosystem), aquatic EP 0.16 g NO3-eq, terrestrial EP 0.008 m2 UES, and NRE use ?0.14 MJ-primary per 1 MJ heat production. Straw conversion to heat in the CHP plant showed better environmental performances compared to the district heating boiler. Furthermore, removing straw from the field is related to the consequence e.g. decline in soil carbon sequestration, limiting soil nutrient availability, and when compared with natural gas the conversion of straw to heat would lead to a higher aquatic and terrestrial EP and AP. The study also outlays spaces for the detail sustainability assessment of straw conversion in a biorefinery and compare with the current study.

Ranjan Parajuli; Søren Løkke; Poul Alberg Østergaard; Marie Trydeman Knudsen; Jannick H. Schmidt?; Tommy Dalgaard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Melting behavior of ashes from the co-combustion of coal and straw  

SciTech Connect

Straw may be used today as a substitute fuel to lower the greenhouse gas emissions from traditional coal-fired power plants and provide green-based electricity. It may also provide an alternative source of income to the local farmers helping the developed countries to support sustainable development. The use of straw as a co-firing feedstock in traditional coal-fired plants is associated with operational problems, such as deposition, agglomeration, and/or corrosion, mainly because of the higher amounts of alkali metals and chlorine in straw compared to coal. This may lead to unscheduled shutdowns and costly repairs, increasing the operational costs and the cost of the produced power. In this paper, the melting characteristics of several ash fractions sampled from different parts of a pilot-scale pulverized fuel (PF) boiler operating with different coal/straw mixtures is determined by measuring the ash viscosity using a high-temperature rotational viscometer. The produced data provide information on the melting of the ash material, its flow characteristics, and the rates of crystallization and recrystallization, as a function of the temperature. This information may be used to modify the temperature profile in the different parts of the boiler to reduce the deposition of the ash material. The results show that the straw in the co-combustion mixture changes the viscosity characteristics of the produced ash fractions. The viscosity of the different ash fractions is lowered, as the percentage of straw in the co-combustion mixture increases, and leads to higher stickiness of the produced ash particles at lower temperatures. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

S. Arvelakis; F.J. Frandsen [Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby (Denmark). CHEC Research Centre

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The energy relationships of corn production and alcohol fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy relationships of corn production and alcohol fermentation ... The production of alcohol from corn lends itself well to illustrating the practical applications of scientific principles that deal with energy transformations and inefficiencies. ...

Thomas E. Van Koevering; Michael D. Morgan; Thomas J. Younk

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Enriched arabinoxylan in corn fiber for value-added products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-step process is evaluated to separate the hexose component in wet milling corn fibers from the pentose component for production of value-added products. Corn fibers were first pretreated with hot water ... ...

Bin Wang; Biao Cheng; Hao Feng

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Improved bio-energy yields via sequential ethanol fermentation and biogas digestion of steam exploded oat straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using standard laboratory equipment, thermochemically pretreated oat straw was enzymatically saccharified and fermented to ethanol, and after removal of ethanol the remaining material was subjected to biogas digestion. A detailed mass balance calculation shows that, for steam explosion pretreatment, this combined ethanol fermentation and biogas digestion converts 85–87% of the higher heating value (HHV) of holocellulose (cellulose and hemicellulose) in the oat straw into biofuel energy. The energy (HHV) yield of the produced ethanol and methane was 9.5–9.8 MJ/(kg dry oat straw), which is 28–34% higher than direct biogas digestion that yielded 7.3–7.4 MJ/(kg dry oat straw). The rate of biogas formation from the fermentation residues was also higher than from the corresponding pretreated but unfermented oat straw, indicating that the biogas digestion could be terminated after only 24 days. This suggests that the ethanol process acts as an additional pretreatment for the biogas process.

Debebe Yilma Dererie; Stefan Trobro; Majid Haddad Momeni; Henrik Hansson; Johanna Blomqvist; Volkmar Passoth; Anna Schnürer; Mats Sandgren; Jerry Ståhlberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Pre-Harvest Sprouting in Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This leaflet cautions producers about the problems associated with pre-harvest sprouting of wheat and how to recognize affected grains....

Morgan, Gaylon

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction Of Wheat Germ Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study is to investigate the aqueous enzymatic extraction of wheat germ oil. Four enzymes (Viscozyme L, Multifect CX 13l, Multifect CX… (more)

Xie, Meizhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recovery and Characterization of ?-Zein from Corn Fermentation Coproducts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recovery and Characterization of ?-Zein from Corn Fermentation Coproducts ... Commercial DDGS was obtained from Lincolnway Energy, Ames, IA. ...

Ilankovan Paraman; Buddhi P. Lamsal

2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Improving Anaerobic Codigestion of Corn Stover Using Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lignin of the corn stover was measured according to the Laboratory Analytical Procedures (LAP) established by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). ... The methane yield per gram of corn stover is an important parameter to estimate the net energy production of the corn stover digestion. ... This means that NaOH pretreatment is an effective way to obtain higher net energy production through anaerobic codigestion of corn stover. ...

Zhaoyang You; Taoyuan Wei; Jay J. Cheng

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro Corn LLC Pro Corn LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro-Corn LLC Place Preston, Minnesota Zip 55965 Product Minnesotan farmer owned bioethanol production company. Coordinates 47.526531°, -121.936019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.526531,"lon":-121.936019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Power Coop Corn Belt Power Coop Place Iowa Utility Id 4363 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Corn_Belt_Power_Coop&oldid=41053

110

Fattening Lambs on Corn, Milo, Hegari, Wheat, and Oats, with Cottonseed Cake and Alfalfa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. ??On leave. $In cooperation with Texas Extension Service. Four feeding trials were conducted to compare lamb-fatten- ng rations using different common grains with alfalfa hay .s the roughage.... - - Year of Trial 1 1927-28 1 1928-19 1928-29 I 1929-30 1929-in - ,,. - -- -- lg.1; 1 Milo 49.4 Leligth of feeding 'period (days) Grain fed with cottonseed cake and alfalfa --I Average initial weight of lambs, Ibs. Increased daily gain due...

Mackey, A. K. (Arthur Kapp); Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle First Draft Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil legitimately ask: Why do the various energy balances of the corn-ethanol cycle still differ so much? Why do some authors claim that the corn-ethanol cycle has a positive net energy balance (Wang et al., 1997

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

112

THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW OR IMPROVED SYNTHETIC MATERIALS FROM CORN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of materials will diversify the market for corn and for wet- mill biorefineries." Jaffe said that the workTHE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW OR IMPROVED SYNTHETIC MATERIALS FROM CORN DERIVATIVES IS THE GOAL OF A PARTNERSHIP AMONG NJIT RESEARCHERS, THE IOWA CORN PROMOTION BOARD AND THE MID-ATLANTIC TECHNOLOGY, RESEARCH

Bieber, Michael

113

Feeding Corn Milling Byproducts to Feedlot Cattle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn milling byproducts are expected to increase dramatically in supply as the ethanol industry expands. Distillers grains, corn gluten feed, or a combination of both byproducts offer many feeding options when included in feedlot rations. These byproduct feeds may effectively improve cattle performance and operation profitability. When these byproducts are fed in feedlot diets, adjustments to grain processing method and roughage level may improve cattle performance. Innovative storage methods for wet byproducts and the use of dried byproducts offer small operations flexibility when using byproducts. As new byproducts are developed by ethanol plants, they should be evaluated with performance data to determine their product-specific feeding values.

Terry J. Klopfenstein; Galen E. Erickson; Virgil R. Bremer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Rice Straw Fiber Reinforced High Density Polyethylene Composite: Effect of Coupled Compatibilizating and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice Straw Fiber Reinforced High Density Polyethylene Composite: Effect of Coupled polyethylene (HDPE) composites were manufactured by extrusion and injection molding. Three compatibilizers compatibilizers, ma- leic anhydride grafted polyethylene and polypropylene (PE-g-MA and PP-g-MA) are considered

115

Straw and Xylan Utilization by Pure Cultures of Nitrogen-Fixing Azospirillum spp  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cultures are able to utilize xylan, and in attacking straw, xylan is probably a major substrate...growing in small depressions in the surface of agar plates. No other case...155.73 6.94 84.05 1.87 Xylan 0.132 0.042 2.133 + 0...

Dorothy M. Halsall; Graham L. Turner; Alan H. Gibson

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

GIS mapping of rice straw residue for bioenergy purpose in a rural area of Assam, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Agricultural residues are a promising source of biomass energy. However, agricultural residues are seasonally available and loosely distributed over large geographical areas and hence require spatio-temporal assessment. Satellite image is a handy input for such assessment and high resolution image could increase the preciseness of estimation. In the present study, rice cropland is mapped using high resolution WorldView-2 satellite image in a rural area of Assam, India. The rice cropland map in combination with agricultural statistics is then analyzed in GIS in order to assess rice straw availability for potential bioenergy generation. About 54% land of study area belongs to rice cropland, which can contribute 5360 tonnes surplus rice straw per annum (equivalent to 83,296 GJ). Potential electric power capacity from the surplus rice straw in the study area is 523.50 kW. However, at individual village level the potential varies from 4.45 kW to 28.69 kW. Considering the power crisis in India, the findings of this work are expected to assist policy makers and biomass energy developers in decision making process. Particularly, this paper generated information on village level rice straw residue availability and subsequently potential electric power capacity. Such information is limited in the India expect for few states.

Moonmoon Hiloidhari; D.C. Baruah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Xylitol Production by Genetically Engineered Trichoderma reesei Strains Using Barley Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pretreated using NaOH and Organosolv pretreatment methods. The highest xylitol production of 6.1 and 13.22 g/L was obtained using medium supplemented with 2 % Organosolv-pretreated barley straw and 2 % D-xylose by the xdh1

Qin, Wensheng

118

Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used by Zuo et al., 501 ( 20 mW/m2 was generated from a paper recycling wastewater containing cellulose and animal wastewaters and corn stover hydrolysates. For example, high power densities (810 to 970 mW/m2

120

Vaguely Quantified Rough Sets Chris Cornelis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vaguely Quantified Rough Sets Chris Cornelis1 , Martine De Cock1 , and Anna Maria Radzikowska2 1@mini.pw.edu.pl Abstract. The hybridization of rough sets and fuzzy sets has focused on creating an end product they allow for gradual membership, fuzzy rough sets are still abrupt in a sense that adding or omitting

Gent, Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy`s H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year`s atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. [Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Wheat Ridge Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheat Ridge Solar Wheat Ridge Solar Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Wheat Ridge Solar Name Wheat Ridge Solar Address 4550 Teller St Place Wheat Ridge, Colorado Zip 80033 Sector Solar Product Design and installation of solar systems for residential and small business Website http://www.wheatridgesolar.com Coordinates 39.779472°, -105.076426° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.779472,"lon":-105.076426,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

College of Agricultural Sciences Calvin & Merle Smith Wheat Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Agricultural Sciences Calvin & Merle Smith Wheat Research Endowment Fund Application PURPOSE The Calvin & Merle Smith Wheat Research Endowment Fund supports a student's work on an OSU wheat.Dorres@oregonstate.edu #12;College of Agricultural Sciences Calvin & Merle Smith Wheat Research Endowment Fund APPLICATION

Grünwald, Niklaus J.

126

Corn stalk orientation effect on mechanical cutting  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts that increase the efficiency of size reduction of biomass can lead to a significant energy saving. This paper deals with the determination of the effect of sample orientation with respect to cutting element and quantify the possible cutting energy reduction, utilising dry corn stalks as the test material (15%e20% wet basis). To evaluate the mechanical cutting characteristics of corn stalks, a Warnere Bratzler device was modified by replacing its blunt edged cutting element with one having a 30_ single bevel sharp knife edge. Cutting force-deformation characteristics obtained with a universal testing machine were analysed to evaluate the orientation effects at perpendicular (90o), inclined (45o), and parallel (0o) orientations on internodes and nodes for cutting force, energy, ultimate stress, and specific energy of corn stalks. The corn stalks cutting force-displacement characteristics were found to differ with orientation, and internode and node material difference. Overall, the peak failure force, and the total cutting energy of internodes and nodes varied significantly (P < 0.05) with stalk cross-sectional area. The specific energy values (total energy per unit cut area) of dry corn stalk internodes ranged from 11.3 to 23.5 kN m_1, and nodes from 8.6 to 14.0 kN m_1. The parallel orientation (along grain) compared to perpendicular (across grain) produced a significant reduction of the cutting stress and the specific energy to one tenth or better for internodes, and to about one-fifth for nodes.

Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Weed Control Recommendations in Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a pH above 7.9. Long rotation restrictions. Barley Hoelon 3EC 2?2.66 pt Annual grass: annual ryegrass. Apply at planting. If no rain occurs within 7 days, expect reduced control. Rate dependent on soil type. None Table 2. Preemergence herbicides.... North central Texas and southern Oklahoma only. Wheat seeds should be planted at least 1 in. deep. Crop rotations are dependent on soil pH. Oat Hoelon 3EC 2?2.66 pt Annual grass: Italian ryegrass. Apply at planting. If no rain occurs within 7 days...

Morgan, Gaylon; Baumann, Paul A.; Baughman, Todd; Bean, Brent W.

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS? TAD as ethanol from corn. When this corn ethanol is burned as a gasoline additive or fuel, its use amounts that burn corn ethanol is halved. The wide- spread use of corn ethanol will cause manifold damage to air

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

129

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant K.D. Rausch March 2003; accepted 10 March 2003 Abstract The primary commodity of corn wet milling is starch, but two Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Coproducts; Corn gluten meal; Corn gluten feed; Corn wet milling

130

The relationship between wheat self-sufficiency and national wheat trade policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to be empha- sized, however, that neither hypothesis makes any assertion as to cause; prediction is the goal, and thus association is of import). The measure of wheat self-sufficiency ut'lized is the ratio of net wheat imports to domestic wheat consumption... of the self-sufficiency ratio (the basic conditions) are operationalized as measures of domestic availability, domestic demand, and the relationship between pro- ducer price and border price. Analysis utilizes ordinary least squares regression techniques...

Maurer, Alan Borman

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The usability of switchgrass, rice straw, and logging residue as feedstocks for power generation in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the economic implications of using agriculturally based feedstock for bio-energy production in East Texas. Specifically I examined the use of switchgrass, rice straw, and logging residue as a feedstock for electrical power...

Hong, Sung Wook

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

132

Life cycle assessment of energy and GHG emissions during ethanol production from grass straws using various pretreatment processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to perform a well-to-pump life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the overall net energy balance and environmental impact of bioethanol production using Tall Fescue grass straw as fee...

Deepak Kumar; Ganti S. Murthy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

GIS based assessment of rice (Oryza sativa) straw biomass as an alternative fuel for tea (Camellia sinensis L.) drying in Sonitpur district of Assam, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on spatial distribution of rice (Oryza sativa) straw and its potential demand as a renewable energy fuel for tea (Camellia sinensis L.) drying. Rice straw availability and its demand in tea gardens are estimated using IRS-P6 LISS III remote sensing data in GIS environment. Shortest road transportation network is designed to ascertain that rice straw is delivered in the tea gardens with minimum transportation cost. Costs of production and harvesting of rice straw are also assessed and incorporated in the overall procurement cost of rice straw biomass. It is observed that the degree of fulfilment of thermal energy demand for tea drying through rice straw is spatially varying. It is also found that straw biomass can economically compete with coal as a source of thermal energy in tea drying and contribute to the farmers earning from otherwise waste straw, if coal equivalent price is fixed for straw. The coal equivalent cost of straw could be raised up to 37.04 $ t?1 which would enhance farmers profit upto 18.26 $ t?1.

Moonmoon Hiloidhari; Dipal Baruah; Haradip Mahilary; D.C. Baruah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Corn Plus Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plus Wind Farm Plus Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn Plus Wind Farm Facility Corn Plus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer John Deere Wind Energy Purchaser N/a Location MN Coordinates 43.760635°, -94.149617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.760635,"lon":-94.149617,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Energy Corporation Corn Belt Energy Corporation Place Illinois Utility Id 4362 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL SUBSTATION RATE ("ISR") Industrial RATE 1 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 10 ELECTRIC HEAT FOR RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 11 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE - INTERRUPTIBLE Residential RATE 12 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICALLY HEATED APARTMENTS Residential

136

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATION REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION (DOW CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSIDERATION CONSIDERATION REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION (DOW CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC22-96PC96050-W(A)-96-026, CH-0915 The Petitioner, Dow Corning, was awarded this cooperative agreement in response to an unsolicited proposal for the engineering scale development of a process for the conversion of natural gas to methyl chloride. The Petitioner was selected based on its past experience in identifying an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst and separation process for this conversion. The initial phase of this work was performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22- 91PC91030. The Contracting Officer has found that the provisions of the 1992 Energy Policy Act P.L. 102-486 apply to this cooperative agreement and that the cost sharing requirement of

137

Cultivating corn in clumps increases water efficiency, yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-tional rows increases water use efficiency and corn yield. Researchers are Dr. B.A. Stewart and graduate student Mohankumar Kapan-igowda of West Texas A&M University in Canyon, and Drs. Terry Howell, Louis Baumhardt, and Paul Colaizzi of the Conservation... have discovered that corn grown in clumps (left) rather than in traditional rows (right) increases water use efficiency and corn yield. ...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Integrated Analysis of Energy, Economic, and Environmental Performance of Biomethanol from Rice Straw in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the simulation of methanol synthesis via biomass gasification in interconnected fluidized beds using Aspen Plus software, the method of LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) is applied to evaluate the impact of pollutant emissions in the full life cycles of biomethanol. ... The integrated performance indicates that producing methanol from rice straw is beneficial to both the utilization of agriculture waste and in the improvement of environment. ...

Jun Xiao; Laihong Shen; Yanan Zhang; Jiqing Gu

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Impact of United States international wheat policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Situation and Policies concerning Mheat 5 12 III ' IRPACTS ON NAJOR WORLD ECONORIC SECTORS ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 27 Developing Importing Countries Asia ~ ~ ~ Africa Latin America Developing Importing countries Developed Importing Countries Centrally Planned... international wheat policy 2. Analyze the impact of significant policies on major world economic sectors, including wheat exporting and, importing countries; special attention will be given to the impact on the balance of trade position of various countries...

Richards, Dean

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stagewise Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis of Distillers’ Grains and Corn Fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distillers’ grains and corn fiber are the coproducts of the corn dry grind and wet milling industries, respectively. Availability of distillers’ grains and corn fiber at the ethanol plant and their ... three-stag...

Hossein Noureddini; Jongwon Byun; Ta-Jen Yu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Optimization of the Extraction and Fractionation of Corn Bran Oil Using Analytical Supercritical Fluid Instrumentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......similar cholesterol- lowering activity (6,7). Corn bran and corn fiber are obtained as byproducts from the dry- and wet-milling of corn, respectively--processes that are used in converting......

Scott L. Taylor; Jerry W. King

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Processors LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC Place: Steamboat Rock, Iowa Zip: 50672 Product: Farmer owned investment and management team which...

144

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process...

145

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

are Adjusted increasing For: rapidly - could * Capital be under- * Labor predicted. * Energy s AEI President' Goal: 2000 real dollars 35 feedstock (corn stover) President's...

146

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gene Controls Flowering Time in Corn - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gene Controls Flowering Time in Corn Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Plant development is marked by three...

148

Production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from corn stalk catalyzed by corn stalk-derived carbonaceous solid acid catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A carbonaceous solid acid was prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of corn stalk followed by sulfonation and was characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM and elemental analysis techniques. The as-prepared corn stalk-derived carbonaceous solid acid catalyst contained SO3H, COOH, and phenolic OH groups, and was used for the one-step conversion of intact corn stalk to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([BMIM][Cl]), where a 5-HMF yield of 44.1% was achieved at 150 °C in 30 min reaction time. The catalytic system was applicable to initial corn stalk concentration of up to ca. 10 wt.% for the production of 5-HMF. The synthesized catalyst and the developed process of using corn stalk-derived carbon catalyst for corn stalk conversion provide a green and efficient strategy for crude biomass utilization.

Lulu Yan; Nian Liu; Yu Wang; Hiroshi Machida; Xinhua Qi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Life-cycle assessment of straw use in bio-ethanol1 production: a case-study based on biophysical modelling.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Gabrielle@grignon.inra.fr19 20 #12;2 ABSTRACT1 Cereal straw, a by-product in the production of agricultural crops, is2 (LCA) of a particular bio-12 energy chain in which straw was used to generate heat and power in a plant16 10% of its C in the long-term (30 years). The LCA concluded to significant benefits17 of straw use

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn Corn Wheat Cassava Source: Green Energy InformationTotal Energy Input EROEI Per MJ Fuel Output Corn-derived

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electricity Production from Steam-Exploded Corn Stover Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

19 Samples were centrifuged (Eppendorf centrifuge 5403; 2?750 × g, 20 min) for soluble COD (SCOD) tests and filtered using 0.2 ?m pore-diameter cellulose syringe filters (Corning) to remove bacteria before color measurement. ... Implications for Using Corn Stover as a Source of Renewable Energy. ...

Yi Zuo; Pin-Ching Maness; Bruce E. Logan

2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

Biofuels from Corn Stover: Pyrolytic Production and Catalytic Upgrading Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explored, in an attempt to convert an abundant agricultural residue, corn stover, into potential bio-fuels. Pyrolysis of corn stover was carried out at 400, 500 and 600oC and at moderate pressure. Maximum bio-char yield of 37.3 wt.% and liquid product...

Capunitan, Jewel Alviar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feedstock, and Technology Diversity Feedstock, and Technology Diversity Pacific Ethanol Biochemical Wheat Straw/Corn Stover (Boardman, OR) Iogen Biochemical Wheat Straw (Shelly, ID) Blue Fire Biochemical Municipal Solid Waste (Corona, CA) Poet Biochemical Corn Stover (Emmetsburg, IA) Lignol Biochemical Wood Residues (Commerce City, CO) ICM Biochemical Switchgrass, Corn Stover (St. Joseph, MO) Abengoa Biochemical/ Thermo Ag Waste, Switchgrass (Hugoton, KS) DOE Joint Bioenergy Institute (Berkeley, CA) DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (Madison, WI) DOE Bioenergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) Stora Enso North America Thermochemical Wood Chips (Wisconsin Rapids, WI) Range Fuels Thermochemical Wood Chips (Soperton, GA) Alico Thermochemical/Bio Citrus Waste (LaBelle, FL) Six Commercial-Scale Biorefinergy

154

Market-oriented ethanol and corn-trade policies can reduce climate-induced US corn price volatility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agriculture is closely affected by climate. Over the past decade, biofuels have emerged as another important factor shaping the agricultural sector. We ask whether the presence of the US ethanol sector can play a role in moderating increases in US corn price variability, projected to occur in response to near-term global warming. Our findings suggest that the answer to this question depends heavily on the underlying forces shaping the ethanol industry. If mandate-driven, there is little doubt that the presence of the corn-ethanol sector will exacerbate price volatility. However, if market-driven, then the emergence of the corn-ethanol sector can be a double-edged sword for corn price volatility, possibly cushioning the impact of increased climate driven supply volatility, but also inheriting volatility from the newly integrated energy markets via crude oil price fluctuations. We find that empirically the former effect dominates, reducing price volatility by 27%. In contrast, mandates on ethanol production increase future price volatility by 54% in under future climate after 2020. We also consider the potential for liberalized international corn trade to cushion corn price volatility in the US. Our results suggest that allowing corn to move freely internationally serves to reduce the impact of near-term climate change on US corn price volatility by 8%.

Monika Verma; Thomas Hertel; Noah Diffenbaugh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphid species aphis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

padi wheat, barley, oats, rye, triticale, corn Buckthorn aphid Aphis nasturtii potato, beets Corn leaf... aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis sorghum, barley, oat, wheat, corn ......

156

Evaluation of synthetic hexaploid wheats (derivative of durum wheats and Aegilops tauschii accessions) for studying genetic diversity using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthetic hexaploid (SH) wheat derived from crossing...Aegilops tauschii...provide germplasm for wheat improvement as the conventional wheat varieties possess very low genetic diversity. This study aims to identi...

Muhammad Shakeel; Muhammad Ilyas; Mujeeb Kazi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Laboratory, in sacco and in vivo assessment of various treatment conditions affecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in vivo digestibilities of untreated and ammonia (NH3) treated wheat straw. Wheat straw and gas ammoniated digestibility trial with 5 sheep per treatment. Lowest NDF values for ammoniated straw were recorded with the 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

Original article Effects of fish-meal supplementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ammoniated wheat straw CM Guedes, A Dias-da-Silva Universidade de Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Department-meal (FM) sup- plementation on digestion of urea-treated wheat straw. Ammoniated straw was offered alone

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Anaerobic fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure to carboxylic acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass (Lynd et al., 2002). Carboxylic acids (C2? C7) are produced from anaerobic fermentation. Because they have a high market value, these acids can be recovered and sold. Alternatively, they can be converted to methane (biogas) or chemicals (e... conditions, both of which contribute heavily to production costs. Zhang and Zhang (1999) studied biogasification of rice straw to produce biogas (CH4 (50%)); however, methane is a low-value product. 1.6 The MixAlco Process An alternative to SSF...

Agbogbo, Frank Kwesi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Consumption of two Bt and six non-Bt corn varieties by the woodlouse Porcellio scaber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

content but varying energy content were detected across the eight corn varieties. Neither the nitrogenConsumption of two Bt and six non-Bt corn varieties by the woodlouse Porcellio scaber Heiri Bacillus thuringiensis corn were limited to date, to a com- parison between one Bt corn variety and its

Richner, Heinz

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling C.I. Thompson a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling C.I. Thompson a , K.D. Rausch b 2005; accepted 6 February 2005 Available online 12 April 2005 Abstract In corn wet milling, dry matter composition; Corn processing; Membrane filtration; Corn gluten meal; Wet milling 1. Introduction Wet milling

162

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

96 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Comparison Between Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures S ABSTRACT Cereal Chem. 76(1):96-99 A corn wet-milling process in which alkali was used was studied as an alternative to the conventional corn wet-milling procedure. In the alkali wet-milling process, corn was soaked

163

Major Insect Threats; Cotton Insects, Grasshoppers, Corn Borer, And Army Worm Still Maior Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Major Insect Threats; Cotton Insects, Grasshoppers, Corn Borer, And Army Worm Still Maior Threats ...

. U S D A

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Simulation of the Process for Producing Butanol from Corn Fermentation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy use for the production process is highlighted and compared to that for the conventional corn ethanol process. ... Energy uses in the fermentation, the downstream processing sections, and the entire production process are compared with those for the conventional corn ethanol production plant. ... Also presented are the mass and energy balances for the complete production process, for which the calculation and assumptions can be found in the work of Wu et al.(17) The mass and energy balances are compared to those of a conventional corn ethanol plant. ...

Jiahong Liu; May Wu; Michael Wang

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1995). Estimating the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. Anfood industry. After corn, energy is the second largestManufacturing Processes and Energy Use Corn wet milling is

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY BAYSIDE, NEW YORK Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY BAYSIDE, NEW YORK At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Sylvania-Corning Nuclear Corporation in Bayside, New York (see Fig. l), on November 29, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those facilities uti 7 Commission (AEC) contract during the 1950s. _ _ ._. __

167

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose The use of corn based ethanol as a supplement or replacement of motor fuel gasoline has many champions as well as detractors. In this presentation I attempt to separate hype from facts and wishful thinking from realistic forecasts. The production of corn based ethanol has physical limits based on land required to grow its primary input. It also has economic limits based on the cost of inputs relative to the cost of the fuel it replaces and the value of the environmental and other benefits its use may provide. By exploring these limits and the likely consequences of

168

Improvement of the Protein Quality of Corn With Soybean Protein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In most Central American countries, lime-treated corn provides 31% of the total protein and 45% of the energy intake, and beans 24% of the ... quality and quantity, as well as in energy. To overcome these deficie...

Ricardo Bressani; Luiz G. Elías…

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Effect of ground corn steeping on starch properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pasting and thermal properties, and microstructure of starch from ground corn (GS) steeped at 52 °C in ... were investigated. The isolated starch obtained by wet milling was characterised by determining pasting p...

Monica Haros; Wioletta Blaszczak; Oscar E. Perez…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enzymatic corn wet milling (E-milling) is a process derived from conventional wet milling for the recovery and purification of starch ... the total starch production in USA by conventional wet milling equaled 23 ...

Edna C Ramírez; David B Johnston; Andrew J McAloon…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES NY.07-1 - Letter, Smith to Norris, Contract at (30-1)-1293- U Metal Requirements, March 5, 1953 NY.07-2 -...

172

Sweet Corn Tests in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in habit and character to Silvercross Evergreen. 10 BULLETIN NO. 689, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION Table 6. Variety test results with white sweet corn Other varieties of white sweet corn of merit are the Narrowgra Hybrids 5 x 22 and 26 x 15..... ....................... Winnebago ...................... Country Gentlemen 5 x 10. ........ Country Gentlemen 8 x 6. ........ Narrow Grain 17x1 1 .............. Narrow Grain 14x13. ............. Narrow Grain 26x15. ............. Shoeped Hybrid.. ................ Stowell...

Pickett, B. S. (Barzalli Stewart)

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Evaluation of mixing characteristics of corn dry masa flours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF MIXING CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN DRY MASA FLOURS A Thesis by RODRIGO LOBEIRA MASSU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1996 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF MIXING CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN DRY MASA FLOURS A Thesis by RODRIGO LOBEIRA MASSU Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Lobeira Massu, Rodrigo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

The values and practices associated with high moisture corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE VALUES AND PRACTICES ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH MOISTURE CORN A Professional Paper by Charles B. Finch Submitted as Partial Fulfillment of the Professional Internship Requirements for the Texas A&M University Degree of Master of Agriculture...THE VALUES AND PRACTICES ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH MOISTURE CORN A Professional Paper by Charles B. Finch Submitted as Partial Fulfillment of the Professional Internship Requirements for the Texas A&M University Degree of Master of Agriculture...

Finch, Charles B

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Corn-to-Ethanol Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant The Illinois Ethanol Research Advisory Board manages and operates the

177

* SGP Central Facility - surrounded by wheat felds, the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGP Central Facility - surrounded by wheat felds, the SGP Central Facility - surrounded by wheat felds, the heavily instrumented Central Facility served as the primary source of information about cloud and carbon feedbacks. * Little Washita Watershed - located in a mix of pasture land and winter wheat, three carbon fux towers and associ ated instruments were added at this site. Two additional fux towers were located at Fort Cobb, in nearby croplands,

178

Registration of five wheat isogenic lines for leaf rust and stripe rust resistance genes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1982. Registration of one disomic substitution line and fivetrans- location lines of winter wheat germplasm resistant toof Five Wheat Isogenic Lines for Leaf Rust and Stripe Rust

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Degradation of Corn Fiber by Clostridium cellulovorans Cellulases and Hemicellulases and Contribution of Scaffolding Protein CbpA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and properties of arabinoxylans from discrete corn wet-milling fiber fractions. J. Agric. Food Chem. 49...and characterization of hemicellulose from the corn fiber produced by corn wet-milling processes. J. Agric. Food Chem. 46: 2615-2619...

Roger Koukiekolo; Hee-Yeon Cho; Akihiko Kosugi; Masayuki Inui; Hideaki Yukawa; Roy H. Doi

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Wheat Production in the Panhandle of Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the U. S. Department of Agriculture at Amarillo and Channing in 1903 and continued at these stations until 1916. Cooperative work on farms and with the Amarillo Chamber of Commerce on land provided by the Price Memorial College at Amarillo... acreage. 2Second figure shows the 1949 seeded acreage. Figure 1. Seeded acreage of winter wheat in the Panhandle of Tex- as by counties, 1927 and 1949. Estimates obtai~ed from the Office of the Agricultural Statistician, Bureau of Agricultural...

Whitfield, Charles J. (Charles James); Atkins, Irvin Milburn; Porter, Kenneth B.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nonrenewable energy cost of corn-ethanol in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonrenewable energy cost is accounted for the believed renewable biofuel of corn-ethanol in China. By a process-based energy analysis, nonrenewable energy cost in the corn-ethanol production process incorporating agricultural crop production, industrial conversion and wastewater treatment is conservatively estimated as 1.70 times that of the ethanol energy produced, corresponding to a negative energy return in contrast to the positive ones previously reported. Nonrenewable energy cost associated with wastewater treatment usually ignored in previous researches is shown important in the energy balance. Denoting the heavy nonrenewability of the produced corn-ethanol, the calculated nonrenewable energy cost would rise to 3.64 folds when part of the nonrenewable energy cost associated with water consumption, transportation and environmental remediation is included. Due to the coal dominated nonrenewable energy structure in China, corn-ethanol processes in China are mostly a conversion of coal to ethanol. Validations and discussions are also presented to reveal policy implications against corn based ethanol as an alternative energy in long term energy security planning.

Q. Yang; G.Q. Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report APSC 261 Sustainability Project An Investigation Into the Use of Cob and/or Straw Bale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report APSC 261 Sustainability, Rebecca Guo, Zi Zhang Source: Green Building Elements Project An Investigation Into the Use of Cob and/or Straw Bale Construction in Non-residential Buildings

183

Influence of the greenhouse effect on yields of wheat, soybean and corn in the United States for different energy scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide has positive effects on agricultural productivity (photosynthesis stimulation), but in some regions it has negative effects (drought due to the temperature rise) as w...

K. Okamoto; T. Ogiwara; T. Yoshizumi; Y. Watanabe

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Predicting corn digestible and metabolizable energy content from its chemical composition in growing pigs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nutrient composition of corn is variable. To prevent unforeseen reductions in ... to define the sources of variation in the energy content of corn and to develop a practical method to accurately estimate the ...

Quanfeng Li; Jianjun Zang; Dewen Liu…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Comparing Corn Drying in Fluidized Bed Dryer and Convective Tray Dryer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn is one of the main agricultural products...1...] and its preservation is of great importance. As is the case for almost all agricultural products in Turkey, corn is most commonly preserved by sun-exposed...2

Mert Gur; Mesut Gur

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optimizing Ethanol and Methane Production from Steam-pretreated, Phosphoric Acid-impregnated Corn Stover  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The composition of raw corn stover and the WIS after pretreatment was...27] from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). All measurements were performed in duplicate. The starch content of corn stover an...

Pia-Maria Bondesson; Aurélie Dupuy; Mats Galbe…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of Blanching on Some Physical Properties and Processing Recovery of Sweet Corn Cobs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of the blanching process of sweet corn on shearing stress, shearing energy, and processing recovery of kernels as well ... of kernels and cobs were studied. Sweet corn cobs were blanched in water, whe...

Mariusz Szymanek

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Degradation of Phytates in Distillers’ Grains and Corn Gluten Feed by Aspergillus niger Phytase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distillers’ dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and corn gluten feed (CGF) are major coproducts of ethanol production from corn dry grind and wet milling facilities, respectively. These coproducts contain important...

H. Noureddini; J. Dang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT FOR THE FRACTIONATION AND ISOLATION OF CORN FIBER HEMICELLULOSE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet-milling process that holds potential to become a value-added product. A process was developed to fractionate and… (more)

Montanti, Justin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Foam Separation of Oil from Enzymatically Treated Wet-Milled Corn Germ Dispersions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 9 billion gallons of ethanol were produced in 2008, mostly from dry grind corn fermentation plants. These plants are a potential source of substantial amounts of corn oil, if an economical method of sep...

Leland C. Dickey; Michael J. Kurantz…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Allocation procedure in ethanol production system from corn grain i. system expansion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the system expansion approach to net energy analysis for ethanol production from domestic corn grain. Production systems included in this study are ethanol production from corn dry milling and cor...

Seungdo Kim; Bruce E. Dale

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Improvement in commercial scale dry mill corn ethanol production using controlled flow cavitation and cellulose hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During commercial-scale dry-mill ethanol production from corn, as much as 6 ... In this study, two methods to improve ethanol production during commercial-scale corn ethanol production were tested that release an...

David A. Ramirez-Cadavid; Oleg Kozyuk…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Marginal yield, technological advances, and emissions timing in corn ethanol’s carbon payback time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous estimates of carbon payback time (CPT) of corn ethanol expansion assumed that marginal yields of newly ... these estimates assumed that the productivity of corn ethanol system and climate change impacts ...

Yi Yang; Sangwon Suh

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 - $180 Night Covers: $6 Programmable Thermostat: $20 - $25

195

Original article Digestion of wheat gluten and potato protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Digestion of wheat gluten and potato protein by the preruminant calf%) substituted by a native wheat gluten or a potato protein concentrate, were given to intact or ileo.05) with the potato than with the gluten and control diets (0.90, 0.93 and 0.95, respec- tively). The same trend

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iogen Biorefinery Partners, LLC Iogen Biorefinery Partners, LLC Corporate HQ: Arlington, VA Proposed Facility Location: Shelley, Idaho Description: This project from a leading enzyme player will demonstrate a scaled up biochemical process with the flexibility to process a wide range of agricultural residues into cellulose ethanol. CEO or Equivalent: Brian Foody Participants: Iogen Corporation, Goldman Sachs; Royal Dutch Shell Oil Company; Others Production: * 18 million gallons/year in the first plant, 250 million gallons/year in future plants * Cellulose ethanol & co-products in first plant; future plants to be primarily cellulose ethanol Technology & Feedstocks: * Agricultural residues: wheat straw, barley straw, corn stover, switchgrass and rice

197

Optimization of Energy and Water Consumption in Corn-Based Ethanol Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optimization of Energy and Water Consumption in Corn-Based Ethanol Plants ... In this paper we study the simultaneous energy and water consumption in the conceptual design of corn-based ethanol plants. ... Review of Energy Optimization in Corn-Based Ethanol Plant ...

Elvis Ahmetovi?; Mariano Martín; Ignacio E. Grossmann

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Profiles of Polyhydroxybutyrates Derived from Corn Grain: A Life Cycle Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Profiles of Polyhydroxybutyrates Derived from Corn Grain: A Life Cycle Perspective ... Polyhydroxybutyrates derived from corn grain could reduced nonrenewable energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions compared to petroleum-based polymer. ... Cradle-to-gate environmental performance of PHB derived from corn grain is evaluated through life cycle assessment (LCA), particularly nonrenewable energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. ...

Seungdo Kim; Bruce E. Dale

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Characteristics of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton, and Soybean Growers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characteristics of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton, and Soybean Growers T.M. Hurley characteristics that influence profitability, using data from a telephone survey of 1,205 corn, cotton

Mitchell, Paul D.

200

Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn primarily by two processes: wet milling and dry grinding. In wet milling, the corn kernel is fractionated kernel is fraction- ated into different components, resulting in several coproducts. Wet-milling plants

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of Soya Flour on the Lactic Fermentation of Milled Corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lactic Fermentation of Milled Corn I. A. AKINRELE, A. MAKANJU...for publication 18 November 1968 Corn (Zea mays) is principally eaten...in Nigeria consists of steeping corn in water, then wet-milling, and finally allowing it to turn...

I. A. Akinrele; A. Makanju; C. C. Edwards

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermostability of Fumonisin B1, a Mycotoxin from Fusarium moniliforme, in Corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calculated L50 of FB1 in dried corn and temperature treatments...one substrate, dried ground corn. Therefore, extrapolation to other conditions, such as wet heating, or other substrates...aflatoxin B1 was destroyed when corn grits naturally contaminated...

J. Dupuy; P. Le Bars; H. Boudra; J. Le Bars

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure S. R. ECKHOFF,' S. K in replicates of 0.36% when the replicates were per- The feasibility of corn wet-milling facilities processing of biotechnology and genetic engineering in corn hybrid development. Identification of better wet-milling hybrids

204

Cellulase Accessibility of Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) The dilute-acid pretreatment reduces xylan content in corn stover. This reduction in xylan content appears to render the substrate less recalcitrant. Below {approx}8%, xylan content is no longer the dominant factor in biomass recalcitrance. (2) Decreasing xylan content of corn stover also created more binding sites for Cel7A, but no strong correlation with actual xylan content. (3) We found no correlation between bound Cel7A concentration and lignin content. Maybe lignin is blocking the way for Cel7A? The contribution of lignin to biomass recalcitrance requires further investigation.

Jeoh, T.; Johnson, D. K.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Measurement of Porosity in Dilute Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this report are: (1) pretreated corn stover appeared to have more accessible pore volume than raw corn stover; (2) solute exclusion method--differences in the pore volume were not detectable due to the high variability of the measurements; (3) thermoporosimetry--differences in pore volume between pretreated samples were not observed despite the low variability of the measurement and a good correction was found between unfrozen water at 240K and xylan content; and (4) porosity measurements showed no correlation between ethanol yields and the volume accessible to an enzyme size probe, for this sample set.

Ishizawa, C.; Davis, M. F.; Johnson, D. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The effects of added wheat proteins on processing and quality of wheat flour tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Gliadin in pastry and tortilla flour. Addition levels of selected wheat proteins were evaluated in weak protein tortilla formulas. Addition of 1% FP5000 or PF6000 improved tortilla stability. Calcium peroxide was added to the formula to better incorporate...

Pascut, Simina

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effects of \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 on pretreatment and xylan hydrolysis of miscanthus straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 on pretreatment and xylan hydrolysis of miscanthus straw for biofuels production. It was observed that increasing the pretreatment temperature decreased the remaining solid, increased the enzymatic digestibility, and increased the xylan removal. When 0.2–5.0% \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 were employed in pretreatments, increasing the inorganic salt concentration slightly diminished the remaining solid, though the enzymatic digestibility was enhanced. Under the higher-than-2% condition, no xylan remained in the solid residues after pretreatment. With pretreatment time, the remaining solid slightly decreased, but the enzymatic digestibility was increased. Moreover, xylan removal was linearly increased to 15 min, after which it was completely hydrolyzed. Overall, these results indicated that pretreatment by 2% \\{NH4Cl\\} or MgCl2 at 185 °C for 15 min completely hydrolyzes the xylan of miscanthus straw. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the physical surface of the miscanthus straw showed an apparently damaged surface area and exposure of the internal structure after pretreatment with \\{NH4Cl\\} and MgCl2 by SEM.

Kyeong Eop Kang; Don-Hee Park; Gwi-Taek Jeong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Pilot scale study on steam explosion and mass balance for higher sugar recovery from rice straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pretreatment of rice straw on pilot scale steam explosion has been attempted to achieve maximum sugar recovery. Three different reaction media viz. water, sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid (0.5%, w/w) were explored for pretreatment by varying operating temperature (160, 180 and 200 °C) and reaction time (5 and 10 min). Using water and 0.5% SA showed almost similar sugar recovery (?87%) at 200 and 180 °C respectively. However, detailed studies showed that the former caused higher production of oligomeric sugars (13.56 g/L) than the later (3.34 g/L). Monomeric sugar, followed the reverse trend (7.83 and 11.62 g/L respectively). Higher oligomers have a pronounced effect in reducing enzymatic sugar yield as observed in case of water. Mass balance studies for water and SA assisted SE gave total saccharification yield as 81.8% and 77.1% respectively. However, techno-economical viability will have a trade-off between these advantages and disadvantages offered by the pretreatment medium.

Sandeep Sharma; Ravindra Kumar; Ruchi Gaur; Ruchi Agrawal; Ravi P. Gupta; Deepak K. Tuli; Biswapriya Das

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Elements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is produced from corn by either wet-milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, several coproducts. Samples of corn, ground corn, beer, wet grains, syrup, and DDGS were obtained from nine dry-grind plantsElements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134

210

Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil: Appendix D on fuel cells, consistent use of fuel HHVs, corrected theoretical yield of ethanol from starch oxidation Increased ethanol yield to 2.5 gal/wet bushel, 91.5% of theoretical yield Appendix E on free

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

211

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

SciTech Connect

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Chapter 23 - How Fuel Ethanol Is Made from Corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this chapter, fuel ethanol, yeast's role in ethanol production, corn as ethanol feedstock, industrial ethanol production including wet milling, and dry-grind ethanol processing steps (milling, liquefaction, saccharification, fermentation, distillation and recovery) are described along with the energy use in ethanol production.

Nathan S. Mosier; Klein E. Ileleji

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

Betts, W. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fuzzy Rough Sets: from Theory into Practice Chris Cornelis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy Rough Sets: from Theory into Practice Chris Cornelis1 , Martine De Cock1 , Anna Maria 1, 00-661 Warsaw, Poland annrad@mini.pw.edu.pl Abstract Fuzzy sets and rough sets address two], 1965), as well as the slightly younger rough sets (Pawlak [23], 1982), have left an important mark

Gent, Universiteit

215

Fuzzy-Rough Instance Selection Richard Jensen and Chris Cornelis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy-Rough Instance Selection Richard Jensen and Chris Cornelis Abstract-- Rough set theory. Recently, the value of fuzzy-rough sets for feature selection and rule induction has been established proposes three novel methods for instance selection based on fuzzy-rough sets. The initial experimentation

Gent, Universiteit

216

Corning and University Technology Collaborations Charles S. Philip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of materials science and process engineering knowledge, and a distinctive collaborative culture. #12;Corning Culture and Bioprocess � Assay and High- Throughput Screening � Genomics and Proteomics � General Products � Light-duty gasoline vehicles � Light-duty and heavy-duty on-road diesel vehicles � Heavy

217

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

SciTech Connect

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Photo of the Week: Wheat and Wind | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wheat and Wind Wheat and Wind Photo of the Week: Wheat and Wind December 14, 2012 - 2:33pm Addthis From 262 feet in the air, 90 General Electric towers rise over Wheatland County, Montana, generating electricity for portions of the northwest United States. With an installed capacity of 135 MW, the Judith Gap Energy Center is one of the strongest wind farms in Montana. The blades begin spinning when winds reach just eight miles per hour, and at their highest point, tower almost 400 feet above the ground. In this photo, the wind turbines rotate while overlooking Wheatland County's main agricultural product: wheat. | Photo courtesy of Idaho National Laboratory Wind Energy Program. From 262 feet in the air, 90 General Electric towers rise over Wheatland County, Montana, generating electricity for portions of the northwest

219

Effect of leavening acids on wheat flour tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactivities of four leavening adds were evaluated during processing of wheat flour tortillas. These were: sodium aluminum phosphate (SAlP), sodium aluminum sulfate (SAS), monocalcium phosphate (MCP) and sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP-28). Each...

Cepeda, Minerva

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Stock, Energy and Currency Effects on the Asymmetric Wheat Market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of financial and currency indicators on wheat futures prices. The results suggest that the stock market, and particularly the S&P 500, positively influence the ...

Nikolaos Sariannidis

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphid rhopalosiphum padi Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

padi wheat, barley, oats, rye, triticale, corn Buckthorn aphid Aphis nasturtii potato, beets Corn leaf... aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis sorghum, barley, oat, wheat, ......

222

STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA TED (CORNING) FOR AN ADV t\NCE WAIV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA TED (CORNING) FOR AN ADV t\NCE WAIV ER OF DOMESTIC AN D FOREIGN P ATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE A WARD 0 . DE-E£000575 7 W(A) 20 12-034 CORNING has req uested a waive r of domestic and fo reign patent rights for all subj ect in vent ions arising from its partjci pation und er the above-referenced awa rd entitled " Innovative Manufactw-ing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for UltraHi gh Energy Density Batteries." The award was made under the Innovative Manufacturing Initiati ve (DE-FOA-0000560). CORNING is a sub-recipient to PolyPfus Battery Company (Poly Plus), the prime recipi ent of the award. Johnson Controls Inc . is anothar sub-recipi ent under the award. This waiver only applies to CORNING. Johnson Control

223

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Plant - NY 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant - NY 19 Plant - NY 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Sylvania-Corning, NY Alternate Name(s): Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. Sylvania Corp. NY.19-1 NY.19-4 Location: Cantiaque Road, Hicksville, Long Island, New York NY.19-5 Historical Operations: Pilot-scale production of powdered metal uranium slugs for AEC's Hanford reactor. NY.19-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NY.19-3 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Sylvania-Corning, NY Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see the Leaving LM Website page for more details.

224

Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn LP (formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy) Place Goldfield, Iowa Zip 50542 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as raw material Coordinates 37.707559°, -117.233459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.707559,"lon":-117.233459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

City of Corning, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corning Corning Place Iowa Utility Id 4375 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Commercial All-Electric Commercial Residential Residential Residential All-Electric Residential Rural Commercial Commercial Rural Commercial All-Electric Commercial Rural Residential Residential Rural Residential All-Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0977/kWh Commercial: $0.0974/kWh

226

Corn Varieties in Texas : Their Regional and Seasonal Adaptation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented in Progress Reports from Angleton, Denton, Beaumont, Troup, Beeville, Temple, Spur, Lubbock, Pecos, and Nacogdoches, and in Bulletin 276, "Corn Variety Experiments, Substation No. 3, Angleton." SCOPE OF THE BULLETIN Two of the most important... to both regional ' and seasonal variations. To determine the adaptation of varieties to these two influences a variety-date-of-planting test was instituted in 1918. This test has been conducted at eleven substations throughout the State, in most cases...

Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Current and potential U.S. Corn Stover Supplies  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues such as corn (Zea mays L.) stover are a potential feedstock for bioenergy and bio-based products that could reduceU.S. dependence on foreign oil. Collection of such residues must take into account concerns that residue removal could increase erosion, reduce crop productivity, and deplete soil carbon and nutrients. This article estimates where and how much corn stover can be collected sustainably in the USA using existing commercial equipment and estimates costs of that collection. Erosion constraints to collection were considered explicitly, and crop productivity and soil nutrient constraints were considered implicitly, by recognizing the value of residues for maintaining soil moisture and including the cost of fertilizer to replace nutrients removed. Possible soil carbon loss was not considered in the analysis. With an annual production of 196 million Mg of corn grain (about9.2 billion bushels), the USA produces 196 million Mg of stover. Under current rotation and tillage practices, about 30% of this stover could be collected for less than $33 per Mg, taking into consideration erosion and soil moisture concerns and nutrient replacement costs. Wind erosion is a major constraint to stover collection. Analysis suggests three regions of the country (central Illinois, northern Iowa/southern Minnesota, and along the Platte River in Nebraska) produce sufficient stover to support large biorefineries with one million Mg per year feedstock demands and that if farmers converted to universal no-till production of corn, then over 100 million Mg of stover could be collected annually without causing erosion to exceed the tolerable soil loss.

Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Nelson, R [Kansas State University; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Sheehan, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wright, Lynn L [subcontractor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Corn Variety Experiments, Substation no. 3, Angleton, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XAS AGRICULl'URAL EXPERIMENT STATION ~ AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL. Preddent . FEBRUARY, 1921 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY CORN VARIETY EXPERIMENTS SUBSTATION NO. 3, t B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR, %LLEOE STATION, BRAZOS... Assistant SOIL SURVEY **W. T. CARTER, JR., B. S.! Chiej T. M. BUSANELL, B: S., Sorl S~ruevot H. W. HAWKER. Sorl Surueuor No. I. Denton Denton County C. H. MCDO\\;ELL. B. S.. Superintenden( SUBSTATIONS No. 7. Spar, Dickene County R. E. DICKSON. B. S...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Lambs : Third Experiment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t J. BKAfCT, CAMPUS, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 306 FEBRUARY, 1923 DIVISION OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY GRAIN SORGHUMS VERSUS CORN FOR FATTENING LAMBS...~ON Ezecutioe Assisfant CRARLES GOR~YCKI Technical Assistant M P. HOLLEMAN JL., Assistanf Chief Clerk R.'N. BURROWS, 'M. A.. Research Librarian VETERINARY SCIENCE *M FRANCIS D. V. M Chief H.. SCHMIDT,' D. V. ~.."~eterinarian V. J. BRAUNER, D. V. M...

Jones, J. M. (Joseph McKinley); Dickson, R. E.

1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effect of hydrocolloids and protein on corn tortilla staling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that hydrolyze u-1, 4 linkages within the amorphous regions of the starch matrix during baking (Zobel and Senti 1959). Bacterial maltogenic u-amylases have also been found to have an anti-staling effect by degrading both amylose and amylopectin...-equilibrium melting and recrystallization of amylopectin, although effects to due amylose are observed (Slade and Levine 1991, Quintero-Fuentes 1999). Fernandez et al (1999) hypothesized the retrogradation of corn tortillas involved rapid associations of amylase...

Yeggy, Heather Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-EE0005436; W(A) 2011-065 OWENS CORNING has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells." OWENS CORNING is a sub-awardee under the cooperative agreement. Solexel Inc. is the prime awardee. This waiver only applies to subject inventions of OWENS CORNING. As described in the petition, the objective of the project funded by the cooperative

232

Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown constituents of aqueous extracts were identified and quantified using a variety of chromatographic techniques. Monomeric sugars (primarily glucose and fructose) were found to be the predominant water-soluble components of corn stover, accounting for 30-46% of the dry weight of extractives (4-12% of the dry weight of feedstocks). Additional constituents contributing to the mass balance for extractives included various alditols (3-7%), aliphatic acids (7-21%), inorganic ions (10-18%), oligomeric sugars (4-12%), and a distribution of oligomers tentatively identified as being derived from phenolic glycosides (10-18%).

Chen, S. F.; Mowery, R. A.; Scarlata, C. J.; Chambliss, C. K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures.Membrane Application in Corn Wet Milling Proceedings of theP. H. (1992). Technology of Corn Wet Milling and Associated

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of variety and drying method on the nutritive value of corn for growing pigs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results indicated that variety significantly influenced (P...?corn but not the bulk weight. Variety also influenced the available energy content (digestible energy of dry ma...

Quanfeng Li; Meng Shi; Chuanxin Shi…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Comparative Methodologies for Measuring Metabolizable Energy of Various Types of Resistant High Amylose Corn Starch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparative Methodologies for Measuring Metabolizable Energy of Various Types of Resistant High Amylose Corn Starch ... BACKGROUND: Knowledge of energetic availability of dietary fibres is important for human nutrition. ...

Richard T. Tulley; Marko J. Appel; Tanya G. Enos; Maren Hegsted; Kathleen L. McCutcheon; Jun Zhou; Anne M. Raggio; Roger Jeffcoat; Anne Birkett; Roy J. Martin; Michael J. Keenan

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

The nutritive properties of two by-products of the wet milling of corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The supplementary protein value of several combinations of a refined law fiber corn gluten meal and a refined soybean oilmeal in supporting growth of weanling… (more)

Christensen, David. A.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Contamination issues in a continuous ethanol production corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low ethanol yields and poor yeast viability were investigated at a continuous ethanol production corn wet milling facility. Using starch slurries and recycle streams...

Esha Khullar; Angela D. Kent…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Impact of Recycling Stillage on Conversion of Dilute Sulfuric Acid Pretreated Corn Stover to Ethanol (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

A description of methods and results from an experiment designed to assess the impact of process water recycle on corn stover-to-ethanol conversion process performance.

Mohagheghi, A.; Schell, D. J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Molecular Characterization of Durable Yellow and Leaf Rust Resistance in Two Wheat Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important food crops, comprising the largest source of daily calorie and protein intake of human beings worldwide. Among the several diseases of wheat, Yellow Rust (YR; caused by Puccinia striiformis...

Basnet, Bhoja

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Effect of Growth Regulators on the Winter Survival of Winter Wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Insufficient winter hardiness is the main factor limiting the expansion of winter wheat on the northern great plains. The winter wheat cultivars grown today are of similar cold hardiness as the Crimean cultiva...

L. V. Gusta; B. J. O’Connor; M. J. T. Reaney

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Prenova & Owens Corning Teaming Presentation- Using Service and Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation- Using Service and Presentation- Using Service and Product Providers to Leverage Your Energy Efforts: Prenova/Owens Corning Energy Process Optimization Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing

243

Chapter 6 - Resource (Land, Water, Nutrient, and Pesticide) Use and Efficiency of Corn and Sorghum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop resource use efficiency, defined as the ratio of crop output over input, has been an essential tool for crop selection. The objective of the review presented in this chapter was to compare corn and sorghum based on their land, water, nutrient, and pesticide use efficiencies. Data from corn and sorghum hybrid trials, herbicide performance trials, long-term fertilizer trials, and journal and extension papers were assembled for this comparison. Results indicated that about 6 Mg ha?1 is the cutoff value above which corn, and below which sorghum, has better land use efficiencies at equal net revenues. Based on relationships between evapotranspiration (ET) and yield described in the literature, about 537 mm of ET was found to be the cutoff above which corn, and below which sorghum, has better water use efficiencies. In rainfed production, approximately 432 mm of total seasonal rainfall (April to September) was the threshold value above which corn, and below which sorghum, has better rainfall use efficiencies on an average. Fertilizer use efficiency of corn was found to be greater than that of sorghum at all application rates, as long as water is not limiting. Preemergent pesticide application has increased yield up to 100% compared to untreated plots in both corn and sorghum. However, unlike corn, sorghum postemergent herbicides were either not available for some weed species, relatively more expensive, or not as effective as preemergent herbicide application. A preliminary estimate of the possible cutoff yield based on general net return from the two crop is presented.

Yared Assefa; Kraig Roozeboom; Curtis Thompson; Alan Schlegel; Loyd Stone; Jane E. Lingenfelser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the western Great Plains states, including Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming. Since 1999, the geographic range of seedling plants, the beans, Phaseolus L. spp., in Colorado, followed by corn, Zea mays L., western beanEcology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans

Ginzel, Matthew

245

Influence of corn drying on its quality for the wet-milling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flint and dent corn were forced air-dried at 70–110 °C to a final moisture of about 12.0%. The rates of water absorption of both hybrids in the presence of 0.25% SO2 aqueous solution were evaluated in terms of the diffusion coefficient. Drying temperature affected negatively the rate of absorption of both hybrids. A laboratory wet-milling procedure was developed to evaluate starch recovery of corn samples. For flint corn starch recovery drop from 96.5% (undried) to 82% (dried at 110 °C); for dent corn the drop was from 97.5% to 90%. The starch isolated from air-dried corn contained greater amounts of protein than starch originated from undried corn. The effect was more marked for flint than for dent corn and increased with the drying temperature. Sorptional characteristics of starch were practically unaffected by drying temperature. DSC transition temperatures of starch showed an increasing tendency with drying temperature. For both hybrids the gelatinization enthalpy of starch decreased with the increasing of drying temperature, the effect being more marked for flint than for dent corn.

Mónica Haros; Marcela P Tolaba; Constantino Suárez

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Determination of Fumonisins in Milled Corn Grains Using HPLC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......No. 1126/2007 (for milling fractions of maize with...m1,400 g/kg and for milling fractions of maize with...of Fumonisins in Milled Corn Grains Using HPLCMS Vlastimil...because the aerosol was wet and caused discharges...samples of grounded maize corn. The mycotoxin content......

Vlastimil Dohnal; Alena Jezková; Ivana Polisenská; Kamil Kuca

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

AGRONOMIC ADVANCES IN THE AGRICULTURE OF THE CORN BELT AND THE GREAT PLAINS REGIONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...THE AGRICULTURE OF THE CORN BELT AND THE GREAT PLAINS...to conduct the various milling and baking studies using...significant tie-up with the milling interests. In the spring...coopera-tion of the milling interests in the testing...Previous to the placing of corn improvement on a definite...

H. K. WILSON

1944-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

DeLucia, Evan H.

249

Development of an immunochromatographic strip test for the rapid detection of Zearalenone in corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of an immunochromatographic strip test for the rapid detection of Zearalenone in corn ... A rapid immunochromatographic test strip had been developed for the detection of zearalenone (ZEN) residues in corn. ... The test could be accomplished within 5–10 min. ...

Ya ning Sun; Xiao fei Hu; Yong Zhang; Ji fei Yang; Fang yu Wang; Yao Wang; Rui guang Deng; Gai ping Zhang

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER and Corn Stover Collection for Heat and Power Generation Mitchell A. Myhre Advisor: Associate Professor heat and electric power. To perform this analysis, yield and production potentials were explored

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

251

Fuzzy Rough Set Based Web Query Expansion Martine De Cock and Chris Cornelis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy Rough Set Based Web Query Expansion Martine De Cock and Chris Cornelis Fuzziness, Krijgslaan 281 (S9), 9000 Gent, Belgium {Martine.DeCock, Chris.Cornelis}@UGent.be Abstract Fuzzy rough set on average -- we focus on query ex- pansion, i.e. the process of adding related terms to the query. Rough set

Gent, Universiteit

252

163Reprod. Nutr. Dev. 45 (2005) 163173 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Effect of long term feeding of ammoniated wheat straw treated with or without HCl on blood to study the effect of long term feeding of ammoniated wheat straw (AWS) and hydrochloric acid treated ammoniated wheat straw (HCl-AWS) on blood biochemical changes. The animals were offered a concentrate mixture

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

The Future of Corn-Ethanol in Fuel Sector of United States from Environmental and Economic Standpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................... 4 LITERATURE REVIEW ................................................................................................ 7 PROCEDURE AND METHODOLOGY ....................................................................... 13 LCA OF CORN... cane, and other starchy agricultural products. In United States, most ethanol is made from corn, although because of the rapidly developing research, cellulosic ethanol may soon become a larger part of the market if proven effective. Most corn...

Tulva, Arya Nath

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Enzymatic Ligation Reactions of DNA "Words" on Surfaces for DNA Anthony G. Frutos, Lloyd M. Smith, and Robert M. Corn*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Smith, and Robert M. Corn* Contribution from the Department of Chemistry, Uni and Company: New York, 1979. (3) Frutos, A. G.; Liu, Q.; Thiel, A. J.; Sanner, A. M. W.; Condon, A. E.; Smith, L. M.; Corn, R. M. Nucleic Acids Res. 1997, 25, 4748-4757. (4) Smith, L. M.; Corn, R. M.; Condon, A

255

The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels Addthis Description Secretary Chu discusses why feedstock grasses such as miscanthus could be the future of biofuels. Speakers Secretary Steven Chu Duration 1:46 Topic Biofuels Bioenergy Credit Energy Department Video SECRETARY STEVEN CHU: This is a photograph of a perennial grass called miscanthus. It was grown without irrigation, without fertilizer. And in the autumn, you just shave it off. You use that to convert it to ethanol. The amount of ethanol in this particular plot of land outside the University of Illinois produces 15 times more ethanol than a similar plot of land if you grew corn, and the energy inputs are far less. So we need to develop methods in order to use these grassy, woody substances and also agricultural waste - wheat straw, rice straw, corn

256

Denton Wheat : A New Variety for North Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'3 Feed Inspector W. E. FLINT, B. S., Agronomist W. D. NORTHCU~,'~~.', B. S., Feed Inspector PUBLICATIONS: SIDNEY D. REYNOLDS, JR., Feed Insprctor A. D. JACKSON. Chief P. A. MOORE, Feed Inspector SUBSTATIONS No. 1, Beeville, Bee County: No. 10... U. S. Department 'of Agriculture. ***In cooperation w~th the School of Agriculture. SYNOPSIS Denton wheat is a pure-line selection of Mediterranean wheat, developed by Texas Substation No. 6 at Denton, Texas. It represents the chief product of a...

Leidigh, A. H. (Arthur Henry); Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph); Dunkle, P. B. (Paul Burtch)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SPROUTING CONDITIONS ON ALPHA AMYLASE ACTIVITY, FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF WHEAT FLOUR AND ON SHELF-LIFE OF BREAD SUPPLEMENTED WITH SPROUTED WHEAT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study sprouting two different wheat cultivars under various environmental conditions revealed that varietal variation is the most important factor affecting ?-amylase quantity as… (more)

Shafqat, Saba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes in alfalfa and wheat: toxicology and uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...not affect the germination of lettuce, corn, cucumber, rape, radish or ryegrass...search for CNTs in plant tissues using Fe energy-filter mapping. 1 TEM characterization...revealed tube-like features whose Fe energy-filter maps (figures 8 d,f) highlighted...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Attitudes towards the Canadian Wheat Board monopoly in Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attitudes towards the Canadian Wheat Board monopoly in Saskatchewan: A research brief December 2011 Saskatchewan Election Study team Dr. Michael Atkinson, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy Dr. David McGrane, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan Dr. Loleen Berdahl, University

Saskatchewan, University of

260

Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Interrelationships among alternative export variables and their impacts on corn prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Feed uses of corn were estimated to increase or decrease by 0. 4 to 0. 6 percent with a one percent change in the price of corn. Furthermore, since the demand for meat is relatively income-elastic compared to other foods, U. S. income levels..., and exchange rates. )&1th the second model, Ruppel found larger price and exchange rate elasticities for corn, indicating that sales were more responsive than shipments to price and exchange rates changes Ayuk &1986) evaluated relationships between sales...

Clarke, Somkid Tammakrut

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA  

SciTech Connect

Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Caloric Analyses of the Distribution of Energy in Corn Plants Zea mays L.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Caloric Analyses of the Distribution of Energy in Corn Plants Zea mays L. ... Caloric calculations of the distribution of energy in HY 9919V, N8811, DK 714, and 3167 corn Zea mays L. plants at the V-10, R-1, R-4, and ripened stages were carried out by employing standard analytical techniques and subsequent calculations based on standard caloric values. ... In ripened corn, 45.8?48.7% of the dry weight and 47.9?50.3% of the caloric energy were found in the kernels, the remainder apportioned to the lower stalk, upper stalk, and cob. ...

Paul A. Hedin; W. Paul Williams; Paul M. Buckley

1998-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

265

Corn Meal in the Food Supply of Texans.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the non-enriched meal makes a variable contribution to the value of the corresponding enriched meal. TABLE 2. THIAMINE CONTENT OF CORN ME : ALS Mcg/g wet basis1 Kind of Non-enriched Enriche meal No. No. repli- Range Av. repli- Range Av. cations...-enriched Enriched Non-enriched Enriched bread No. repli- Range Avm NO. repli- Range cations Av. Range Av. Range Av. cations i Texas Tech. Sour milk Everlite 3 1.40 2 1.35 1.35 1.44 1.51 2.29 2.26 i::: 2.36 1.43 2.24 Aunt Jemima Sweet milk 1.28 1.40 2...

Winters, Jet C.; Scoular, Florence I.; McLaughlin, Laura; Lamb, Mina W.; Whitacre, Jessie

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

PCR markers for Triticum speltoides leaf rust resistance gene Lr51 and their use to develop isogenic hard red spring wheat lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hard red spring wheat lines. Crop Sci. 43:1839–1847.and Lr35 in wheat breeding lines. Electron. J. Biotechnol.Hard Red Spring Wheat Lines M. Helguera, L. Vanzetti, M.

Helguera, M; Vanzetti, L; Soria, M; Khan, I A; Kolmer, J; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVER OF DOMESTIC WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26- 05NT42461, SUBCONTRACT QZ001; W(A)-05-040, CH-1322 The Petitioner, Corning Incorporated (Corning) was awarded a subcontract under a cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps". The prime contract is with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The purpose of the project is to develop effective, economical technology to enable the removal of mercury from syngas created when coal is gasified. Under the subcontract, Corning will conduct research into whether Corning's impregnated monolith technology, in conjunction with the University of North Dakota's

268

Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, used DOE energy assessments and Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000 annually through plant-wide improvements.

269

Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of deficit irrigation strategies for corn using crop growth simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn yields for full irrigation and 4 different ... 0 to 800 m, four ratios of energy cost to commodity price and climatic data ... . Total pumping head and the ratio of energy cost to commodity price were import...

C. O. Stockle; L. G. James

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy balance and turbulent flux partitioning in a corn–soybean rotation in the Midwestern US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantifying the energy balance above plant canopies is critical for ... patterns. This study examined temporal variations of energy balance terms for contrasting canopies [corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine ...

Guillermo Hernandez-Ramirez; Jerry L. Hatfield…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The translation of turbulent wind energy to individual corn plant motion during senescense  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind flow within inflexible plant canopies is turbulent and leads to an oscillatory motion of individual plants. A study was conducted to describe the motion of corn (Zea mays...L.) stalks in the wind using a tra...

T. K. Flesch; R. H. Grant

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Energy and resource conservation in the grain corn cultivation on irrigated lands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of increasing the efficiency of grain maize (corn) cultivation is shown in the comparative study of two cultivation technologies of this culture: the traditional and the proposed one—based on...

P. I. Kuznetsov; A. E. Novikov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Prediction of County-Level Corn Yields Using an Energy-Crop Growth Index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weather conditions significantly affect corn yields. while weather remains as the major uncontrolled variable in crop production, an understanding of the influence of weather on yields can aid in early and accurate assessment of the impact of ...

Jeffrey A. Andresen; Robert F. Dale; Jerald J. Fletcher; Paul V. Preckel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A First-Law Thermodynamic Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes energy efficiency of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle. In particular, it critically ... publications by DOE, USDA, and UC Berkeley Energy Resources Group. It is demonstrated that most of the ...

Tad W. Patzek

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fermentation and costs of fuel ethanol from corn with quick-germ process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Quick-Germ process developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a way to obtain corn oil, but with lower capital costs than the traditional wet-milling process. Quick-Germ has the potential ...

Frank Taylor; Andrew J. Mcaloon…

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Distribution of Fumonisins in Food and Feed Products Prepared from Contaminated Corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fate and distribution of the fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2...) were determined in products obtained from naturally contaminated corn used for ethanol fermentation and wet milling operations. Fumonisins are ...

Glenn A. Bennett; John L. Richard; Steve R. Eckhoff

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Extraction and Functional Properties of Non-Zein Proteins in Corn Germ from Wet-Milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate the extractability of wet-milled corn germ protein, characterize the recovered protein and ... potential applications. Protein was extracted from both wet germ and finished (d...

Mila P. Hojilla-Evangelista

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mineral utilization of malted sorghum and corn with added crayfish in rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forty adult rats were used to study the mineral balances of malted and unmalted wet- or dry-milled sorghum and corn combined with crayfish and fed rats for ... for the entire study period. Malting and wet milling

Ikemefuna C. Obizoba

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fatty acid compositions of lipids from corn and grain sorghum kernels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics and fatty acid compositions of the lipid components of the main fractions (germ, starch, gluten, and fiber) obtained in the wet milling of corn and grain sorghum kernels have been determined.

A. R. Baldwin; M. S. Sniegowski

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Improved Solubility and Emulsification of Wet-Milled Corn Germ Protein Recovered by Ultrafiltration–Diafiltration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluated Ultrafiltration–Diafiltration (UFDF) as a means to improve the extractability of wet-milled corn germ protein and determined its effects on ... functional properties of the recovered protein ...

Mila P. Hojilla-Evangelista

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Integrated Concentration in Science, 2012 High Fructose Corn Syrup a mini iCons case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

� Integrated Concentration in Science, 2012 High Fructose Corn Syrup� a mini iCons case study knowledge affect you? What iCons learning goals did you meet with this case study, and how? How could you

Auerbach, Scott M.

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian corn borer Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to 1 and 14 inches long when mature. COMMON HOST PLANT(S): Tomato, corn, pepper and potato... weeds in late summer or early fall are the overwintering stage of stalk borers....

284

Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of imidazolinone weed management systems and tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn to imazapic. Field experiments were conducted in 1997 and 1998 at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES...

Thompson, Ann Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Germination and seedling growth of corn (Zea mays l.) under varying levels of copper and zinc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heavy metal tolerance in corn (Zea mays L.) var. ‘Neelum’ was assessed at germination and seedling growth after having subjected it to different concentrations of CuSO4 and ZnSO4. Germination was not affected...

S. Mahmood; A. Hussain; Z. Saeed; M. Athar

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Incorporating risk and uncertainty into extension applications: case example -- the wheat and stocker cattle grazing evaluator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. , or the additional working capital needed to finance a stocker operation. The producer may decide against owning stockers if his price projections indicate the enterprise would be unprofitable. Should he prefer wheat pasture leasing, an acceptable leasing... for both wheat and stocker cattle production, and may choose several stocker cattle grazing strategies these include owning stocker catle as well as leasing wheat pasture for grazing. Finally, the user specifies correlations between each pair of random...

Ralston, Roger E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

EASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| P | P a g e MEASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY SPONSORED BY THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AS PART OF THE ENERGY STAR® PROGRAM GALE A. BOYD AND CHRISTIAN DELGADO DUKE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS BOX 90097, DURHAM, NC 27708 JULY 10, 2012 2 | P a g e MEASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY CONTENTS Figures .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Tables ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

288

Dust suppression results using mineral oil applications on corn and milo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DUST SUPPRESSION RESULTS USING MINERAL OIL APPLICATIONS ON CORN AND MILO A Thesis by HERMAN DOUGLAS WARDLAW, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering DUST SUPPRESSION RESULTS USING MINERAL OIL APPLICATIONS ON CORN AND MILO A Thesis by HERMAN DOUGLAS WARDLAW, JR. Approved as to style and content by: Calvin B. Parnell, Jr. (Chairman...

Wardlaw, Herman Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Interactions between the herbicide CGA-136872 and selected soil-applied insecticides in corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HERBICIDE CGA-136872 AND SELECTED SOIL-APPLIED INSECTICIDES IN CORN A Thesis by DARRIN LOUIS BIEDIGER Approved as to style and content by M. G. Merkle (Co-Chair of Committee) D. N. Weaver (Co-Chair of Committee) I.... M. Chandler (Member) P. A. Baumann (Member) F. W. Plapp (Member) E. C. A. Rouge (Head of Department) May 1991 ABSTRACT Interactions Between the Herbicide CGA-136872 and Selected Soil-Applied Insecticides in Corn. (May 1991) Darrin L...

Biediger, Darrin Louis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development and evaluation of corn cooking procedures for the production of tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF CORN COOKING PROCEDURES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF TORTILLAS A Thesis by MARY CANDACE DES ROSIERS Approved as to style and content by: (Chair an of Committee) (Member ) (Member) December 1979 la 1 ABSTRACT... Development and Evaluation of Corn Cooking Procedures for the Production of Tortillas. (December 1979) Mary Candace Des Rosiers, B. S. , Texas Woman's University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Lloyd Rooney A method to objectively predict optimum cook...

Des Rosiers, Mary Candace

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Effect of genotype on cooking and texture of corn for tortilla production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECT OF GENOTYPE ON COOKING AND TEXTURE OF CORN FOR TORTILLA PRODUCTION A Thesis by SANTIAGO BEDOLLA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology I I EFFECT OF GENOTYPE ON COOKING AND TEXTURE OF CORN FOR TORTILLA PRODUCTION A Thesis By SANTIAGO BEDOLLA Approved as to style and content by: (Cha rman of the C ittee) (Member} (Member...

Bedolla, Santiago

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

Availability of selected amino acids in sorghum grain and corn determined in ileocecal cannulated finishing pigs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trials to determine the availability of selected amino acids in corn and sorghum grain when measured at the distal ileum and in the feces. The cereal diets were based on grains representative of commercial production in Texas. Each pig received both... the corn and sorghum grain diets alternatively during two consecutive 18 day periods. A purified, non-protein diet was used to determine the endogenous amino acids in the ileal digests and feces. The apparent availability of amino acids from both grains...

Easter, Robert Arnold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Prececal, postileal and total tract starch digestion in ponies fed corn, oats, barley or sorghum grain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barley Oats Corn Sorghum Sorghum Barley Oats Corn Whole grains were purchased from a local commercial supplier. All grains were elevator run. Prior to ration formulation grains were coarsely cracked in an automatic roller mill..., chromium and starch by the same procedures except 5 ml of wet sample was used for each analy- For determination of amylase content and viscosity, grains were pulverized in a laboratory Udy mill through a 1 mm screen. An alkaline hydroylsate was prepared...

Arnold, Fairfax Ferguson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Environmental and Economic Trade-Offs in a Watershed When Using Corn Stover for Bioenergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental and Economic Trade-Offs in a Watershed When Using Corn Stover for Bioenergy ... Taken together, these are the principal reasons corn stover has been looked upon favorably in the policy dialogue relative to dedicated bioenergy crops. ... Research that considers greenhouse gases, water quality, and farm-gate economics of cellulosic bioenergy crops together in a single integrated analysis is needed given societal concerns about the overall impact of using agricultural land to grow bioenergy crops. ...

Benjamin M. Gramig; Carson J. Reeling; Raj Cibin; Indrajeet Chaubey

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Study of the Black and the Yellow Molds of Ear Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn from t Lrne cause, it map be asserted that the Texas growers are sustaini yearly loss of $5,818,349. The thoughtful farmer will at once real the importance of being able to save this unnecessary waste. It sho~ be added that as far as the corn.... 25 onions, fully grown bulbs. .......... 25 onions, fully grown bulbs. .......... 25 onlons fully grown bulb;. .......... 25 onions' fully grown bulbs ......... 25 tuber$'Irish potatoes, var: ~ountain A. niger from cott ........... 'Irish...

Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

SciTech Connect

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the United States began a programme to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types—categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly—from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Michael Wang; May Wu; Hong Huo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluating Lines in a Wheat Breeding Program for Race Nonspecific Resistance to Leaf Rust, Puccinia Triticina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Breeding resistance to leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) into wheat varieties has long depended on the incorporation of one or more race specific or “major” genes… (more)

Thomas, Christopher Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Alpha-Amylase Activity of Varieties of English Wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the National Institute of Agricultural Botany grown at its headquarters and sub-stations, the oc-amylase activity ranged from 1-141 Farrand units1 with a mean of 7. Some samples ... wheat buyers to know which varieties are likely to produce samples of unusually high a-amylase activity and yet appear to be bright and attractive. It would therefore be worth ...

B. A. STEWART

1964-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Water Conservation in Southern Great Plains Wheat Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time in the fall contributed greatly to the size of grain yields the following year. Where contour tillage and level terracing were used to retain surface runoff water favorable sowing conditions more frequently occurred and the risk of crop failure... that these might he analyzed lation to water consel*vation practice. 51rnificant increases of wheat yield resulted f roin each of the following : liitial soil moisture stores, (2) July rainfall previous to sowing, (3) terracing and contour farming, and (4...

Finnell, H. H. (Henry Howard)

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermal Properties of Starch From New Corn Lines as Impacted by Environment and During Line Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research were to further characterize exotic by adapted corn inbreds by studying the impact of environment on their starch thermal properties, and investigating the development of starch thermal properties during kernel maturation by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A method to expedite identification of unusual starch thermal traits was investigated by examining five corn kernels at a time, instead of one kernel, which the previous screening methods used. Corn lines with known thermal functions were blended with background starch (control) in ratios of unique starch to control starch, and analyzed by using DSC. Control starch was representative of typical corn starch. The values for each ratio within a mutant type were unique ({alpha} < 0.01) for most DSC measurements. These results supported the five-kernel method for rapidly screening large amounts of corn germplasm to identify unusual starch traits. The effects of 5 growing locations on starch thermal properties from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines were studied using DSC. The warmest location, Missouri, generally produced starch with greater gelatinization onset temperature (T{sub oG}), narrower range of gelatinization (R{sub G}), and greater enthalpy of gelatinization ({Delta}H{sub G}). The coolest location, Illinois, generally resulted in starch with lower T{sub oG}, wider R{sub G}, and lower {Delta}H{sub G}. Starch from the Ames 1 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Illinois, whereas starch from the Ames 2 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Missouri. The temperature at Ames 2 may have been warmer since it was located near a river; however, soil type and quality also were different. Final corn starch structure and function change during development and maturity. Thus, the changes in starch thermal properties during 5 stages of endosperm development from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines at two locations were studied by using DSC. The T{sub oG} tended to decrease during maturation of the kernel, whereas the {Delta}H{sub G} tended not to change. Retrogradation parameters did not vary greatly among days after pollination (DAP) and between locations. Genotypes were affected differently by environments and significant interactions were found between genotype, environment,and DAP.

Elizabeth M. Lenihan

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

The correlationship between the metabolizable energy content, chemical composition and color score in different sources of corn DDGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate the apparent metabolizable energy (AME) and true metabolizable energy (TME) contents in 30 sources of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS)...

Yong-Z Jie; Jian-Y Zhang; Li-H Zhao…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Y sorghum to S. 02fo for the N-Y sorghum. Lysinc content was higher in corn than the average of the sorghums (0. 25 us. 0. 22fo). Corn had a. slightly higher gross energy value (8. 97 kcal/g) than the average of the sorghums (g. 94 kcal/g) which resulted... corn. Metabolism trial results showed an advantage f' or the corn and N-Y sorghum diets in dry matter, organic me. tter and gross energy digestibilities which enabled these diets to also have higher digest- ible and metabolizablc energy values...

Meadows, Doyle Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In corn wet milling, dry matter can be separated from liquids in process streams with centrifuges or vacuum belt filtration (VBF). Because separations usually are not complete, dry matter can be lost in the liquid streams (overflow from the gluten thickener centrifuge and filtrate from VBF). This represents a loss of nutrients, especially protein, to low valued coproducts and reduces quality of water for recycling within the process. The objective was to compare microfiltration of light and heavy gluten process streams to conventional separation methods. Batches of light and heavy gluten were obtained from a wet mill plant and processed by microfiltration. Samples of permeate and concentrate from microfiltration were analyzed and compared to corresponding streams from wet milling. Microfiltration of light gluten resulted in concentrate and permeate streams similar in composition to conventionally processed light gluten using a centrifuge, suggesting that microfiltration is as effective as centrifugation in partitioning solids and water in light gluten. Dewatering of heavy gluten found that conventional VBF caused dry matter concentrations in gluten cake to be higher than concentrate from microfiltration. Permeate from microfiltration of heavy gluten had higher concentrations of ash and lower soluble nitrogen than filtrate from VBF. Microfiltration was able to remove more ash from concentrate, which may improve the value of wet milling coproducts. These data demonstrated microfiltration has potential for separation of light and heavy gluten streams, but more data are needed on effectiveness and practicality.

C.I. Thompson; K.D. Rausch; R.L. Belyea; M.E. Tumbleson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

NETL: LabNotes - July 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 2008 July 2008 NETL Researchers Focus on Combining Coal and Biomass in Co-Gasification Todd Gardner is one of the NETL researchers studying co-gasification of various types of coal and biomass. Todd Gardner is one of the NETL researchers studying co-gasification of various types of coal and biomass. He's holding pelletized corn stover. Two other types of biomass are in the containers: poplar dust and switchgrass. Researchers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory are looking at ways to combine the natural resources of coal and biomass - biomass including such growing things as wheat straw, corn stover, switchgrass, mixed hardwood and distillers' dried grains with corn fiber, and even algae - but avoid the emission of carbon dioxide.

306

Experimental co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost to improve biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost (VC) as well as mono-digestion of corn stalk were investigated. Batch mono-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial total solid loading (TSL) ranged from 1.2% to 6.0%. Batch co-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial TSL of 6% with VC proportions ranged from 20% to 80% of total solid (TS). For mono-digestion of corn stalk, a maximum methane yield of 217.60 {+-} 13.87 mL/g TS{sub added} was obtained at initial TSL of 4.8%, and acidification was found at initial TSL of 6.0% with the lowest pH value of 5.10 on day 4. Co-digestion improved the methane yields by 4.42-58.61% via enhancing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and pH value compared with mono-digestion of corn stalk. The maximum biogas yield of 410.30 {+-} 11.01 mL/g TS{sub added} and methane yield of 259.35 {+-} 13.85 mL/g TS{sub added} were obtained for 40% VC addition. Structure analysis by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that the lowest crystallinity of 35.04 of digested corn stalk was obtained from co-digestion with 40% VC, which decreased 29.4% compared to 49.6 obtained from un-treated corn stalk. It is concluded that co-digestion with VC is beneficial for improving biodigestibility and methane yield from corn stalk.

Chen Guangyin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zheng Zheng, E-mail: zzhenghj@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang Shiguan [National Engineering Laboratory of Biomass Power Generation Equipment, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Fang Caixia; Zou Xingxing; Luo Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

J.-P. Denuit et al.Management of nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat and potato Original article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.-P. Denuit et al.Management of nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat and potato Original article Management of nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat and potato crops using the chlorophyll meter for crop results from a new field-scale N management strategy for winter wheat and potato crops in Belgium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

308

Nutrient Management of Conservation-Till Cotton in Terminated-Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutrient Management of Conservation- Till Cotton in Terminated-Wheat K.F. Bronson, J.W. Keeling, R, respectively. #12;A conservation-till cotton production system using wheat or rye winter cover, terminated (Lascano et al., 1994). Conservation-till cotton in the High Plains can be as productive as and more

Mukhtar, Saqib

309

Winnowing Wheat from Chaff: The Chunking GA Hal Stringer and Annie S. Wu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a farmer who separates wheat from the chaff. We refer to this property as the "winnowing effectWinnowing Wheat from Chaff: The Chunking GA Hal Stringer and Annie S. Wu School of Computer Science are then made available to other individuals in the population for evolving potential future solutions. The Ch

Wu, Annie S.

310

EFFECT OF HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT ON PHYSICOCHEMICAL1 PROPERTIES OF WHEAT, WAXY AND STANDARD MAIZE STARCHES2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EFFECT OF HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT ON PHYSICOCHEMICAL1 PROPERTIES OF WHEAT, WAXY AND STANDARD MAIZE.10.005 #12;2 ABSTRACT18 Standard maize (SMS), waxy maize (WMS) and wheat (WTS) starches were19 hydrothermally treated at three pressure levels. Effects of D.I.C. processing conditions20 on thermal characteristics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

311

A comparative risk assessment of genetically engineered, mutagenic, and conventional wheat production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production systems Robert K.D. Peterson* & Leslie M. Shama Agricultural and Biological Risk Assessment engineered, mutagenic, and conventional wheat production systems. Replacement of traditional herbicides with different wheat production systems in the US and Canada using the risk assessment paradigm. Specifically, we

Peterson, Robert K. D.

312

Achieving Deep Cuts in the Carbon Intensity of U.S. Automobile Transportation by 2050: Complementary Roles for Electricity and Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Achieving Deep Cuts in the Carbon Intensity of U.S. Automobile Transportation by 2050: Complementary Roles for Electricity and Biofuels ... Electricity could supply the majority of daily fuel demand through the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), while biofuels could fuel long trips or travel in areas with insufficient charging infrastructure. ... To assess the likely reduction in reliance on gasoline, we estimate the quantity of Miscanthus, corn stover, and wheat straw available for conversion to fuel and compare the resulting volume of ethanol with the quantity of ethanol necessary to replace all conventional gasoline used for passenger automobiles with E85. ...

Corinne D. Scown; Michael Taptich; Arpad Horvath; Thomas E. McKone; William W. Nazaroff

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis of the mineral content of corn bran treated in vitro and by passage through the pig Gastrointestinal tract  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis was ... a method for examining the mineral contents of corn bran loaded in vitro or passed through ... tract of pigs. Particles of dry-milled corn pericarp treated in vitro ...

Frederick R. Dintzis; Frederick L. Baker…

314

Fractionation of Corn Fiber Treated by Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia (SAA) for Isolation of Hemicellulose B and Production of C5 Sugars by Enzyme Hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A process was developed to fractionate and isolate the hemicellulose B component of corn fiber generated by corn wet milling. The process consisted of pretreatment by soaking ... developed process offered a means...

Nhuan P. Nghiem; Justin Montanti…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide for the American Corn Growers Association  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Guide Produced for the Guide Produced for the American Corn Growers Foundation Small Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program Small Wind Electric Systems Cover photo: This AOC 15/50 wind turbine on a farm in Clarion, Iowa, saves the Clarion-Goldfield Community School about $9,000 per year on electrical purchase and provides a part of the school's science curriculum. Photo credit - Robert Olson/PIX11649 A national survey of corn producers conducted by the American Corn Growers Foundation (ACGF) found a strong majority level of support among farmers on a range of important wind energy issues. The survey, conducted by Robinson and Muenster Associates, Inc. of Sioux Falls, South Dakota during

316

Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash October 22, 2009 - 12:22pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Todd Mathisen's family has been working the rich soil in Northwest Iowa for the last 130 years, ever since his great-great grandfather homesteaded the land in the 1870s. Todd has cultivated the fields himself for the last three decades. His family's roots here go so deep they'd be pretty hard to pull up now, and he doesn't plan on leaving anytime soon. But that doesn't mean Todd is stuck in his ways. In fact, he's at the forefront of American farmers helping to supply the United States with a biofuel that may have a promising future: cellulosic ethanol.

317

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-EE0003915; DOE WAIVER NO. W{A)2011-006; CH1590 The Petitioner, Dow Corning Corporation (DOW), has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions in the above cited research and development cooperative agreement issued by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). See attached Dow's Petition, Answer 1. The waiver is to apply to DOW's and its subcontractors' employee subject inventions, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517 as amended. Subject of the R&D Cooperative Agreement Title: Contributing to Net Zero Building: High Energy Efficient EIFS Wall Systems

318

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

319

The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IX Experiment ?1: pHa and colorb of corn tortillas pack- aged (and stored) in polyethylene and modified atmos- phere bagsc 76 X Experiment ?1: shelf life of corn tortillas packaged in plastic and MAPa bags and stored at 25' and 4'C...

Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A First-Law Thermodynamic Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes energy efficiency of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle. In particular, it critically evaluates earlier publications by DOE, USDA, and UC Berkeley Energy Resources Group. It is demonstrated that most of the current First Law net-energy models of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle are based on nonphysical assumptions and should be viewed with caution. In particular, these models do not (i) define the system boundaries, (ii) conserve mass, and (iii) conserve energy. The energy cost of producing and refining carbon fuels in real time, for example, corn and ethanol, is high relative to that of fossil fuels deposited and concentrated over geological time. Proper mass and energy balances of corn fields and ethanol refineries that account for the photosynthetic energy, part of the environment restoration work, and the coproduct energy have been formulated. These balances show that energetically production of ethanol from corn is 2-4 times less favorable than production of gasoline from petroleum. From thermodynamics it also follows that ecological damage wrought by industrial biofuel production must be severe. With the DDGS coproduct energy credit, 3.9 gallons of ethanol displace on average the energy in 1 gallon of gasoline. Without the DDGS energy credit, this average number is 6.2 gallons of ethanol. Equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions from corn ethanol are some 50% higher than those from gasoline, and become 100% higher if methane emissions from cows fed with DDGS are accounted for. From the mass balance of soil it follows that ethanol coproducts should be returned to the fields.

Patzek, Tad W. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@patzek.berkeley.edu

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Organic Rankine Cycle System Preliminary Design with Corn Cob Biomass Waste Burning as Heat Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy source potencies in Indonesia are needed to be utilized to fulfill the electricity requirement in rural or remote area that not yet get electricity. One of the potency is biomass waste. Therefore, this paper discusses about the electricity generation preliminary design of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system with corn cob biomass waste burning as heat source, so it can be obtained the theoretic corn farm area requirement, electricity power, and thermal efficiency at heat source temperature and flow rate variations. Corn cob burning temperature can heat up the heating fluid that is heated by boiler with corn cob as the biomass fuel. Furthermore, that heating fluid is used as ORC electricity generation heat source. The independent variables in this study are the heating fluid temperature which varied between 110, 120, and 130oC, and the heating fluid flow rate that varied between 100, 150, and 200 liter/minute. \\{R141b\\} is selected to be the working fluid, palm oil is used for heating fluid and water as cooling fluid. The calculation results that the theoretic electricity power, thermal efficiency, and corn farm area requirement, respectively, are in the range of 3.5-8.5 kW, 9.2-10.3%, and 49.5-101.1 hectare/year. All of the highest range values are resulted at the highest temperature and flow rate, 130oC and 200 liter/minute. This result shows that corn cob burning heat is potential to be utilized as electricity generation heat source for rural society, particularly for some areas that have been studied.

Nur Rohmah; Ghalya Pikra; Agus Salim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Engineering process and cost model for a conventional corn wet milling facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional wet milling of corn is a process designed for the recovery and purification of starch and several coproducts (germ, gluten, fiber and steep liquor). The total starch produced by the wet milling industry in the USA in 2004 equaled 21.5 billion kg, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production. Process engineering and cost models for a corn wet milling process (for steeping and milling facilities) have been developed for a “generic” processing plant with a capacity of 2.54 million kg of corn per day (100,000 bu/day). The process includes grain cleaning, steeping, germ separation and recovery, fiber separation and recovery, gluten separation and recovery and starch separation. Information for the development of the models was obtained from a variety of technical sources including commercial wet milling companies, industry experts and equipment suppliers. The models were developed using process and cost simulation software (SuperPro Designer®) and include processing information such as composition and flow rates of the various process streams, descriptions of the various unit operations and detailed breakdowns of the operating and capital cost of the facility. Based on the information from the model, we can estimate the cost of production per kilogram of starch using the input prices for corn and other wet milling coproducts. We have also used the model to conduct a variety of sensitivity studies utilizing modifications such as feedstock costs, corn compositional variations, and the sale of wet corn gluten feed. The model is also being used as a base-case for the development of models to test alternative processing technologies and to help in the scale-up and commercialization of new wet milling technologies. This model is available upon request from the authors for educational, non-commercial and research uses.

Edna C. Ramirez; David B. Johnston; Andrew J. McAloon; Winnie Yee; Vijay Singh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield, and Michael Wang. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield estimated the net energy value (NEV) of corn ethanol. However, variations in data and assumptions used among variation and develops a more consistent estimate. We conclude that the NEV of corn ethanol has been rising

Laughlin, Robert B.

324

Introduction to Energy Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

325

Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of variance of lodging percentage at College Stationi Silage yields grain yield snd lodging percentage of four corn 5. 6. hybrids and three spacingsi CoU. ege Station, Analysis of variance of silage yields at Temple Analysis of variance of grain yields... difference in yields of grain at 12~ 18 snd 24-inch spac- ings ~ Singleton et al. (Q) oaution that a good silage hybrid must not oniy produce well but should also stand up in summer storms. They point out that corn must be ereot at harvest time in order...

Spears, Ben Riley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effect of drying, initial moisture and variety in corn wet milling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laboratory wet-milling process was used to determine starch yield and starch recovery of dent and flint corn dried under different drying conditions. A comparison with undried samples was performed. For the undried samples the starch recovery was not significantly different between both varieties. It decreased as both initial moisture content of the grains and drying air temperature increased. The reduction in starch recovery as well as the contamination by protein was greater for the flint than for the dent corn. Swelling, solubility and initial gelatinization temperatures of the starch derived from both varieties were affected by the drying conditions.

Mónica Haros; Costantino Suarez

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data  

SciTech Connect

The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Estimation of Performance of an Active Well Coincidence Counter Equipped with Boron-Coated Straw Neutron Detectors - 13401  

SciTech Connect

He-3, a very rare isotope of natural helium gas, has ideal properties for the detection of thermal neutrons. As such it has become the standard material for neutron detectors and sees ubiquitous use within many radiometric applications that require neutron sensitivity. Until recently, there has been a fairly abundant supply of He-3. However, with the reduction in nuclear weapons, production of tritium ceased decades ago and the stockpile has largely decayed away, reducing the available He-3 supply to a small fraction of that needed for neutron detection. A suitable and rapidly-deployable replacement technology for neutron detectors must be found. Many potential replacement technologies are under active investigation and development. One broad class of technologies utilizes B-10 as a neutron capture medium in coatings on the internal surfaces of proportional detectors. A particular implementation of this sort of technology is the boron-coated 'straw' (BCS) detectors under development by Proportional Technologies, Inc. (PTi). This technology employs a coating of B-10 enriched boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) on the inside of narrow tubes, roughly 4 mm in diameter. A neutron counter (e.g. a slab, a well counter, or a large assay counter designed to accommodate 200 liter drums) could be constructed by distributing these narrow tubes throughout the polyethylene body of the counter. One type of neutron counter that is of particular importance to safeguards applications is the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC), which is a Los Alamos design that traditionally employs 42 He-3 detectors. This is a very flexible design which can accurately assay small samples of uranium- and plutonium-bearing materials. Utilizing the MCNPX code and benchmarking against measurements where possible, the standard AWCC has been redesigned to utilize the BCS technology. Particular aspects of the counter performance include the single-neutron ('singles') detection efficiency and the time constant for the decrease in neutron population in the counter following a fission event (a.k.a. the die-away time). Results of the modeling and optimization are presented. (authors)

Young, B.M. [Canberra Industries, Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)] [Canberra Industries, Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States); Lacy, J.L.; Athanasiades, A. [Proportional Technologies, Inc., 8022 El Rio Street, Houston, TX 77054 (United States)] [Proportional Technologies, Inc., 8022 El Rio Street, Houston, TX 77054 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The authors do note that assumptions regarding yield growth and the feasibility of expanding corn acres significantly affect the model outcome. Islas, Manzini, and Masera (2007) examined various scenarios of bioenergy use in Mexico based on moderate... and high usage of bioenergy in the electricity and transportation sectors. The authors analyzed three scenarios from 2005 to 2030. Results of their model indicate that ethanol, biodiesel, and electricity produced from biomass could make up 16...

Campiche, Jody L.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wheat Gray Shorts for the Prevention of Slipped Tendons in Battery Brooder Chicks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the variations in the percentages of calcium and phosphorus studied. Rations containing 1.90-1.93 percent calcium and .87-.99 percent phosphorus, even though pro- tected by twenty and thirty percent wheat gray shorts, produced more slipped tendons than did... rations containing 1.20-1.62 per- cent cajlcium and ,5647 percent phosphorus. CONTENTS Page Introduction 5 Previous Work 5 Method of Procedure 7 Experimental Results 10 Comparison of no Wheat Gray Shorts with Twenty Percent Wheat Gray Shorts...

Sherwood, R. M. (Ross Madison); Couch, James Russell

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Examining strategies to improve the carbon balance of corn/soybean agriculture using eddy covariance and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if it occurs rapidly. Consequently, there is intense interest in finding ways to damp projected changesExamining strategies to improve the carbon balance of corn/soybean agriculture using eddy There is much interest in the role that agricultural practices might play in sequestering carbon to help offset

Minnesota, University of

333

Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

Wu, Qinglin

334

Corn phosphoglycolate phosphatase: Modulation of activity by pyridine nucleotides and adenylate energy charge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity of corn phosphoglycolate phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.18...in vitro, both by NADP(H) and adenylate energy charge. The Vmax of the enzyme is ... the light. At both pH, the adenylate energy charge alone has a...

P. Baldy; J. P. Jacquot; D. Lavergne; M. L. Champigny

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

Susanne Kleff

2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019 Daniel M. O released long term projections for grain and energy markets at its 2010 Agricultural Outlook Forum, and the quantity of U.S. feedgrains and oilseeds to be used in bioenergy production processes, The USDA's long term

337

Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a and Tony E.Grift2,b 1@illinois.edu Key words: Machine vision, Agricultural robot, Turning, Field of view Abstract. This article discusses the development of variable field of view (FOV) of camera to realize headland turning of an agricultural robot

338

Membrane separation of solids from corn processing streams Tricia L. Templin a,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time is re- duced and starch yields are similar to those of wet mill- ing. Corn processing streams from by a conventional wet milling process and a wet milling process that used enzymes to eliminate use of SO2 steeping Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Membrane filtration; Processing; Wet milling; Enzymes

339

Properties and processing of corn oils obtained by extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crude oils were extracted from wet- and dry-milled corn germs with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) at 50–90 C and 8,000–12,000 psi and were characterized for color, free fatty acids, phosphorus, refining lo...

G. R. List; J. P. Friedrich…

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fuzzy Rough Sets: Beyond the Obvious Martine De Cock, Chris Cornelis, Etienne Kerre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy Rough Sets: Beyond the Obvious Martine De Cock, Chris Cornelis, Etienne Kerre Fuzziness.Kerre@UGent.be Abstract-- Rough set theory was introduced in 1982. Soon it was combined with fuzzy set theory, giving rise. I. INTRODUCTION Pawlak [12] launched rough set theory as a framework for the construction

Gent, Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes Robert H erected up till 30 m height with sensors at several heights for the measurement of temperature; (iii) the design consequences for the new generation of high-resolution solar telescopes. Keywords

Rutten, Rob

342

1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in order to drink a water-like liquid of density 1.0 g cm-3 ? 1.6 Charles' law is sometimes expressed1.2 What pressure difference must be generated across the length of a 15 cm vertical drinking straw

Findley, Gary L.

343

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Adaptive polymorphism of tetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitors in wild emmer wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Amylase inhibitors are attractive candidates for the control of seed weevils as these insects are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. Wheat tetrameric ?-amylase inhibitor (WTAI) is a mixture (60 ...

Ji-Rui Wang; Mei Deng; Ya-Xi Liu; Xin Qiao; Zhen-Hong Chen…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Elucidating and Mapping Heat Tolerance in Wild Tetraploid Wheat (Triticum turgidum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying reliable screening tools and characterizing tolerant germplasm sources is essential for developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties suited for the hot areas of the world. Our objective was to evaluate heat tolerance of promising...

Ali, Mohamed Badry Mohamed

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Identification of effective leaf-rust resistance genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum) using STS markers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular STS markers J13, Gb, and J09 were used for screening wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accessions previously found to possess leaf-rust resistance genes according to test crosses or phytopathological tests. ...

L. G. Tyryshkin; E. I. Gul’tyaeva; N. V. Alpat’eva…

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Role of Leaf Epicuticular Wax an Improved Adaptation to Moisture Deficit Environments in Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water deficiency is the primary reason for decreasing wheat (Triticum aestivum) yields globally, causing a nearly 50-90% yield reduction on at least 60 Mha of land in developing countries Previous studies have identified associations in genomic...

Mohammed, Suheb

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

348

Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and steam explosion (Playne, 1984), pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Azzam, 1989), alkali treatment of soybean straw to improve digestibility (Felix, Hill, and Diarra, 14 1990), ammoniation of wheat straw to improve nutritive...

Ashok, Ganesh

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A History of Small Grain Crops in Texas: Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye 1582-1976.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The harvest varies from 25 t c , Fik..,e 3A: Map of Old Spanish Fort area, north of Nocona, Figure 3B: State historical marker at Old Texas, where the French built a fort, settled families and Spanish Fort, north of Nocona, Texas. grew wheat 1719... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Spanish 1 Early Wheat Improvement in Texas 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The French 4 The Selection Period 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northern Areas 6...

Atkins, Irvin Milburn

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Molecular and cytological analysis of a novel leaf rust resistance gene in wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE Ap ved as to sibyl and content by: r g/Q Allan K. Fritz~ (Chair of Commit%+) David S. Marshall (Member) David M. Stelly (Member) Mark S. Hussey (Head... of Advisory Committee: Dr. Allan K. Fritz A novel wheat leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops cylindricum accession TTCC295 was investigated, using both cytogenetic and molecular tools. Previous work had introgressed this gene in to adapted wheat...

Franks, Cleve Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Analysis of Reproductive Stage Heat Tolerance in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHENOTYPIC AND MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF REPRODUCTIVE STAGE HEAT TOLERANCE IN WHEAT (TRITICUM AESTIVUM) A Dissertation by RICHARD ESTEN MASON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2010 Major Subject: Molecular and Environmental Plant Sciences PHENOTYPIC AND MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF REPRODUCTIVE STAGE HEAT TOLERANCE IN WHEAT (TRITICUM...

Mason, Richard Esten

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

Identification of added rye chromosomes in wheat-rye addition lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDENTIFICATION OF ADDED RYE CHROMOSOMES IN WHEAT-RYE ADDITION LINES A Thesis by Kuang Shy Tang Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&K University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975... Major Subject: Genetics IDENTIFICATION OF ADDED RYE CHROMOSOMES IN WHEAT-RYE ADDITION LINES A Thesis by Kuang Shy Tang Approved as to style and content by: Chairm f Committee ember Head of Dep tment Member May 1975 428045 ABSTRACT...

Tang, Kuang Shy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Wheat Belt Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belt Public Power Dist Belt Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheat Belt Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 20509 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC/MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DISTRIBUTION HEAVY INDUSTRIAL (E-2) Commercial GENERAL PURPOSE - LARGE COMMERCIAL Industrial GENERAL PURPOSE - LARGE COMMERCIAL Commercial GENERAL PURPOSE - SMALL Residential GENERAL PURPOSE - SMALL COMMERCIAL Commercial IRRIGATION Multi Phase Commercial LARGE POWER Industrial

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphid aphis glycines Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

padi wheat, barley, oats, rye, triticale, corn Buckthorn aphid Aphis nasturtii potato, beets Corn leaf... aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis ... Source: Jurenka, Russell A. -...

355

E-Print Network 3.0 - aphid aphis craccivora Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

padi wheat, barley, oats, rye, triticale, corn Buckthorn aphid Aphis nasturtii potato, beets Corn leaf... aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis ... Source: Jurenka, Russell A. -...

356

Economic impact of ethanol production on U.S. livestock sector: a spatial analysis of corn and distillers grain shipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of corn-based ethanol in the U.S. has increased from 1,630 million gallons in 2000 to 4,855 million gallons in 2006, representing a 198%… (more)

N'Guessan, Yapo Genevier

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part I: Statistics and Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements just within and above a mature corn canopy have been performed to clarify the small-scale spatial structure of the turbulence. The smallest resolved scales are about 15 times the Kolmogorov length ...

R. van Hout; W. Zhu; L. Luznik; J. Katz; J. Kleissl; M. B. Parlange

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particularly eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production.

359

An Econometric Analysis of the Relationship among the U.S. Ethanol, Corn and Soybean Sectors, and World Oil Prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aimed to investigate the relationships among the following variables: U.S. corn prices, U.S. ethanol production, U.S. soybean prices and world oil prices. After… (more)

Savernini, Maira Q. M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Production of carotenoids byPhaffia rhodozyma grown on media composed of corn wet-milling co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural isolates of the carotenoid-producing yeastPhaffia rhodozyma...were analyzed for their ability to grow and to produce carotenoids in culture media composed exclusively of co-products of corn wet-milling fo...

G. Thomas Hayman; Bruno M. Mannarelli…

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The effect of enzymes and hydrocolloids on the texture of tortillas from fresh nixtamalized masa and nixtamalized corn flour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The texture of tortillas was improved by the addition of maltogenic amylase and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and guar gum to fresh masa from ground nixtamal (FNM) and nixtamalized corn flour (NCF) masa. Differences in the performance of additives...

Gutierrez de Velasco, Arturo Carlos

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Maximal Replacement of Forage and Concentrate with a New Wet Corn Milling Product for Lactating Dairy Cows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the maximal amount of concentrate and forage that could be replaced with a new wet corn milling product. The corn milling product contained 23.1% crude protein, 9.9% ruminally undegradable protein, 13.7% acid detergent fiber, 40.3% neutral detergent fiber, and 2.6% ether extract (% of dry matter; DM). In experiment 1, 16 Holstein cows were assigned to one of four diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. The four diets contained 54.3% forage (alfalfa:corn silages, 1:1 DM basis) with the wet corn milling product replacing 0, 50, 75, or 100% of the concentrate portion (corn and soybean meal) of the diet (DM basis). The diets containing wet corn milling product resulted in 7.8% lower DM intake, equivalent milk production (28.5 kg/d), and 13.6% greater efficiency of 4% fat-corrected milk (FCM) production than the control diet. There was no effect of diet on ruminal pH. In experiment 2, 16 Holstein cows were assigned to one of four diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. The 100% concentrate replacement diet from experiment 1 was used as control diet. For the test diets, forage was replaced with 15, 30, or 45% of the corn milling product (DM basis). Efficiency of FCM production (1.16) was not affected by diet. Rumination time was reduced for the 30 and 45% forage replacement diets, but ruminal pH was unaffected. In experiment 3, 30 Holstein cows were assigned at parturition to either a control diet (no corn milling product) or a diet containing 40% corn milling feed in place of both forage and concentrate (optimal levels from experiments 1 and 2) for 9 wk. The diet containing corn milling feed resulted in 21% greater efficiency of FCM production than the control diet. These results indicate that a new feed product based on wet corn milling ingredients has the potential to effectively replace all of the concentrate and up to 45% of the forage in the diet for lactating dairy cows.

K. Boddugari; R.J. Grant; R. Stock; M. Lewis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comparison of the Forage and Grain Composition from Insect-Protected and Glyphosate-Tolerant MON 88017 Corn to Conventional Corn (Zea mays L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monsanto Company, 800 North Lindbergh Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri 63167, Covance Laboratories Inc., 3301 Kinsman Boulevard, Madison, Wisconsin 53704, and Certus International Inc., 1422 Elbridge Payne Road, Suite 200, Chesterfield, Missouri 63017 ... In conventional plants, glyphosate binds to the endogenous plant EPSPS enzyme and blocks the biosynthesis of EPSP, thereby depriving plants of essential amino acids (12, 13). ... Corn seed from MON 88017, a control hybrid (LH198 × LH59), and 12 different conventional hybrids (Table 1) were planted in Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska in the United States during the 2002 field season. ...

Melinda C. McCann; William A. Trujillo; Susan G. Riordan; Roy Sorbet; Natalia N. Bogdanova; Ravinder S. Sidhu

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

SciTech Connect

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Test of the Producing Power of Some Texas Seed Corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 TEXAS AGRIClnTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. - A BULLETIN NO. 92. Agricultural Seetion-Decem ber 1906. A TEST OF THE PRODUCING POWER OF SOME TEXAS SEED CORN. BY R. L. BENNETT In Charge of Cotton Inve~tigation and Breeding POSTOFFICE... Stenographer STATE SUB-STATIONS. S. A. WASCHKA, Superintendent - Beeville, Bee Countv W. S. HOTCHKISS, Superintendent , - - 'Troupe, Smith Coun NoTE.-The main station is located on the grounds of the Agrieu tzmal and Mechanical College, in Rrazos Coz...

Bennett, R. L. (Robert Love)

1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the American Corn Growers Foundation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's Guide produced for the AGCF is to provide members of the foundation with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system will work for them based on their wind resource, the type and size of their sites, and their economics. The cover of this guide contains the results of the 2003 National Corn Producer Survey Wind Energy Issues.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Corn Stover Conversion to Biofuels: DOE's Preparation for Readiness in 2012 (Guest Editorial)  

SciTech Connect

Today, the United States Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 focuses on biofuels support research and development (R and D) needed to enable achieving respective volumetric and cost targets. Indeed, the worldwide objective is to bring us closer to independence from transportation fuels derived from fossil resources. This Special Issue highlights key areas of science and technology that impact the rollout of viable corn stover biofuels processes by 2012.

Himmel, M. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry Christina Galitsky Ernst Worrell Principal Research Associate Staff Scientist Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS: 90-4000, One Cyclotron Road... to achieve a moisture content of 2-4%, typically using a rotary steam tube dryer. This dryer consists of a large rotating cylinder that has numerous tubes running inside it. These tubes are heated internally by steam. As the cylinder rotates, the moist...

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

371

Determination of total dietary fiber and resistant starch in processed corn and rice products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and probably, Maillard reaction products. Values of TDF for rice products decreased up to 50% during milling, but remained unchanged with parboiling. Formation of RS around 1% in corn was found when consecutive heat treatments were applied (alkaline... starch" (RS) was first used by Englyst and Cummings in 1982 to describe starch that was resistant to pancreatic amylase. During heat treatments (boiling or baking), intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the starch granules are formed (crystallization...

Corujo Martinez, Juan Ignacio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

A phenological study of five maturity classes of corn at two dates of planting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakdown in the irrigation system was not corrected in time to prevent severe drought stress in the third planting. The fourth planting encountered a heavy infestation of the Southern Corn Stalk Borer which caused a drastic reduction in plant gr... constant among maturity classes and between planting dates. This indicates that the period from planting or emergence to blister would give a much better estima te of maturity classification than that of planting or emergence to silk. The coefficient...

Lane, Robert A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

375

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

feedstock and technology diversity feedstock and technology diversity Legend Company Name Process Technology Feedstock Type (Site Location) * Acquired by NewPage Corporation Six Commercial-Scale Biorefinery Projects; DOE will invest up to $385 million P j t Four Small-Scale Biorefinery Projects; DOE will invest up to $114 million (first round) Three Bio-Energy Centers; DOE will invest up to $405 million Alico Thermochemical/Bio Citrus Waste (LaBelle, FL) Range Fuels Thermochemical Wood Chips (Soperton, GA) DOE BioEnergy Science Center (Oak Ridge, TN) Abengoa Biochemical/Thermo Ag Waste, switchgrass (Hugoton, KS) Blue Fire Biochemical Municipal Solid Waste (Corona, CA) Iogen Biochemical Wheat Straw (Shelley, ID) Poet Biochemical Corn Stover (Emmetsburg, IA) ICM Biochemical Switchgrass, Corn Stover (St. Joseph, MO) Lignol

376

Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery  

SciTech Connect

MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

MBI International

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary commodity of corn wet milling is starch, but two coproducts (corn gluten feed, CGF and corn gluten meal, CGM) also are produced. CGM and CGF are marketed as animal foodstuffs and are important economically; however, variation in composition reduces quality. There are few data on the effect of composition of the parent process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light gluten (LG), respectively, on composition of CGF and CGM. The objective was to characterize LG and LSW. Samples of LG and LSW were collected: (1) hourly for one day, (2) every 3 h for 3 days, and (3) daily for 3 weeks. Dry matter, N and ash were determined. Variation in composition of LG and LSW was greatest during longer periods of time (days and weeks) rather than shorter (hourly or every 3 h). There was significant variation in DM (solids) content, which directly affected the concentration of other components. Variation in N (protein) of LG and LSW accounted for much of the variation in CGF and CG. Processes that modify processing and reduce variation could increase the quality of CGF and CGM.

K.D Rausch; C.I Thompson; R.L Belyea; M.E Tumbleson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The potential of pyrolysis technology in climate change mitigation – influence of process design and –parameters, simulated in SuperPro Designer Software.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This report investigates whether or not it would be possible to produce carbon-negative energy from pyrolysis of wheat straw in a series of Danish agricultural… (more)

Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

nonenergy subindex, the main price increases occurred in corn, wheat, and gold. With Russia and Ukraine both major exporters of corn and wheat, and gold serving as an alternative...

380

Recovering corn germ enriched in recombinant protein by wet-fractionation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Corn wet-fractionation processes (quick-germ fractionation and traditional wet milling) were evaluated as means of recovering fractions rich in recombinant collagen-related proteins that were targeted for expression in the germ (embryo) of transgenic corn. Transgenic corn lines accumulating a recombinant full-length human collagen type-I-alpha-1 (full-length rCI?1) or a 44-kDa rCI?1 fragment targeted for seed expression with an embryo-specific promoter were used. Factors to consider in efficient recovery processes are the distribution of the peptides among botanical parts and process recovery efficiency. Both recombinant proteins were distributed 62–64% in germ comprising about 8.6% of the dry grain mass; 34–38% in the endosperm comprising 84% of the dry grain mass; 1.7% in the pericarp comprising about 5% of the dry mass; and 1% in the tip-cap comprising 1.5–2% of the dry mass. The quick-germ method employed a short steeping period either in water or SO2–lactic acid solution followed by wet-milling degermination to recover a germ-rich fraction. Of the total recombinant protein expressed in germ, the quick-germ process recovered 40–43% of the total recombinant protein within 6–8% of the corn mass. The traditional corn wet-milling process produced higher purity germ but with lower recovery (24–26%) of the recombinant protein. The two quick-germ methods, using water alone or SO2–lactic acid steeping, did not substantially differ in rCI?1 recovery, and the quick-germ processes recovered germ with less leaching and proteolytic losses of the recombinant proteins than did traditional wet milling. Thus, grain fractionation enriched the recombinant proteins 6-fold higher than that of unfractionated kernels. Such enrichment may improve downstream processing efficiency and enable utilizing the protein-lean co-products to produce biofuels and biorenewable chemicals by fermenting the remaining starch-rich fractions.

Ilankovan Paraman; Steven R. Fox; Matthew T. Aspelund; Charles E. Glatz; Lawrence A. Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Influence of Planting Date on Response of Winter Wheat to Phosphorus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ie 245.7 3 .'l5 4 TH TEX A RI / B-1564 April 1987 Influence of Planting Date on Response of Winter Wheat to Phosphorus p T T Billy W. Hipp* LIBRARY JUN 1 5 1987 T ~x s A&M llniveusi Abstract Wheat is grown extensively in the Texas... Blacklands, and even though phosphorus (P) fertilization is a common practice, factors that influence the magnitude of response have not been ascertained. Field studies were conducted over a 4-year period to determine the influence of planting date...

Hipp, Billy W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Quantifying yield gaps in wheat production in Russia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop yields must increase substantially to meet the increasing demands for agricultural products. Crop yield increases are particularly important for Russia because low crop yields prevail across Russia's widespread and fertile land resources. However, reliable data are lacking regarding the spatial distribution of potential yields in Russia, which can be used to determine yield gaps. We used a crop growth model to determine the yield potentials and yield gaps of winter and spring wheat at the provincial level across European Russia. We modeled the annual yield potentials from 1995 to 2006 with optimal nitrogen supplies for both rainfed and irrigated conditions. Overall, the results suggest yield gaps of 1.51–2.10 t ha?1, or 44–52% of the yield potential under rainfed conditions. Under irrigated conditions, yield gaps of 3.14–3.30 t ha?1, or 62–63% of the yield potential, were observed. However, recurring droughts cause large fluctuations in yield potentials under rainfed conditions, even when the nitrogen supply is optimal, particularly in the highly fertile black soil areas of southern European Russia. The highest yield gaps (up to 4 t ha?1) under irrigated conditions were detected in the steppe areas in southeastern European Russia along the border of Kazakhstan. Improving the nutrient and water supply and using crop breeds that are adapted to the frequent drought conditions are important for reducing yield gaps in European Russia. Our regional assessment helps inform policy and agricultural investors and prioritize research that aims to increase crop production in this important region for global agricultural markets.

Florian Schierhorn; Monireh Faramarzi; Alexander V Prishchepov; Friedrich J Koch; Daniel Müller

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software - Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 On this page you'll find information about the Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 qualified computer software (www.buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings (www.buildings.energy.gov/commercial/). Date Documentation Received by DOE: 14 August 2007 Statements in quotes are from the software developer. Internal Revenue Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations Notice 2006-52, Section 6 requirements (1) The name, address, and (if applicable) web site of the software developer; Green Building Studio, Inc. 444 Tenth Street, Suite 300 Santa Rosa, California 95401

384

Influence of drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes of corn kernels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of air drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes were investigated for corn kernels dried between 54 °C and 130 °C. It was observed that when the drying temperature increases, the starch yield drops significantly. The gluten recovered increased abruptly for drying temperatures up to 80 °C. The albumin, globulin and zein solubility indexes decreased continuously when corn drying temperatures increased. According to the temperatures used, the starch yield, the gluten recovered and the salt-soluble proteins solubility indexes were adjusted satisfactorily by using a two asymptotic logistic model. This model has the advantage of supplying information on the dynamic of the variation of described parameters. The solubility index of total salt-soluble proteins was shown to be a suitable indicator of the severity of the drying treatment in regard to the corn wet-milling performance.

Paul Malumba; Sébastien Janas; Thaddée Masimango; Mariane Sindic; Claude Deroanne; François Béra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",2.8,1.1,86.8,37.8 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0.7,0.7,"X",0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,"X",0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",1.2,1.2,"X",44.1

386

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion to Increase the Net Energy Balance of Corn Grain Ethanol ... However, the calculation did not include the energetic costs to physically replace the evaporator with the integrated digester system (this will be a relatively small fraction of the energy input because the percentage of energy input per unit of ethanol energy output for construction of the entire conventional dry mill is 0.2% (4)); the improved quality in animal feed (DDG vs DDGS); nor the available waste heat from circumventing thin stillage evaporation. ...

Matthew T. Agler; Marcelo L. Garcia; Eric S. Lee; Martha Schlicher; Largus T. Angenent

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Effect of Rock Phosphate Upon the Corn Possibility of Phosphoric Acid of the Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Veterinary Medicine, A. and M. College of Texas. **In cooperation with United Statee Department of Agriculture. THE EFFECT OF ROCK PHOSPHATE UPON THE CORN POS- SIBILITY OF PHOSPHORIC ACID OF THE SOIL. In connection vith oil-fertilit~ stuclies..., it is important to lcnow the relation between the effect of the phosphoric acid of the rock phosphate on crops and the phosphoric acid that can be withdrawn from the soil by crops. The phosphoric acid of rock phosphate is readily soluble in K/5 nitric acid...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn }~bride and 3 spacings~ Teapleo ~b14 Tease Tesas 28 Texas 26 . hybrid I'. san . 05 level ul*. iu, Ve3 V. 4 Q ~ 2 8. 6 gal ~ 7 57o 5 5 q. 6 57. 1 43+4 54. 4 4. 3 89, 2 87. 1 x4. 3 88e7 92+4 n. s. 2 12 inches 18 inches 24... of variance of grain yields at Tyler. Source of variation Degrees of freedom sums of uares Nean uares Total Spacings (5) Replications (k) Error A Varieties (V) carp. vs. Texas hybrids Texas 26 vs. Texas 28 a 30 Texas 28 vs, Texas 30 V x 5...

Martelino, Rafael Agcaoili

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

The effect of seed source on some agronomic and genetic characters of five Texas corn hybrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hybrids in bushels of shelled corn per acre 12 3. Analysis of variance of source yields 4. Analysis of variance of hybrid yields 12 12 5. Correlation and regression of emergence percentages with germination percentages 14 6. Average plant heights... in harvesting and seed processing. Neal (4) has found that the average actual loss of vigor of F2 plants as represented by yield is 29. 5V. for single-cross hybrids. He also states that "the stalks and leaves of the advanced generations (of single...

Douglas, Alvin Gene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Influence of Genetic Background on Anthocyanin and Co-Pigment Profile and Stability of Colored Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these compounds in a limited set of samples (De la Parra et al., 2007; Del Pozo-Insfran 3 et al., 2006; Mora-Rochin et al., 2010). However, no studies have investigated the potential impact of anthocyanin and co-pigment composition on stability of color..., the anthocyanin losses in blue corn were found to further increase when the raw kernels were processed into nixtamal, tortillas, and chips (losses of 37%, 54%, and 75%, respectively) (Del Pozo-Insfran et al., 2006). This and other studies suggest...

Collison, Amy Elizabeth

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

GMOs in animal agriculture: time to consider both costs and benefits in regulatory evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

81%), corn (35%), and canola (30%) crops grown globally areGE corn, soybean, cotton, canola, wheat, potato, alfalfa,Soybeans Maize (Corn) Cotton Canola Page 9 of 14 animal feed

Van Eenennaam, Alison L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Wheat export restrictions and domestic market effects in Russia and Ukraine during the food crisis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies investigating the effects of wheat export controls on the domestic market in the exporting country itself are scarce. This paper analyses the domestic market impact of wheat export controls in Russia and Ukraine during the 2007/2008 global food crisis within a spatial price transmission approach. Using a Markov-switching vector error-correction model, we contrast our estimation for Russia and Ukraine with Germany and the USA, two countries that did not intervene in their wheat export markets. An explicit “crisis” regime during times of export controls is exclusively identified for Russia and Ukraine. We find that export restrictions temporarily reduced the degree of integration of Russian and Ukrainian domestic markets in world wheat markets, which pushed the growers prices below their long-run equilibrium level. Further, domestic markets were disconnected from their equilibrium and market instability increased. These effects were even more pronounced and long lasting in Ukraine (export quota) than in Russia (export tax). The negative market effects discouraged private investors, thereby preventing Russia and Ukraine from maximizing their grain potential and contributing to global food security.

Linde Götz; Thomas Glauben; Bernhard Brümmer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Multielemental Fingerprinting as a Tool for Authentication of Organic Wheat, Barley, Faba Bean, and Potato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multielemental Fingerprinting as a Tool for Authentication of Organic Wheat, Barley, Faba Bean, and Potato ... Potato peels were also manually removed by a ceramic peeler on selected subsamples to allow comparison with automatically peeled potatoes. ... Analysis of automatically and manually peeled potatoes as well as potato peels confirmed that the automatic peeling process did not induce any systematic and significant contamination. ...

Kristian H. Laursen; Jan K. Schjoerring; Jørgen E. Olesen; Margrethe Askegaard; Ulrich Halekoh; Søren Husted

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Ph1 Locus Suppresses Cdk2-Type Activity during Premeiosis and Meiosis in Wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leading to a more open chromatin structure (Hale et al., 2006). This in turn leads to...capillary temperature of 200C, no sheath gas was used, and the source voltage and focusing...polyploid wheat. Nature 439 : 749-752. Hale, T.K. , Contreras, A., Morrison...

Emma Greer; Azahara C. Martín; Ali Pendle; Isabelle Colas; Alexandra M.E. Jones; Graham Moore; Peter Shaw

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Quantitative trait loci(qtl) analysis of yield components and heat tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to identify and map QTLs for yield components and heat tolerance of wheat in response to two kinds of heat treatment (short term-and long term-heat treatment) during seed formation in a set of 62 RILs derived from a cross...

Do, Jung Hwa

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Seeding rate and seed size as management techniques for ryegrass (Lolium Multiflorum, Lam) in winter wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ______________________________ _____________________________ Harry Cralle James M. Chandler (Chair of Committee) (Member) ______________________________ _____________________________ Rodney W. Bovey Mark A. Hussey... of wheat in either year. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to gratefully acknowledge my graduate student committee: Dr. Harry Cralle, Dr. James Chandler, and Dr. Rodney Bovey. Their continued support and direction made...

Cook, Casey Lee

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Resistance to Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis is conferred by Pch2 in wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 289 cM, respectively) that was equivalent in location to that for resistance to O. yallundae (LOD = 13Resistance to Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis is conferred by Pch2 in wheat K. L of seedling plants, evidence of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) conferring resistance to O. acuformis

Murray, Timothy D.

399

Effect of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculated on the total batch moist basis. Table 7 gives the retention data along with the pH values before cooking for corn bread, pone and spoonbread, and af- ter cooking for mush and grits. The data in Table 7 indicate that pH of batter has a bear... by the five groups of corn breads which contained from 84 to 89 percent of the content of this vitamin in the corresponding batters. The variation within the groups was greater than between the groups, the respective mean squares being 19.98 and 5...

Whitacre, Jessie; Pace, June K.; Thomas, Kathreen

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus: Effect of Strain A On Corn Inbreds, Single- and Double-Cross Hybrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. '. .,~. k ? -. MAIZE DWARF MOSAIC VIRUS: EFFECT OF STRAIN A ON CORN INBREDS, SINGLE- AND DOUBLE-CROSS HYBRIDS R. W. Toler, A.J. Bockholt and F. G. Alston* *Respectively, Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, Associate Professor, and Graduate... significantly affected the performance of the hybrid. MAIZE DWARF MOSAIC VIRUS: EFFECT OF STRAIN A ON CORN INBREDS, SINGLE- AND DOUBLE-CROSS HYBRIDS R. W. Toler, A.J. Bockho1t and F. G. Alston INTRODUCTION Maize dwarf mosaic virus strain A (MDMV...

Toler, R.W.; Bockholt, A.J.; Alston, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparative feeding value of a cubed alfalfa:corn plant product as an exclusive diet for exercising horses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPARATIVE FEEDING VALUE OF A CUBED ALFALFA:CORN PLANT PRODUCT AS AN EXCLUSIVE DIET FOR EXERCISING HORSES A Thesis by GEORGIA ANN YOUNGLOVE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Animal Science COMPARATIVE FEEDING VALUE OF A CUBED ALFALFA:CORN PLANT PRODUCT AS AN EXCLUSIVE DIET FOR EXERCISING HORSES A Thesis by GEORGIA ANN YOUNGLOVE Approved as to style...

Younglove, Georgia Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Population dynamics and within field distribution of the greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), and its parasitoids in Central Texas winter wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

along field perrmeter and within fteld interior of winter wheat during 1979-80 in A) Jonah, B) Elgin, C) Snook 58 7 Linear regression of log (variance) x log (mean) for Sh*ph'g'(Rd). Rhp)*'php*d'(4) and mummtfied greenbug from wtnter wheat samples... of the Greenbug, Schtzaphts Gramtnum (Rondani), and Its Parasitoids in Central Texas Winter Wheat. (December 1981) Timothy J. Kring, B. A. , Quinniptac College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr, Frank E. Gilstrap A study was conducted to describe...

Kring, T. J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Synergistic Enhancement of Cellobiohydrolase Performance on Pretreated Corn Stover by Addition of Xylanase and Esterase Activities  

SciTech Connect

Significant increases in the depolymerization of corn stover cellulose by cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Trichoderma reesei were observed using small quantities of non-cellulolytic cell wall-degrading enzymes. Purified endoxylanase (XynA), ferulic acid esterase (FaeA), and acetyl xylan esterase (Axe1) all enhanced Cel7A performance on corn stover subjected to hot water pretreatment. In all cases, the addition of these activities improved the effectiveness of the enzymatic hydrolysis in terms of the quantity of cellulose converted per milligram of total protein. Improvement in cellobiose release by the addition of the non-cellulolytic enzymes ranged from a 13-84% increase over Cel7A alone. The most effective combinations included the addition of both XynA and Axe1, which synergistically enhance xylan conversions resulting in additional synergistic improvements in glucan conversion. Additionally, we note a direct relationship between enzymatic xylan removal in the presence of XynA and the enhancement of cellulose hydrolysis by Cel7A.

Selig, M. J.; Knoshaug E. P.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality  

SciTech Connect

Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Impact of Cell Wall Acetylation on Corn Stover Hydrolysis by Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of variously pretreated corn stover samples showed neutral to mildly acidic pretreatments were more effective at removing xylan from corn stover and more likely to maintain the acetyl to xylopyranosyl ratios present in untreated material than were alkaline treatments. Retention of acetyl groups in the residual solids resulted in greater resistance to hydrolysis by endoxylanase alone, although the synergistic combination of endoxylanase and acetyl xylan esterase enzymes permitted higher xylan conversions to be observed. Acetyl xylan esterase alone did little to improve hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes, although a direct relationship was observed between the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups and improvements in the enzymatic conversion of xylan present in substrates. In all cases, effective xylan conversions were found to significantly improve glucan conversions achievable by cellulolytic enzymes. Additionally, acetyl and xylan removal not only enhanced the respective initial rates of xylan and glucan conversion, but also the overall extents of conversion. This work emphasizes the necessity for xylanolytic enzymes during saccharification processes and specifically for the optimization of acetyl esterase and xylanase synergies when biomass processes include milder pretreatments, such as hot water or sulfite steam explosion.

Selig, M. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Feasibility study of a corn-to-ethanol plant in Sardis, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study for a corn-to-ethanol plant in Panola County, Mississippi was carried out. This area is well suited for the production of ethanol from corn, as it has a mild climate, a plentiful supply of wood fuel, and a well-developed agricultural infrastructure. The project was designed for 5 million gallons per year, using the ACR Process, a process proven in 6 plants now operating. It was determined to be technically feasible for this size. However, without a state financial incentive such as a gasoline excise tax or sales tax exemption, the plant is not economically feasible in Mississippi. Even though a 4 cents per gallon federal excise tax exemption will likely remain, the economics without any other incentive are not strong enough to obtain financing or equity funds. While the Mississippi legislature decided not to consider a financial incentive in their 1982 session, an attempt will be made to introduce a proposal for a suitable exemption during the 1983 legislative session. Until then, the project is on hold.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Regeneration of asymmetric somatic hybrid plants from the fusion of two types of wheat with Russian wildrye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two types of protoplasts of wheat (Triticum aestivum...L. cv. Jinan 177) were used in fusion experiments—cha9, with a high division frequency ... 176, with a high regeneration frequency. The fusion combination of...

Cuiling Li; Guangmin Xia; Fengning Xiang; Chuanen Zhou; Aixia Cheng

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Decisions to reduce greenhouse gases from agriculture and product transport: LCA case study of organic and conventional wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A streamlined hybrid life cycle assessment is conducted to compare the global warming potential (GWP) and primary energy use of conventional and organic wheat production and delivery in the US. Impact differences from agricultural inputs, grain farming, and transport processes are estimated. The GWP of a 1 kg loaf of organic wheat bread is about 30 g CO2-eq less than the conventional loaf. When organic wheat is shipped 420 km farther to market, organic and conventional wheat systems have similar impacts. These results can change dramatically depending on soil carbon accumulation and nitrous oxide emissions from the two systems. Key parameters and their variability are discussed to provide producers, wholesale and retail consumers, and policymakers metrics to align their decisions with low-carbon objectives.

Kyle Meisterling; Constantine Samaras; Vanessa Schweizer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Biolistic and agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of immature and mature embryos of spring wheat cultivar Saratovskaya-29  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well. The primary objective of this study was to use the callus-based transformation procedures mentioned above with a non-model cultivar of hexaploid spring wheat Saratovskaya-29, widely grown in Kazakhstan, to test the genotype dependence...

Kopbayev, Arman A.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Rapid Genome Divergence at Orthologous Low Molecular Weight Glutenin Loci of the A and Am Genomes of Wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of hexaploid wheat, Chinese Spring (Sears, 1966), and Langdon/Chinese Spring substitution lines in which...substituted by the Chinese Spring D genome homologs (Joppa and...assembled using the Phrap assembly engine (version 0.990319 provided...

Thomas Wicker; Nabila Yahiaoui; Romain Guyot; Edith Schlagenhauf; Zhong-Da Liu; Jorge Dubcovsky; Beat Keller

2003-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

4-(Methylnitrosamino)-I-(3-Pyridyl)-1-Butanone Enhances the Expression of Apolipoprotein A-I and Clara Cell 17-kDa Protein in the Lung Proteomes of Rats Fed a Corn Oil Diet but not a Fish Oil Diet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the pI fraction of 5.4 to 5.7 Peak Peak area (106) Fish oil Corn oil Fish oil + NNK Corn oil + NNK...5.2, P = 0.05], where corn oil exhibited greater overall peaks compared to fish oil. Post hoc tests revealed corn oil + NNK-treated...

Sung Il Chang; Karam El-Bayoumy; Indu Sinha; Neil Trushin; Bruce Stanley; Brian Pittman; and Bogdan Prokopczyk

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Experiences from a Novel Sensor for Fireside Corrosion Monitoring during Grate Combustion of Corn Stover/Wood Chip Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operation of a pilot-scale online corrosion sensor system was studied at VTT’s 100 kW grate pilot plant. The feedstock composition in tests was varied from 100% wood chips to a blend that also contained 40 en-% d.b. corn stover. The mass flow of ...

Timo J. Leino; Martti J. Aho; S. Juhani Gynther; Tommi A. Ruuskanen; Matti H. Häkkinen

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

415

Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Evaluation of energy systems in corn and barley based diets and an enzyme complex in broiler chicks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Twenty mash diets from 5 ingredients (corn, soybean meal, pro-plus, barley and...2...). At 0 d of age and 21d of age, 5 birds per floor pen were randomly collected to measure protein and fat gain using the Dual Energy

S. Cerrate; J. Caldas; R. Ekmay; J. England…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from Corn Stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from mass, xylan, and lignin and increases cellulose digestibility compared to batch operations at otherwise in corn stover at 180 °C. A flow rate of 10 mL/min in a 3.8-mL reactor enhanced xylan removal by about 25

California at Riverside, University of

418

Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

DeLucia, Evan H.

419

As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

Reisslein, Martin

420

Comparison of lines of corn selected on Lufkin fine sandy loam and Norwood silt loam with and without commercial fertilizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................ 62 LITERATURE CITED ............................................................................... 64 COMPAMPR TABLES Table Page 1. Yields in bushels per acre of inbred lines selected and tested under four soil environ? ments... ....................................................................................... 27 6 . Days to silk of inbred lines, selected and tested under four soil environments....................................... 31 7 . Analysis of variance of days to silk of corn inbreds grown on Lufkin and Norwood s o i l...

McAfee, Thomas Edison

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chemometric Evaluation of Adulteration Profile in Coffee Due to Corn and Husk by Determining Carbohydrates Using HPAEC-PAD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......addition of corn to coffee increases the level of glucose...concentration of arabinose increases. Greater concen- trations...ture of coffee and husk increase the concentration of...perspectives in coffee quality improve- ment. Au...of carbohydrates in wines and instant cof- fees......

Livia Maria Zambrozi Garcia; Elis Daiane Pauli; Valderi Cristiano; Carlos Alberto Paulinetti da Camara; Ieda Spacino Scarminio; Suzana Lucy Nixdorf

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner 1 , Yimin Zhang 1 , Helena Chum 2 , Robin Newmark 1 Biofuels represent an opportunity for improved sustainability of transportation fuels, promotion of rural development, and reduction of GHG emissions. But the potential for unintended consequences, such as competition for land and water, necessitates biofuel expansion that considers the complexities of resource requirements within specific contexts (e.g., technology, feedstock, supply chain, local resource availability). Through technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in

423

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVER WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. B29143; DOE WAIVER NO. W(A)-95-029 The Petitioner, Corning Incorporated, has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions made under the above cited research and development contract (R&D Contract). The objective of the R&D Contract issued by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on behalf of DP-11 is to reduce the costs associated with the manufacturing of large size high quality fused silica transmissive optics utilized in advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laser systems. The present cost of laser optics used in the ICF laser system is between $1.7/cm 3 to $2.0/cm 3 . After completion of the R&D Contract, it is believed that a 50% reduction in cost for the

424

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-05NT42344; W(A)-05-002, CH-1266 The Petitioner, Dow Coming Corporation (Dow), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products." The waiver will apply to inventions made by Dow employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop novel substrate and packaging technology for solid state lighting devices that use Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) as the

425

High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Correlating Detergent Fiber Analysis and Dietary Fiber Analysis Data for Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

There exist large amounts of detergent fiber analysis data [neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL)] for many different potential cellulosic ethanol feedstocks, since these techniques are widely used for the analysis of forages. Researchers working in the area of cellulosic ethanol are interested in the structural carbohydrates in a feedstock (principally glucan and xylan), which are typically determined by acid hydrolysis of the structural fraction after multiple extractions of the biomass. These so-called dietary fiber analysis methods are significantly more involved than detergent fiber analysis methods. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is feasible to correlate detergent fiber analysis values to glucan and xylan content determined by dietary fiber analysis methods for corn stover. In the detergent fiber analysis literature cellulose is often estimated as the difference between ADF and ADL, while hemicellulose is often estimated as the difference between NDF and ADF. Examination of a corn stover dataset containing both detergent fiber analysis data and dietary fiber analysis data predicted using near infrared spectroscopy shows that correlations between structural glucan measured using dietary fiber techniques and cellulose estimated using detergent techniques, and between structural xylan measured using dietary fiber techniques and hemicellulose estimated using detergent techniques are high, but are driven largely by the underlying correlation between total extractives measured by fiber analysis and NDF/ADF. That is, detergent analysis data is correlated to dietary fiber analysis data for structural carbohydrates, but only indirectly; the main correlation is between detergent analysis data and solvent extraction data produced during the dietary fiber analysis procedure.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Lorenz, A. J.; deLeon, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Performance of late sown wheat crop under different planting geometries and irrigation regimes in arid climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proper orientation of plants in the field and management of soil moisture for appropriate utilization of land, water and environmental resources plays a significant role in the optimum development and functioning of vital plant organs. A two factor field experiment was conducted for two consecutive crop growth seasons viz. 2006–07 and 2007–08 at Research and Demonstration Farm, Regional Agricultural Economic Development Centre (RAEDC), Vehari, Pakistan to make a comparison of four different planting geometries viz. planting in 22 cm apart rows under conventional, minimum and zero tillage, respectively and planting in 11 cm apart rows under conventional tillage system. Wheat cultivar, Inqlab-91 was planted late in December. Crop was subjected to five irrigation levels in which irrigation was applied equivalent to 120%, 100%, 80%, 60% or 40% of ETo. Lower soil bulk density and penetration resistances at 10–20 cm soil depth were recorded with conventional tillage with either narrow or wider row spacing as compared to other planting geometries. The maximum values for LAI, LAD, TDM, productive tillers (m?2), 1000-grain weight and grain yield were recorded with planting geometry having 11 cm apart rows under conventional tillage system along with irrigation level of 120% \\{ETo\\} that remained statistically at par with the same planting geometry subjected to the irrigation regime of 100% ETo. This planting geometry also resulted in minimum weed fresh biomass. It is concluded that late planted wheat crop planted in 11 cm wide rows under conventional tillage irrigated @ 100% \\{ETo\\} may serve as an appropriate technology for enhancing the wheat productivity of late sown wheat crop under limited water supplies.

Hakoomat Ali; Nadeem Iqbal; Shakeel Ahmad; Ahmad Naeem Shahzad; Naeem Sarwar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Effects of phenanthrene on seed germination and some physiological activities of wheat seedling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the highly persistent organic pollutants, and they are toxic to plants and other living organisms, including human beings. To analyze the response of higher plant to PAHs, we investigated the effects of phenanthrene (PHE) on seed germination and various physiological changes of wheat seedlings. Specifically, we investigated growth, chlorophyll content, lipid peroxidation (LPO), activities of antioxidant enzymes and H2O2 accumulation. The results showed that PHE inhibited seed germination, affected the growth and chlorophyll level of wheat seedlings. Furthermore, PHE elevated the levels of LPO and induced H2O2 accumulation in leaf tissues in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by the changes in the antioxidant status. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), displayed a decreasing trend with the increasing of PHE concentration. The results indicated that PHE could exert oxidative damages in the early development stage of wheat and the harmfulness occurred mainly in samples with higher concentrations of PHE.

Haiying Wei; Shanjuan Song; Hongling Tian; Ting Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock  

SciTech Connect

For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag’s ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Direct enzymatic extraction of starch from corn as an energy saving alternative to production of high fructose syrup. Final executive report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to study, test, and demonstrate a process of producing high-fructose corn syrup and protein byproducts from dry milled corn as an energy conserving alternative of the current industrial corn wet-milling process. This final report is divided into 5 sections. Section 1 deals with the process which is the main and, indeed, the final product of the energy conservation study. Section 2 deals with protein Extraction which conditions the dry-milled corn before hydrolysis. Section 3 deals with the analytical technique of GPC developed with the alpha-amylase hydrolysis of starch. Section 4 deals with immobilized glucoamylase hydrolysis. Section 5 deals with the recovery of soluble protein by ion-exchange resins. Each section has been abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Response to partial replacement of yellow corn with potato processing waste as non-traditional source of energy on the productive performance of Ossimi lambs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Twenty-one male growing lambs aged 6 months with an average weight 27.6 ± 0.24 kg were used to determine the effects of partial replacing yellow corn with potato processing waste (PPW) on ... diets containing PPW...

Hamed A. A. Omer; Soha S. Abdel-Magid…

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effects of salt stress on photosynthesis, PSII photochemistry and thermal energy dissipation in leaves of two corn (Zea mays L.) varieties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of four different NaCl concentrations (from 0 to 102 mM NaCl) on seedlings leaves of two corn (Zea mays L.) varieties (Aristo and Arper) was investigated through chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence parame...

H. Hichem; A. El Naceur; D. Mounir

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Synoptic Circulation and Land Surface Influences on Convection in the Midwest U.S. “Corn Belt” during the Summers of 1999 and 2000. Part I: Composite Synoptic Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt, the 1999 and 2000 summer seasons (15 June–15 September) expressed contrasting spatial patterns and magnitudes of precipitation (1999: dry; 2000: normal to moist). Distinct from the numerical modeling approach often ...

Andrew M. Carleton; David L. Arnold; David J. Travis; Steve Curran; Jimmy O. Adegoke

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Productive Energy of Corn Meal, Alfalfa Leaf Meal, Dried Buttermilk, Casein, Cottonseed Meal, and Tankage as Measured by Production of Fat and Flesh by Growing Chickens.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LTBRARY, ' A 8c M COLLEGE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER. DIRECTOR. College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 600 PRODUCTIVE ENERGY OF CORN MEAL, ALFALF LEAF MEAL, DRIED BUTTERMILK, CASEIN, COT- TONSEED... reported, it was found that the productive energy of a primary mixed ration for production of fat and flesh on growing chicks was 278 calories per 100 grams of effec- tive digestible nutrients. The ration used was composed of 51 per cent yellow corn...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers  

SciTech Connect

The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

Cozar, O. [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania)] [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania); Filip, C.; Tripon, C. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cioica, N.; Co?a, C.; Nagy, E. M. [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

Effect of reducing amino acid excess in a corn-soybean meal diet on performance, nitrogen balance and nutrient digestibilities of growing pigs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING PIGS A Thesis by KATHERINE ANN KELLY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIFNT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING...

Kelly, Katherine Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

Effect of plant populations and row spacings on plant and ear characters and grain yield of corn hybrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased linearly with increased population. Lodging increased approximately 2. 4X for each increase of 4, 000 ppa. (9, 884 pph. ). Stalk diameter showed a linear decrease with increasing populations which accounts for the increase in stalk breaking... (47) studied effect of corn population densities ranging from 2, 700 to 283, 00 ppa. They concluded that popu- lation density had no discernible effect on the root percentage. The maximum LAI (LAI = 20) was obtained from the densest population which...

Silapapun, Anek

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation’s First Plant to Use Corn Waste as a Feedstock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

POET-DSM’s Project LIBERTY in Emmetsburg, Iowa, will celebrate its grand opening September 3, 2014, becoming the first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant to use corn waste as a feedstock. Developed through a joint venture between POET LLC in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and DSM Royal, a Dutch enzyme manufacturer, the project uses biochemical conversion technologies (yeast and enzymes) to convert cellulosic biomass into transportation fuels.

439

Evaluation of protein fractionation and ruminal and intestinal digestibility of corn milling co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel corn milling co-products developed from technological advancements in ethanol production vary widely in chemical composition and nutrient availability. The objectives of this study were to characterize feed protein fractions and evaluate differences in rumen-undegradable protein (RUP) and its digestible fraction (dRUP), amino acid concentration, and in vitro gas production of 7 corn milling co-products. The crude protein (CP; % of dry matter) of co-products was 12.7 for germ, 26.9 for dried distillers grains plus solubles that had no heat exposure before fermentation (DDGS1), 45.4 for high-protein dried distillers grains (HPDDG), 12.7 for bran, 30.2 for wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS), 23.1 for wet corn gluten feed (WCGF), and 26.0 for dried distillers grains plus solubles that had heat exposure before fermentation (DDGS2). Two ruminally and duodenally fistulated Holstein steers weighing 663 ± 24 kg were used to determine RUP and dRUP with the in situ and mobile bag techniques. Samples of each feed were ruminally incubated for 16 h, and mobile bags were exposed to simulated abomasal digestion before insertion into the duodenum and subsequent collection in the feces. Protein fractions A, B1, B2, B3, and C were characterized as follows (% CP): germ = 30.0, 15.0, 38.1, 13.5, 3.4; DDGS1 = 17.0, 7.0, 67.0, 4.8, 4.2; HPDDG = 7.4, 0.6, 82.4, 8.8, 0.8; bran = 33.5, 4.0, 54.3, 6.0, 2.2; WDGS = 18.6, 2.4, 53.1, 11.0, 14.9; WCGF = 36.6, 15.9, 33.2, 10.1, 4.1; and DDGS2 = 17.9, 2.1, 41.1, 11.1, 27.9. The proportions of RUP and dRUP were different and are reported as follows (% CP): DDGS2 = 56.3, 91.9; HPDDG = 55.2, 97.7; WDGS = 44.7, 93.1; DDGS1 = 33.2, 92.1; bran = 20.7, 65.8; germ = 16.5, 66.8; and WCGF = 11.5, 51.1. The concentrations of Lys and Met in the RUP were different and are listed as follows (% CP): germ = 2.9, 2.0; DDGS1 = 1.9, 2.0; HPDDG = 2.0, 3.2; bran = 3.2, 1.5; WDGS = 1.9, 2.3; WCGF = 3.5, 1.6; and DDGS2 = 1.9, 2.4. In vitro gas production (mL/48 h) was highest for germ (52.1) followed by bran (50.1), WDGS (40.7), DDGS2 (40.1), WCGF (39.0), DDGS1 (38.6), and HPDDG (37.5). Comparison of co-products defined differences in chemical composition, protein fractionation, ruminal availability, and microbial fermentation.

J.M. Kelzer; P.J. Kononoff; L.O. Tedeschi; T.C. Jenkins; K. Karges; M.L. Gibson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

G-Plus report to Owens Corning-thermal conductivity Measurements of Fiberglass  

SciTech Connect

Fiberglass made by Owens Corning is being used in noise reduction of automobile exhaust system. Specifically, the glass fibers are packed inside the muffler to achieve the desired acoustic effect. A secondary benefit of the fibers is to serve as a thermal insulation. Because of this insulating property, the glass fibers can serve to reduce the temperature of the muffler shell. This in turn reduces the need for heat shields around mufflers and reduces the amount of exterior temperature accelerated corrosion of the muffler shell, especially in the winter ''salt belts'' where large amounts of salt are placed on highways to minimize the safety impact of snow and ice. In addition, for some applications the use of the fiberglass could allow the use of lighter weight carbon based polymer composite materials in place of steel for muffler shells. However, in order to properly design exhaust systems without heat shields or to take advantage of new materials, the thermal conductivity of the fiberglass material at operating temperatures (for some applications above 750 C) must be known. We selected two types of Owens Corning glass fibers, 17 {micro}m and 24 {micro}m in diameter, for this study. There are some room temperature thermal conductivity data for the fiberglass, but high temperature data are not available. Based on the thermal radiation model, thermal conductivity should increase rapidly at high temperature, providing less thermal insulation. In addition, thermal conductivity depends on packing density of the glass fibers. We will study the effect of packing density on thermal conductivity. Another issue is that the glass fiber conducts heat better along the fiber, while the conduction across the fibers is poor, because thermal conduction from one fiber to another has to go through an interface with thermal resistance. In fiberglass, most fibers are not in good contact with the surrounding fibers, thus, most heat transfer is dependent on the thermal radiation effect. Among the many methods of measuring thermal conductivity, only a few can be used for glass fibers. The traditional heat flow meter is used in testing thermal insulations near room temperature. At higher temperatures this method cannot be used due to material and instrument limitations. Our plan is to use a transient plane source (TPS) method to measure thermal conductivity directly. The advantage of the TPS method is that measurements can be taken at over 700 C, and covers the temperature of the automobile exhausts. The following is a report for the G-Plus project conducted at ORNL to apply the TPS method to characterizing the thermal conductivity of two types of fiberglass and also the effect of packing density.

Wang, H

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Table 2 -Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN.7 Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2000 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 1999 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NC OH SD TX WI

Kammen, Daniel M.

442

Synthesis and characterization of NaMt biocomposites with corn cob xylan in aqueous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study synthesis and characterization of biopolymer/clay biocomposites was aimed using naturally occurring polysaccharide (xylan) as biopolymer and montmorillonite type clay (NaMt). Xylan was extracted from corn cobs via alkaline oxidative treatment. Maximum solubility of xylan was determined as 1% (w/v) in water at room temperature. Thus synthesis was realized following two routes; first NaMt concentration was kept constant at 2.0 × 10?2 g/ml and xylan concentration was changed. Latter xylan concentration was kept constant at 1.0 × 10?2 g/ml and NaMt concentration was changed. Natural xylan, NaMt and biocomposites were examined in terms of their spectral, electrokinetic, rheologic, morphologic and thermal properties. Results showed that lower amounts of xylan interacted with NaMt on the surface, however, when the xylan amount was increased also intercalation of NaMt has occurred. Biocomposites showed better thermal and rheologic behaviors with respect to the starting materials.

Cüneyt H. Ünlü; Ebru Günister; Oya At?c?

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To explore the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates financial and emissions accounting for dry-mill corn ethanol plants. Three policy options are modeled: (1) a charge per unit of life cycle CO2 emissions, (2) a charge per unit of direct biorefinery emissions only, and (3) a low carbon fuel standard (LCFS). A CO2 charge on life cycle emissions increases production costs by between $0.005 and $0.008 l?1 per $10 Mg?1 CO2 price increment, across all modeled plant energy systems, with increases under direct emissions somewhat lower in all cases. In contrast, a LCFS increases the cost of production for selected plant energy systems only: a LCFS requiring reductions in average fuel global warming intensity (GWI) with a target of 10% below the 2005 baseline increases the production costs for coal-fired plants only. For all other plant types, the LCFS operates as a subsidy. The findings depend strongly on the magnitude of a land use change adder. Some land use change adders currently discussed in the literature will push the GWI of all modeled production systems above the LCFS target, flipping the CO2 price from a subsidy to a tax.

R J Plevin; S Mueller

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of ethanol from corn, sugarcane and cellulosic biomass for US use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, bioethanol is the largest volume biofuel used in the transportation sector, with corn-based ethanol production occurring mostly in the US and sugarcane-based ethanol production occurring mostly in Brazil. Advances in technology and the resulting improved productivity in corn and sugarcane farming and ethanol conversion, together with biofuel policies, have contributed to the significant expansion of ethanol production in the past 20 years. These improvements have increased the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of using bioethanol as opposed to using petroleum gasoline. This article presents results from our most recently updated simulations of energy use and GHG emissions that result from using bioethanol made from several feedstocks. The results were generated with the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model. In particular, based on a consistent and systematic model platform, we estimate life-cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions from using ethanol produced from five feedstocks: corn, sugarcane, corn stover, switchgrass and miscanthus.We quantitatively address the impacts of a few critical factors that affect life-cycle GHG emissions from bioethanol. Even when the highly debated land use change GHG emissions are included, changing from corn to sugarcane and then to cellulosic biomass helps to significantly increase the reductions in energy use and GHG emissions from using bioethanol. Relative to petroleum gasoline, ethanol from corn, sugarcane, corn stover, switchgrass and miscanthus can reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 19–48%, 40–62%, 90–103%, 77–97% and 101–115%, respectively. Similar trends have been found with regard to fossil energy benefits for the five bioethanol pathways.

Michael Wang; Jeongwoo Han; Jennifer B Dunn; Hao Cai; Amgad Elgowainy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effects of Tillage Practices on Water Consumption, Water Use Efficiency and Grain Yield in Wheat Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Water shortage is a serious issue threatening the sustainable development of agriculture in the North China Plain, with the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as its largest water-consuming crop. The effects of tillage practices on the water consumption and water use efficiency (WUE) of wheat under high-yield conditions using supplemental irrigation based on testing soil moisture dynamic change were examined in this study. This experiment was conducted from 2007 to 2010, with five tillage practice treatments, namely, strip rotary tillage (SR), strip rotary tillage after subsoiling (SRS), rotary tillage (R), rotary tillage after subsoiling (RS), and plowing tillage (P). The results showed that in the SRS and RS treatments the total water and soil water consumptions were 11.81, 25.18% and 12.16, 14.75% higher than those in SR and R treatments, respectively. The lowest ratio of irrigation consumption to total water consumption in the SRS treatment was 18.53 and 21.88% for the 2008–2009 and 2009–2010 growing seasons, respectively. However, the highest percentage of water consumption was found in the SRS treatment from anthesis to maturity. No significant difference was found between the WUE of the flag leaf at the later filling stage in the SRS and RS treatments, but the flag leaf WUE at these stages were higher than those of other treatments. The SRS and RS treatments exhibited the highest grain yield (9573.76 and 9507.49 kg ha?1 for 3-yr average) with no significant difference between the two treatments, followed by P, R and SR treatments. But the SRS treatment had the highest WUE. Thus, the 1-yr subsoiling tillage, plus 2 yr of strip rotary planting operation may be an efficient measure to increase wheat yield and WUE.

Cheng-yan ZHENG; Zhen-wen YU; Yu SHI; Shi-ming CUI; Dong WANG; Yong-li ZHANG; Jun-ye ZHAO

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background Maternal diet during pregnancy may affect childhood allergy and asthma. Objective We sought to examine the associations between maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during early pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. Methods We studied 1277 mother-child pairs from a US prebirth cohort unselected for any disease. Using food frequency questionnaires administered during the first and second trimesters, we assessed maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during pregnancy. In mid-childhood (mean age, 7.9 years), we assessed food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis by questionnaire and serum-specific IgE levels. We examined the associations between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We also examined the cross-sectional associations between specific food allergies, asthma, and atopic conditions in mid-childhood. Results Food allergy was common (5.6%) in mid-childhood, as was sensitization to at least 1 food allergen (28.0%). Higher maternal peanut intake (each additional z score) during the first trimester was associated with 47% reduced odds of peanut allergic reaction (odds ratio [OR], 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.94). Higher milk intake during the first trimester was associated with reduced asthma (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) and allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97). Higher maternal wheat intake during the second trimester was associated with reduced atopic dermatitis (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.90). Peanut, wheat, and soy allergy were each cross-sectionally associated with increased childhood asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis (ORs, 3.6 to 8.1). Conclusion Higher maternal intake of peanut, milk, and wheat during early pregnancy was associated with reduced odds of mid-childhood allergy and asthma.

Supinda Bunyavanich; Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman; Thomas A. Platts-Mills; Lisa Workman; Joanne E. Sordillo; Carlos A. Camargo Jr.; Matthew W. Gillman; Diane R. Gold; Augusto A. Litonjua

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The effect of varying degrees of infection of wheat stem rust and of oat smuts on yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY A A M COLLEGE OF TEXX'8 THE EFFECT OF VARYING DEGREES OF INFECTION OF WHEAT STEM RUST AND OF OAT SMUTS ON YIELDS A Thesis by WILEY NATHAN GARRETT Submitted. to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... in Partial fulfillment of the requirements i' or the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1958 Major Sub/cot: Plant Pathology THE EFFECT OF VARYING DEGREES OF INJECT10N QF WHEAT STEM RUST AND OF OAT SNHS ON YIELDS A Thesis by WILEY NATHAN GARRETT...

Garrett, Wiley Nathan

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Winter wheat yield forecasting in Ukraine based on Earth observation, meteorological data and biophysical models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ukraine is one of the most developed agriculture countries and one of the biggest crop producers in the world. Timely and accurate crop yield forecasts for Ukraine at regional level become a key element in providing support to policy makers in food security. In this paper, feasibility and relative efficiency of using moderate resolution satellite data to winter wheat forecasting in Ukraine at oblast level is assessed. Oblast is a sub-national administrative unit that corresponds to the NUTS2 level of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) of the European Union. NDVI values were derived from the MODIS sensor at the 250 m spatial resolution. For each oblast NDVI values were averaged for a cropland map (Rainfed croplands class) derived from the ESA GlobCover map, and were used as predictors in the regression models. Using a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure, the best time for making reliable yield forecasts in terms of root mean square error was identified. For most oblasts, NDVI values taken in April–May provided the minimum RMSE value when comparing to the official statistics, thus enabling forecasts 2–3 months prior to harvest. The NDVI-based approach was compared to the following approaches: empirical model based on meteorological observations (with forecasts in April–May that provide minimum RMSE value) and WOFOST crop growth simulation model implemented in the CGMS system (with forecasts in June that provide minimum RMSE value). All three approaches were run to produce winter wheat yield forecasts for independent datasets for 2010 and 2011, i.e. on data that were not used within model calibration process. The most accurate predictions for 2010 were achieved using the CGMS system with the RMSE value of 0.3 t ha?1 in June and 0.4 t ha?1 in April, while performance of three approaches for 2011 was almost the same (0.5–0.6 t ha?1 in April). Both NDVI-based approach and CGMS system overestimated winter wheat yield comparing to official statistics in 2010, and underestimated it in 2011. Therefore, we can conclude that performance of empirical NDVI-based regression model was similar to meteorological and CGMS models when producing winter wheat yield forecasts at oblast level in Ukraine 2–3 months prior to harvest, while providing minimum requirements to input datasets.

Felix Kogan; Nataliia Kussul; Tatiana Adamenko; Sergii Skakun; Oleksii Kravchenko; Oleksii Kryvobok; Andrii Shelestov; Andrii Kolotii; Olga Kussul; Alla Lavrenyuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

EIS-0407: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0407: Final Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas DOE's Proposed Action is to provide federal funding to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC (Abengoa Bioenergy) to support the design, construction, and startup of a commercial-scale integrated biorefinery to be located near the city of Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas. If DOE decides to provide federal funding, it would negotiate an agreement with Abengoa Bioenergy to provide up to $71 million, subject to annual appropriations, of the total anticipated cost of approximately $685 million (2009 dollars). The biorefinery would use lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover, wheat straw) as feedstock to produce ethanol and biopower (electricity)

451

EIS-0407: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: Record of Decision 7: Record of Decision EIS-0407: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC for the Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas (October 2011) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its decision to issue a $134 million loan guarantee under Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC (Abengoa) for construction and start-up of a cellulosic ethanol plant near Hugoton, Kansas (Project). The integrated biorefinery will use a combination of biomass feedstocks, such as corn stover and wheat straw, to produce cellulosic ethanol and to generate sufficient electricity to power the facility. The Project site comprises approximately 810 acres of

452

The outlook for crops (and biofuels and policy and...)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jarrett Whistance Jarrett Whistance EIA Biofuels Workshop 20 March 2013  Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at the University of Missouri (FAPRI-MU)  Objective policy analysis  Focus on how policies affect decisions, then estimate market impacts  Recently released annual baseline  10-year projection of agricultural and biofuel markets  Stochastic process to account for different assumptions in oil price, weather patterns, etc.  Cellulosic model basics  Key assumptions in the biofuel model  Focus on cellulosic waiver options  Implications of cellulosic waiver options  A look at the 2013 Baseline results  Cellulosic biofuel production based on supply of five feedstocks:  Warm-season grasses; Wheat straw; Corn stover;

453

EIS-0407: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0407: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas DOE's Proposed Action is to provide federal funding to Abengoa Bioenergy Biomass of Kansas, LLC (Abengoa Bioenergy) to support the design, construction, and startup of a commercial-scale integrated biorefinery to be located near the city of Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas. If DOE decides to provide federal funding, it would negotiate an agreement with Abengoa Bioenergy to provide approximately $85 million of the total anticipated cost of approximately $300 million (2008 dollars). The biorefinery would use lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover, wheat straw) as feedstock to produce ethanol and biopower (electricity) sufficient to meet the needs of

454

Feedstocks (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedstocks Feedstocks Customized milling and continuous handling of a wide variety of feedstocks Integrated Biorefi nery Research Facility | NREL * Golden, Colorado | December 2011 | NREL/PO-5100-53598 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Offi ce of Energy Effi ciency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 10446 Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 00459 Photo by Warren Gretz, NREL/PIX 05754 Feedstock handling capabilities * We have experience working with: - Perennials - switchgrass, sorghum, and others - Crop residue - corn stover, bagasse, wheat straw - Forestry biomass - hickory, poplar, oak * Our mill takes dry material from large super sacks and mills the feedstock to a variety of sizes

455

Moisture Metrics Project  

SciTech Connect

the goal of this project was to determine the optimum moisture levels for biomass processing for pellets commercially, by correlating data taken from numerous points in the process, and across several different feedstock materials produced and harvested using a variety of different management practices. This was to be done by correlating energy consumption and material through put rates with the moisture content of incoming biomass ( corn & wheat stubble, native grasses, weeds, & grass straws), and the quality of the final pellet product.This project disseminated the data through a public website, and answering questions form universities across Missouri that are engaged in biomass conversion technologies. Student interns from a local university were employed to help collect data, which enabled them to learn firsthand about biomass processing.

Schuchmann, Mark

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

An integrated approach to the degradation of phytates in the corn wet milling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated process was developed to hydrolyze the phytates in light steep water (LSW) and to simultaneously isolate inorganic phosphate (Pi) and myo-inositol products. The proposed integrated process will be helpful in resolving the environmental and nutritional concerns in the use of corn gluten feed (CGF) in the animal diets. This process comprised of partial and total hydrolysis of LSW and intermediate anion exchange separation technique. The phytates in LSW were initially degraded to negatively charged myo-inositol phosphates (InsP2–InsP5). The optimized experimental parameters for the partial hydrolysis of LSW were determined to be 2 h hydrolysis with 1 FTU Aspergillus niger/g substrate at 35 °C. The negatively charged species of the partially hydrolyzed substrate were separated on a strong base anion exchange resin. The negatively charged species, retained by the resin, were eluded with 1 M NaCl solution and were subjected to complete hydrolysis with the Escherichia coli, A. niger derived phytases and their respective combinations. The maximum amount of myo-inositol released from the anion exchange column was 3.73 ± 0.03 mg/NaCl elution which was detected after 48 h reactions catalyzed by 100 FTU E. coli, 150 FTU E. coli, and 150 FTU the combination of A. niger and E. coli. The time course of Pi released showed a similar trend to that of myo-inositol and the released Pi reached a maximum amount of 3.30 ± 0.05 mg/g NaCl elution after 48 h incubation at the enzyme loadings for which the maximum concentration of myo-inositol were reached.

H. Noureddini; J. Dang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Photosynthetic Traits in Wheat Grown under Decreased and Increased CO2 Concentration, and after Transfer to Natural CO2 concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wheat plants were grown from sowing to day 18 in 26-dm3 chambers at three different CO2 concentrations: 150 (-CO2), 350 (C, control), 800 (+CO2) ?mol mol-1. Afterwards, plants of the three variants were grown at ...

P. Ulman; J. ?atský; J. Pospíšilová

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Extraction and Proteome Analysis of Starch Granule-Associated Proteins in Mature Wheat Kernel (Triticum aestivum L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of ?-amylase inside the starch granules indicates that this enzyme is needed to directly break down the starch polymer. ... (48, 49) This xylanase inhibitor also displays inhibitory activity toward barley alpha-amylases. ... (54) Some authors studied starch associated proteins from commercial wheat starches,(54) and found stress defense proteins including ?-amylase subtilisin inhibitor, chitinase and serpin. ...

Emmanuelle Bancel; Hélène Rogniaux; Clément Debiton; Christophe Chambon; Gérard Branlard

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wheat germ cell-free expression system as a pathway to improve protein yield and solubility for the SSGCID pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set of 44 protein targets was used to test expression in the wheat germ cell-free system, the vast majority of which were expressed and soluble in this system; further increases in solubility were achieved by addition of the NVoy polymer.

Guild, K.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Use of near-isogenic wheat lines to determine glutenin and gliadin composition and funtionality in flour tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tortilla baking quality. Near-isogenic wheat lines in which one or more of these loci were absent or deleted were used in the study. These lines were analyzed using SSR primers to verify the chromosome deletions. A standard SDS PAGE gel and a Lab on Chip...

Mondal, Suchismita

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

A corn oil diet, but not a fish oil diet enhances the expression of apolipoprotein A-I in the lung of rats treated with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-4-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK): A proteomic approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...drinking water. The FO diet contained 17% fish oil and 3% corn oil, while the CO diet contained 20% corn oil. Rats were sacrificed at 3 month intervals...reversed-phase step in the second dimension. Using a peak height threshold value of 0.001 in the second-dimension...

Sung Il Chang; Indu Sinha; Neil Trushin; Bruce Stanley; Karam El-Bayoumy; and Bogdan Prokopczyk

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Assessment of potential life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission effects from using corn-based butanol as a transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect

Since advances in the ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation process in recent years have led to significant increases in its productivity and yields, the production of butanol and its use in motor vehicles have become an option worth evaluating. This study estimates the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. It employs a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis tool: the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The estimates of life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are based on an Aspen Plus(reg. sign) simulation for a corn-to-butanol production process, which describes grain processing, fermentation, and product separation. Bio-butanol-related WTW activities include corn farming, corn transportation, butanol production, butanol transportation, and vehicle operation. In this study, we also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. Our study shows that driving vehicles fueled with corn-based butanol produced by the current ABE fermentation process could result in substantial fossil energy savings (39%-56%) and avoid large percentage of the GHG emission burden, yielding a 32%-48% reduction relative to using conventional gasoline. On energy basis, a bushel of corn produces less liquid fuel from the ABE process than that from the corn ethanol dry mill process. The coproduction of a significant portion of acetone from the current ABE fermentation presents a challenge. A market analysis of acetone, as well as research and development on robust alternative technologies and processes that minimize acetone while increase the butanol yield, should be conducted.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on canopy transpiration in senescent spring wheat  

SciTech Connect

The seasonal course of canopy transpiration and the diurnal courses of latent heat flux of a spring wheat crop were simulated for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations of 370 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1} and 550 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}. The hourly weather data, soil parameters and the irrigation and fertilizer treatments of the Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment wheat experiment in Arizona (1992/93) were used to drive the model. The simulation results were tested against field measurements with special emphasis on the period between anthesis and maturity. A model integrating leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was scaled to a canopy level in order to be used in the wheat growth model. The simulated intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration, C{sub i} was determined from the ratio of C{sub i} to the CO{sub 2} concentration at the leaf surface, C{sub s}, the leaf to air specific humidity deficit and a possibly unfulfilled transpiration demand. After anthesis, the measured assimilation rates of the flag leaves decreased more rapidly than their stomatal conductances, leading to a rise in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. In order to describe this observation, an empirical model approach was developed which took into account the leaf nitrogen content for the calculation of the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio. Simulation results obtained with the new model version were in good agreement with the measurements. If changes in the C{sub i}/C{sub s} ratio accorded to the decrease in leaf nitrogen content during leaf senescence were not considered in the model, simulations revealed an underestimation of the daily canopy transpiration of up to twenty percent and a decrease in simulated seasonal canopy transpiration by ten percent. The measured reduction in the seasonal sum of canopy transpiration and soil evaporation owing to CO{sub 2} enrichment, in comparison, was only about five percent.

Grossman, S.; Kimball, B.A.; Hunsaker, D.J.; Long, S.P. et al

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Yield and water use efficiency of wheat and cotton under alternate furrow and check-basin irrigation with canal and tube well water in Punjab, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 4-year field experiment was conducted in a semi-arid area to evaluate the response of each furrow and alternate furrow irrigation in wheat-cotton system using irrigation waters of different qualities in a calca...

H. S. Thind; G. S. Buttar; M. S. Aujla

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Water-use efficiency and transpiration efficiency of wheat under rain-fed conditions and supplemental irrigation in a Mediterranean-type environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growth and water use were measured in wheat (Triticum aestivum ... over five seasons 1991/92–1995/96. Water use was partitioned into transpiration (T)...s) using Ritchie's model, and water-use efficiency (WUE) an...

Heping Zhang; Theib Y. Oweis; Sonia Garabet; Mustafa Pala

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Presence of an alpha-amylase isozyme with high temperature optima in the wheat variety tolerant to high temperature at juvenile plant stage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study ?-amylase was partially purified from detached grains of five day old seedlings of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties, showing differential responses to high temperature stress at see...

Gurpreet Kaur Hunjan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The spectrum of low molecular weight alpha-amylase/protease inhibitor genes expressed in the US bread wheat cultivar Butte 86  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wheat grains accumulate a variety of low molecular weight proteins that are inhibitors of alpha-amylases and proteases and play an important ... both seedling growth and human nutrition. The alpha-amylase/proteas...

Susan B Altenbach; William H Vensel; Frances M Dupont

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Meiotic pairing and alpha-amylase phenotype in a 5B/5Rm Triticum aestivum — Secale montanum translocation line in common wheat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 5BS/5RmS translocation chromosome spontaneously recovered from a ‘Chinese Spring’ — Secale montanum wheat-rye telocentric 5RmS addition line has been identified and cytologically studied using C-banding in soma...

M. Montero; J. Sanz; N. Jouve

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Acclimation response of spring wheat in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) atmosphere with variable soil nitrogen regimes. 3. Canopy architecture and gas exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of whole-canopy net CO2 exchange rate (CER) and canopy architecture to CO2 enrichment and N stress during 1996 and 1997 for open-field-grown wheat ecosystem (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) are...

Talbot J. Brooks; Gerard W. Wall; Paul J. Pinter Jr.…

471

Understanding the Genetic Interactions that Regulate Heat and Drought Tolerance in Relation to Wax Deposition and Yield Stability in Wheat (Tricticum Aestivum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been a major food crop for nearly 8000 years. Breeders continue to face an ongoing battle to produce stress tolerant cultivars that are able to feed a rapidly increasing global population. The ability of varieties...

Huggins, Trevis D

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

472

Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful or you will break it with a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful. Two Point Calibration Routine · The pH meter should be turned "ON". · Your buffers should from your sample, rinse with distilled water, and BLOT with a kimwipe. 4. Turn pH meter OFF and store

Cross, George

474

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

Minnesota, University of

475

A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant poten- tial as a feedstock for conversion to liquid fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel (Kadam to be limited. However, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment has proven to be a very effective in recov- ering most of these pretreatments to corn stover include dilute-sulfuric acid in a high-solids percola- tion reactor (Zhu et al

California at Riverside, University of

476

Absence of an Effect of Dietary Corn Oil Content on Plasma Prolactin, Progesterone, and 17?-Estradiol in Female Sprague-Dawley Rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of age, fed 5% com oil (3 rats: A; C; E) or 24% com oil (3 rats: B; D; F...the late- afternoon peak (Chart 3). Examination...cycle were found with peak concentra tions at proestrus...the rats fed 5% corn oil and 27% in the rats...

William C. Wetsel; Adrianne E. Rogers; Adrienne Rutledge; and Wendell W. Leavitt

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The group of soil of protection and the group of plant nutrition of the ETH and the FiBL propose two MSc theses on on-farm management of organic matter in the project "Zinc biofortification of Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in organic and conventional farming, affects soil Zn and Cd dynamics, wheat production (liquid slurry, solid farmyard manure, plant residues, compost, fallowing); how

Fischlin, Andreas

478

UREA’S UNLIKELY ROLE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE FASTEST-GROWING U.S. market for urea isn’t corn, wheat, or soybeans. ... It’s diesel trucks. ...

MICHAEL MCCOY

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wheat) along with energy prices for ethanol, gasoline, andby cassava. Ethanol from corn provides much lower energy andbiofuel (ethanol from sugarcane) in converting solar energy

Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Royalty revenues, which assist funding of programs and attracting/retaining top scientists, have increased

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wheat straw corn" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Effects of Variations in High Molecular Weight Glutenin Allele Composition and Resistant Starch on Wheat Flour Tortilla Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strong gluten that gives small diameter tortillas with good flexibility over storage. Good quality tortilla flour should have extensible gluten that will provide rapid extension during pressing to form larger diameter tortillas that retain air bubbles... and flexibility during storage (Waniska et al. 2004). Tortilla producers use food additives such as reducing agents, fats and enzymes to increase gluten extensibility in dough during production of wheat flour tortilla. However, besides reducing...

Jondiko, Tom Odhiambo

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

482

Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) Associated with Maintenance of Bread Making Quality under Heat Stress in Wheat (Triticum aestivum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDENTIFICATION OF QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTLs) ASSOCIATED WITH MAINTENANCE OF BREAD MAKING QUALITY UNDER HEAT STRESS IN WHEAT (Triticum aestivum) A Thesis by FRANCIS WARD BEECHER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Molecular and Environmental Plan Sciences IDENTIFICATION OF QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTLs) ASSOCIATED WITH MAINTENANCE OF BREAD MAKING QUALITY UNDER HEAT...

Beecher, Francis Ward

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

483

Comparison of energy potentials from combined ethanol and methane production using steam-pretreated corn stover impregnated with acetic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Acetic acid was investigated as a catalyst in steam pretreatment of corn stover. The purpose was to study ethanol production using either baker's yeast or a genetically modified pentose-fermenting version of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KE6-12. Biogas production was investigated as an alternative for utilization of xylose. The high levels of acetic acid was found to be toxic using KE6-12. Some pentose fermentation was achieved, but the ethanol end concentration was almost the same as using baker's yeast (28 g L?1 compared to 27 g L?1). Using xylose for biogas production resulted in a high total energy recovery. The highest total energy recovery in the products, i.e. ethanol, methane and solids, obtained was 88% compared with the energy in ingoing raw material. This result was achieved when the solids and the liquid was separated after pretreatment.

Pia-Maria Bondesson; Mats Galbe; Guido Zacchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

A comparison of yellow corn and three sorghum grains with different endosperm types for growing-finishing swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 4 of 4. 82, nd 6. 21 for the corn a!d ka. . =i r c) e?s, res!ien& i ?e iy, Perfo&? v'!ines &?os i))&proved i) i th rhc acid i!cion oi ao')&;rii!i !!enl; 0. 6i8 enn 0, C)4 verag, ciail2 gair) &inc&:3. (i9 ai. ri 3. 96 ' eu/8 ~ 'I' roc & o. ' r?- Ll...; . ;, rien?&I vr r i ! 6 ?ca', n; vi &! j cat": i I c' ti&i i'ilil I i lln &. n) i '". '. . ' '' I&. , ) &ir rii o&&'i ~ orn a&d . ni;n, &?-. er! ii. . ', , hut 10 ic. ?02 rr?' fc u &v. s !ccu)rrd peo a!!cl &, '. , "!! (19 !38) fr. I 224 gro! Ing pi g...

Copelin, Johnny Landon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

485

Biofuels supply chain characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethanol can be made from agricultural residues like wheat straw and from crops dedicated to energy use, like switchgrass. We study the logistics aspects of this transformation and determine the main characteristics of the ...

Banerjee, Anindya, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Integration of Ambient Formic Acid Process and Alkaline Hydrogen Peroxide Post-Treatment of Furfural Residue To Enhance Enzymatic Hydrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ahvazi, B.; Wojciechowicz, O.; Ton That, T. M.; Hawari, J.Preparation of lignopolyols from wheat straw soda lignin J. Agr. ... Ahvazi, Behzad; Wojciechowicz, Olivia; Ton-That, Tan-Minh; Hawari, Jalal ...

Chang-Zhou Chen; Ming-Fei Li; Yu-Ying Wu; Run-Cang Sun

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

487

Winter wheat with subsurface drip irrigation (SDI): Crop coefficients, water-use estimates, and effects of SDI on grain yield and water use efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in the North China Plain (NCP) is threatened by insufficient water supply. Interest in microirrigation is increasing in the NCP, while data and guidance for microirrigation scheduling are lacking. An accurate estimation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa) is critical for appropriate water management. In this study, therefore, the \\{SIMDualKc\\} model was calibrated with the data from a three-season experiment, and \\{ETa\\} of winter wheat with subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) was estimated with the dual crop coefficient approach and stress adjustments described in the FAO-56 using the data of the other two treatments. The mean value of basal crop coefficient (Kcb) for the winter wheat at the initial-, mid-, and late-season growth stages over the three seasons was 0.25, 1.06, and 0.34, respectively. Over the three growing seasons, the \\{ETa\\} for subsurface drip-irrigated wheat with three irrigation treatments ranged from 393 to 449 mm. The Kc-local (ETa/ETo) values for the winter wheat with SDI were 0.34–0.80, 0.91–1.11, and 0.41–0.98, respectively, at the initial-, mid-, and late-season growth stages. Results indicated that the procedure of the dual Kc approach and stress adjustments simulated \\{ETa\\} of the winter wheat reasonably well, with the average absolute error (AAE) of 0.36 mm d?1, the root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.43 mm d?1,the index of agreement (d) of 0.98, the Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.91, and the RMSE-observations standard deviation ratio (RSR) of 0.31. Discrepancy between the simulated and measured data was mainly attributed to the assumption of a uniform distribution of soil water around an emitter. Irrigation rates have significant effects on ETa, grain yield and WUE. Based on effects of irrigation rates on grain yield and WUE, irrigation schedule for optimum yield and WUE was developed for winter wheat. It was estimated that grain yield and WUE of winter wheat with the optimum irrigation schedule was 7780 kg ha?1 and 1.83 kg m?3, respectively. The simulated results can be used as a reference for irrigation schedule and water management for winter wheat in the NCP.

Yang Gao; Linlin Yang; Xiaojun Shen; Xinqiang Li; Jingsheng Sun; Aiwang Duan; Laosheng Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Abbreviated life tables of natural populations of the corn earworm, Heliothis zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counties, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Smith . Jr . Abbreviated life tables are presented and are based on sampling data ga thered from eight generations of corn ear- worm on peanuts. Four generations were sampled from a oea- nu t mo nocu ltur e, two each on dryland and i rrigated peanuts.... Four generations were sampled from a diverse aaroecosystem which included grain sorghum, peach and apple trees, native and improved pastures, woodlands, and home gardens, two each on dryland and irrigated peanuts. Differences in population densities...

Sears, Darrell Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel

2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

491

Pilot-scale production of low molecular weight peptides from corn wet milling byproducts and the antihypertensive effects in vivo and in vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pilot-scale production was developed to enhance the value of proteins from corn gluten meal (CGM). Corn protein isolate (CPI) with high protein content (90.68%) was obtained through heat treatment of CGM (150 kg) in aqueous alkaline solution. Two-step enzymatic hydrolysis and multistage separation were applied to enrich corn oligopeptides (COP) with low molecular weights, 96.77% of which were less than 1000 Da. The greatest antihypertensive effect of COP treatment in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was observed at a dose of 0.45 g/kg. One major ACE-inhibitory peptide, Ala-Tyr, was identified and quantified (9.16 ± 0.08 mg/g) from COP. The ACE inhibitory activity of Ala-Tyr (IC50 = 0.037 mg/ml) was over 27 times higher than that of COP (IC50 = 1.020 mg/ml). The results indicate that COP may be a source of natural antihypertensive compounds that could be used for drugs or functional food ingredients.

Feng Lin; Liang Chen; Rui Liang; Zhaofeng Zhang; Junbo Wang; Muyi Cai; Yong Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Nitrogen utilization, nutrient digestibility, and excretion of purine derivatives in dairy cattle consuming rations containing corn milling co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of feeding a combination of modified wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) and wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on nutrient digestion, purine derivative excretion, and N utilization. Multiparous (n = 20) and primiparous (n = 20) cows were arranged in a replicated 5 × 5 Latin square with 21-d periods. Animals were fed one of 5 treatment diets during each period: 1) 0% co-products (control); 2) 15% WDGS (15WDGS); 3) 15% WCGF (15WCGF); 4) 7.5% WDGS and 7.5% WCGF (15MIX); and 5) 15% WDGS and 15% WCGF (30MIX; dry matter basis). A portion of forages, corn, and soy-based protein was replaced with WDGS, or WCGF, or both. Dry matter intake was greater for 15WDGS (25.1 kg/d) and 30MIX (25.5 kg/d) than for control (22.4 kg/d), 15WCGF (23.2 kg/d), or 15MIX (23.5 kg/d). Dry matter digestibility was greatest for 15WCGF and 30MIX (63.6 and 64.1%, respectively) and least for 15WDGS (59.8%), and neutral detergent fiber and N digestibility were greatest for 30MIX (50.7 and 68.6%, respectively) and lowest for 15WDGS (41.3 and 61.5%, respectively). Excretion of purine derivatives in urine was greater for co-product treatment diets than for control. Fecal N was greatest for 15WDGS compared with other treatment diets (311.0 vs. 263.3 g/d), whereas urinary N was greatest for 30MIX (330.0 g/d), intermediate for 15WCGF and 15MIX (319.3 and 320.5 g/d, respectively), and lowest for control and 15WDGS (308.5 and 312.2 g/d, respectively). Manure N (fecal + urinary N) was greatest for 15WDGS, intermediate for 15MIX and 30MIX, and lowest for control and 15WCGF. Treatment diets did not differ in 4% fat-corrected milk production. Compared with the ration containing WDGS, the ration with a 30% mixture of WDGS and WCGF improved nutrient digestibility and N utilization with reduced manure N excretion and increased N retention. Thus, it appears feeding WDGS and WCGF in combination reduces some of the negative effects of feeding WDGS alone.

A.M. Gehman; P.J. Kononoff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

The bulking effect of dietary fiber in the rat large intestine: an in vivo study of cellulose, guar, pectin, wheat bran and oat bran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BULKING EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER IN THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE: AN IN VIVO STUDY OF CELLULOSE, GUAR, PECTIN, WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN A Thesis by JEANNE MARIE GAZZANIGA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition THE BULKING EFFECT OF DIETARY FIBER IN THE RAT LARGE INTESTINE: AN IN VIVO STUDY OF CELLULOSE, GUAR, PECTIN, WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN A Thesis...

Gazzaniga, Jeanne Marie

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

A diallel analysis of six components of partial resistance to Leptosphaeria nodorum in seedlings of six winter wheats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Components of Partial Resistance to ~ht h ' d ' g dl' g f g'* W' t llh (May 1987) Hans Henning Bruno, B. A, , University of Goettingen; Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Lloyd R. Nelson Dr. Norman E. Borlaug A diallel analysis was conducted...-based approach to disease protection has been emphasized because of economic and/or environmental reasons. One of the major diseases of wheat, Triticum aestivum (L. em Shit. ), 'Sp'dbl hdby~Lt h'd E. M 1 )*, ph ~St d (B k )B . k *L. . d present on all five...

Bruno, Hans Henning

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

Changes in niacin content produced by nickel-chloride in a rust susceptible wheat and oat variety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control and two txeatuents of Alamo oats (wet weight). ~ . . ?, 17 4, Suncau nultiple range test for niacin content of Aleno oats for a control and two treataents based on the nitrogen content of the plants at four weeks of ageo ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o... . I5. 2 3 . 4 . 5 MICROGRA MS OF NIACIN Figure l, A ~ical e~ ecxve fox' the grcnrth ef stxafn 3, p~g af Xactobaeiliws exshXsosus, wheat plants~ faU. owed in ascending order by the plants treated with niche'. ~oride, niacin an4 niche~oxide plus...

Lacy, Logan Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Effect of Lignin Removal by Alkaline Peroxide Pretreatment on the Susceptibility of Corn Stover to Purified Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes  

SciTech Connect

Pretreatment of corn stover with alkaline peroxide (AP) at pH 11.5 resulted in reduction of lignin content in the residual solids as a function of increasing batch temperature. Scanning electron microscopy of these materials revealed notably more textured surfaces on the plant cell walls as a result of the delignifying pretreatment. As expected, digestion of the delignified samples with commercial cellulase preparations showed an inverse relationship between the content of lignin present in the residual solids after pretreatment and the extent of both glucan and xylan conversion achievable. Digestions with purified enzymes revealed that decreased lignin content in the pretreated solids did not significantly impact the extent of glucan conversion achievable by cellulases alone. Not until purified xylanolytic activities were included with the cellulases were significant improvements in glucan conversion realized. In addition, an inverse relationship was observed between lignin content after pretreatment and the extent of xylan conversion achievable in a 24-h period with the xylanolytic enzymes in the absence of the cellulases. This observation, coupled with the direct relationship between enzymatic xylan and glucan conversion observed in a number of cases, suggests that the presence of lignins may not directly occlude cellulose present in lignocelluloses but rather impact cellulase action indirectly by its association with xylan.

Selig, M. J.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Comparative breeding ecology of Lesser Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis canadensis) and Siberian cranes (G. leucogeranus) in Eastern Siberia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VII CONCLUSION ................................................................................................ 91 Future Research Considerations................................................................. 93 LITERATURE...). Harvested grain fields (corn, wheat, and barley) were the principal habitat types used by Lesser Sandhill Cranes during spring migration in Nebraska, Saskatchewan, and Alaska, respectively (Iverson et al. 1987). Wheat, corn, sorghum, and milo are major...

Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

498

Prevention of Food-Processing Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beans 99.8 99.8 Corn on the cob 46.0...green beans, and corn on the cob. Tests...starch and glu by new, wet processing of wheat...food exist.) Dry milling and air classification...con-ventional wheat-milling equipment. rom Two...from the conventional wet process and the proposed...

Sam R. Hoover

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Permissive role of the acidification caused by wheat aleurone layers upon. alpha. -amylase induction by GA sub 3  

SciTech Connect

Wheat aleurone has the capacity of acidifying the incubation medium in 1 to 2 pH units. The {alpha}-amylase induction by GA{sub 3} in isolated wheat aleurone layers is strongly dependent on acidic pH of the medium (pH < 5). To examine possible mechanisms {sup 35}-Met incorporation into proteins and {alpha}-amylase, in the presence of GA{sub 3} and Ca{sup 2+} at pH, 4, 5 and 6 was studied. Although {sup 35}-Met uptake decreased markedly ({approx} 90%) at pH 4 in thepresence of GA{sub 3}, incorporation into total protein did not change significantly from other conditions. Auto-radiography of SDS-PAGE showed that most of the amino acid was in the {alpha}-amylase band, meaning that the effect of acidic pH is specific for GA{sub 3} actions on aleurone tissue. On the other hand, an increase of protonated GA{sub 3} diffusion could be ruled out. Also, there was not {alpha}-amylase inactivation at pH 6. These findings point out to the important physiological role of the acidification caused by the aleurone.

Rodriguez-Campos, E.; Bernal-Lugo, I.; Hamabata, A. (CINVESTAV-IPN (Mexico))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Metabolic click-labeling with a fucose analog reveals pectin delivery, architecture, and dynamics in Arabidopsis cell walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2007 ) Comparison of five xylan synthesis mutants reveals new insight into the mechanisms of xylan synthesis . Plant J 52 : 1154 – 1168 . 6...wall porosity and available surface area of wheat straw and wheat...n 30 seedlings total per treatment), and seedlings in a...

Charles T. Anderson; Ian S. Wallace; Chris R. Somerville

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z