National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wheat corn soybeans

  1. Ozone impacts on the productivity of selected crops. [Corn, wheat, soybean and peanut crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.W.; Cure, W.W.; Shriner, D.S.; Olson, R.J.; Heagle, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The regional impacts of ozone on corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops are estimated by using dose-response functions to relate ambient maximum 7 h/d seasonal ozone concentrations to crop productivity data. Linear dose-response functions were developed from open-top field chamber studies. It was assumed that the limited number of cultivars and growing conditions available for the analysis were representative of major agricultural regions. Hourly ozone data were selected to represent rural concentrations and used to calculate maximum 7-h/d average values. Seasonal ozone averages for counties were extrapolated from approximately 300 monitoring sites. Results must be interpreted with knowledge of these assumptions and sources of uncertainty. Impacts are calculated for county units for the conterminous United States with maps showing patterns and tables summarizing the potential magnitude of ozone effects on selected crop yields. The assessment estimates that approximately three billion dollars of productivity could be gained if current maximum 7 hour per day ozone levels were reduced from present levels to below 25 parts per billion. Dollar values are based on 1978 crop prices, without accounting for price effects, to provide an overall estimate of the impact. Of the estimated economic impact, soybean represents 64%, corn 17%, wheat 12%, and peanuts 7%.

  2. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report summaries, production and costs data from the Depart- ments of Economics, Agricultural and Biosystems and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs

  3. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al-falfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al- falfa, and pasture maintenance record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of Economics, Agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average

  4. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  5. Antistaling properties of amylases, wheat gluten and CMC on corn tortilla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueso Ucles, Francisco Javier

    2004-09-30

    ANTISTALING PROPERTIES OF AMYLASES, WHEAT GLUTEN AND CMC ON CORN TORTILLA A Dissertation by FRANCISCO JAVIER BUESO UCLES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2003 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ANTISTALING PROPERTIES OF AMYLASES, WHEAT GLUTEN AND CMC ON CORN TORTILLA A Dissertation by FRANCISCO JAVIER BUESO UCLES...

  6. Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life-Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, S. E.

    2005-05-01

    Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particular eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production. This modeling study found that eutrophication potential for the base case already exceeds proposed water quality standards, that switching to no-till cultivation and collecting stover increased that eutrophication potential by 21%, and that switching to continuous-corn production on top of that would triple eutrophication potential.

  7. Corn Silage Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Silage Testing 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12; The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials Coordnated by B. Jones, H. Behl Syngenta Co.) NK Brand Po Box 959, Mnneapols, MN 55440 Poneer H-bred Int'l, Inc. Poneer 7501 Memoral

  8. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2007 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS IN 2007 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2007 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  9. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid Management and Trials 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12;Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2006 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2006 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  10. Barley tortillas and barley flours in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitre-Dieste, Carlos Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    Barley tortillas (100%) were easily processed using corn tortilla technology. Flavor and color of barley tortillas were different from those of corn or wheat tortillas. Barley tortillas were generally darker, maybe due to ...

  11. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

  12. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

  13. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. [Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1989-12-31

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy`s H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year`s atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

  14. Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    will change. 4 Seed, fertilizer, chemical, and fuel prices are based on projections for 2009. Page 1 #12;Table 179 190 59 84 35 Harvest price3 $4.50 $4.50 $9.30 $4.80 $9.30 $4.50 $4.50 $9.30 $4.80 $9.30 $4.50 $4 $129 $187 $83 Both product prices and input prices may have significantly changed since these estimates

  15. Corn fodder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Geo. W. (George Washington)

    1891-01-01

    Hay ................. Red Top Hay .............. Mixed Ilay and Clover ........ Clover Hay ................. Ensilage from Southern Corn. . ..... Ensilage from Sweet Corn ....... Pasture (Tame Grasses) e, we ase as Digestible Non- Digestible I'rotcinlnitrogenous Nu...- Nutritive Ratio. ---- 3.45 Green Rye .................... I ::: Sugar Beets.. ................ trients. 48.71 12.87 7.81 I 15.4 15.5 From the above it will be seen that pure leaf fodder has a very high value for feeding-second only to clover hay...

  16. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01

    . Land resource areas and corn test locations. Discussion of Results e areas affords an opportunity to determine if any Weather conditions were highly differences in adaptation to climatic and general corn production during the 3 soil conditions... usually has a climate for corn production and appr TABLE 6. CORN PERFORMANCE TEST, EAST BERLANDS, 1957-59 Bushels of shelled corn per acre ' Y-1 Kirby- Nacog- Mount Bowie' jr: ville doches Jyk~leasant countv A'! Texas 30 Texas 32 Texas 28 Texas...

  17. Mechanical Harvesting of Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1948-01-01

    , the field results of this study can be divided intc, three parts: (I) plant characteristics prior to harvest, (2) machine performance and (3) effect of machine on the corn ears. Review of Literature According to Shedd (7), a few corn picking machines... and yields are shown as shelled corn. Preharvest Plant Data Manufacturers of corn harvesting machinery have found tha: corn growers of the Southwest prefer a machine that snaps the ears from the stalks without removing the husks. They have nlw Figure 7...

  18. 24 Crops & Soils magazine | NovemberDecember 2013 As the last of the corn and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    24 Crops & Soils magazine | November­December 2013 As the last of the corn and soybean harvest crop rotation, disease-resistant hybrid selection, optimum planting timing, and post-harvest tillage." Other claims sug- gested strobilurins improve efficient use of water and nitrogen, and improve stalk

  19. Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer Management for Winter Wheat Production in the Blackland Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Tim C.; Hipp, Billy W.; Marshall, David S.; Sutton, Russelll L.

    1995-01-01

    include wheat, oats, grain sorghum, corn, cotton, forage sorghum, and legumes. About half of the region is rangeland with pasture crops consisting primarily of Coastal bermudagrass, clover, alfalfa, wheat, oats, and na tive grasses such as bluestem..., and Shickluna, 1983). Intelligent crop management demands a working knowledge of these relationships depicted in Figure 5. Soil?N gains and transforma tions include fertilizer or manure applications, fixa tion of atmospheric N2 by legumes (clover, alfalfa...

  20. Managing Soybean Insects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Knutson, Allen E.; Cronholm, Gregory B.; Patrick, Carl D.; Way, M. O.

    1999-07-29

    , or if the field is very large, sample more areas to increase 3 Managing Soybean Insects Dawn H. Gouge, Michael O. Way, Allen Knutson, Greg Cronholm and Carl Patrick* *Assistant Professor and Extension Entomologist; Associate Professor, Texas Agricultural...

  1. Soybean Diseases Atlas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    new disease which causes root and stem rot to soybeans and other legumes in several southern states. The earliest sympt om is yellowing of leaves of individual plants or patches of plants across fields. Leaves of damaged plants usually develop... new soybean disease restricts root development and causes an absence of nitrogen-fixing nodules. Plants are stunted in an irregular pattern that may resemble manganese toxicity, or moisture or potash deficiency. High nematode populations often...

  2. Wheat Diseases Atlas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Norman L.; Berry, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    to wheat producers over the state on whose farms demonstrations have been conducted and pic tures for this publication were made. WhEAT DisEASES ATLAs Norman L. McCoy and Robert W Berry* INTRODUCTION Wheat diseases have caused untold human suffer ing...

  3. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Stacey, Gary

    2011-04-26

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  4. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messing, Joachim

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to academia and industry, progress in plant research and new crop development could accelerate and benefit the public.

  5. A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

    2011-11-01

    Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

  6. Wheat Production in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, I. M.; Porter, K. B.; Lahr, Keith; Merkle, Owen G.; Futrell, M. C.

    1960-01-01

    of the land after har- This permits penetration of summer rains illing of weeds and volunteer wheat. Leav- le stubble as a mulch aids in preventing erosion. These practices fit well into both uous and fallow wheat production. Another I is that of delayed... races of leaf and stem rust. The spikes are awnless and the glumes white. Several other soft wheat varieties are grown on small acreages. These include Atlas 66, Coker 47-27, Austin, Clarkan, Vigo, Blackhawk and KanQueen. HARD RED SPRING WHEAT...

  7. Soybean Insect Control Suggestions. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides .............................. 10 Policy Statement for Making Chemical Control Recommendations ....................... 11 Soybean Insect Control Suggestions (chart) ... 12 Conversion Table... and maximum coverage. When making any insecticide applications, follow label directions. Refer to the ((Protecting Bees and other Pollinators from Insecticides" section of this bulletin to avoid bee losses. Biological Insecticides ':,.,.dcillus...

  8. Managing Soybean Insects. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.; Way, Michael O.

    1988-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Biological Insecticides .................................................................. 7 Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Soybean Insect...>y to insure less drift and max imum coverage. When making any insecticide application, follow label directions. For calibration and safety informa tion refer to MP-1289, "Using Pesticides-Private Ap plicator ManuaL" The section on "Protecting Bees...

  9. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01

    Corn Hybrids for Terns ST LOCATIONS AREA I AREA II ARE4 Ill AREA IV 2Prdrie View 7.Tylw lZ.Lockhart 17.Waxahachie 22San Antonio 3.Cleveland 8.Mt. Pbctont I3Brsnha B.Garland 23Lamposas 4.Colbqe Sta. 9Sulphw Spp. 14Holland l9.0reenvilb 24...Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea...

  10. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  11. Cooking with Corn Syrup 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-09-10

    1 1 /2 cups chopped nuts 1 cup packed brown sugar 3 /4 cup melted butter or margarine 1 /2 cup corn syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking... 2 eggs 9- to 10-inch unbaked pie shell How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Mix the ingredients and pour the mixture into an unbaked pie shell. 3. Bake the pie for 45...

  12. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of corn syrup, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  13. Glyphosate, Roundup, Glyphosate-Tolerance GM Soybeans, Chemical Extracted Soybean Food Oil/Soybean Powder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneff, Stephanie

    Glyphosate, Roundup, Glyphosate-Tolerance GM Soybeans, Chemical Extracted Soybean Food Oil, food and chemical extracted food oil 3. Eleven studies by Chinese scholars reveal harm to health caused in 2005 had at least one chronic medical condition; Chinese residents with chronic disease is already 20

  14. Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB): a Web Resource for Soybean Translation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB): a Web Resource for Soybean Translational Genomics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB): a Web Resource for...

  15. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  16. Wheat Pasture Poisoning. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crookshank, H. R.; Sims, Frank H.

    1956-01-01

    in sexually mature cows which are in the late stages of pregnancy or with a calf at side. Most cases developed sometime between 60 and 150 days on wheat, and in cows which had calves under 60 days of age. When the level of several components of the blood..., globulin and possibly the potassium levels were in- creased. The wide range of values observed in the cases suggests that the blood serum findings could be the result of the effect of wheat pasture poisoning rather than the cause. 1 Salt, cottonseed...

  17. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01

    practices which would bring their corn into tassel around June 1. This can be done by planting adapted hybrids at the dates recom- mended in Table 1. When planting is delayed, or if it is necessary to replant, hybrids with earlier maturity should... 90 ' 65.2 Coker 911 67.3 Texas 28 64.9 Texas 26 62.7 Texas 17W 73.0 Tennessee 29 67.5 Texas 9W 74.0 North Carolina 29 65.9 Georgia lOlW 70.7 Dixie 18 63.0 Asgrow lOlW 59.0 TRF 3 62.2 Coker 811 40.0 Surcropper 47.6 - - Averase yield 67...

  18. Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon

    2005-01-26

    Extension Small Grains Specialist, College Station, TX Carl Patrick, Extension Entomologist, Amarillo, TX Karl Steddom and Charlie Rush, Plant Pathologists, Amarillo, TX W Overview of WSMV and HPV Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus First discovered in Nebraska... losses due to WSMV exceed $30 million in some years but are in- significant in others. High Plains Virus High Plains Virus (HPV), occasionally called High Plains Disease, is a relatively new virus identified in the Great Plains in 1993. HPV usually...

  19. Sweet Corn Cultivar Trial Dr. Richard Hassell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    regulates the water transfer through the plant, reducing water loss from the leaves, making them more beetle Corn Borer Fall Armyworm Corn Earworm Mole Cricket #12;HARVESTING #12;PACKAGING Sweet Corn suckers, not all kernels straight Tassel Date: June 2 Silk Date: June 6 Harvest Date: June 20 Average

  20. Standing corn rows needed to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Standing corn rows needed to help reduce drifting snow By PAULA MOHR T HE Minnesota Department of Transportation is looking for more farmers to par- ticipate in its standing corn row program to help reduce and pays farmers to leave cornstalks up throughout the winter. Farmers are reimbursed for standing corn

  1. Wheat quality evaluation methods to predict wheat flour tortilla production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullins, Barbie Denise

    1997-01-01

    and processed more easily into wheat flour tortillas. Tortilla flour specifications utilized by manufacturers impart information to the miller for the production of the desired flours. Tortilla bake tests provide additional information that supplements...

  2. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998. Companies participating in the 1998 Corn Hybrid Trials 2 1998 Virginia Corn Hybird Plot, and 1998. 36 SECTION II. EVALUATION OF DOUBLECROP CORN UNDER IRRIGATION IN EASTERN VIRGINIA. Table 27

  3. SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    1 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid COLUMBIA PLAINVIEW TX 79072 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997 Coordinated by H. Behl, E

  4. Karnal Bunt: A Disease of Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Greta; Krausz, Joseph P.; Rush, Charlie

    2002-11-20

    Karnal bunt is a fungal disease that affects wheat, durum wheat and triticale. This publication explains the life cycle of the disease, how it spreads, and methods of control....

  5. The effect of heat treatment on the digestibility of wheat gluten in a model food system containing wheat gluten, corn starch and corn oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Debra Marie Ruzicka

    1984-01-01

    ), gross prote1n value (GPV), relat1ve nitrogen ut111zat1on (RNU), net protein rat1o (NPR), and relat1ve protein value (RPV), will reveal a change only when the treatment affects the limiting amino acid but show no change when other amino acids...

  6. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle Midwest fields, waiting to rot or be processed into ethanol. Interestingly, the National Corn Growers

  7. Owens Corning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpenOsmosisWesternCorning Jump to:

  8. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  9. Vegetation water content mapping using Landsat data derived normalized difference water index for corn and soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    Vegetation water content mapping using Landsat data derived normalized difference water index Information about vegetation water content (VWC) has widespread utility in agriculture, forestry. D 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vegetation water content; Landsat; NDWI 1

  10. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999. Companies participating in the 1999 Corn Hybrid Trials 2 1999 Virginia Corn Hybird Plot Information and Management Practices 3 Table 1. 1999 Relative Yield of hybrids entered in three or more

  11. Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean energy can come from the sun. The energy in wind can make electricity. Bioenergy comes from plants we can turn into fuel. Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass We can use...

  12. Factors affecting viscosity changes in corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGill, Kendra Louise

    1995-01-01

    Corn meals with known differences were tested using the Rapid Visco Analyzer. Various tests included the effect of solid concentration, effect of heating rate, effect of particle size, effect of Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose ...

  13. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -intensive or expensive process to extract sugars for bioenergy production. However, it is possible to directly generate and animal wastewaters and corn stover hydrolysates. For example, high power densities (810 to 970 mW/m2

  14. Contact:Duane Dailey Senior Writer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    projects an average wheat price of $5.10 per bushel for the current market year. Total wheat use, including prices are projected to average $3.68 per bushel for the crop harvested this fall. USDA estimates record yields this year, which moderates price increases for corn, Gerlt said FAPRI projects a soybean price

  15. Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2009-08-03

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

  16. Corn Performance Trials Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn Performance Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Performance Trials in 1994 #12;#12;1 Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn IN 46031 CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE SCIENCES MYCOGEN 624 27TH ST LUBBOCK TX 79404 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING 317 330TH ST STANTON MN 55018

  17. Soybean Production in the Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fromme, D. D.; Isakeit, T.; Falconer, L.

    2011-01-01

    . Recommended amounts of P 2 O 5 (Mehlich III ICP only) at different soil test levels for soybeans Soil Test Level Soil Test P (ppm) P 2 O 5 (lbs/A) Extremely Low 0-4.99 80 Very Low 5-9.99 70-60 Low 10-19.99 55-45 Moderate 20-49.99 40-5 High 50-99.99... conditions during the early nodulation were so severe the bacteria could not survive. Examples include very cold weather or extremely wet or dry weather. Molybdenum is a nutrient needed by soybeans in small quantities. Mo- lybdenum is required...

  18. Wheat Root Exudates Affected Phosphorus Uptake and Growth of Soybean in Two Farming Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Yanli; Zheng, Yi; Tang, Li; Li, Yuncong

    2009-01-01

    Soil. 2003; 256: 131-137. Nie YL, Tang L, Zheng Y, Effects2001: Zheng Y, Tang L, and Nie YL, Could root exudates ofStatistical Bureau, 2004). Nie et al. (2004) has shown that

  19. Fattening Lambs on Corn, Milo, Hegari, Wheat, and Oats, with Cottonseed Cake and Alfalfa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, A. K. (Arthur Kapp); Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

    1932-01-01

    Engineering J. R. Knox, M. S., Animal Husbandry A. K. Mackey. M. S., Animal Husbandry A. L. Darndx, M. A., Dairy Husband- arian *ian *Dean School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of December 1, 1932. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. ??On.... MACKEY and J. M. JONES I The lamb-feeding trials reported in this Bulletin were made to gain 1 additional information on the value of Texas-grown feedstuffs for fat- tening lambs. Five trials (11) at the Spur Substation (Texas Bulletin 379...

  20. Endocytosis in soybean protoplasts and synchronous suspension cultures of soybean cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sui, Xiaomei

    1994-01-01

    The double phosphate starvation method for inducing cell division synchrony in suspension cultures was applied to a rapidly growing suspension culture of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cells. The synchrony of the culture was confirmed by changes...

  1. Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhihong

    1998-01-01

    Feasibility of the stress relaxation technique which has a strong potential for texture characterization of dough and food products, was evaluated with both corn masa and corn tortillas (These are "low-moisture tortillas" which are ready to be fried...

  2. Cash Wheat in a Wheat-Ryegrass Grazing System. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, L.R.; Rouquette, F.M. Jr.; Randel, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    . On the grazed area sam:-'" pIing error was very high and comparisons be tween varieties were not significant. TABLE 1. FORAGE YIELD (LB OVENDRY WT/A) OF 5 WHEAT VARIETIES MECHANICALLY CLIPPED DURING TWO GROWING SEASONS 1980-81 Harvest Date Variety Dec. 12... jan. 23 Feb. 16 Mar. 13 Apr. 7 May 7 Total Coker "68-15 894 409 McNair 1003 715 588 Arthur 71 486 0 Tx-72-9 460 128 Tx-73-93 843 460 Mean 680 317 CV 19 51 LSD (10% level) 169 206 Variety Dec. 16 jan. 25 TAM-106 2018 1252 Coker 68-15 2247...

  3. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  4. 98 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Genetic Variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    98 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Virology Genetic Variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States, T. D. 2013. Genetic variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States Pacific Northwest, is a widespread and damaging pathogen of wheat. WSMV is not a chronic problem of annual wheat in the United States

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air [kg NOx-Equiv.]. Production and processes of corn and petroleum from crude oils are also observed ­ Global Warming Air [kg CO2-Equiv.], 3) TRACI, Acidification Rain [kg mol H + Equiv.], and 4) TRACI, Smog for ethanol production (corn versus corn stover) had little effect on the life cycle emissions of E85, however

  6. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1957-01-01

    Barley (grain) Cowpeas (grain) Rye (grain) Sugar beet Corn (field) Wheat Rape Castorbean (grain) Soybean Oats (grain) Rice FORAGE CROPS White clover8 TaIl fesque Wheat- Alkali sacaton Alsike clover Meadow grasses Bermudagrass Red clover fesque... Sudangrass Barley (hay) Ladino clover Orchard- Sweetclover Rhodesgrass Crimson grass Alfalfa Blue clover Millet Ryegrass Panicgrass Rose clover Sour clover Rye (hay) Burnet clover Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLE CROPS Lima bean...

  7. Influence of Climate on Composition of Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill); Adriance, Duncan

    1891-01-01

    IN DOUGH STATE-GEEEN-IN LBS. Wisconsin. Kew Pork. Maryland. Kansas. Kentucky. Texas. Georgia. 11252 8120 16864 14364 13716 17892 16224 CURED-FODDER MAIZE. 9828 8100 7776 9984 8840 FORAGE CORN-GRAIN HARD-YIELD PER ACRE. 5184 3564 9720 1614 6588 12852...

  8. Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB): a Web Resource for Soybean Translational Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Trupti; Patil, Kapil; Fitzpatrick, Michael R.; Franklin, Levi D.; Yao, Qiuming; Cook, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Zhem; Libault, Marc; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Valliyodan, Babu; Wu, Xiaolei; Cheng, Jianlin; Stacey, Gary; Nguyen, Henry T.; Xu, Dong

    2012-01-17

    Background: Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB) is a comprehensive all-inclusive web resource for soybean translational genomics. SoyKB is designed to handle the management and integration of soybean genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics data along with annotation of gene function and biological pathway. It contains information on four entities, namely genes, microRNAs, metabolites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods: SoyKB has many useful tools such as Affymetrix probe ID search, gene family search, multiple gene/ metabolite search supporting co-expression analysis, and protein 3D structure viewer as well as download and upload capacity for experimental data and annotations. It has four tiers of registration, which control different levels of access to public and private data. It allows users of certain levels to share their expertise by adding comments to the data. It has a user-friendly web interface together with genome browser and pathway viewer, which display data in an intuitive manner to the soybean researchers, producers and consumers. Conclusions: SoyKB addresses the increasing need of the soybean research community to have a one-stop-shop functional and translational omics web resource for information retrieval and analysis in a user-friendly way. SoyKB can be publicly accessed at http://soykb.org/.

  9. Multi-Component Harvesting of Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop commercially-viable technologies that will potentially overcome these barriers and enable the use of wheat residues as an inexpensive feedstock resource.

  10. Stabilizing Soybean Production in Northeast Texas with Early Planting of Early-Maturing Soybean Varieties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, G.R. Jr; Nelson, L.R.; Finch, G.A. III

    1990-01-01

    low of32,100 acres in 1985 (2). Changes in soybean acreage are often abrupt. In 1980, 108,300 acres were harvested (4), dropping to 63,600 the following year (5). Average annual yields have been equally sporadic, ranging from 25 bulA in 1979 (3...) to 13 bulA in 1980 (4). Acreage fluctuations generally restilt from environ mental and price instabilities. Nonirrigated soybeans grown on the area's black land soils are most susceptible to environ mental hazards. Historically, the area experiences...

  11. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbotts Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchTall Corn

  12. Heartland Corn Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent|Corn Products Jump to:

  13. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGIC...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corporaion Metallurgical Laboratory in Bayside, New York THE FORMER SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION, INC. METALLURGICAL LABORATORY Bayside, New York Site Function late...

  14. Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

    2010-12-21

    The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

  15. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process Design and...

  16. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 259 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL John D years. Soybean Rust is active in South Carolina primarily after mid-August in most years. Soybean South Carolina Soybean Production Guide for information on accurate identification of diseases based

  17. WATER REQUIREMENTSWATER REQUIREMENTSWATER REQUIREMENTSWATER REQUIREMENTS of Hard Red Spring Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    WATER REQUIREMENTSWATER REQUIREMENTSWATER REQUIREMENTSWATER REQUIREMENTS of Hard Red Spring Wheat C. Hopkins #12;Estimating Water Requirements of Hard Red Spring Wheat for Final Irrigations 2 Introductiond water use Producers of hard red spring wheat know that inadequate water reduces yield and quality

  18. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  19. Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guajardo Flores, Sara

    1998-01-01

    The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three...

  20. Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil Sustainability & Renewability 28 1 Introduction 28 2 Disclaimer 28 #12;ii Thermodynamics of corn-ethanol biofuel. . . Web Version 3 Preliminaries 29 4 Laws of Thermodynamics 29 5 Thermodynamics and Economics 31 6

  1. THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    used on farms, such as gasoline, diesel, LP gas (LPG), natural gas, and electricity, for the production plants. The major objectives of this report are to improve the quality of data and methodology used on the latest data on corn production and corn yield, (2) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

  2. The Real Corn-Ethanol Transportation Tad W. Patzek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The Real Corn-Ethanol Transportation System Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil and Environmental of ethanol in the US is essentially equal to the unleaded gasoline prices in Europe research, mass transit systems, highway upgrades, etc. Corn and ethanol subsidies in the US channel money

  3. Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    · E10 vs. E85 choice · Examined of corn-based ethanol fuel systems on the following: - environmentalBiofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol

  4. Corning and University Technology Collaborations Charles S. Philip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is primarily a high-tech B2B company 4 Former Corning primary consumer brand. Current Corning primary consumer Display Technology · Drug Discovery Technology · New Business Development · Equity JV Companies · Cell Products · Light-duty gasoline vehicles · Light-duty and heavy-duty on-road diesel vehicles · Heavy

  5. Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | OpenCorinna,CorixCorn

  6. The effects of added wheat proteins on processing and quality of wheat flour tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascut, Simina

    2002-01-01

    crust characteristics when the buns are stored in a steamer. Gluten Changes During Baking of Flour Tortillas Wheat proteins develop into gluten during mixing and form a protein network through disulfide linkages and hydrophobic, ionic and hydrogen...

  7. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes-fold expansion of biofuel production (4), which will likely drive further expansion of corn area crops that compete with corn for land. Increased corn acreage for biofuel production has raised con

  8. A First Law Thermodynamic Analysis of Biodiesel Production From Soybean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    in moist alluvial soils with a good organic content. Soybeans, like most legumes perform nitrogen fixation and disinfectants, pesticides, fertilizers, candles, linoleum, varnish, fire extinguisher fluid, and paint. Figure 1

  9. Characterization of peanut-soybean films for food packaging applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellez Garay, Angela Maria

    1999-01-01

    Edible films made from peanut and soybean were developed using casting and single-screw extrusion methods. The effect of time, formulation and processing method on the rheological, barrier and physical properties of the ...

  10. Reducing nitrate loads from corn and soybean, tile-drained, agricultural production systems in the Upper Mississippi River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    ). Tile woodchip bioreactors had good nitrate removal in 2012 (80% nitrate reduction), and wetlands had

  11. Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Develops Student-StakeholdersProtocolQ &Training

  12. Future Contracts and Options Commodity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    in specific areas: ­ New York Mercantile Exchange(NYMEX): concentrates in energy products such as crude oil, soybean oil and wheat ­ London Metal Exchange (LME): specializes in metal trading such as copper, lead are contracts for future delivery of the underlying asset ( corn, oil, livestock, precious metal, etc

  13. Buying Hedge with Futures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Mark; Kastens, Terry L.

    2009-01-07

    , David Anderson and Terry Kastens* 2 hogs, corn, wheat and soybeans are a few examples. A notable exception is grain sorghum. Because of grain sorghum?s close price relationship to corn, producers can use corn futures to manage grain sorghum price... of gain) is 7. The cattle feeder?s projected feed requirement is 6,750 bushels (54,000 pounds total gain x 7 pounds of feed per pound of gain ? 56 pounds per bushel). Since one Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) corn contract is specified as 5,000 bushels...

  14. Characterization of secondary grain dust explosions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulman, Cheryl Wendler

    1983-01-01

    dust less than 106 um . . . ~ . . ~ ~ ~ ~ 27 4 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for wheat dust less than 106 um . 28 5 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for rice dust less than 106 um ~ 29 6 Coulter Counter particle size... distribution f' or wheat/sorghum dust, less than 106 um . 7 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for soybean dust less than 106 um 31 8 Coulter Counter particle size distribution for corn dust between 106 and. 250 um 9 Coulter Counter particle size...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES NY.07-1 - Letter, Smith to Norris, Contract at (30-1)-1293- U Metal Requirements, March 5, 1953 NY.07-2 -...

  16. 2015 Soil Testing Form Corn, Forage, Pasture & Hay Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    __________ tons/acre gal/acre Wood ash applied? ________ Yes ________ No 2. Time until manure will be incorporated/acre Wood ash applied? ________ Yes ________ No Corn yield goals 15 to 18(90 ­ 108 BU) 18 to 22 (108 ­ 132

  17. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  18. Alternative Export - Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas - Oklahoma Panhandle. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Shanmugham C.V.

    1980-01-01

    to be the most efficient of the export-wheat bility and potential cost savings of operating wheat- distribution systems. For the six-county area, this carrying unit trains between a six-county area in the would annually generate marketing-systemsavings Texas-Oklahoma... is a major source of income for U.S. and South Plains grain producers. Historically, wheat has ranked as one of the most valuable crops in Texas and Oklahoma, states that are major producers of the annual Hard Red Winter wheat national output...

  19. Screening of wheat genotypes for boron efficiency in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, S; Jahiruddin, M; Islam, M A; Islam, M R; Brown, P H; Gustafson, J P

    2009-01-01

    of wheat cultivars. Bangladesh Journal Agricultural Scienceimportant cereal crop in Bangladesh. Its yield is very low,of boron deficiency in Bangladesh soils. Boron deficiency

  20. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  1. Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore, Herminia T.

    2010-07-14

    A billion tons per year of genetically modified corn residues are soil incorporated having both direct and indirect effects on the belowground environment, soil carbon (C) sequestration, and nutrient cycling. If Bt genetic ...

  2. Synthetic Hexaploid Wheat as a Source of Improvement for Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Jessica Kay

    2012-02-14

    backcrosses to spring wheats show improvement over recurrent parents (del Blanco et al., 2000; Lage et al., 2004a; Mujeeb-Kazi et al., 2008; Villareal et al., 1994) but evidence of the benefits of synthetic backcrosses to winter wheat is meager... drought stress, a common problem in Texas High Plains, as well as heat stress, a common problem in South Texas (del Blanco et al., 2000; Reynolds et al., 2007; Trethowanand Mujeeb-Kazi, 2008). Reynolds et al. attributed synthetic lines to be better...

  3. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 CORN INSECT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 48 CORN INSECT CONTROL Francis in each field where corn is to be planted. Major insect pests of corn in South Carolina. Insect and Bt11, vip protein Vip3A and cry protein Cry1Ab). #12;South Carolina Pest Management Handbook

  4. Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-04-18

    In an effort to assess the true effects of higher corn prices, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) commissioned an analysis on the impact of increased corn prices on retail food prices. This paper summarizes key results of the study and offers additional analysis based on information from a variety of other sources.

  5. Field Manipulation of Nomuraea rileyi (Moniliales: Moniliaceae): Effects on Soybean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Field Manipulation of Nomuraea rileyi (Moniliales: Moniliaceae): Effects on Soybean Defoliators defoliators and 10% of their larvae are mummified by the ento- mopathogenic fungus Nomuraea rileyi (Farlow) ABSTRACT Attempts to influence the prevalence of the entomophathogenic fungus No- mUTaea rileyi (Farlow

  6. Building Bio-based Supply Chains: Theoretical Perspectives on Innovative Contract Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres, Jody M.; Endres, A. Bryan; Stoller, Jeremy J.

    2013-01-01

    to the price of corn, crude oil, or natural gas. Parties maythree corn contracts, two crude oil contracts, a soybeans

  7. Creating Advanced Biosensors with Chips and Light Robert M. Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creating Advanced Biosensors with Chips and Light Robert M. Corn Department of Chemistry University of California, Irvine Surface Bioaffinity Sensors #12;DNA-DNA Binding Surface Bioaffinity Biosensors Surface bioaffinity biosensors use a biochemical recognition event to detect the presence of a target biological

  8. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  9. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J.W.; Patrick, Carl; Cronholm, Gregory B.

    1982-01-01

    Cutworm ............................... 15 Grasshoppers ........................................ 16 INSECTICIDE APPLICATION METHODS ....................................... 17 PROTECTING BEES FROM INSECTICIDES .................................. 17... will seriously reduce bee populations. 10 Flea Beetles Flea beetles are very tiny, shiny black or greenish black insects that will jump when disturbed. They nge in size from a little smaller than a pinhead to ;,everal times as large. They damage corn...

  10. Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Lambs : Third Experiment. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (Joseph McKinley); Dickson, R. E.

    1923-01-01

    about fourteen per cent. cheaper than made by Lot 1 ancl the profits per lamb were 29 cents greater. Table 10. Comparison of ground threshed kafir with ground shelled corn. It will be seen that Lot 7, fattened on ground threshed kafir. made practica...

  11. Kaffir Corn and Milo Maize for Fattening Cattle. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, F. R. (Frederick Rupert); Burns, John C.

    1907-01-01

    the remaining one hundred divided into two lots practicaIly alike in weight and quality. Those wh~ch, were to receive cotton seed with their kaffir corn were de~signatecl lot 1, and those to which meal was to 1)c fecl as lot 11. The ex- ~erimcnt clid...

  12. Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

    2009-08-15

    The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

  13. Effects of Variations in High Molecular Weight Glutenin Allele Composition and Resistant Starch on Wheat Flour Tortilla Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jondiko, Tom Odhiambo

    2012-02-14

    digestion, similar to white wheat bread (Saldana and Brown 1984). However, consumers prefer refined wheat tortillas mostly due to their sensory attributes compared to whole wheat tortillas. Hence, technology and ingredients are needed to improve...

  14. Upstream Transmission Effects of Generic Advertising and Promotion: The Case of Soybeans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hyeon

    2014-11-21

    . The Brazil Component of the World Soybean Model ................................... 181 Table 11. The Argentina Component of the World Soybean Model ............................. 188 Table 12. World Market Clearing Conditions of the World Soybean Model... farm supply; (d) no free-rider gains to Brazil and Argentina; (e) no domestic supply chain effects; (f) no global supply chain effects; (g) no checkoff investments in production research (only in demand promotion), and (h) no promotion...

  15. Plain, Asiago, Chocolate Chip, Blueberry, Cin Sugar, Cin Raisin, Sesame, Everything, Sourdough, Honey Wheat, Plain Thin, Wheat Thin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Applewood Bacon and Cheddar Egg Sandwich: Plain Bagel, Egg, Bacon and Cheddar Cheese, Bacon, Ancho-Mayo, Lettuce, Tomato, Red Onion, Spinach. $6.99 Turkey BAT: Honey Wheat Bagel, Turkey, Bacon, Avocado, Roasted Tomato Sauce, Lettuce, Tomato. $6

  16. Molecular and cytological analysis of a novel leaf rust resistance gene in wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franks, Cleve Douglas

    2002-01-01

    A novel wheat leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops cylindricum accession TTCC295 was investigated, using both cytogenetic and molecular tools. Previous work had introgressed this gene into adapted wheat germplasm, which was crossed to 'Chinese...

  17. Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Baby Beeves. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Brewer, Roy A.; Dickson, R. E.

    1922-01-01

    Initial and Final Weights. Shrinkages and Dressing Percentages .............................................. (Table 8) 19 .............. Discussion of Finishing Beeves in Texas Feed Lots 20 .......................................... Hints to Beginners... markets at figures ranging from ten to t~enty per cent. below corn.* It was with a view of casting some additional light on the above ques- tion that the Texas Experiment Station has, during recent years, con- ducted a series of lamb-feeding tests...

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Wheat Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and social aspects of wheat paper and 30% recycled paper have been compared. The Carbon Footprint is one footprint of wheat production is actually lower than the wood production if carbon storage is taken.0 Environmental Analysis 6 2.1 Carbon Storage 6 2.1.1 Wheat 6 2.1.2 Wood 7 2.2 Carbon Footprint 7 2.2.1 Wheat 8 2

  19. Wheat Gray Shorts for the Prevention of Slipped Tendons in Battery Brooder Chicks. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, R. M. (Ross Madison); Couch, James Russell

    1936-01-01

    STATION -- - A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - BULLETIN 1 -- - JUNE, 1936 DIVISION OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY WHEAT GRAY SHORTS FOR THE PREVENTION OF SLIPPED TENDONS IN BATTERY BROODER CHICKS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL... COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President Rations containing wheat gray shorts milled from hard wheat produced fewer slipped tendons and'more rapid gains than rations containing shorts milled from soft wheat when fed to chicks ih battery brooders...

  20. Development of wheat marketing strategies for the Texas Northern High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Karl E

    1982-01-01

    Marketing Strategy Results Marketing Strategy Comparison 42 55 55 71 72 77 78 SUEY. REFERENCES 83 86 APPENDIX A: Selected Moving Average Combination Results 88 APPENDIX B: February and August Wheat Outlook and Situa- tion Accuracy Plots 90..., 1974-1980. Examples of Buy and Sell Signals Generated by Moving Averages. 14 May Wheat Outlook and Situation Hard Winter Wheat Forecast Beginning Stock and Actual Beginning Stock Values for Crop Years 1975-1979. 44 November Wheat Outlook...

  1. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the earmore »averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.« less

  2. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Novak, Jeff M.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Arriaga, Francisco; Lightle, David T.; Hoover, Amber; Emerson, Rachel; Barbour, Nancy W.

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  3. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  4. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN NEMATODE CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops - 2015 264 SOYBEAN NEMATODE CONTROL John D for more in-depth information on nematode management. NEMATICIDES AVAILABLE FOR CONTROLLING SOYBEAN Pesticide & Temik Brand 15G Lock'n Load Aldicarb Pesticide Aldicarb 3.0 - 5.0 lbs. Apply granules in a 6 ­ 8

  5. 794 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Effect of Solar Radiation on Severity of Soybean Rust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuerger, Andrew C.

    794 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Mycology Effect of Solar Radiation on Severity of Soybean Rust Heather M. Young., and Marois, J. J. 2012. Effect of solar radiation on disease severity of soybean rust. Phytopathology 102). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how

  6. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  7. Soybean and Coconut Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Combustion Characteristics in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Manbae [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional diesel combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.

  8. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harholt, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    of wheat straw for bioethanol production by a combinedyields when processed for bioethanol production. In the

  9. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harholt, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    of wheat straw for bioethanol production by a combinedwhen processed for bioethanol production. In the present

  10. Effects of ethanol, heat, and lipid treatment of soybean meal on nitrogen utilization by ruminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, G.L.; Berger, L.L.; Fahey, G.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ruminant nitrogen utilization of soybean meal treated with (1) 70% ethanol at 23 or 78/sup 0/C, (2) 10% coconut oil or tallow, or (3) a combination of 70% ethanol at 78/sup 0/C and coconut oil or tallow was evaluated. Nitrogen solubility was lowest for soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil and ethanol plus tallow. In situ nitrogen disappearance was lowest for soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil, and ethanol plus tallow. Rates of nitrogen disappearance between 3 and 12 h were lowest for soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil, and ethanol plus tallow. Nitrogen retained by lambs was greater for lambs fed soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C than for those fed untreated soybean meal. Ruminal ammonia 4 h post feeding was lowest for lambs fed soybean meal treated with ethanol at 78/sup 0/C, ethanol plus coconut oil, and coconut oil. These data indicate that the 78/sup 0/C ethanol treatment improved nitrogen utilization.

  11. ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING AND PROCESSING A 100-g Laboratory Corn Wet-Milling Procedure S. R. ECKHOFF,' S. K of biotechnology and genetic engineering in corn hybrid development. Identification of better wet-milling hybrids of separation of the germ or the ability Professor, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University

  12. GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    agroecological regions where Golden Harvest's suite of corn hybrids were bested adapted in the western Corn Belt qualities and root zone water-holding capacities, reducing risks to drought events. A toolkit of ESRI Arc Harvest brand products, outlined a series of issues within their business model to improve acreage

  13. 16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

  14. Impact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113116, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    with velocity, especially in the early reaction stage, suggests that chemical reaction is not the only factorImpact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113 Velocity on Hot Water Only Pretreatment of Corn Stover in a Flowthrough Reactor CHAOGANG LIU AND CHARLES E

  15. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The effect of CO 2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production This article has been) 024003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/3/2/024003 The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates

  16. Supercritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of corn stover and switchgrass for lignocellulosic ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    ethanol production Naveen Narayanaswamy a , Ahmed Faik b , Douglas J. Goetz a , Tingyue Gu a, a Department). Increased demand in biofuels cannot be met by the use of corn and sugarcane. In the US, corn ethanol has in and Liska, 2007). The production of lignocellulosic ethanol from biomass gener- ally involves four major

  17. ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    by agricultural and chemical companies for many reasons. However, ethanol does not mix well with gasoline that one burns 1 gallon of gasoline equivalent in fossil fuels to pro- duce 1 gallon of gasoline equivalent as ethanol from corn. When this corn ethanol is burned as a gasoline additive or fuel, its use amounts

  18. Assessing Hail and Freeze Damage to Field Corn and Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen

    1995-11-30

    New Growth. Physical damage to young corn can be experienced from a freeze or heavy frost, from blowing sand and whipping in high winds, and from hail. Sometimes it may be a combination of several events. With each of these the growing point has... sunshine and temperatures above 55?F to support photosynthesis and to grow through any extended stress period once seed stores are depleted. Frost Damage (27 to 32?F). Tissue loss from frost damage is directly proportional to how low the temperature falls...

  19. Environmental Impacts of Stover Removal in the Corn Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David Muth

    2012-08-01

    When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs.

  20. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN~$7-KSYLVANIA-CORNING

  1. Dow Corning Europe S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the National ClimateDongying ShengdongCorning Europe S A

  2. Little Sioux Corn Processors LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, UnitedLibertyLite On TechnologyCorn Processors LP Jump

  3. Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy| OpenNewRiversideRoanoke,Robbins Corn

  4. Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii | OpenCorinna,CorixCornLP

  5. Wheat and ryegrass interaction in response to drought 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Katherine Holt

    1995-01-01

    :12 in 19 1 pots. Controls were well watered for the 14 wk experiment. Plants exposed to drought were well watered for 8 wk, had no water for 2 wk, and then were well watered for 4 wk. Despite a much smaller seed than wheat and a similar time of emergence...

  6. Does GM wheat affect saprophagous Diptera species (Drosophilidae, Phoridae)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Does GM wheat affect saprophagous Diptera species (Drosophilidae, Phoridae)? Marco Peter, Andreas Antifungal resistance Powdery mildew Pleiotropic effect S u m m a r y Genetically modified (GM) plants might. Therefore, an ecological risk assessment for GM plants also has to include decomposers. In a laboratory diet

  7. Forecasting Using Time Varying Meta-Elliptical Distributions with a Study of Commodity Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancetta, Alessio; Nikanrova, Arina

    2006-03-14

    products), cartels among producing countries reducing supply (e.g. OPEC), changes in legislations (e.g. import-export tariffs), international war conflicts (e.g. Iraq war), changes in weather conditions (e.g. global warming), the behaviour of commodity... . The commodities studied are crude oil, gas oil (IPE), heating oil, natural gas, propane, un- leaded gas, cocoa, coffee, sugar, orange juice, soybean, corn, rice, oats, wheat and cotton. Assum- ing the data possess suitable ergodic properties, we report sample...

  8. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  9. Free amino acids, nitrate, and nitrate reductase in nitrogen fixation by soybean nodules 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madtes, Paul Clayton

    1978-01-01

    FREE AMINO ACIDS, NITRATE, AND NITRATE REDUCTASE IN NITROGEN FIXATION BY SOYBEAN NODULES A Thesis by PAUL CLAYTON MADTES, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Biophysics FREE AMINO ACIDS, NITRATE, AND NITRATE REDUCTASE IN NITROGEN FIXATION BY SOYBEAN NPDULES A Thesis by PAUL CLAYTON MADTES, JR. Approved as to style and content by: g jap (Chairman...

  10. The Essential Amino Acid Content of Cottonseed, Peanut and Soybean Products. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Fred; Kuiken, Kenneth A. (Kenneth Alfred); Lyman, Carl M. (Carl Morris)

    1947-01-01

    STATlON R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station, Texaa BULLETIN NO. 692 SEPTEMBER 1947 The Essential Amino Acid Content of Cottonseed, Peanut and Soybean Products CARL M. LYMAN, KENNETH KUIKEN and FRED HALE With the technical assistance of Shirley... SEPTEMBER 1947 The Essential Amino Acid Conten,t of Cottonseed, Peanut and Soybean Products CARL M. LYMAN, KENNETH KUIKEN and FRED HALE With the technical assistance of Shirley Dieterich, Marjory Bradfc~rd and Mary Trant The nutritional requirement...

  11. The relation between Brazilian and Chicago Board of Trade soybean prices: a time series test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melcher, Bruno

    1991-01-01

    , and finally, (c) the nature and degree of intervention by governments or international agencies in the market price determination mechanism. 17 CHAPTER III THE HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OP THE BRAZILIAN SOYBEAN SYSTEM Soybean cultivation in Brazil dates from... at distance, were always present with their love and encouragement. vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Objectives. Overview. 5 6 CHAPTER II FUTURES MARKETS Price Discovery. Information. 11 13 CHAPTER III THE HISTORICAL EVOLUTION...

  12. Soil Acidity and Manganese Nutrition of Corn and Soybeans as Affected by Lime and Nitrogen Applications in an Oxisol under a No-Till System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caires, Eduardo Fávero; Garbuio, Fernando José; Joris, Hélio Antonio Wood; Pereira, Paulo Roberto da Silva Filho

    2009-01-01

    control soil acidity in NT, lime is broadcast on the surfacethat examined the effect of lime and N applications soilacid loamy soil. Dolomitic lime was surface applied and N-NH

  13. Abstract The ability of Trametes versicolor ATCC 20869 to colonize several natural and synthetic materials (wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsay, Juliana

    materials (wheat straw, jute, hemp, maple woodchips, and nylon and poly- ethylene teraphthalate fibers such as woodchips is cheaper. In M. Shin · T.

  14. Effects of hydrocolloids on processing and qualities of wheat tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friend, Christopher Patric

    1991-01-01

    . (August, 1991) Christopher Patrie Friend, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ralph D. Waniska Effects of hydrocolloids were evaluated in hot-press wheat tortillas. Natural (arabic, guar, and xanthan), modified... these transitions causes baked products to become hard and brittle, i. e. , stale (Dziezak, 1991). The rate of firming of a baked product, a parameter of staling, is dependent upon moisture level, storage temperature, product formulation and baking process...

  15. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-03-01

    This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

  16. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

  17. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different corn hybrids (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammoglia Villagomez, Agustin

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different agronomic and grain quality characteristics of 106 corn hybrids. A randomized split-plot design with 3 replications was used. The virus isolate obtained...

  18. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals: Pilot-Scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-04-01

    This project focuses on the development and pilot-scale testing of technologies that will enable the development of a biorefinery capable of economically deriving high-value chemicals and oils from lower value corn fiber.

  19. Economic Analysis of Atoxigenic Mitigation Methods for Aflatoxin in Corn in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampson, Jessica Sue

    2014-04-09

    Atoxigenics and crop insurance are available to producers to assist in preventing economic loss from aflatoxin contamination in corn. Atoxigenics are a newer technology available to farmers, and although professional opinion ...

  20. A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makaudze, Ephias

    1993-01-01

    Board's financial resource needs. Thus, the corn supply forecasts are important information used by the government for contingency planning, decision-making, policy-formulation and implementation. As such, the need for accurate forecasts is obvious...

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Textured Wheat Ingredients and Soy Proteins in the Quality and Acceptability of Chicken Nuggets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeater, Michael C

    2013-04-24

    Chicken nuggets are commonly made with varying levels of textured vegetable proteins such as soy and wheat, for their ability to bind water and their meat like conformation. This project compared textured wheat proteins and soy proteins at 10%, 20...

  2. Genetic Analysis of Bread Making Quality Stability in Wheat using a Halberd X Len Recombinant Inbred Line Population 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poudel, Ashima

    2012-07-16

    Wheat grain quality has a complex genetic architecture heavily influenced by the growing environment. Consistency in wheat quality not only affects the efficiency of milling and baking but also the quality of end-use ...

  3. Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-04-01

    Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

  4. Economic Impact of Harvesting Corn Stover under Time Constraint: The Case of North Dakota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of stochastic harvest field time on profit maximizing potential of corn cob/stover collection in North Dakota. Three harvest options are analyzed using mathematical programming models. Our findings show that under the first corn grain only harvest option, farmers are able to complete harvesting corn grain and achieve maximum net income in a fairly short amount of time with existing combine technology. However, under the second simultaneous corn grain and cob (one-pass) harvest option, farmers generate lower net income compared to the net income of the first option. This is due to the slowdown in combinemore »harvest capacity as a consequence of harvesting corn cobs. Under the third option of separate corn grain and stover (two-pass) harvest option, time allocation is the main challenge and our evidence shows that with limited harvest field time available, farmers find it optimal to allocate most of their time harvesting grain and then proceed to harvest and bale stover if time permits at the end of harvest season. The overall findings suggest is that it would be more economically efficient to allow a firm that is specialized in collecting biomass feedstock to participate in cob/stover harvest business.« less

  5. Field Experiments at McKinney Sub-Station and Wichita Falls Sub-Station with Wheat, Corn, Cotton, Grasses and Manures. Field Experiments at College Station with Corn, Cotton, Grasses, Peas and Manures. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connell, J. H.; Clayton, James

    1895-01-01

    Cracken . . ............................... Smooth . . . . . . . . 17 .18 ..... . 206 White Frack .................................. do ......... Hi.29 .... .. 207 Lebanon ................................... Bearded ........ 23.55 3.43. 208 Bodine E., 0. K. West .... . ................. Smooth...

  6. Leaf epicuticular wax ultrastructure and trichome presence on Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) resistant and susceptible leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leaf epicuticular wax ultrastructure and trichome presence on Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia wax ultrastructure and leaf trichomes were examined on two Russian wheat aphid-susceptible wheat. Comparison of the scanning electron micrographs showed that the epicuticular wax structure was similar

  7. Chromosomes form into seven groups in hexaploid and tetraploid wheat as a prelude to meiosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Peter

    Chromosomes form into seven groups in hexaploid and tetraploid wheat as a prelude to meiosis be further divided into seven groups of six chromosomes (one chromosome pair being derived from each tetraploid) wheat associate via the centromeres into seven groups as the telomeres begin to cluster

  8. Prebiotics Have Limited Effects on Nutrients Digestibility of a Soybean-Meal-Based Diet by Goldfish Carassius auratus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raggi, Thiago

    2011-02-22

    ), galactooligosaccharide (GOS), and the fructooligosaccharide (FOS) inulin on digestibility of soybean-meal-based diets by goldfish. A basal diet was formulated so that 50% of the protein was provided by soybean meal and the other 50% was from menhaden fishmeal. Each...

  9. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on soybean and maize production in the Midwest United States and soybeans to cooler, drier, and darker conditions from war-related smoke. We combined observed climate had an important effect. 1 Introduction In the event of nuclear war, targets in cities and industrial

  10. U S B P R O J E C T # 7 2 1 1 Transferring Soybean Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagtap, Shrikant

    University, University of Georgia Evaluating PCYield for yield prediction in the Midwest 7 Iowa State Comparing growth of genotypes differing in drought tolerance 18 North Carolina State University Evaluating drought response of modern soybean varieties 18 to improve the soybean model Illinois State Water Survey

  11. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  12. Analyzing and Comparing Biomass Feedstock Supply Systems in China: Corn Stover and Sweet Sorghum Case Studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ren, Lantian; Cafferty, Kara; Roni, Mohammad; Jacobson, Jacob; Xie, Guanghui; Ovard, Leslie; Wright, Christopher

    2015-06-11

    This paper analyzes the rural Chinese biomass supply system and models supply chain operations according to U.S. concepts of logistical unit operations: harvest and collection, storage, transportation, preprocessing, and handling and queuing. In this paper, we quantify the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum in China under different scenarios. We analyze three scenarios of corn stover logistics from northeast China and three scenarios of sweet sorghum stalks logistics from Inner Mongolia in China. The case study estimates that the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk to be $52.95/dry metric ton and $52.64/dry metric ton, respectively,more »for the current labor-based biomass logistics system. However, if the feedstock logistics operation is mechanized, the cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk decreases to $36.01/dry metric ton and $35.76/dry metric ton, respectively. The study also includes a sensitivity analysis to identify the cost factors that cause logistics cost variation. Results of the sensitivity analysis show that labor price has the most influence on the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum stalk, with a variation of $6 to $12/dry metric ton.« less

  13. Influence of Planting Date on Response of Winter Wheat to Phosphorus. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.

    1987-01-01

    RI / B-1564 April 1987 Influence of Planting Date on Response of Winter Wheat to Phosphorus p T T Billy W. Hipp* LIBRARY JUN 1 5 1987 T ~x s A&M llniveusi Abstract Wheat is grown extensively in the Texas Blacklands, and even though... phosphorus (P) fertilization is a common practice, factors that influence the magnitude of response have not been ascertained. Field studies were conducted over a 4-year period to determine the influence of planting date on winter wheat response to P...

  14. The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield, and Michael Wang. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield estimated the net energy value (NEV) of corn ethanol. However, variations in data and assumptions used among variation and develops a more consistent estimate. We conclude that the NEV of corn ethanol has been rising

  15. Tracking of Transgene Expression in Soybean using Robotics and GFP John James Finer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    Tracking of Transgene Expression in Soybean using Robotics and GFP John James Finer Department system that is composed of a 2-dimensional robotics platform, a Leica MZFLIII fluorescence dissecting on the robotics platform. The platform contains docking centers for 16 Petri dishes, which are secured

  16. Evaluation of soybean germplasm for germination and storage under conditions simulating tropical environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arulnandhy, Vytilingam

    1982-01-01

    (62) reported that soybean seed stored at 134 moisture content. in polyethylene bags or tins lost viability in eight ~saks at 35 C but the loss was less rapid with 7% moisture content. However, at 25 C 13 seed stored at 7-10% moisture content mainr...

  17. Virtual and Embedded Nutrient Flows from Soybean Production in Mato Grosso, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosso, Brazil Michael J. Lathuillière1,2 (mlathuilliere@gmail.com), Eduardo Guimarães Couto2, Mark S (Vancouver, BC Canada) 2Departamento de Solos, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (Cuiabá, MT Brazil) 3 calculated from annual yields (IBGE 2012) Methods Soybean in Mato Grosso, Brazil Mato Grosso is home

  18. SOYBEAN APHID Christian H. Krupke, John L. Obermeyer, and Larry W. Bledsoe, Extension Entomologists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    in many areas of the Midwest, including Indiana. Researchers do not know how, when, or where this exotic's present distribution extends throughout the Midwest, much of the Great Plains' states, and east;2Soybean Aphid -- E-217-W under stress from other factors (e.g., drought, late planting, disease, nutrient

  19. Private governance in royalty collection Effectiveness and limitations in tracing GM soybean in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in Brazil Patricio. Mendez del Vilar1 , Carlos Magri Ferreira2 , Juliana Galvarros Bueno Lobo Ribeiro3, Brazil. 3 University of Brasilia, Brazil Summary This paper focuses on the emergence of an institutional innovation along with the diffusion of Genetically Modified Soybean in Brazil. It results in private

  20. Ectopic expression of a soybean phytase in developing seeds of Glycine max to improve phosphorus availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    (*author for correspondence; e-mail egrabau@vt.edu); 2 Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, OARDC, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA., 1989). Similar to other agriculturally important crops, soybean contains 60­80% of total seed P

  1. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    1953-01-01

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  2. Fuelwood procurement for an industrial power plant: a case study of Dow Corning's program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, A.G.; Sworden, P.G.; Bond, C.T.

    1984-08-01

    Dow Corning Corporation has developed effective procedures for meeting the fuelwood requirements of a 22.4 megawatt steam and electricity cogenerating power plant. The fuelwood procurement program of Dow Corning's Natural Resources Department involves special arrangements with private landowners, logging and hauling producers, and waste wood suppliers. The program's success is attributable to a favorable location, adequate allowance for advance planning, effective public relations, and flexible management. The program is significant because it demonstrates that industrial fuelwood requirements can be met and that improved production from nonindustrial private forests can be relied upon as a major source of fuelwood. 7 references, 7 figures.

  3. Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

  4. Objective methods to evaluate rheological properties of wheat flour tortilla dough 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Meera

    1996-01-01

    Characteristics of wheat flour tortilla dough were measured on a texture analyzer using texture profile analysis (TPA), stress relaxation, extensibility and adhesiveness tests. Doughs were optimally mixed, rested, divided, rounded and sampled...

  5. Instrumental and sensory methods to evaluate texture of wheat flour tortillas during storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Suman

    1999-01-01

    Subjective reliability, sensory evaluation, and objective rheological techniques characterized wheat flour tortillas on 0, 1, 4, 7, 10 and 13 days of storage. Subjective reliability scores increased during storage (r = 0.80). The 5-member expert...

  6. Roles of carbohydrates and proteins in the staling of wheat flour tortilla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alviola, Juma Novie Ayap

    2009-05-15

    Effects of enzymatic modification of starch, proteins and pentosans on dough and tortilla properties were determined to establish the role of these wheat components in tortilla staling. Starch, protein and pentosans were ...

  7. The effect of enzymes and starch damage on wheat flour tortilla quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arora, Sapna

    2007-04-25

    Specific enzymes have been used to improve flour quality for bread but enzyme action in tortilla flour has not been investigated. Two different wheat flours were prepared into tortillas using laboratory-scale, commercial ...

  8. Impact of planting date and seeding rate on grain and forage yields of wheat in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Oliver Jacob

    2009-05-15

    IMPACT OF PLANTING DATE AND SEEDING RATE ON GRAIN AND FORAGE YIELDS OF WHEAT IN TEXAS A Thesis by OLIVER JACOB SHAFFER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Agronomy IMPACT OF PLANTING DATE AND SEEDING RATE ON GRAIN AND FORAGE YIELDS OF WHEAT IN TEXAS A Thesis by OLIVER JACOB SHAFFER...

  9. Influence of Solar Activity on State of Wheat Market in Medieval England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev A. Pustilnik; Gregory Yom Din

    2003-12-09

    The database of Prof. Rogers (1887), which includes wheat prices in England in the Middle Ages, was used to search for a possible influence of solar activity on the wheat market. We present a conceptual model of possible modes for sensitivity of wheat prices to weather conditions, caused by solar cycle variations, and compare expected price fluctuations with price variations recorded in medieval England. We compared statistical properties of the intervals between wheat price bursts during years 1249-1703 with statistical properties of the intervals between minimums of solar cycles during years 1700-2000. We show that statistical properties of these two samples are similar, both for characteristics of the distributions and for histograms of the distributions. We analyze a direct link between wheat prices and solar activity in the 17th Century, for which wheat prices and solar activity data (derived from 10Be isotope) are available. We show that for all 10 time moments of the solar activity minimums the observed prices were higher than prices for the correspondent time moments of maximal solar activity (100% sign correlation, on a significance level solar activity.

  10. Establishing and Implementing an IPM Program for the Redbanded Stink Bug: An Emerging Soybean Pest in the Southern Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavhare, Suhas

    2014-08-04

    Redbanded stink bug (RBSB), (Piezodorus guildinii Westwood) has recently emerged as an economic pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill in the southern US. Having only recently emerged as a pest in the US, little information ...

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Governing the Differential Regulation of Cysteine Proteases in Insect Adaptation to a Soybean Protease Inhibitor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Ji Eun

    2009-05-15

    Under challenge by a dietary soybean cysteine protease inhibitor (scN), cowpea bruchids overcome the inhibitory effects by reconfiguring the expression profiles of their major digestive enzymes, the cathepsin L-like cysteine proteases (Cm...

  12. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and oxygen addition) were also applied for pre-treatment of manure. The manure was blended with water for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

  13. Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ann Marie

    1999-01-01

    ) Field Laboratory, near College Station TX, and at TP Farms, near Waller TX. Different imidazolinone herbicide treatments were applied to imidazolinone tolerant corn between the 2- to 3- and 6- to 8- leaf stage at 36 and 72 pa/ha to evaluate weed control...

  14. Surveys of the Logging Contractor Population 8 Southern States and Maine Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10.0 Surveys of the Logging Contractor Population ­ 8 Southern States and Maine by Cornelis F. de. Egan Associate Professor Department of Forest Management University of Maine Orono, ME 04469-5755 W. Thus, surveys of loggers in Maine and in eight southern states were conducted to gain additional

  15. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  16. Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a and Tony E.Grift2,b 1@illinois.edu Key words: Machine vision, Agricultural robot, Turning, Field of view Abstract. This article discusses the development of variable field of view (FOV) of camera to realize headland turning of an agricultural robot

  17. Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    , distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS), is generated. Dry-grind plants require less equipment, 2006 Index Entries: Distillers' dried grains with solubles; dry-grind process; wet milling; dry milling and reformulated gasoline to reduce CO and other pollutants. The amount of corn used for ethanol production has

  18. Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of light gluten and light steep water from a corn wet milling plant K.D. Rausch. There are few data on the effect of composition of the parent process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light value of CGF and CGM. CGF and CGM are formed from two process streams, light steep water (LSW) and light

  19. Companies Participating in the 1996 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 DEKALB PLANT GENETICS DEKALB 3100 SYCAMORE MYCOGEN PO BOX 68 TULIA TX 79088 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER-6000 WILSON SEEDS, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1996 Coordinated

  20. Companies Participating in the 1995 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE 1921 BLUEGRASS RD DANVILLE KY 40422-9293 DEKALB PLANT MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI-BRED INT., INC. PIONEER BRAND 1000 W JEFFERSON ST TIPTON IN 46072 SOUTHERN PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1995 Coordinated by H. Behl, E. R

  1. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    change issues at the Center for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Nigeria from 1991-1996. HeGlobal Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security to gasoline over the next few decades. Specifically, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA

  2. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  3. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  4. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01

    , (range of 8$. 5 to 102. 4 percent) the value of corn. A wide variation existed in effic'ency due to quality of' grain and protein supplements, creating a need for m &re identification of' ration constituents, More recent trials in which high quality... The data, indicates a 5. Pjo advantage in feed efficI. ency for corn over the average of the sorghum diets ($. 15 vs. 3. 27) . The advan- tage for corn in feed ef'ficiency is less than has been reported by Peo and. Hudman (1958), 11. II@; Danielson and...

  5. Characterization of Quantitative Loci for Morphological and Anatomical Root Traits on the Short Arm of Chromosome 1 of Rye in Bread Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Sundrish

    2009-01-01

    bread wheat 'Pavon'. Crop Science 43:710-717 Esau K (1965)bread wheat 'Pavon'. Crop Science 43:710-717 Endo TR (1988)42- chromosome triticale. Crop Science 16:688-693 Hackauf B,

  6. Soybean production and conversion of tropical forest in the Brazilian Amazon: The case of Vilhena, Rondônia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, J. Christopher; Koeppe, Matthew; Coles, Benjamin; Price, Kevin P.

    2005-08-01

    :WorldSupplyandDistribution.CounselorandAttache´ Reports. Foreign Agricultural Service, Cotton, Oilseeds, Tobacco and Seeds Division. 5. EMBRAPA 2002. Sistemas de Produc¸ a˜ o 1: Tecnologias de Produc¸ a˜ o de Soja—Regia˜ o Central do Brasil. (Production Systems 1: Technologies of Soybean Production... Recursos Naturais. 20. (Survey of Natural Resources). Rio de Janeiro: Ministe´ rio das Minas e Energia. (In Portuguese). 16. RADAMBRASIL 1978. Levantamento de Recursos Naturais. 19. (Survey of Natural Resources). Rio de Janeiro: Ministe´ rio das Minas e...

  7. Lipid Metabolism in Bovine Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Steers Fed Supplementary Palm Oil or Soybean Oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gang, Gyoung Ok

    2012-10-19

    ., 1994). Mardron et al. (2002) indicated that adipose tissue contained more linoleic acid, a key substrate in rumen biohydrogenation, and stearic acid, and contained less palmitic and oleic acids in steers fed extruded full-fat soybeans. Extruded... in a shaking water bath. Neutral lipids in adipose tissues were extracted using the procedure of (Folch et al., 1957) evaporated to dryness, and resuspended in 10 mL of scintillation cocktail (Bio-safe2, Research Product international Corp., Mount...

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. The effect of enzymes and hydrocolloids on the texture of tortillas from fresh nixtamalized masa and nixtamalized corn flour 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez de Velasco, Arturo Carlos

    2004-09-30

    THE EFFECT OF ENZYMES AND HYDROCOLLOIDS ON THE TEXTURE OF TORTILLAS FROM FRESH NIXTAMALIZED MASA AND NIXTAMALIZED CORN FLOUR A Thesis by ARTURO CARLOS GUTIERREZ DE VELASCO ALVAREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... MASA AND NIXTAMALIZED CORN FLOUR A Thesis by ARTURO CARLOS GUTIERREZ DE VELASCO ALVAREZ Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style...

  10. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  11. Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

  12. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A.

    2011-05-01

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  13. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  14. Influence of Cropping Systems On Cotton and Corn Yields on the Gulf Coast Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, B. E.; Smith, J. C.; Whiteley, E. L.

    1962-01-01

    and better stands of cotton were obtained. The main disadvantage of this system was that two planting operations a year were re- quired. Cropping systems containing Dallisgrass and White clover are more highly recommended than all other systems tested... clover can cause bloat in cattle; (3) 2 years are needed to obtain high forage yields and (4) it is difficult to obtain a good seedbed for corn or cotton when the land goes out of forage production. Dallisgrass and White clover produced higher...

  15. Inheritance of resistance to southern stem canker (Diaporthe phaseolorum f.s. meridionalis) in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngeleka, Kadima

    1990-01-01

    Committee: Dr. Olin D. Smith. Soybean 'Crockett', 'Dowling', and 'Tracy-M', resistant to stem canker (Diaporrhe phaseoloram f. s. rnerirlionalis), were crossed with two susceptible soybean cultivars, Coker 338 and Johnston, in order to study... of Fz population of the cross Dowling x Johnston to 3:1 ratio 25 Table 8. Reaction of Dowling, Coker 338, and their progenies to stem canker 27 Table 9. Chi-square test for homogeneity of Fz population of the cross Dowling x Coker 338 to 3:1 ratio...

  16. Producing Early-Maturity (Group IV) Soybeans on the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klosterboer, Arlen; Miller, Travis; Livingston, Stephen

    1996-04-11

    be planted in May and harvested in October and November, when rainfall is generally at a minimum. When Group IV?s were used, less than 1 year in 4 produced soybeans that were not damaged (molded, discolored) because of wet weather at harvest (August... along the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. Acreage in 1994 (all of Texas) reached 220,000, with nearly all beans being marketed through local elevators or by truck to the Port of Houston. Figure 1. Texas Gulf Coast counties predominantly growing maturity group...

  17. Seeding rate and seed size as management techniques for ryegrass (Lolium Multiflorum, Lam) in winter wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Casey Lee

    2005-08-29

    . These wheat seed and seed of the Italian ryegrass cultivar AGulf@ were planted in plastic pots containing fritted clay. A replacement series design with 12 plants per pot compared the relative growth in pure culture and competitiveness in mixtures of the two...

  18. Elucidating and Mapping Heat Tolerance in Wild Tetraploid Wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohamed Badry Mohamed

    2012-02-14

    ................................................................................... 5 Heat stress constrains wheat yield ................................................ 5 Heat stress impairs photosynthesis ............................................... 7 Morphological adaptation to heat stress................................................................................ 37 2.7 The relationship between flag leaf temperature depression (FLTD) and spike temperature depression (STD) at 0 day (50% anthesis); before heat stress treatment...

  19. Nitrogen Cycling from Pea Forage to Wheat in No-Till Systems Perry Miller1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    . Harvesting early at the first bloom stage used 2.5 in. of soil water compared with 3.1 in. when forage harvest was delayed until plump pod (approx. 3 wk). The most water conservative strategy was winter pea harvested at first bloom with 2.1 in. of soil water use. Wheat Yield Response to Previous Crop At Moccasin

  20. Molecular Characterization of Durable Yellow and Leaf Rust Resistance in Two Wheat Populations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basnet, Bhoja

    2012-07-16

    , characterize and utilize Adult Plant Resistance (APR), a.k.a. slow rusting resistance, in wheat germplasm to promote durability of resistance against rust. The objectives of this study were to 1) understand the genetics of APR to YR and/or LR present in two...

  1. Quantitative trait loci(qtl) analysis of yield components and heat tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Jung Hwa

    2009-05-15

    This study was conducted to identify and map QTLs for yield components and heat tolerance of wheat in response to two kinds of heat treatment (short term-and long term-heat treatment) during seed formation in a set of 62 ...

  2. Biocontrol S cience and Technology ( 1999) 9, 529 543 Wheat Seed Colonized with Atoxigenic Aspergillus avus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    ). When applied as a solid formulation, the biocontrol agent is activated by m oisture (fro m irrigation of biocontrol agents must allow cost eVective production and adequate stability to allow the productBiocontrol S cience and Technology ( 1999) 9, 529± 543 Wheat Seed Colonized with Atoxigenic

  3. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-30

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  4. The Effect of Rock Phosphate Upon the Corn Possibility of Phosphoric Acid of the Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    else, or the proper phosphate. For dicalcium phosphate, 1 gram was used. For rock phosphate, 5 grams were used for pots marked R, 10 grams for pots marked 2R, 20 grams for pots marked 4H, and 25 grams for pots marked 5R. Corresponding 3mounts... of Florida soft phosphate were used for pots marked F. The phosphoric acid contained in the ma- terials used is giren in Table 1. Corn was planted first, harvester1 after about sixty days, and sorghum planted as a second crop. Thl? crops were dried...

  5. Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

    2012-02-14

    for the production of high protein germ and corn protein concentrate (CPC). The factors affecting the extraction and purification of HuLZ from rice were evaluated. Ionic strength and pH was used to optimize HuLZ extraction and cation exchange purification.... The selected conditions, pH 4.5 with 50 mM NaCl, were a compromise between HuLZ extractability and binding capacity, resulting in 90% purity. Process simulation was used to assess the HuLZ purification efficiency and showed that the processing costs were...

  6. Comprehensive quantification of triacylglycerols in soybean seeds by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with multiple neutral loss scans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Maoyin; Butka, Emily; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-10-10

    Soybean seeds are an important source of vegetable oil and biomaterials. The content of individual triacylglycerol species (TAG) in soybean seeds is difficult to quantify in an accurate and rapid way. The present study establishes an approach to quantify TAG species in soybean seeds utilizing an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with multiple neutral loss scans. Ten neutral loss scans were performed to detect the fatty acyl chains of TAG, including palmitic (P, 1650), linolenic (Ln, 1853), linoleic (L, 1852), oleic (O, 1851), stearic (S, 1850), eicosadienoic (2052), gadoleic (2051), arachidic (2050), erucic (2251), and behenic (2250). The abundance of ten fatty acyl chains at 46 TAG masses (mass-to-charge ratio, m/z) were determined after isotopic deconvolution and correction by adjustment factors at each TAG mass. The direct sample infusion and multiple internal standards correction allowed a rapid and accurate quantification of TAG species. Ninety-three TAG species were resolved and their levels were determined.The most abundant TAG species were LLL, OLL, LLLn, PLL, OLLn, OOL, POL, and SLL. Many new species were detected and quantified. As a result, this shotgun lipidomics approach should facilitate the study of TAG metabolism and genetic breeding of soybean seeds for desirable TAG content and composition.

  7. Debates in the Environmentalist Community: The soy moratorium and the construction of illegal soybeans in the Brazilian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, J. Christopher; Koeppe, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    Mora - torium.” from http://www.abiove.com.br/english/sustent/ms_1reuniao_16nov06 _us.pdf ABIOVE (Brazilian Association of Vegetable Oil Industries). 2006b. “Soybean Working Group Meeting.” from http://www.abiove.com.br/english/sustent/ms_minuta_ata_ 19...

  8. Comprehensive quantification of triacylglycerols in soybean seeds by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with multiple neutral loss scans

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Maoyin; Butka, Emily; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-10-10

    Soybean seeds are an important source of vegetable oil and biomaterials. The content of individual triacylglycerol species (TAG) in soybean seeds is difficult to quantify in an accurate and rapid way. The present study establishes an approach to quantify TAG species in soybean seeds utilizing an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with multiple neutral loss scans. Ten neutral loss scans were performed to detect the fatty acyl chains of TAG, including palmitic (P, 1650), linolenic (Ln, 1853), linoleic (L, 1852), oleic (O, 1851), stearic (S, 1850), eicosadienoic (2052), gadoleic (2051), arachidic (2050), erucic (2251), and behenic (2250). The abundance ofmore »ten fatty acyl chains at 46 TAG masses (mass-to-charge ratio, m/z) were determined after isotopic deconvolution and correction by adjustment factors at each TAG mass. The direct sample infusion and multiple internal standards correction allowed a rapid and accurate quantification of TAG species. Ninety-three TAG species were resolved and their levels were determined.The most abundant TAG species were LLL, OLL, LLLn, PLL, OLLn, OOL, POL, and SLL. Many new species were detected and quantified. As a result, this shotgun lipidomics approach should facilitate the study of TAG metabolism and genetic breeding of soybean seeds for desirable TAG content and composition.« less

  9. UVM Scientists Identify Eco-Friendly Tool for Fighting Wheat Blight AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH (01.10.07)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    UVM Scientists Identify Eco-Friendly Tool for Fighting Wheat Blight AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH (01 to decide when and how to use these eco-friendly techniques. At least 3 million hectares -- or 300 million

  10. Defining the Molecular and Physiological Role of Leaf Cuticular Waxes in Reproductive Stage Heat Tolerane in Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondal, Suchismita

    2012-07-16

    environments. For the first objective, thirteen wheat cultivars were subjected to a 2-day heat treatment at 38 degrees C at 10 days after pollination (DAP). Leaf cuticular waxes, canopy temperature depression and stomatal conductance were estimated during...

  11. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  12. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  13. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  14. Wheat interactions with Italian ryegrass; forage production and quality in pure and mixed stands of wheat, oats, and ryegrass; and halosulfuron interaction with soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Alexandra Cathryn

    2007-09-17

    OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Harry T. Cralle Committee Members, Norman E. Borlaug Rodney W. Bovey James M. Chandler Travis D. Miller Scott A. Senseman Head of Department, C. Wayne Smith May 2007 Major Subject: Agronomy ABSTRACT Wheat... the ecological dimensions of pesticide applications and the use of his laboratory, to Dr. Travis Miller for giving me field space and providing me with an understanding of my career in extension, to Dr. Norman Borlaug for inspiring me to reach for my star...

  15. Effect of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitacre, Jessie; Pace, June K.; Thomas, Kathreen

    1952-01-01

    .9 iled 30 min. 3 100.1 No. of repli- cations Corn brc 2n Retention, yo Thiamine Thiamine hydrochloride I mononitrate Range ( Average I Range / Average lit; meal 1 premix kite meal llnn -nnl 1 premix1 llow meal along with the number...

  16. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  17. As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

  18. Multiple Word DNA Computing on Surfaces Liman Wang, Qinghua Liu,, Robert M. Corn, Anne E. Condon,,# and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Word DNA Computing on Surfaces Liman Wang, Qinghua Liu,,§ Robert M. Corn, Anne E. Condon words" is demonstrated, with applications to DNA computing. A new DESTROY operation to selectively enzyme cleavage, has been developed for multiple-word DNA computing. DNA polymerase is used to extend DNA

  19. Electricity Production from Steam-Exploded Corn Stover Biomass Yi Zuo, Pin-Ching Maness, and Bruce E. Logan*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    primarily of acetic and butyric acids.6 Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new method for energy (MFCs) was examined from corn stover waste biomass using samples prepared through either neutral or acid and acid hydrolysates (1000 mg-COD/L, 250 ). Power output exhibited saturation kinetics with respect

  20. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol

  1. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, J.R

    2005-01-31

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  2. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-09-30

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  3. Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Analysis of Reproductive Stage Heat Tolerance in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Richard Esten

    2011-08-08

    , an analysis of both the phenotypic and genetic responses of two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations was conducted. RIL populations Halberd x Cutter and Halberd x Karl 92 (H/K) both derive heat tolerance from Halberd and segregate in their response... ............................................................................... 61 3.2 Photosynthetic rate (a), relative photosynthetic rate (b), transpiration (c), and conductance (d) of wheat cultivars under 38?C heat stress at 10 days after pollination...

  4. Training agricultural scientists at the International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cote?, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    agricultural production" (World Food Conference, 1974). At a meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) held at CIMMYT in Mexico during October, 1975, the consensus of those...TRAINING AGRICULTURAL SCIENTISTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF MAIZE AND WHEAT A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Michael E. Cote Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. Evaluation of glandless cottonseed meal plus lysine as a substitute for soybean meal in swine starter and growing-finishing diets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaRue, David Charles

    1982-01-01

    EVALUATION OF GLANDIZSS COTTONSEED MEAL PLUS LYSINE AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR SOYBEAN MEAL IN SWINE STARTER AND GROWING-FINISHING DIETS A Thesis by DAVID CHARLES LARUE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Nutrition EVALUATION OF GLANDLESS COTTONSEED MEAL PLUS LYSINE AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR SOYBEAN MEAL IN SWINE STARTER AND GROWING-FINISHING DIETS A Thesis by DAVID CHARLES LARUE...

  6. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public...

  7. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more than 20-year historyCommissionOWENS

  8. Impact of Collection Equipment on Ash Variability of Baled Corn Stover Biomass for Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Smith; Jeffery Einerson; Kevin Kenney; Ian J. Bonner

    2014-09-01

    Cost-effective conversion of agricultural residues for renewable energy hinges not only on the material’s quality but also the biorefinery’s ability to reliably measure quality specifications. The ash content of biomass is one such specification, influencing pretreatment and disposal costs for the conversion facility and the overall value of a delivered lot of biomass. The biomass harvest process represents a primary pathway for accumulation of soil-derived ash within baled material. In this work, the influence of five collection techniques on the total ash content and variability of ash content within baled corn stover in southwest Kansas is discussed. The equipment tested included a mower for cutting the corn stover stubble, a basket rake, wheel rake, or shred flail to gather the stover, and a mixed or uniform in-feed baler for final collection. The results showed mean ash content to range from 11.5 to 28.2 % depending on operational choice. Resulting impacts on feedstock costs for a biochemical conversion process range from $5.38 to $22.30 Mg-1 based on the loss of convertible dry matter and ash disposal costs. Collection techniques that minimized soil contact (shred flail or nonmowed stubble) were shown to prevent excessive ash contamination, whereas more aggressive techniques (mowing and use of a wheel rake) caused greater soil disturbance and entrainment within the final baled material. Material sampling and testing were shown to become more difficult as within-bale ash variability increased, creating uncertainty around feedstock quality and the associated costs of ash mitigation.

  9. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into 30% Post-Consumer Recycled Wood Fiber Paper and Wheat Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Canada's pulp and paper industry was investigated by determining the availability of wheat straw along pulp and paper processes were explored. The ecological footprint of each resource was found along in the farming sector along with the social impact wheat paper would have on the current wood pulp and paper

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Labour Practices of Sugarcane and Wheat Suppliers Comparing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the Labour Practices of Sugarcane and Wheat Suppliers Comparing TreeFrog's Suppliers with Alternatives OF BRITISH COLUMBIA An Investigation into the Labour Practices of Sugarcane and Wheat Suppliers Comparing TreeFrog's Suppliers with Alternatives For Long Term Use At UBC Evan Huang Lisa Lee Amitoj Sandhu Henry

  12. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  13. Determining Fiber and Protein Degradation Rates of Corn Milling (Co)Products and Their Effects on Rumen Bacterial Populations and Lactating Dairy Cow Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Whitney

    2012-07-16

    ....................................................................... 10 2.3 Chemical composition of the diets fed to lactating dairy cows predicted by the CPM-dairy model ............................................................................ 12 2.4 Comparison of the anaerobic fermentation...-fold in what is called stillage. The stillage is then further processed and refined into nutrient dense corn (co)products. These corn milling (co)products are an excellent source of CP, specifically RUP, and digestible fiber for ruminant consumption. Ideally...

  14. Effects of nitrogen source and rate and legume interseeding on the yield of soft red winter wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Jon Eric

    1986-01-01

    and N uptake of soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Coker 762). The locat1ons were the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station research farms in Burleson and Rusk Counties. The study was divided into two parts: wheat fertilized w1th three.... agriculture was brought about by the use of this input (24). Reduction in the cost of N fertilization can be accomplished in two ways. The first method is to maximize crop use efficiency for each unit of applied N. This result can be achieved either...

  15. Effect of plant populations and row spacings on plant and ear characters and grain yield of corn hybrids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silapapun, Anek

    1976-01-01

    break- age and barren stalks increased with increase in population densities. Allessi and Power (2) also found that number of barren stalks increased and ear weight decreased with increased plant population. Bleasdale (7) proposed that if a crop...EFFECT OF PLANT POPULATIONS AND ROW SPACINGS ON PLANT AND EAR CHARACTERS AND GRAIN YIELD OF CORN HYBRIDS A Thesis by ANEK SILAPAPUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  16. Optimal operation of a concurrent-flow corn dryer with a drying heat pump using superheated steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moraitis, C.S. [Systelligence Consultants and Research Associates, Volos (Greece); Akritidis, C.B. [Dept. of Hydraulics and Agricultural Engineering, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1998-07-01

    A numerical model of a concurrent-flow dryer of corn using superheated steam as drying medium is solved applying a shooting technique, so as to satisfy boundary conditions imposed by the optimal design of a drying heat pump. The drying heat pump is based on the theory of minimum energy cycles. The solution of the model proves the applicability of the heat pump to a concurrent-flow dryer, achieving a Specific Energy Consumption as low as 1080 kJ/kg.

  17. Dryland Winter Wheat and Grain Sorghum Cropping Systems: Northern High Plains of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Paul W.

    1972-01-01

    -RF and T47F systems, respectively. hfult.iple linear regression analvsis (Ezekiel and Fox, 1959)-was used to establish relationships between available soil water at seeding, growing seayon precipi- tation and wheat grain yields. For this analysis... at seedins for the CS and TVSF-RF systems were sim- ilar during the 1967-70 period, and yields also were similar for the two systems. The yield increases due to additional stored water at seeding were in the range reported by Bond, Army and Lehman (1964...

  18. The influence of awns on yield and certain morphological characters of wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Milton J

    1951-01-01

    functions of awns+ They cite several experiments whexe the inexeased transpiration rate of awned heads 'ever awnlsss heals have been demonstrated, aC, km NI, Xiel4 Wheat growers and breedors in the Great Plains generally bolievi that awned varieties ate...)', fowy'f kh4 kQijkla ~";o~e'd eyQres Wished less than @hose from uae14yye4 ay&ac ~ 8e holieved , tract y~of, , thd'e. ~g&oicee, gg~ ~e hoon case+. ~ in]wry cjf the epochs im roaring 'th? ccaAe& . . 'lo avoid this ocscyxicsL- tiom he eoayarek- kielj5...

  19. Wheat Flour Tortilla: Quality Prediction and Study of Physical and Textural Changes during Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro De Barros, Frederico

    2010-07-14

    stream_source_info RIBEIRO-DE-BARROS-THESIS.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 202855 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name RIBEIRO-DE-BARROS-THESIS.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 WHEAT FLOUR TORTILLA: QUALITY PREDICTION AND STUDY OF PHYSICAL AND TEXTURAL CHANGES DURING STORAGE A Thesis by FREDERICO AUGUSTO RIBEIRO DE BARROS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  20. JV 38-APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-11-01

    Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential application of firing biomass fuels combined with coal and comparative economics of natural gas-fired turbines. Various biomass fuels are available at each location. The most promising options based on availability are as follows. The economic impact of firing 25% biomass with coal can increase return on investment by 0.5 to 1.5 years when compared to firing natural gas. The results of the comparative economics suggest that a fluidized-bed cogeneration system will have the best economic performance. Installation for the Brewster site is recommended based on natural gas prices not dropping below a $4.00/MMBtu annual average delivered cost. Installation at the Volga site is only recommended if natural gas prices substantially increase to $5.00/MMBtu on average. A 1- to 2-year time frame will be needed for permitting and equipment procurement.

  1. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-04-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been madeexclamation In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection.

  2. Enrichment for CFU-C from murine and human bone marrow using soybean agglutinin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisner, Y.; Kapoor, N.; Hodes, M.Z.; O'Reilly, R.J.; Good, R.A.

    1982-02-01

    Mouse bone marrow and spleen cells agglutinated by soybean agglutinin (SBA) or peanut agglutinin (PNA) were previously shown to be enriched for spleen colony-forming cells (CFU-S) and sufficiently depleted of graft-versus-host reaction producing cells to allow hematologic reconstitution of lethally irradiated allogeneic recipient mice. A similar enrichment for cells capable of forming colonies in soft agar culture (CFU-C) has now been found in the SBA-agglutinated fraction of mouse bone marrow cells, in contrast to the finding that in human bone marrow the majority of the CFU-C are in the fraction not agglutinated by SBA. Cytofluorometric studies with fluorescein-labeled SBA (FITC-SBA) revealed that the majority of both mouse and human bone marrow cells bind the lectin. Experiments mixing the human marrow fractions separated by SBA reveal that true enrichment for CFU-C is achieved in the unagglutinated fraction, as opposed to a possible depletion of a suppressor cell population. Granulocytic, monocytic, and mixed cell colonies were all enriched in the SBA-unagglutinated cell fraction from human bone marrow.

  3. Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

    2012-02-01

    This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

  4. Drought effects on composition and yield for corn stover, mixed grasses, and Miscanthus as bioenergy feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Amber Hoover; Allison Ray; Jeffrey Lacey; Marnie Cortez; Courtney Payne; Doug Karlen; Stuart Birrell; David Laird; Robert Kallenbach; Josh Egenolf; Matthew Sousek; Thomas Voigt

    2014-11-01

    Drought conditions in 2012 were some of the most severe reported in the United States. It is necessary to explore the effects of drought on the quality attributes of current and potential bioenergy feedstocks. Compositional analysis data for corn stover, Miscanthus, and CRP grasses from one or more locations for years 2010 (normal precipitation levels) and 2012 (a known severe drought year nationally) was collected. Results & discussion: The general trend for samples that experienced drought was an increase in extractives and a decrease in structural sugars and lignin. The TEY yields were calculated to determine the drought effects on ethanol production. All three feedstocks had a decrease of 12-14% in TEY when only decreases of carbohydrate content was analyzed. When looking at the compounded effect of both carbohydrate content and the decreases in dry matter loss for each feedstock there was a TEY decrease of 25%-59%. Conclusion: Drought had a significant impact on the quality of all three bioenergy crops. In all cases where drought was experienced both the quality of the feedstock and the yield decreased. These drought induced effects could have significant economic impacts on biorefineries.

  5. Effect of global warming and increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] on water stress in soybeans during critical reproductive stages: A regional study of Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haskett, J.D.; Pachepsky, Y.A.; Acock, B.

    1997-12-31

    The anthropogenic increase in radiatively active gases in the atmosphere has been well documented. Recently the impact of this increase on the earth`s climate has been confirmed. Agriculture is vulnerable to climatic change, and estimating the likely response to such changes is critical. Many studies of these responses have included soybeans both because they are an important commodity and because they are sensitive to changes in atmospheric CO, concentration. Such studies have generally focused on yield response. While this is critical it does not provide information on the underlying causal link between climate and atmospheric change and changes in soybean yield. The current work examines the impact of climatic change on water stress during the critical periods of soybean reproductive development.

  6. List of publications 1. Sun, L., Mller, B. and Schnrer, A. (2013) Biogas production from wheat straw community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    List of publications 1. Sun, L., Müller, B. and Schnürer, A. (2013) Biogas production from wheat biogas digesters. Biores. Technol. 132, 327­332 4. Manzoor, S., Müller, B., Niazi A., Bongcam-Rudloff E of syntrophic acetate- oxidising culture in biogas reactors exposed to increasing levels of ammonia. Applied

  7. Use of near-isogenic wheat lines to determine glutenin and gliadin composition and funtionality in flour tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondal, Suchismita

    2006-10-30

    The synthesis of high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin, low molecular weight glutenin and gliadin proteins are controlled by nine major loci present in wheat chromosomes. The loci Glu A1, Glu B1, Glu D1 and Gli A1, Gli B1, ...

  8. Engineering, Nutrient Removal, and Feedstock Conversion Evaluations of Four Corn Stover Harvest Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birrell; Corey W. Radtke; W.W. Wilhelm

    2007-02-01

    Crop residue has been identified as a near-term source of biomass for renewable fuel, heat, power, chemicals and other bio-materials. Replicated plots were established in a corn (Zea mays L.) field near Ames, IA to evaluate four harvest scenarios (low cut, high-cut top, high-cut bottom, and normal cut). A prototype one-pass harvest system was used to collect the residue samples. High-cut top and high-cut bottom samples were obtained from the same plots in two separate operations. Chemical composition, dilute acid pretreatment response, ethanol conversion efficiency and gasification parameters for each scenario were determined. Mean grain yield (10.1 Mg ha-1 dry weight) was representative of the area. The four harvest scenarios removed 6.7, 4.9, 1.7, and 5.1 Mg ha-1 of dry matter. Expressed as harvest indices (HI) the values were 0.60 for low cut, 0.66 for normal cut, and 0.61 for the total high-cut (top + bottom) scenarios, which are probably realistic for machine harvest and current hybrids. The macro-nutrient replacement value for the normal harvest scenario under our conditions was $57.36 ha-1 or $11.27 Mg-1. Harvesting stalk bottoms increased the water content, the risk of combine damage, the transportation costs, and left insufficient soil cover, while also producing a problematic feedstock. Harvesting stover at current combine height (~40 cm) would be best for farmers and ethanol producers because of better harvest speed and efficiency as well as the quality of the ethanol feedstock.

  9. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  10. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  11. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rover, Majorie [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Whitmer, Lysle [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  12. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-04-13

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore »the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  13. The effect of global warming scenarios on soybean and peanut yields in the Coastal Plain region of Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laitta, M.T.; Huebner, N.J. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This study is an evaluation of peanut and soybean yield in the Coastal Plain of Georgia as a function of seasonal water deficit scenarios. An analytical model of the Thornthwaite water balance model, based on historical temperature and precipitation data, is used to evaluate the probable response of crop productivity to climate changes in selected counties in South Georgia. The input of temperature and precipitation values for each site is based on the results of three general circulation models (GCM), which were regionally tailored to the Southeastern United States. A regression analysis was preformed to establish a numerical relationship between historical yield and moisture deficits. This model, in association with projected GCM model deficits, was used to predict future crop yields. Our results showed that given all GCM models evaluated, deficit periods for the selected sites will increase both the intensity and duration droughts in the southeastern U.S. Of the two crops analyzed, it was found that soybeans showed a higher sensitivity to moisture deficits than did peanuts.

  14. Hairy Vetch, Bur Clover and Oats as Soil-Building Crops for Cotton and Corn in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forest); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus); Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1950-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull0731.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 43509 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull0731.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 1 HAIRY VETCH, BUR CLOVER AND OATS...-8-4 fertilizer per acre at Tyler and Nacog- doches. Hairy vetch was a better green-manure crop than oats at Tyler and oats or bur clover at Nacogdoches. The effects of plowing under hairy vetch lasted more than a year. Corn planted on land where vetch had...

  15. Soybean leaf hydraulic conductance does not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2] or temperature in growth chambers or in the field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    Soybean leaf hydraulic conductance does not acclimate to growth at elevated [CO2] or temperature Leaf hydraulic properties are strongly linked with transpiration and photosynthesis in many species. However, it is not known if gas exchange and hydraulics will have co-ordinated responsesto climate change

  16. Molecular Markers Associated with Water Use Efficiency and Leaf Ash in Soybean M. A. R. Mian, M. A. Bailey, D. A. Ashley,* R. Wells, T. E. Carter, Jr.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Molecular Markers Associated with Water Use Efficiency and Leaf Ash in Soybean M. A. R. Mian, M. A ash (LASH) generally related to WUE.A restriction fragmentlength polymorphism (RFLP)mapwas constructed. Maylandet al. (1993) found that ash concentration (leaf and stem) of crested wheatgrass [Agropyron

  17. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P.; Curran, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to the transportation sector. Examples include steam reforming of natural gas to provide hydrogen for hydrotreating unit operations within the refinery and production of urea for use as a reductant for diesel after treatment in selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This discussion focuses on the consumption of natural gas in the production pathway of conventional ethanol (non-cellulosic) from corn through fermentation. Though it is clear that NG would also play a significant role in the cellulosic production pathways, those cases are not considered in this analysis.

  18. Biochemical & Thermochemical High Throughput Characterization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20 40 60 80 100 120 140 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 Frequency Corn Stover Corn Cob Miscanthus Wheat...

  19. VALIDATION OF FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE INDICES: FOULING/CORROSION EVALUATION OF MDF PARTICLEBOARD AND BLENDS WITH WHEAT STRAW BOARD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Jay R. Gunderson; Donald P. McCollor

    1999-02-01

    Sauder Woodworking currently fires a large portion of all wood wastes in a boiler producing process steam. It is investigating using particleboard made from wheat straw in its manufacturing process and is concerned with the effects of the inorganics on its boiler. Wheat straw board contains higher ash contents and increased levels of potassium, creating concern over fouling characteristics in Sauder's tight boiler design. In addition, the wheat straw board contains high concentrations of chlorine, which may affect boiler tube corrosion when fired in combination with the particleboard wastes currently generated. Sauder has engaged the services of the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota to investigate the potential detrimental effects of firing blends containing wheat straw on boiler tube fouling and corrosion. Additional funding for this project was provided through the U.S. Department of Energy Jointly Sponsored Research Program (DOE JSRP) project ''Validation of Fireside Performance Indices'' to validate, improve, and expand the PCQUEST (Predictive Coal Quality Effects Screening Tool) program. The PCQUEST fuel database is constantly expanding and adding new fuels, for which the algorithms may need refinement and additional verification in order to accurately predict index values. A key focus is on performing advanced and conventional fuel analyses and adding these analyses to the PCQUEST database. Such fuels include coals of all ranks and origins, upgraded coals, petroleum coke, biomass and biomass-coal blends, and waste materials blended with coal. Since there are differences in the chemical and mineral form of the inorganic content in biomass and substantial differences in organic matrix characteristics, analysis and characterization methods developed for coal fuels may not be applicable. The project was seen to provide an excellent opportunity to test and improve the ability of PCQUEST to handle nontypical soil and biomass minerals.

  20. Grinding energy and physical properties of chopped and hammer-milled barley, wheat, oat, and canola straws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Tumuluru; L.G. Tabil; Y. Song; K.L. Iroba; V. Meda

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, specific energy for grinding and physical properties of wheat, canola, oat and barley straw grinds were investigated. The initial moisture content of the straw was about 0.13–0.15 (fraction total mass basis). Particle size reduction experiments were conducted in two stages: (1) a chopper without a screen, and (2) a hammer mill using three screen sizes (19.05, 25.4, and 31.75 mm). The lowest grinding energy (1.96 and 2.91 kWh t-1) was recorded for canola straw using a chopper and hammer mill with 19.05-mm screen size, whereas the highest (3.15 and 8.05 kWh t-1) was recorded for barley and oat straws. The physical properties (geometric mean particle diameter, bulk, tapped and particle density, and porosity) of the chopped and hammer-milled wheat, barley, canola, and oat straw grinds measured were in the range of 0.98–4.22 mm, 36–80 kg m-3, 49–119 kg m-3, 600–1220 kg m-3, and 0.9–0.96, respectively. The average mean particle diameter was highest for the chopped wheat straw (4.22-mm) and lowest for the canola grind (0.98-mm). The canola grinds produced using the hammer mill (19.05-mm screen size) had the highest bulk and tapped density of about 80 and 119 kg m-3; whereas, the wheat and oat grinds had the lowest of about 58 and 88–90 kg m-3. The results indicate that the bulk and tapped densities are inversely proportional to the particle size of the grinds. The flow properties of the grinds calculated are better for chopped straws compared to hammer milled using smaller screen size (19.05 mm).

  1. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  2. Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Karen E. Thome Abstract Ethanol has attracted considerable policy policy and strategic interactions affect decisions about when and where to invest in building new ethanol

  3. Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn Erik B. Dopman, Luisa Prez, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, and Richard G. Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dopman, Erik B.

    borer Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn Erik, see: Notes: #12;Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European is often incomplete, gene genealogies will be discordant, and most regions of the genome will display

  4. Productive Energy of Feeds Calculated from Feeding Experiments with Sheep. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01

    beet pulp, clover hay, corn fodder, corn stover, emmer or spelt, molasses, oat straw, rye, soy bean straw, sun- flower silage, whole wheat, ground wheat, and wheat bran. The productive values of corn fodder and of oat straw were greater in balanced..., 69 per cent correct for clover hay, and 77 per cent correct for wheat bran. To put it another way, the assumption of equal value for digestible nutrients would be five times the actual value found by experiment with the wheat straw, nearly 50 per...

  5. Spontaneous gelation of wheat gluten proteins in a food grade solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsen Dahesh; Amélie Banc; Agnès Duri; Marie-Hélène Morel; Laurence Ramos

    2015-06-10

    Structuring wheat gluten proteins into gels with tunable mechanical properties would provide more versatility for the production of plant protein-rich food products. Gluten, a strongly elastic protein material insoluble in water, is hardly processable. We use a novel fractionation procedure allowing the isolation from gluten of a water/ethanol soluble protein blend, enriched in glutenin polymers at an unprecedented high ratio (50%). We investigate here the viscoelasticity of suspensions of the protein blend in a water/ethanol (50/50 v/v) solvent, and show that, over a wide range of concentrations, they undergo a spontaneous gelation driven by hydrogen bonding. We successfully rationalize our data using percolation models and relate the viscoelasticity of the gels to their fractal dimension measured by scattering techniques. The gluten gels display self-healing properties and their elastic plateaus cover several decades, from 0.01 to 10000 Pa. In particular very soft gels as compared to standard hydrated gluten can be produced.

  6. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    the prices of corn, crude oil, ethanol, gasoline, soybeans, and sugar, and their open interest. The empirical-grain price nexus, open interest, futures prices, ethanol, crude oil, gasoline, corn, soybean, sugar CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND The Dynamics of Energy-Grain Prices with Open Interest Shawkat Hammoudeh, Soodabeh

  7. Supplemental feeding of lactating does increased body condition and circulating leptin but fails to improve reproductive efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candler, Kimberly Carol

    2013-02-22

    Thirty six gestating Fallow does (Dama dama; BW=51.3kg) were allotted into groups: 1) Control (C; No Supplement; n=12), 2) Supplement (S; 4:1, corn:soybean meal; n=12), or 3) Rice Bran (R; 3:1:1, corn:soybean meal:20% fat ...

  8. The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Cruz, Armando

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Biozyme-, a commercial germination stimulant, on the germination and emergence of bean and sweet corn seeds, treated with four levels of Carbofuran and Chlorothalonil, and grown under suboptimal temperatures, was evaluated. Field...

  9. Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Texas Southern High Plains Wheat Farms. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, James W.; Smith, Edward G.

    1985-01-01

    the relative magnitude of real financial growth. ? Acres owned, leased, and controlled at the end of the planning horizon for each iteration indicate the impacts of alternative scenarios on the rate of growth for representative farms. These three statistics...~ :) ,'---( _..----' I ... - Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Southern High Plains Wheat Farms tiD'" A".,V SEP 04 1985 8-1506 August 1985 THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION/Neville P. Clarke, DirectorlThe Texas A...

  10. Effect of process variables on the quality attributes of briquettes from wheat, oat, canola and barley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2011-08-01

    Effect of process variables on the quality attributes of briquettes from wheat, oat, canola and barley straw Jaya Shankar Tumuluru*, L. G. Tabil, Y. Song, K. L. Iroba and V. Meda Biomass is a renewable energy source and environmentally friendly substitute for fossil fuels such as coal and petroleum products. Major limitation of biomass for successful energy application is its low bulk density, which makes it very difficult and costly to transport and handle. To overcome this limitation, biomass has to be densified. The commonly used technologies for densification of biomass are pelletization and briquetting. Briquetting offers many advantages at it can densify larger particles sizes of biomass at higher moisture contents. Briquetting is influenced by a number of feedstock and process variables such as moisture content, particle size distribution, and some operating variables such as temperature and densification pressure. In the present study, experiments were designed and conducted based on Box-Behnken design to produce briquettes using barley, wheat, canola and barley straws. A laboratory scale hydraulic briquette press was used for the present study. The experimental process variables and their levels used in the present study were pressure levels (7.5, 10, 12.5 MPa), three levels of temperature (90, 110, 130 C), at three moisture content levels (9, 12, 15% w.b.), and three levels of particle size (19.1, 25.04, 31.75 mm). The quality variables studied includes moisture content, initial density and final briquette density after two weeks of storage, size distribution index and durability. The raw biomass was initially chopped and size reduced using a hammer mill. The ground biomass was conditioned at different moisture contents and was further densified using laboratory hydraulic press. For each treatment combination, ten briquettes were manufactured at a residence time of about 30 s after compression pressure setpoint was achieved. After compression, the initial dimensions and the final dimensions after 2 weeks of storage in controlled environment of all the samples were measured. Durability, dimensional stability, and moisture content tests were conducted after two weeks of storage of the briquettes produced. Initial results indicated that moisture content played a significant role on briquettes durability, stability, and density. Low moisture content of the straws (7-12%) gave more durable briquettes. Briquette density increased with increasing pressure depending on the moisture content value. The axial expansion was more significant than the lateral expansion, which in some cases tended to be nil depending on the material and operating variables. Further data analysis is in progress in order to understand the significance of the process variables based on ANOVA. Regression models were developed to predict the changes in quality of briquettes with respect of the process variables under study. Keywords: Herbaceous biomass, densification, briquettes, density, durability, dimensional stability, ANOVA and regression equations

  11. Productive Energy of Corn Meal, Alfalfa Leaf Meal, Dried Buttermilk, Casein, Cottonseed Meal, and Tankage as Measured by Production of Fat and Flesh by Growing Chickens. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1941-01-01

    , TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER. DIRECTOR. College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 600 PRODUCTIVE ENERGY OF CORN MEAL, ALFALF LEAF MEAL, DRIED BUTTERMILK, CASEIN, COT- TONSEED MEAL, AND TANKAGE AS MEASURED... of a comprehensive investigation of the value of feeds and foods for productive energy as measured by the production of fat and flesh in growing chickens. In 11 experi- ments with 256 chicks previously reported, it was found that the productive...

  12. Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel

    2011-08-07

    The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

  13. Studies on glycoproteins produced by wild type and wheat germ agglutinin-resistant B16 mouse melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinnaduwage, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two variants of B16 mouse melanoma cells have been selected in serum-free medium for their resistance to toxic levels of wheat germ agglutinin isolation 1 (WGA). Chromosome analysis and characteristic melanin production showed that the variants are derived from the parent mouse melanoma cell lines. However, the two variants were less tumorigenic in mice compared to the parent B16 mouse melanoma cells. The variants showed a marked decrease in cell agglutination with WGA. Cell agglutination with recin and peanut lectin was not different between the three cell lines, but the two variants showed a slight increase in agglutination with concanavalin A. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin to the two variant cells was reduced compared to that of the parent cell. Glycoproteins secreted or shed by the three lines were isolated after growth in serum-free medium in the presence of (/sup 3/He)glucosamine and bovine serum albumin (1%). These metabolically labeled products were fractionated on the basis of their interaction with WGA-Sepharose (2 mg/ml). The WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatographic data suggested a decrease in WGA-binding glycoprotein(s) secreted to the medium by the two variants. The WGA-bound glycoproteins from the two variants upon SDS-PAGE revealed three bands of approximate molecular weights, 92,000, 56,000, and 42,000, none of which were present in the parent cell line (50,000 molecular weight).

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Economic Influence of Sugar Cane and Wheat Waste Paper on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have occurred within the pulp and paper industry. #12;ii After thorough analysis on both the sugar cane, increasing GDP. However, the disadvantage of making this switch is that the Canadian pulp and paper industry into the Economic Influence of Sugar Cane and Wheat Waste Paper on Canadian Economy Daniel Khuu, David Wong, Ka Wang

  15. The Riboflavin Content of Some Animal Feeds and Some Human Foods. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Kemmerer, A. R. (Arthur Russell)

    1945-01-01

    , wheat brown shorts and wheat gray sh Feeds which contained low amounts of riboflavin (below 2.0 p.p.m.) su oil meal, barley, beans, bone meal, citrus pulp, corn and Argentine fish meal, grape nuts, kafir-milo mil1 feed with scl kafir chop and meal...). ..................... ICitrus pulp ..................................... Corn bran ...................................... Cornchop...

  16. Substitution of meat and bone meal and cottonseed meal for soybean meal on a digestible amino acid basis in growing pig diets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobler-Mehner, Carl Heinz

    1982-01-01

    % gain made by this group but 27 again F:G was more desirable than predicted (93/). Adding 10Z addi- tional tryptophan to diet 5 made digestible tryptophan 99% adequate but lysine and isoleucine were only 80 and 83X adequate, therefore the gains were... for Soybean Meal on a Digestible Amino Acid Basis in Growing Pig Diets (May 1982) Carl Neinz Dobler-Mehner, B. S. , Instituto Tecnologico y de Fstudios Superiores de Monterrey Co-Chairmen of Committee: Dr. T. D. Tanksley, Jr. Dr. D. A. Knabe One hundred...

  17. Impact of process conditions on the density and durability of wheat, oat, canola, and barley straw briquettes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, J. S.; Tabil, L. G.; Song, Y.; Iroba, K. L.; Meda, V.

    2015-03-01

    The present study is to understand the impact of process conditions on the quality attributes of wheat oat, barley, and canola straw briquettes. Analysis of variance indicated that briquette moisture content and initial density immediately after compaction and final density after 2 weeks of storage are strong functions of feedstock moisture content and compression pressure, whereas durability rating is influenced by die temperature and feedstock moisture content. Briquettes produced at a low feedstock moisture content of 9 % (w.b.) yielded maximum densities >700 kg/m3 for wheat, oat, canola, and barley straws. Lower feedstock moisture content of 110 °C and compression pressure >10 MPa minimized the briquette moisture content and maximized densities and durability rating based on surface plots observations. Optimal process conditions indicated that a low feedstock moisture content of about 9 % (w.b.), high die temperature of 120–130 °C, medium-to-large hammer mill screen sizes of about 24 to 31.75 mm, and low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa minimized briquette moisture content to 700 kg/m3. Durability rating >90 % is achievable at higher die temperatures of >123 °C, lower to medium feedstock moisture contents of 9 to 12 % (w.b.), low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa, and large hammer mill screen size of 31.75 mm, except for canola where a lower compression pressure of 7.5 to 8.5 MPa and a smaller hammer mill screen size of 19 mm for oat maximized the durability rating values.

  18. Impact of process conditions on the density and durability of wheat, oat, canola, and barley straw briquettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumuluru, J. S.; Tabil, L. G.; Song, Y.; Iroba, K. L.; Meda, V.

    2014-10-01

    The present study is to understand the impact of process conditions on the quality attributes of wheat oat, barley, and canola straw briquettes. Analysis of variance indicated that briquette moisture content and initial density immediately after compaction and final density after 2 weeks of storage are strong functions of feedstock moisture content and compression pressure, whereas durability rating is influenced by die temperature and feedstock moisture content. Briquettes produced at a low feedstock moisture content of 9 % (w.b.) yielded maximum densities >700 kg/m3 for wheat, oat, canola, and barley straws. Lower feedstock moisture content of <10 % (w.b.) and higher die temperatures >110 °C and compression pressure >10 MPa minimized the briquette moisture content and maximized densities and durability rating based on surface plots observations. Optimal process conditions indicated that a low feedstock moisture content of about 9 % (w.b.), high die temperature of 120–130 °C, medium-to-large hammer mill screen sizes of about 24 to 31.75 mm, and low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa minimized briquette moisture content to <8 % (w.b.) and maximized density to >700 kg/m3. Durability rating >90 % is achievable at higher die temperatures of >123 °C, lower to medium feedstock moisture contents of 9 to 12 % (w.b.), low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa, and large hammer mill screen size of 31.75 mm, except for canola where a lower compression pressure of 7.5 to 8.5 MPa and a smaller hammer mill screen size of 19 mm for oat maximized the durability rating values.

  19. Impact of process conditions on the density and durability of wheat, oat, canola, and barley straw briquettes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluru, J. S.; Tabil, L. G.; Song, Y.; Iroba, K. L.; Meda, V.

    2014-10-01

    The present study is to understand the impact of process conditions on the quality attributes of wheat oat, barley, and canola straw briquettes. Analysis of variance indicated that briquette moisture content and initial density immediately after compaction and final density after 2 weeks of storage are strong functions of feedstock moisture content and compression pressure, whereas durability rating is influenced by die temperature and feedstock moisture content. Briquettes produced at a low feedstock moisture content of 9 % (w.b.) yielded maximum densities >700 kg/m3 for wheat, oat, canola, and barley straws. Lower feedstock moisture content of more »higher die temperatures >110 °C and compression pressure >10 MPa minimized the briquette moisture content and maximized densities and durability rating based on surface plots observations. Optimal process conditions indicated that a low feedstock moisture content of about 9 % (w.b.), high die temperature of 120–130 °C, medium-to-large hammer mill screen sizes of about 24 to 31.75 mm, and low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa minimized briquette moisture content to 700 kg/m3. Durability rating >90 % is achievable at higher die temperatures of >123 °C, lower to medium feedstock moisture contents of 9 to 12 % (w.b.), low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa, and large hammer mill screen size of 31.75 mm, except for canola where a lower compression pressure of 7.5 to 8.5 MPa and a smaller hammer mill screen size of 19 mm for oat maximized the durability rating values.« less

  20. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  1. Investigation of the chemical interface in the soybean–aphid and rice–bacteria interactions using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klein, Adam T.; Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hohenstein, Jessica D.; Ji, Zhiyuan; Zi, Jiachen; Reichert, Malinda D.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.; Yang, Bing; Peters, Reuben J.; Vela, Javier; et al

    2015-04-27

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging technology for high-resolution plant biology. It has been utilized to study plant–pest interactions, but limited to the surface interfaces. Here we expand the technology to explore the chemical interactions occurring inside the plant tissues. Two sample preparation methods, imprinting and fracturing, were developed and applied, for the first time, to visualize internal metabolites of leaves in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-MSI. This is also the first time nanoparticle-based ionization was implemented to ionize diterpenoid phytochemicals that were difficult to analyze with traditional organic matrices. The interactions between rice–bacterium and soybean–aphid were investigated asmore »two model systems to demonstrate the capability of high-resolution MSI based on MALDI. Localized molecular information on various plant- or pest-derived chemicals provided valuable insight for the molecular processes occurring during the plant–pest interactions. Basically, salicylic acid and isoflavone based resistance was visualized in the soybean–aphid system and antibiotic diterpenoids in rice–bacterium interactions.« less

  2. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  3. Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have developed a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Technology Biodiesel is produced from a wide variety of oilseed crops. In Europe, canola is the major biodiesel crop while in the U.S. soybeans dominate. Montana State University researchers have plants used for biodiesel. Seed oil content increases are induced by puroindoline genes which promote

  4. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01

    significantly increased Ca to 18 inches, while only the 6-ton/acre rate of fine dolomitic lime- stone increased Ca into the same depth. All dolomitic treatments increased Mg to 18-inch depths. Sampling deeper than 18 inches in the 6 ton/acre dolomitic fine... formed soluble salts with the NO and were leached down as Ca(ND ) Limestone treatments did not produce significant increases in yield of corn or Coastal bermudagrass. The no-lime plots produced 70 bushels of corn and 9. 2 tons of oven-dry Coastal...

  5. The bulking effect of dietary fiber in the rat large intestine: an in vivo study of cellulose, guar, pectin, wheat bran and oat bran 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Jeanne Marie

    1985-01-01

    H. Chromium Concentration. IS 19 19 19 25 25 26 TABLE OF CONTENTS DISCUSSION. CONCLUSION. REFERENCES. . Page 32 47 50 LIST OF TABLES Page 1. COMPOSITION OF BASAI FIBER-FREE DIET. . . . 2. COMPOSITION OF THE EXPERIMENTAL DIETS. . . 13 3.... COMPOSITION OF WHEAT BRAN AND OAT BRAN SUPPLEMENTS. . 14 4. EFFECT OF FIBER SUPPLEMENTATION ON FOOD AND ENERGY INTAKE 5. EFFECT OF FIBER SUPPLEMENTATION ON WEIGHT GAIN. . 6. EFFECT OF FIBER ON 24-HOUR FECAL DRY WEIGHT. . . . . 20 21 22 7. EFFECT...

  6. Soybean Production in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staten, R. D.; Hodges, R. J.

    1958-01-01

    cannot be considered a profitabli one in Texas under dryland conditions. Table 4. Yields during this period at Chillicothe were below 15 bushel, and some years yields as low as ? bushels were obtained. Yields it Denton were below 15 bushels ad... from plot of Illini White Gray Yellow Light- brown Macoupin x Ogden mite dray yellow ~uff Dunfield x Arksoy 2913 White Gray Yellow Light- Dortchsoy 67 Dorman brown D53-526 D632-15 x D49-2525 White Brown Yellow Brown VI Kksoy 2913 PI 37335...

  7. Corn Production in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jesse W. (Jesse Wilton); Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1952-01-01

    , at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington, currently stores 65 million gallons of radioactive wastes in 177 underground storage tanks. Sixty seven of these 177 tanks are presumed to be leaking and potentially contaminating surface and ground waters... million curies of radioactivity (U. S. Department of Energy, 2000). The bulk of the wastes is stored at 4 major sites across the United States, including Hanford Site, Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge, and Idaho National Engineering...

  8. Some Fungi Attacking Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haslam, Thomas Powell

    1910-01-01

    . R - raceme - X 96. S - sporophore - X 96. , -43- PLATE X I I . Macor erectus: M - mycelium. K - conidium formation. P L A T E XII -44- Trichoderma lignorium. Trichoderma lignorium has been found occurring abundantly in a few fields in Riley... of the Penioillium and the large amount of filamentous growth between the grains readily distinguish it from Penioillium glaucum. -45- PLATE XIII. Trichoderma lignorium: M - mycelium. C - conidia. P L A T E XIII -46- PLATE 117. Trichoderma lignorium: 36...

  9. Cotton and Corn Experiments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1897-01-01

    .......................... . . ... .............. . 23 300 pounds Kainit in subsoil furrow; 300 pounds surface application. 24 500 pounds Lime in subsoil furrow; 500 pounds surface application. 2f> 2000 pounds Wood Ashes; 400 pounds C. S. Meal; 300 pounds Acid Phosphate. 26 100 pounds Kainit... ? 400 pounds Acid Phosphate; 150 pounds Nitrate Soda. 32 (Check)-No manure ... .. ............. .. .................... .. .... .. 33 2000 pounds Wood Ashes ........... . .. ........... .. .. ... ...... . 34 200 pounds Muriate of Potash...

  10. Investigating insect molecular responses to two plant defense proteins and characterizing a novel insecticidal protein from Arabidopsis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yilin

    2007-04-25

    proteins. Three projects were developed. First, we evaluated the effects of soybean cysteine protease inhibitor (soyacystatin N, scN) on the growth and development in southern corn rootworm. Both subtractive suppressed hybridization (SSH) and c...

  11. TECHNICAL REPORTS Conversions of Mollisols from prairie to cropland and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    . Omonode Univ. of Illinois­Urbana-Champaign Humans are a major factor in soil formation in central Illinois on poorly drained Mollisols that were in corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L

  12. ARE Update Volume 12, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sexton, Steven E; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D; Aker, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    from corn and sugarcane. Biodiesel, produced mainly in thecorn-ethanol and soybean-biodiesel, but they are yet to bewe include the impact of biodiesel on the soy market, we do

  13. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis for Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, A.; Ruth, M.; Ibsen, K.; Jechura, J.; Neeves, K.; Sheehan, J.; Wallace, B.; Montague, L.; Slayton, A.; Lukas, J.

    2002-06-01

    This report is an update of NREL's ongoing process design and economic analyses of processes related to developing ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks as an alternative to conventional petroleum-based transportation fuels. DOE funds both fundamental and applied research in this area and needs a method for predicting cost benefits of many research proposals. To that end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has modeled many potential process designs and estimated the economics of each process during the last 20 years. This report is an update of the ongoing process design and economic analyses at NREL. We envision updating this process design report at regular intervals; the purpose being to ensure that the process design incorporates all new data from NREL research, DOE funded research and other sources, and that the equipment costs are reasonable and consistent with good engineering practice for plants of this type. For the non-research areas this means using equipment and process approaches as they are currently used in industrial applications. For the last report, published in 1999, NREL performed a complete review and update of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process utilizing co-current dilute acid prehydrolysis with simultaneous saccharification (enzymatic) and co-fermentation. The process design included the core technologies being researched by the DOE: prehydrolysis, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, and cellulase enzyme production. In addition, all ancillary areas--feed handling, product recovery and purification, wastewater treatment (WWT), lignin combustor and boiler-turbogenerator, and utilities--were included. NREL engaged Delta-T Corporation (Delta-T) to assist in the process design evaluation, the process equipment costing, and overall plant integration. The process design and costing for the lignin combustor and boiler turbogenerator was reviewed by Reaction Engineering Inc. (REI) and Merrick & Company reviewed the wastewater treatment. Since then, NREL has engaged Harris Group (Harris) to perform vendor testing, process design, and costing of critical equipment identified during earlier work. This included solid/liquid separation and pretreatment reactor design and costing. Corn stover handling was also investigated to support DOE's decision to focus on corn stover as a feedstock for lignocellulosic ethanol. Working with Harris, process design and costing for these areas were improved through vendor designs, costing, and vendor testing in some cases. In addition to this work, enzyme costs were adjusted to reflect collaborative work between NREL and enzyme manufacturers (Genencor International and Novozymes Biotech) to provide a delivered enzyme for lignocellulosic feedstocks. This report is the culmination of our work and represents an updated process design and cost basis for the process using a corn stover feedstock. The process design and economic model are useful for predicting the cost benefits of proposed research. Proposed research results can be translated into modifications of the process design, and the economic impact can be assessed. This allows DOE, NREL, and other researchers to set priorities on future research with an understanding of potential reductions to the ethanol production cost. To be economically viable, ethanol production costs must be below market values for ethanol. DOE has chosen a target ethanol selling price of $1.07 per gallon as a goal for 2010. The conceptual design and costs presented here are based on a 2010 plant start-up date. The key research targets required to achieve this design and the $1.07 value are discussed in the report.

  14. Southwest MN IPM STUFF All the pestilence that's fit to print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    's high temperatures. Fields with moisture stress will be slowed down with this week's heat wave. May 14th pollination. Corn moisture stress is visible on light textured soils and compacted areas. Grasshoppers Red when soybeans are under late season drought stress. Other soybean defoliators Nymphs per square yard

  15. Fueling America Through Renewable Resources Purdue extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    produces 1 gallon of biodiesel. Cost Structure The typical historical price of soybean oil indicates if corn prices were $2 or $3 per bushel, respectively. In comparison, the cost of crude oil, the raw plant oils, such as soybean oil; animal fat from slaughter facilities; or used greases. Seventy

  16. Ackee, Lychee, Longan, Maple Syrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    , Collard greens, Daikon, Kale, Kohlrabi, Horseradish, Mustard greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Turnip, Turnip greens, Watercress Asparagus Barley, Corn, Lemongrass, Millet, Oat, Rye, Rice, Wheat, Sugarcane, Sorghum Black currant Poppy Tea Coffee Brazil nut Blueberry, Cranberry, Lingonberry Chinese Gooseberry, Kiwi

  17. FINDINGS IN BRIEF 2008 S W E D I S H U N I V E R S I T Y O F A G R I C U LT U R A L S C I E N C E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bioethanol is currently mainly made from cultivated crops such as sugar cane, sugar beet, wheat and corn.Sandgren@molbio.slu.se Johan.Schnurer@mikrob.slu.se microdrive.slu.se Efficient production of bioethanol from cellulose

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 results. Video Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More See how organic materials like corn stover, wheat straw, and woody plants are being used to create homegrown biofuels...

  19. Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    See how organic materials like corn stover, wheat straw, and woody plants are being used to create homegrown biofuels in the United States—all while reducing our dependence on foreign oil and creating jobs in rural America.

  20. No-tillage and high-residue practices reduce soil water evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    harvest and before corn seeding), we es- timated that 0.89 and 0.97 inches more waterwater content in a Panoche clay loam soil during the transition from wheat harvest

  1. Biological studies and characterization of the High Plains Disease pathogen 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirabile, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    High Plains Disease (HPD), which is a recently recognized affliction causing up to 80% yield losses in corn and wheat, has been suspected to be of viral origin, however no clear evidence existed to validate this claim. ...

  2. Characterization of Sclerotinia minor populations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Merribeth Annette

    2009-06-02

    Agriculture is a crucial component of the economy of Texas with millions of pounds of peanuts, cotton, wheat, and corn produced annually. However, Texas agricultural crops are not exempt from pathogens, especially Sclerotinia ...

  3. Search results | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 of 5 results. Video Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More See how organic materials like corn stover, wheat straw, and woody plants are being used to create homegrown...

  4. Effect of bypass protein and lasalocid on reproductive function in the postpartum Brahman cow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpena, Mario Luis

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-six fall-calving, pluriparous suckled Brahman cows were allotted randomly within sex of calf to receive: (d O= parturition) 2.6 kg corn and 0.60 kg soybean meal (SBM, n=ll), or 2.80 kg corn and 0.40 kg Menhaden fish meal (FM,n=ll) alone...

  5. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  6. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  7. The Net Effect of Exchange Rates on Agricultural Inputs and Outputs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Myriah D.

    2012-10-19

    throughout my time here at Texas A&M. viii NOMENCLATURE BACE Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates BU Bushel CWT Hundred-weight DAP Di-ammonium Phosphate EIA Energy Information Administration ERS Economic Research Service RFS Renewable Fuel... on operating capital. A portion of the inputs, fertilizer, chemicals, and fuel, are imported. For corn and wheat, inputs are similar and according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City ?wheat and corn producers feel more of a pinch from higher energy...

  8. Wheat Production in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, I. M.; Porter, K. B.; Merkle, O. G.; Lahr, K. A.; Gilmore, E. C.

    1970-01-01

    fomanche2 7 18.5 9 Farly B!ackhul12 7 20.0 9 Eiharkof- 7 18.5 9 Average of checks 7 19.0 9 .\\pent 1 10.1 htec 3 19.0 3 Rlcon 6 19.6 8 raddo 7 20.5 9 raprock 2 19.7 2 'oncho 3 20.7 6 'rocket t 6 18.8 6 .ape 3 19.2 3 .21nes 2 14.8 2 hdt. 3 22...

  9. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  10. Contact information: Jagadeesh Jagarlamudi, Department of Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742 Email: jags@umiacs.umd.edu; Web: http://www.cs.umd.edu/jags/ Related Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    -in-set knowledge mln mln dlrs bank oil cts tonnes company dollar pct NUM wheat lt exchange year dlrs pct shares stock yen company year prices share rate gas revs opec offer currency crude share dlrs group central, commodity, foreign, exchange, rates Grain grain, wheat, corn, forage, oilseed, silage Crude natural, gas

  11. The Heating of Corn Chops. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1912-01-01

    .................................. 18 2 8 mBU U B LL8888888888888888888888888888888 E8 T 8 I BN OUB . 888888888888888888888888888888888 A G8 18 I S U B 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888 PRESIDENT OF COLLEGE, 18 9 8 y FRU B... SAMPLES, AND NUMBER CONTAINING OVER FOURTEEN PER CENT MOISTURE. Month. Total. Over 14% Total. Over 14% Total. Over 14% 1909 IS10 1911 75 37 1 31 2 37 1 35 21 5 1910 1911 1912 January - . - . . . - - 35 3 39 8 25 12 Feburary...

  12. Corn Plus | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii |

  13. Agricultural Industry Advanced Vehicle Technology: Benchmark Study for Reduction in Petroleum Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger Hoy

    2014-09-01

    Diesel use on farms in the United States has remained relatively constant since 1985, decreasing slightly in 2009, which may be attributed to price increases and the economic recession. During this time, the United States’ harvested area also has remained relatively constant at roughly 300 million acres. In 2010, farm diesel use was 5.4% of the total United States diesel use. Crops accounting for an estimated 65% of United States farm diesel use include corn, soybean, wheat, hay, and alfalfa, respectively, based on harvested crop area and a recent analysis of estimated fuel use by crop. Diesel use in these cropping systems primarily is from tillage, harvest, and various other operations (e.g., planting and spraying) (Figure 3). Diesel efficiency is markedly variable due to machinery types, conditions of operation (e.g., soil type and moisture), and operator variability. Farm diesel use per acre has slightly decreased in the last two decades and diesel is now estimated to be less than 5% of farm costs per acre. This report will explore current trends in increasing diesel efficiency in the farm sector. The report combines a survey of industry representatives, a review of literature, and data analysis to identify nascent technologies for increasing diesel efficiency

  14. Effects of No-Till on Yields as Influenced by Crop and Environmental Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; West, Tristram O.

    2012-02-07

    Th is research evaluated diff erences in yields and associated downside risk from using no-till and tillage practices. Yields from 442 paired tillage experiments across the United States were evaluated with respect to six crops and environmental factors including geographic location, annual precipitation, soil texture, and time since conversion from tillage to no-till. Results indicated that mean yields for sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with no-till were greater than with tillage. In addition, no-till tended to produce similar or greater mean yields than tillage for crops grown on loamy soils in the Southern Seaboard and Mississippi Portal regions. A warmer and more humid climate and warmer soils in these regions relative to the Heartland, Basin and Range, and Fruitful Rim regions appear to favor no-till on loamy soils. With the exception of corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Southern Seaboard region, no-till performed poorly on sandy soils. Crops grown in the Southern Seaboard were less likely to have lower no-till yields than tillage yields on loamy soils and thus had lower downside yield risk than other farm resource regions. Consistent with mean yield results, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and wheat grown on sandy soils in the Southern Seaboard region using no-till had larger downside yield risks than when produced with no-till on loamy soils. Th e key fi ndings of this study support the hypothesis that soil and climate factors impact no-till yields relative to tillage yields and may be an important factor infl uencing risk and expected return and the adoption of the practice by farmers.

  15. United States based agricultural {open_quotes}waste products{close_quotes} as fillers in a polypropylene homopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M.; Caulfield, D.F. [Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    With the advent of modern coupling agents (MAPP or maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene), the potential use of various types of renewable, sustainable agricultural byproducts as fillers in thermoplastics is explored. Over 7.7 billion pounds of fillers were used in the plastics industry in 1993. With sharp price increases in commodity thermoplastics (i.e. approximately 25% in 94`), the amount of fillers in thermoplastic materials will increase throughout the 90`s. Various types of agricultural fibers are evaluated for mechanical properties vs. 50% wood flour and 40% talc filled polypropylene (PP). The fibers included in this study are: kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, oat hulls, wood flour (pine), corncob, hard corncob, rice hulls, peanut hulls, corn fiber, soybean hull, residue, and jojoba seed meal. Composite interfaces were modified with MAPP to improve the mechanical properties through increased adhesion between the hydrophilic and polar fibers with the hydrophobic and non-polar matrix. The agro-waste composites had compositions of 50% agro-waste/48% PP/2% MAPP. All of the agricultural waste by-products were granulated through a Wiley mill with a 30 mesh screen and compounded in a high intensity shear-thermo kinetic mixer. The resultant blends were injection molded into ASTM standard samples and tested for tensile, flexural, and impact properties. This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the twelve resultant composites and compares them to wood flour and talc-filled polypropylene composites. The mechanical properties of kenaf core, oat straw, wheat straw, and oat hulls compare favorably to the wood flour and talc-filled PP, which are both commercially available and used in the automotive and furniture markets.

  16. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  17. A Statewide Pest Management Plan for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01

    comprehensive way, the future direc- tion for IPM programs within the state. The plan includes IPM systems for cotton, sorghum, corn, pea- nuts, rice, riceland mosquitoes, soybeans, citrus, pecans, timber, small grains, alfalfa, sunflowers and forage grass... Citrus Mutual, American Soybean Association-Texas Chap- ter, and the American Rice Growers Cooperative) have been extremely helpful in the development and review of this plan. The Texas Pest Management Association requested the writing of A...

  18. Weed Control Recommendations in Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon; Baumann, Paul A.; Baughman, Todd; Bean, Brent W.

    2008-06-05

    to label for specific weeds. Apply after 2-leaf stage but before flagleaf is visible. Must be thoroughly mixed with water before adding to liquid nitrogen fertilizer. 2,4-D, MCPA, Clarity, Hoelon, Buctril. Refer to label for additional tankmixes... with water before adding to liquid nitrogen fertilizer. 2,4-D, MCPA, Clarity, Hoelon, Buctril. Refer to label for additional tankmixes. Barley Agility SG with TotalSol (Ally Extra+Dicamba) 1.6?3.2 oz Annual broadleaves: mustards, docks, henbit, kochia...

  19. Hessian Fly in Texas Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon; Sansone, Chris; Knutson, Allen E.

    2005-07-01

    The Hessian fly came from Russia and may have been introduced into the United States during the Revolutionary War. It has since spread to many parts of the country. By 2005, more than 67 counties in Texas reported Hessian fly infestations...

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER The influence of plants on atmospheric methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER The influence of plants on atmospheric methane in an agriculture-dominated landscape on atmospheric methane (CH4) in an agriculture-dominated landscape in the Upper Mid- west of the United States role in the landscape-scale CH4 budget. Keywords Methane . Corn . Soybean . Agriculture . Land surface

  1. D U K E I n s t i t u t e F o r G e n o m e S c i e n c e s & P o l i c y I s s u e 1 1 O c t o b e r 0 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolbow, John

    r 0 4 Message from the Director 2 Meet Phillip Febbo, MD 4 Genomic Profiling 5 Better Living Through Genomics Forum at Duke Are genetically engineered corn and soybeans a boon to farmers and con- sumers genomics, an emerging area at the interface of natural resources management and the genome sciences

  2. Spatial Analysis of Market Linkages in North Carolina Using Threshold Autoregression Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Spatial Analysis of Market Linkages in North Carolina Using Threshold Autoregression Models in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at North Carolina State University. Direct correspondence-2920. Email: anton.bekkerman@montana.edu #12;Abstract In North Carolina, where soybeans and corn are the two

  3. Oxidative Stress Is a Mediator for Increased Lipid Accumulation in a Newly Isolated Dunaliella salina Strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    that growth and biomass productivities of this strain were directly related to nitrogen levels, as the highest biomass concentration under 0.05 mM or 5 mM nitrogen regimes were 495 mg/l and 1409 mg/l, respectively. We including microalgae, animal fats, soybeans, corns and other oil crops. While none of these options

  4. New Challenges in Agricultural Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    purely on historical relationships. In the past, energy prices affected costs of producing, but small. If petroleum price increase 1%, then corn price is up by 0.20% and the soybean oil price rises Commodity Prices FAPRIMU Report #0511 Providing objective analysis for over 25 years

  5. Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels Jason- out reducing food supplies. We use these criteria to evaluate, through life-cycle accounting, ethanol from corn grain and biodie- sel from soybeans. Ethanol yields 25% more energy than the energy invested

  6. Nutrient Management in North Deanna L. Osmond, NCSU, Dept. Soil Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Management in North Carolina Deanna L. Osmond, NCSU, Dept. Soil Science Carroll Pierce, NC Carolina 43 M Turkeys $ 452 M #1 US 712 M Broilers $ 1.7 B #4 US 9.6 M Swine $ 1.7 B #2 US #12;Crop Agriculture in North Carolina Tobacco $ 719 M Cotton $ 254 M Soybeans $185 M Corn $184 M #12;Crop Production

  7. A LIDAR-based crop height measurement system for Miscanthus giganteus Lei Zhang, Tony E. Grift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G stem densities. The results showed an average error of 5.08% with a maximum error of 8% and a minimum of bioenergy crop performance. Field crops such as corn and soybean are harvested for their seeds, and various flow measurements. However, in the case of bioenergy crops, the complete above ground plant

  8. InsideIllinoisF o r F a c u l t y a n d S t a f f , U n i v e r s i t y o f I l l i n o i s a t U r b a n a -C h a m p a i g n Aug. 16, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    at the im- pact of elevated carbon dioxide on wheat crops (Arizona and Germany) and on rice (Japan). Soy that deliver at crop level a precisely regulated flow of carbon dioxide, based on wind speed and direction, pumped from a 50-ton solar- powered tank. Next summer, soybeans will grow on an adjacent 40 acres dotted

  9. Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production, and agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Impacts of land use change due to biofuel crops on carbon balance, bioenergy production that biofuel crops have much higher net pri- mary production (NPP) than soybean and wheat crops. When food). Global biofuel production has increased dramatically in the last decade, especially in United States

  10. Quick Breads and Cereals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1965-01-01

    . : Contents 3 Quick -Bread Reciw 9 Standard 3&ng ~owder~iwu& 3 Bisnrits Supme , 3 Sour Milk Biscuit*, 5 Drap Biscuits 5 Cheese Bis6uits 5 Nut Biscuits 5 Orange Bjlkuits - 5 Bread muffins 5 Fruit Muffins 5 Whale Wheat Muffins 5 Nut Muffins 5... 7 Homemade Mixes 8 Master Mix Recipes 8 Biscuits 8 Muffins 8 Corn Bread 8 Hot Cakes ar Waffles 8 Nut Bd 8 Corn Meal Mix 8 Corn Meal Muffi~s 9 Chi?- GQ~ Meal Muffins 4 9 Orange Carn Meal Muffifilis 3 9 Caraway Muffins. . 9 jalapem Gorn...

  11. Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L; Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Wolfe, Amy K; Perlack, Robert D; Dale, Virginia H; McMahon, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

  12. Biofuel Feedstock Assessment for Selected Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, K.L.; Oladosu, G.A.; Wolfe, A.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Dale, V.H.

    2008-02-18

    Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as ‘available’ for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

  13. Nutrient digestibility of 44% soybean meal, extruded whole soybeans, and an extruded soybean mixture for growing-finishing swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggs, Lynne S.

    1980-01-01

    ). Fecal values were particularly hig for leucine plus glycine, proline, glutamic acid, and for lysine in rapeseed meal. The fact that the availability of the most common first limiting amino acid, lysine, tends to be overesti- mated when using... the fecal index is a serious limitation of the fecal index method. The authors suggested that the amino acids within a feed- stuff having fecal values closest to the ileal values were those most resistant to bacterial fermentation, indicating...

  14. Irrigation Resources to Grow Biofuel:Irrigation Resources to Grow Biofuel: A National Overview with Role of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    1 Irrigation Resources to Grow Biofuel:Irrigation Resources to Grow Biofuel: A National Overview about the water and land potentially used forabout the water and land potentially used for biofuel Dry Beans Other small Wheat Barley Pasture Other Crops Other Hay Potatoes Veggies Silage corn Berries

  15. What plants does our food come from? Use the words from the word bank to correctly write the name of the plants in the boxes below. Each correct answer is one point.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Name: What plants does our food come from? Use the words from the word bank to correctly write the name of the plants in the boxes below. Each correct answer is one point. Wheat Corn Oats Rye Barley +2 Points: What is another word for grist? +3 Points: List five things at home that came from these grains

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing of Distillers Dried

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS. Twin- screw extrusion studies were performed to investigate the production of nutritionally balanced amounts of fish meal, fish oil, whole wheat flour, corn gluten meal, and vitamin and mineral premixes

  17. FUTURESF U T UR E SAGBIORESEARCH MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY SPRING/SUMMER 2011 VOLUME 29 NOS 1 & 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BioResearch scientists do not work in a vacuum -- the results of their studies are used by various groups of people who-consumed food crop in the world, after rice, wheat, and corn. Therefore, research on the genetic improvement

  18. Ethanol plant investment in Canada: A structural model1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Fujin Yi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 Ethanol plant investment in Canada: A structural model1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Fujin Yi Most of the fuel ethanol plants in Canada were built recently and either use corn or wheat as feedstock. It is important to determine what factors affect decisions about when and where to invest in building new ethanol

  19. A Science Service p a t u r e Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Science Service p a t u r e Released upon receipt but intended f o r use April 25, 1933 ? WHY in the United States: f132eportsof falls of hail in the crop-growing seasan so heavy the ice formed in drifts data. of wheat and corn crops utterly dostropd over almost entire counties in the middle rest, of half

  20. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. MCP, 11(11):1140-1155 Research Org: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  1. Indiana Soybean Alliance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei |source Historypub [ICO]Indian Valley Hot

  2. Watergrass and Volunteer Sorghum Control in Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.; Lavake, D.E.; Hollingsworth, Dale

    1979-01-01

    + 3 + 1 AAtrex , AAtrex 2 AAtrex 1 Evik + 2 84ab 79ab 115 a 71 cd 77 a 110a 0.5% S d7 Check Od Oc 116 a Oe 0 d 128 a aMeans followed by the same letter are not different at the 5% level of significance. b~une 8 was prior to postemergence sprays... (ail herbicide (ail (LbIA) (BulA) c*" (NolA) AAtrex 442 c-e 820 c-e 1,561 b-d 1506 3 e 2 350 de 12,192 ab 12,288 ab 1 1,328 a-c 11,616a-c Princep AAtrex 1ya iha 125 a-c 137a 1 2 AAtrex + oilb 2 AAtrex 2 2 137a 133 a-c 11...

  3. Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaar, William Edward

    1996-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. agricultural residues, wood, municipal solid waste, tree and yard t gs, sewage sludge, and waste paper) comprises three major components: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. It can contain as much as 75% polysaccharide...

  4. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19

    in seedling dock AA tr ex N i ne-O ? 0.9 to 1.1 lbs. on winter fallo w ed lands. the spring. N o rmal w eed contr ol pr ograms will be (atrazine) necessar y at cr op planting time. (R efer to label for specific S yngenta and others w eeds contr olled.) N umer... factant or cr op oil concentrate at 1.0% v/v . S yngenta cr op oil concentrate N o te: G r amo x one E xtra or M a x ? may be combined with atrazine or B ladex ? for r esidual contr ol Annual br oadleaf and grass w e eds R oundup U ltra ? 0.5 to 1.5 qts...

  5. Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be used to pump water uphill for later use, directly run light, heat and equipment or electrolyze water

  6. DOW CORNING CORPORATION Material Safety Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    : On large fires use dry chemical, foam or water spray. On small fires use carbon dioxide (CO2), dry chemical

  7. Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Lambs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Brewer, Roy A.

    1922-01-01

    she reach first place in the production of sheep. At the same time an increasing West Texas acreage is being planted in grain sor- ghums during each succeeding year, and the farmers producing these crops are demanding information and assistance... producing 60,000,000 bushels of the grain sor- ghums. This is conceded to be only a partial showing of the possible production because the area planted in them is limited to the popular annual estimate of the farmers as to how much production the market...

  8. Dow Corning Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOEDixmont,Missouri:Dow Chemical Company-Oyster

  9. Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliam County,| OpenEIPrism

  10. Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumer ConnectionCoral Power LLC Place:PowerBelt

  11. Glacial Lakes Corn Processors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectric Jump to:GerGlacialGlacial EnergyHoldings

  12. Grupo Corn lio Brennand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydroLegalAlto AlegreConsiag Jump to:lio

  13. Superior Corn Products LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember CorpSunvie SAS Jump

  14. Quad County Corn Processors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology JumpPrueba 1VenturePzero JumpQnovo Jump

  15. Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen EnergyFebruary 2009 | OpenAkiachak,AksaAkutan,

  16. Corning, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii |NorthCornia 2

  17. Corn Plus Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobalTechnology VenturesPlus Wind Farm

  18. Registration of `HS03243' Soybean Soybean cultivar HS03243 [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] (Reg.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    yield of HS0­3243 was 6% greater than that of `Dilworth' (Fioritto et al., 2004), a cur- rent public, compared with 403 g kg21 for Dilworth and 419 g kg21 for Kottman. Oil content has averaged 203 g kg21

  19. Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB): a Web Resource for Soybean Translational

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System in the CERNimmobilizeReport)Aluminate

  20. Pre-Harvest Sprouting in Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon

    2005-01-26

    stream_source_info pdf_2046.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3668 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_2046.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 E-336 1/05 Gaylon Morgan, State...

  1. Wheat Versus Milo for Dairy Cows. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, O. C. (Orlin Cephas)

    1933-01-01

    . Scoates. A. E.. Agricultural Engineering J. H. Knox. M. S., Animal Husbandry A. K. Mackey. M. S., Animal Husbandry A. L. Darnell. M. A.. Dairy Husbandry *Dean, School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of August 1, 1938 **In coo~eration with U. S. Department...

  2. Wheat Ridge Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,What Is a Small Community Wind Project? JumpWhat's

  3. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  4. 64 INDUSTRIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY SPRING 2008 F E AT U R E C O M M E N TA RY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    64 INDUSTRIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY SPRING 2008 F E AT U R E C O M M E N TA RY G U E S T E D I TO R I A L for energy to be produced from renewable resources, the contribution of Indiana's corn and soybean industry. Reports show that the wood products industry is the largest, by paid wages, of any agricultural industry

  5. Impact of ethanol expansion on the cattle feeding industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Erin

    2007-09-17

    metric tons by 2015/16 (Westhoff 2006). Analysis by Doering and Hurt (2006) showed, at the local level, individual livestock producers “may well feel impacts” from bio-fuel production greater than the national average estimates, depending upon... the particular situation of their state or region. “A large bio-fuel processing presence in an area may well increase corn or soybean prices above the national average change and disrupt existing marketing and transportation logistics.” At the national level...

  6. Fire Ants and Their Control. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamman, Philip J.; Drees, Bastiaan M.; Vinson, S. Bradleigh

    1986-01-01

    Agricultural Extension Service because these substances are dangerously flammable, kill grass and plants around the treated mounds and can seriously pollute the soil. Other home remedies include soap solutions, cleaning products or wood ashes soaked... ant workers feed on parts of plants or remove planted corn, peanut or soybean seeds and/or seedlings. Seed treat ments or insecticides applied before or at planting to control soil insects usually will prevent fire ant damage, although...

  7. Agroforestry: Conifers. (Latest citations from the Cab Abstracts database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of lands forested with conifers for crop and livestock production. Citations cover the grazing of livestock and the production of crops, including tomatoes, soybeans, lespedeza, wheat, rape, taro, cotton, cabbages, ginger, watermelons, and strawberries. Livestock discussed include cattle, sheep, geese, and horses. Economic analyses and economic models are presented. (Contains a minimum of 147 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Salinity Control in Irrigation Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longenecker, Donald E.; Lyerly, Paul J.

    1962-01-01

    -tolerant tolerant salt salt tolerant tolerant FIELD CROPS Field bean Cowpea White clover" Alsike clover Red clover Ladino clwer Crimson clover Rose clover Burnet clover Lima bean Green bean Celery Pear Apple Orange Grapefruit Plum Apricot... Ryegrass Sour clover Rye (hay) Birdsfoot Wheat (hay) trefoil Oats (hay) VEGETABLECROPS Tomato Garden beet Broccoli Kale Cabbage Spinach Pepper Okra Lettuce Sweet corn Onion Pea Watermelon Cantaloupe Squash FRUIT CROPS Olive Pomegranate...

  9. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for large-scale watershed modeling could be useful for evaluating the quality of the water in regions that are dominated by nonpoint sources in order to identify potential “hot spots” for which mitigating strategies could be further developed. An analysis of water quality under future scenarios in which changes in land use would be made to accommodate increased biofuel production was developed for the Missouri River Basin (MoRB) based on a SWAT model application. The analysis covered major agricultural crops and biofuel feedstock in the MoRB, including pasture land, hay, corn, soybeans, wheat, and switchgrass. The analysis examined, at multiple temporal and spatial scales, how nitrate, organic nitrogen, and total nitrogen; phosphorus, organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, and total phosphorus; suspended sediments; and water flow (water yield) would respond to the shifts in land use that would occur under proposed future scenarios. The analysis was conducted at three geospatial scales: (1) large tributary basin scale (two: Upper MoRB and Lower MoRB); (2) regional watershed scale (seven: Upper Missouri River, Middle Missouri River, Middle Lower Missouri River, Lower Missouri River, Yellowstone River, Platte River, and Kansas River); and (3) eight-digit hydrologic unit (HUC-8) subbasin scale (307 subbasins). Results showed that subbasin-level variations were substantial. Nitrogen loadings decreased across the entire Upper MoRB, and they increased in several subbasins in the Lower MoRB. Most nitrate reductions occurred in lateral flow. Also at the subbasin level, phosphorus in organic, sediment, and soluble forms was reduced by 35%, 45%, and 65%, respectively. Suspended sediments increased in 68% of the subbasins. The water yield decreased in 62% of the subbasins. In the Kansas River watershed, the water quality improved significantly with regard to every nitrogen and phosphorus compound. The improvement was clearly attributable to the conversion of a large amount of land to switchgrass. The Middle Lower Missouri River and Lower Missouri River were identified as hot regions. Further analysis identified four subbasins (10240002, 10230007, 10290402, and 10300200) as being the most vulnerable in terms of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loadings. Overall, results suggest that increasing the amount of switchgrass acreage in the hot spots should be considered to mitigate the nutrient loads. The study provides an analytical method to support stakeholders in making informed decisions that balance biofuel production and water sustainability.

  10. Iron, zinc, and manganese distribution in mature soybean seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przyby?owicz, Wojciech J.; Mesjasz-Przyby?owicz, Jolanta; Blair, Matthew W.; Jensen, Erik Ø.; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Augustyniak M, et al. (2005) Micro-PIXE in ecophysiology. Xsensitive, non-destructive micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ICP-AES) in axial mode. Micro-PIXE analysis. Both dry and

  11. Meat Alternate Cookery: Eggs, Nuts, Soybeans, Dried Beans and Peas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1980-01-01

    are listed on the back cover. Eggs serve as a meat alternate as they are good sources of animal protein, minerals and vitamins . Nuts, including peanuts, are rich in fat as well as protein. Peanuts are especially good sources of B vitamins . Nuts.... Eggs are used in meat dishes, as a leavening agent, and to thicken sauces. Nuts and peanut butter make good snacks and are used as an ingredient in main dishes, soups, salads, cooked veg etables, breads and desserts. Dried beans and whole peas...

  12. Genomics, Gene Expression and Other Studies in Soybean Rust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posada-Buitrago, Martha Lucia

    2005-01-01

    Joint Genome Institute Genomics, Gene Expression and otherRust Martha Lucía Posada-Buitrago Ph.D Genomics DivisionEvolutionary Genomics DOE- Joint Genome Institute Lawrence

  13. Peanut, soybean and cottonseed oil as diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazed, M.A.; Summers, J.D.; Batchelder, D.G.

    1985-09-01

    Two single cylinder diesel engines burning three vegetable oils, and their blends with diesel fuel, were evaluated and compared to engines burning a reference diesel fuel (Phillips No. 2). Tests were conducted determining power output, fuel consumption, thermal efficiency and exhaust smoke. Using the three vegetable oils and their blends with No. 2 diesel fuel, maximum changes of 5%, 14%, 10%, and 40% were observed in power, fuel consumption by mass, thermal efficiency, and exhaust smoke, respectively. 41 references.

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy measurement

  15. Biofuels from Corn Stover: Pyrolytic Production and Catalytic Upgrading Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capunitan, Jewel Alviar

    2013-01-15

    product properties (lower moisture, TAN, and highest heating value), and can be a potential feedstock for co-processing with crude oils in existing refineries. Major reactions involved were conversion of phenolics to aromatics and hydrogenation of ketones...

  16. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , · Sonny Mills, LA Dept. of Labor · Greg Honaker, OSHA #12;OSHA -- LA Logging Council Strategic Partnership startup procedures. · Safe maintenance & repair procedures. · Safe work flow. · Minimize risk to fellers

  17. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29

    Department of Agriculture (USDA), including Dartmouth College, Auburn University, Purdue University, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Working with other people from various institutes provided a great opportunity... of carbon-carbon bonds. O O H-C C O H+ H+ H2C C OCH3 C O- C O O- OCH3 15 Agriculture (USDA) including Dartmouth College, Auburn University, Purdue University, Michigan State University, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Texas...

  18. Abraham Cornelis Adwin Boogert Curriculum Vitae--April 14, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, Adwin

    (external) NASA Funding of Origins of Solar Systems 2011 Panel member (external) NASA Funding of Origins of Solar Systems 2011 Panel member (internal) NASA Funding of Exobiology/Evolutionary Biology 2011 Reviewer Panel member (external) NASA Funding of Origins of Solar Systems 2003 External Reviewer Time Allocation

  19. Corn Variety Experiments, Substation no. 3, Angleton, Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1921-01-01

    1777 1330 1983 1712 Mosby's Prolific. Munson. Oklahoma Yellow Dent. Rockdale. St. Charles White. Sllrcropper. Surcropper. . Surcropper. Surcropper. Tankersley. Thomas. Virginia White Dent. ' Ferguson Yellow Dent. Given's Red Cob.... Golden Dent. . Gorham's Yellow Dent. Hastings' Prolific. Henry Grady. Improved Indian Squaw. Improved Indian +.Squaw. Improved Learning. Mosby's Prolific. Munson. Oklahoma White Wonder. 2444 1713 2425 2435 2424 2445 1777 2420 327...

  20. Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01

    . D., Chief; State Entomologist H J RFINHARD B. S Enfomologid R' K FLETcHFR' Ph 6. Entomologisf W. L: OWEN, JR:. M: ~.,'~nfom?logisf J N RONEY M S. Entornologr~t J' c.' GAINES) JR M. S Ent~mologist S: E. JONES, M. g., ~ntb;nologist F F BIBRY B...., Superintendent No. 3, Angleton, Brazoria County: R. I-I. STANSEL, M. S., Superrntendenf No. 4, Beaumont, Jefferson Connty: R. H. WYCHE, B. S., Superrntendent No. 5, Temple, Bell County: HENRY DUNLAVY, h4. S., Superintendent B F. DANA M S. Plant Pathologrst...

  1. Serendipity in Science by Robert M. Corn. May 2, 2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    optical properties and can be used to harvest photons efficiently for solar energy, split laser beams used ingredient of plastic water bottles) on top of a thin, bendable film of Teflon. They then etched the layers that depositing a very small amount of gold onto Teflon creates small beads or grains--the same way that water

  2. CURRICULUM VITA Cornelis Folkert de Hoop May 22, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems. SUMMARY OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS * Research in worker safety, biomass energy and environmental lobbyists. * Marketed timber under competitive bids. * Overall coordination of data processing-1976 Abitibi Paper Co., Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. 1974-1975 US Forest Service, London, KY. #12;COURSES

  3. The effect of flaxseed hulls on expanded corn meal products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, Marc Edward

    2009-05-15

    , brown and golden flaxseed hulls? 33 VI Oil content of sieved fractions of flaxseed hulls (% d.b.) ??????? 33 VII Moisture, oil, and crude protein (% d.b.) for blends extruded using the twin screw extruder at 72 kg/hr feed rate ???????????.. 35... ?- oxidation to produce energy; 2) its stored in triacylglycerols (triglycerides) and phospholipids of cell membranes; and 3) its converted to longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) (Morris, 2003). 8...

  4. Factors affecting the color of corn tortillas and tortilla chips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mireles, Raquel C

    1995-01-01

    of equilibration on chip color. White dry masa flour (1.2% sucrose, 2.3% free amino groups and 1.2% phenols) for tortilla chips was blended with different concentrations and combinations of glucose, lysine and ferulic acid. Calcium oxide and citric acid were used...

  5. Sandia Energy - JBEI Researchers Splice Corn Gene into Switchgrass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the most promising alternative to petroleum-based liquid fuels for a renewable, clean, green, domestic source of transportation energy. Nature, however, does not make it easy....

  6. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; Cronholm, Gregory B.; Parker, Roy D.; Troxclair, Noel N.; Patrick, Carl D.; Biles, Stephen; Morrison, William P.

    2006-05-24

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Insecticide Application Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides . . . . . . . 22 Beneficial Arthropods...

  7. Integrating Economic Analysis Wiith Biophysical Simulation: Appraising Blackland Corn Production. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Carl R.; Mjelde, James W.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Cothren, J. Tom; Martin, J. Rod; Rister, M. Edward; Stockle, Claudio

    1990-01-01

    superphosphate (0-46-0) , banded with the seed during planting at a rate of 50 lb Pp5 increased grain yields of all six varieties by 10 to 12% compared to unfertilized plots (Figure 4b). At the same fertilizer-Prates, !tll six varieties had similar grain...

  8. Collection, Commercial Processing, and Utilization of Corn Stover

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

  9. Integrated Management of Sweet Corn Insects in New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    trap catch (the moths) . . . . 6 Suppliers . . . . . . . 6 Introduction Integrated Pest Management (IPM) arose as an alternative to the conventional techniques growers were usingtohandlepestproblemsinthe1960, UNH Cooperative Extension offered an alternative approach: IPM. In this approach, we recommend

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Corn to Ethanol the Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  11. Mathematical modeling of impingement drying of corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, Louise Marie

    2000-01-01

    was driven according to Fourier's Law of conduction. Boundary conditions for drying in both air and superheated steam were developed for incorporation into the model. Convective heat transfer accounted for heat flow into the product at the surface. When...

  12. The Origin of Indian Corn and its Relatives. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph); Reeves, R. G. (Robert Gatlin)

    1939-01-01

    Introduction; Botanical Relationships of Maize; Previous Evidence on the Origin of Maize; Previous Theories on the Origin of Maize; New Evidence from Cytogenetic Studies; The Origin of Teosinte; The Origin of Maize; The ...

  13. Blending municipal solid waste with corn stover for sugar production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    applied an enzyme free process by adding mineral acid and water directly into the ILbiomass slurry to induce hydrolysis. With the acidolysis process in the IL...

  14. BloombergBusiness: Viewed from space: less corn

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimetic Dye MoleculesBlakeViewed from space:

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear Corp Inc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OHStar Cutter Corp -Sutton

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Plant - NY 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OHStar Cutter Corp -SuttonPlant - NY

  17. South Corning, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergy IncAshburnham,BoundChicago Heights,

  18. Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | Open EnergyPhoenicia,Creek,PilgrimGroveIsland Ridge,Lake

  19. City of Corning, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgiaBurley,Columbus Place: OhioCornell,

  20. Sandia Energy - JBEI Researchers Splice Corn Gene into Switchgrass,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColinEnergyComputationalJBEI Home

  1. Sandia Energy - Louisiana Blue Ribbon Commission on Bayou Corne Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSampleLignin-Feasting Microbe Holds Promise for

  2. Corning, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans,Oregon:Volcano, Hawaii |NorthCornia 2New York:

  3. Development of a Wet Logistics System for Bulk Corn Stover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen andMEQ inWoody

  4. Gene Controls Flowering Time in Corn - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblems ISecurityGene Controls Flowering

  5. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz -Technologies forBig

  6. Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012 |Department of Energy Industrial

  7. Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M.

    2008-04-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

  8. Effects of Compressive Force, Particle Size and Moisture Content on Mechanical Properties of Biomass Grinds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar; Tabil, Lope Jr.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2006-03-01

    Chemical composition, moisture content, bulk and particle densities, and geometric mean particle size were determined to characterize grinds from wheat and barley straws, corn stover and switchgrass. The biomass grinds were compressed for five levels of compressive forces (1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4400 N) and three levels of particle sizes (3.2, 1.6 and 0.8 mm) at two levels of moisture contents (12% and 15% (wb) to establish the compression and relaxation data. Corn stover grind produced the highest compact density at low pressure during compression. Compressive force, particle size and moisture content of grinds significantly affected the compact density of barley straw, corn stover and switchgrass grinds. However, different particle sizes of wheat straw grind did not produce any significant difference on compact density. Barley straw grind had the highest asymptotic modulus among all other biomass grinds indicating that compact from barley straw grind were more rigid than those of other compacts. Asymptotic modulus increased with an increase in maximum compressive pressure. The trend of increase in asymptotic modulus (EA) with the maximum compressive pressure ( 0) was fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Keywords: Biomass grinds, chemical composition, compact density and asymptotic modulus

  9. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  10. Group Risk Plan (GRP) Insurance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

    1999-06-09

    sorghum, soybeans and wheat. Coverage Levels A grower selects a specific dollar amount of protection per acre and one of the five coverage levels (70, 75, 80, 85 or 90 percent). The specific dollar amount of protection per acre ranges from 60 to 100... percent of the maximum dollar amount of protection shown in the county?s actuarial table. Generally, the maximum dollar amount of protection will be 150 percent of the expected county yield, valued at the market price elected under the APH plan...

  11. Wheat Ridge, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland: EnergyWexford County, Michigan:NewWhat's MyRidge,

  12. Effect of leavening acids on wheat flour tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cepeda, Minerva

    1995-01-01

    leavening acid was first evaluated in combination with sodium bicarbonate at different levels, controlling dough temperature at 38'C. Individual leavening acids did not yield optimum dough properties and had pH higher than 6.0, except for MCP treatments...

  13. The Composition and Value of Wheat By-Products. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1921-01-01

    .. . . . . . . . . . . . . Ether extract 3.33 3.09 6.18 4.25 5.33 3.40 2.93 3.31 8.14 1.94 2.35 3.50 2.22 3.38 2.60 2.17 2.49 1.95 3.23 3.39 1.97 1.90 0.24 2.48 3.05 2.49 .5.13 2.28 1.46 2.98 3.62 3.85 4.11 3.48 5.42 5.50 Protein. 18.13 16....31 19.94 18.00 19.81 18.72 13.08 14.48 16.46 16.38 14.63 14.50 13.25 16.28 12.13 14.50 16.00 15.56 14.00 14.82 11.07 10.91 12.69 15.63 14.56 12.05 8.75 10.44 7.38 16.63 18.50 16.88 15.94 17.81 18.56 19.19 Crude fiber...

  14. Wheat Variety Identification Using MALDI-TOF M Znamirowski1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ens, Werner

    % ethanol in 1.5 mL micro-centrifuge tubes. Each tube is mixed with a vortex stirrer and then incubated to form a saturated solution. The solution was mixed with a vortex stirrer and then centrifuged for 10

  15. Dryland Wheat Response to Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilization. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramp, Betty A.; Bordovsky, David

    1995-01-01

    .172.3 . - ~ LIBRARY TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY JUN 13 1995 TEXAS STATE DOCUMENTS TEXAS STATE DEPOSITORY J]) ID W J1, ?~tiD ~JE~JP@ ~J]1f)]l@@ JPoo?~??JPoo? JFJE)]l1filJLU~? B-1723 Aprill995 Texas Agricultural Experiment Station ? Edward A. Hiler, Director...

  16. Water Conservation in Southern Great Plains Wheat Production. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finnell, H. H. (Henry Howard)

    1944-01-01

    .Iculated effect of other factors was eliminated it was 2.62 bushels ch. INCHES OF JULY RAINFALL PREVIOUS TO SOWING *lnd~cotes number of f~elds averaged In each group F= Vanance Ratio. - 10 5q* the ca per in 85# .SO-1.50 1.51-2.50 2.51-3.50 14... BUSHELS PER F = 9.05 0-40 50-80 90-100 PERCENT OF FIELD AREA AFFECTED BY WlND EROSION *Indrcates number of f~elds overaged In each group F = Var~ance Ratio. factor on lands where water conservation practices were used, probably due to an apparent...

  17. The Phosphorus Compounds of Cotton Seed Meal and Wheat Bran. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

    1913-01-01

    as in 0.2 per cent hydro? , s H SN s H OD S UH . NHD 1 V S HF UH 5 5H 1 SEEV Y E A W A 1 V J s E A 5 i O A 1 a chloric acid, and that after extraction with acid the remaining phosphorus was no longer soluble in water, but could be dissolved in 0.2..., and that after extraction with acid the remaining phos? ,936,93IL6 U H . NHD 1 V S HF UH 5 5H 1 SEEV Y E AW A 1 V J s E A 5 i O A 1 hh phorus was no longer Soluble in water, but soluble in 0.2 per cent am? monia. The principal acid-soluble and ammonia...

  18. * SGP Central Facility - surrounded by wheat felds, the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208)InventorHow to Save(ANL-IN-03-032) -Feb 16in5

  19. Wheat Belt Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)VosslohWest Plains ElectricElectricCountyWhat

  20. A case study of agricultural residue availability and cost for a cellulosic ethanol conversion facility in the Henan province of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Wu, Yun [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    A preliminary analysis of the availability and cost of corn stover and wheat straw for the area surrounding a demonstration biorefinery in the Henan Province of China was performed as a case study of potential cooperative analyses of bioenergy feedstocks between researchers and industry in the US and China. Though limited in scope, the purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into some of the issues and challenges of estimating feedstock availability in China and how this relates to analyses of feedstocks in the U.S. Completing this analysis also highlighted the importance of improving communication between U.S. researchers and Chinese collaborators. Understanding the units and terms used in the data provided by Tianguan proved to be a significant challenge. This was further complicated by language barriers between collaborators in the U.S. and China. The Tianguan demonstration biorefinery has a current capacity of 3k tons (1 million gallons) of cellulosic ethanol per year with plans to scale up to 10k tons (3.34 million gallons) per year. Using data provided by Tianguan staff in summer of 2011, the costs and availability of corn stover and wheat straw were estimated. Currently, there are sufficient volumes of wheat straw and corn stover that are considered 'waste' and would likely be available for bioenergy in the 20-km (12-mile) region surrounding the demonstration biorefinery at a low cost. However, as the industry grows, competition for feedstock will grow and prices are likely to rise as producers demand additional compensation to fully recover costs.

  1. Dairy Digest. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, G. G.

    1955-01-01

    been used to determine a starting place. 4. Feed loose salt and steamed bonemeal free choice. 5. Keep clean, cool drinking water available at all times. ZED BUDGET REQUIREMENTS FOR DAIRY HEIFERS From Birth to Calving The amounts given below... Cottonseed meal Gluten meal Gluten feed Wheat bran Molasses Oats, whole Oats. around One qt. weighs, pounds 0.6 1.7 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.3 0.5 3.0 1 .o 0.7 Good corn or sorghum silage, well packed, weighs from 40 to 45 pounds per cubic foot...

  2. A study of the anatomical and physiological effects of the toxicity of galactose on seedlings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Owen Harrison

    narrow glass jars, to accomodate the growth of the leafy stems. After a period of thirty days, the plants growing on the galactose media v/ere seen to have been unable to penetrate the agar, the roots dying soon after contact with the same. Many.... Experiments with galactose, involving varying per cents of the same, (from 0.125 to 2Ja), showed that marked toxicity was produced by percents of l°/o or more. Canada field peas, corn,and wheat were tried with like results. Finally it was discovered...

  3. Changing Supply of Grains in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Clarence A.; Whitney, Howard S.

    1959-01-01

    importance, while rice in- creased, in the food grain group in the 1950's. Grain sorghum increased from 21 percent of total feed grain production in 1935-39 to 72 percent in 1955-58, while corn decreased from 52 to 14 per- cent. Texas usually grows more... for food. This indi- cates a greater dependence on export markets to take the increased production in recent years. Although Texas grows an average of 43,000,- 000 bushels of wheat annually, this makes up only a relatively small proportion of total U...

  4. Lamb Feeding Trials in the El Paso Valley, 1947-49 : A Comparison of High Protein Cottonseed Products, and of Ground and Unground Sorghum Grain. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyerly, P. J. (Paul J.); Jones, John H.; Willey, N. B. (Norman Bailey)

    1951-01-01

    threshed mi10 in two lamb fattening tests, but it was stated that the test should be continued further. Later, Mackey and Jones (1932) observed *Respectively, assistant animal husbandman, El Paso Valley Experiment Station, Ysleta, Texas; professor... of Sorghum, Tex. Agr. Esp. Sta. Prog. Report 1064. Mackey, A. K. and s. M. Jones, 1932. Fattening Lambs on Corn, Milo, Hegari, Wheat and Oats with Cottonseed Cake and Al- falfa. Tex. &gr. Exp. Sta. Rul. 465. Neale, P. E., 1932. The Use of Cottonseed Meal...

  5. Newsfront 31 March - 6 April 2008, Issue 60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Yubaraj

    , they were calling off the peace initiative. They also announced that the joint team they had formed to negotiate with the official team consisting of members from the seven party ruling alliance stood dissolved. Deputy Prime Minister, Ram Chandra Poudel who... there are on the rise and so are standards of living. Globally we should now expect the opposite of the benefits we once enjoyed. Super stellar Chinese demand has the power to raise commodity prices worldwide. Wheat, corn, pork, oil, gas, gold, steel and onion prices...

  6. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  7. Medium-term effects of corn biochar addition on soil biota activities and functions in a temperate soil cropped to corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Biochar is a carbon(C) -rich product obtained by thermal decomposition of biomass at relatively low traditional charcoal production, but biochar is used as a soil amendment and not for energy generation production as a C-negative technology for climate change mitigation (Woolf et al., 2010). Biochar application

  8. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campiche, Jody L.

    2010-07-14

    The renewable energy industry continues to expand at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to reduce our dependency on foreign oil. The evolution of these new biofuel markets could have significant effects...

  9. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    distributions for soybean biodiesel (food fixed) . . . . . .distributions for soybean biodiesel (food not fixed) . . .land use from expanded biodiesel production. Technical

  10. The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Rafael de Farias

    2009-05-15

    , Argentina, Rest of South America (Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Canada, and India. The importing countries are composed of China, European Union, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and the Rest of the World. Results suggest these proposed transportation improvements...

  11. Effect of inoculation and nitrogen addition on the yield and yield components of soybeans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambaudo, Sebastian Pedro

    1983-01-01

    this technique resulted in percentages of nitrogen fixed of 37, 27, and 13% for Coker 338, Cobb, and Dowling varieties. Estimates made using total nitrogen by difference were also variable due to variability in the yield data. Percentages of nitrogen fixed... were 20, 19, and 16% for Coker 338, Dowling, and Cobb using this method. A four variable regression model was developed which explained 68% of the variability in grain yield. These factors, in decreasing order of importance, were plant dry weight...

  12. COMMON SOYBEAN INSECTS 1. BEAN LEAF BEETLE, Cerotoma trifurcata (Forster). The adult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    , Epilachna varivestis Mulsant. The Mexican bean beetle is a pest of garden beans but will also attack soy importance in Indiana, stink bug injury in southern states has been severe enough to affect quality and lower dam age early in the growing season. The adults (not pictured) are tan col ored beetles about the size

  13. INCLUSION OF FERMENTED SOYBEAN MEAL IN RAINBOW TROUT DIETS MICHAEL E. BARNES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and supplies. I greatly appreciate the assistance of Timothy Bruce, Amanda Davis, Rici Domenici, Meghan Waugh, Matt Wipf, Christine Wood, and Sarah Zimmerman. I thank my committee members, Bill Gibbons

  14. Effect of Biocidal Treatments on Cation Exchange Capacity and Fusarium Blight of Soybean in Delaware Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    in Delaware Soils H. A. Sandier, R. B. Carroll,* and D. L. Sparks ABSTRACT Fusarium wilt has caused it is caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum. A better understanding of the relationship between soil characteristics and the pathogen and between biocidal treatments and physiochemical properties

  15. Quantum dynamical studies on Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 Isaiah Sumner, Prasad Phatak and Srinivasan S. Iyengar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    us to define kinetic energy. The Hamiltonian for the nuclear- electronic-fictious particle system nuclear orbitals (eigenstates) along the reaction coordinate, we note that tunneling for both hydrogen-dimensional nature of the tunneling process. The quantum dynamical evolution indicates a signicant contribution from

  16. South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2015 SOYBEAN INSECT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    scouting and treatment thresholds tailored for use in narrow rows. There are several sampling alternatives-382- 8473 or www.gemplers.com) and Forestry Suppliers (800-647-5368 or www.forestry-suppliers.com). Ask

  17. Geek-Up[10.08.10] -- Laser Systems, Soybean Root Hair Experiments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to be the first to demonstrate reliable fusion ignition - the same force that powers the sun and the stars - in a laboratory environment. Says NNSA Deputy Administrator for...

  18. Phosphorus availability does not affect the root to shoot allometric relationship in soybean, sunflower and maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubio, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    2001. The effect of P availability on the carbon economy ofin the resources availability by applying morphological andbecause the high nutrient availability compensates for the

  19. Molecular footprints of domestication and improvement in soybean revealed by whole genome re-sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    China Institute of Crop Science, The National Key FacilityResearch in Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy ofdetails Institute of Crop Science, The National Key Facility

  20. Geek-Up[10.08.10] -- Laser Systems, Soybean Root Hair Experiments and the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashers |Gamma-Ray LoggingtheElectron

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide for the American Corn Growers Association

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:WizardYatescloud HomeNewsEERERolesPowering America% % % %A

  2. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through 2019 period included estimates of world and U.S. energy prices, ethanol and biodiesel production the sector. Expansion of biodiesel use in the EU raises demand for vegetable oils in global markets." Key.S. and World economic growth, b) the value of the U.S. dollar, c) oil prices, d) domestic and international

  3. Feasibility study of a corn-to-ethanol plant in Sardis, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    A technical description of a chemical processing facility capable of producing 5 million gallons per year of denatured anhydrous ethanol (power alcohol) is presented. In addition, certain equipment options are evaluated on the basis of availability, reliability, and budget constraints. Analysis of logistics and sensitivity of financial decision making criteria to market variables is not within the scope of this study. Consequently, concluding statements are limited to a discussion of technical feasibility and a statement of capital cost for turn-key construction.

  4. The influence of testers and fertility levels in the evaluation of inbred lines of corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jesse W

    1952-01-01

    Seleetiene within linea ~factions within Pfluger lines Seleotfono within Burton liaes (10) 5 (105e00) (10 50) Sin&2 5, 24?? 7SI58 14+72?? Fertility X seleotfone within lines Krror 5 10 lOe83 1, 08 48e80 lo22 Tesiers Testers X Testers X Testors...

  5. Batch Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Corn Stover and Improvements with Countercurrent Saccharification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Chao

    2015-07-29

    Enzymatic saccharification of non-food biomass, such as lignocellulose, can produce sugars. Sugars are the common feedstock for bioethanol, which can be substituted for transportation fuel and address the shortage of fossil fuels. Traditional batch...

  6. Regional Differences in Corn Ethanol Production: Profitability and Potential Water Demands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Lindsey M.

    2010-07-14

    to location differences. Changes in consumptive water use in the Texas High Plains, Southern Minnesota, and the Central Valley of California, as impacted by current and proposed grain-based ethanol plants were addressed. In addition, this research assesses...

  7. The effect of processing parameters on oil content of corn tortilla chips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Peta Rock

    1993-01-01

    has been reported, much work has been done to reduce fat content of potato chips (Gamble et al. , 1987b; Gamble and Rice, 1987; Hannigan, 1981; Hill et al. , 1984; Kloos 1990; Lee, et al. , 1986; Morris, 1984; Prosise and Ramsey, 1990). Drying... potato slices before frying produces chips lower in fat than those produced by standard methods (Gamble and Rice, 1987). A similar method of production for tortilla chips would require little capital investment (i. e. , new equipment), and no notation...

  8. A Test of the Producing Power of Some Texas Seed Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, R. L. (Robert Love)

    1906-01-01

    This study examined the development of Clear Lake-NASA Area, Texas into an edge city and challenged the Garreau edge city model by addressing the question, Do all edge cities follow the Garreau model of development? ...

  9. Synthesis Gas Production by Rapid Solar Thermal Gasification of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, C. M.; Woodruff, B.; Andrews, L.; Lichty, P.; Lancaster, B.; Weimer, A. W.; Bingham, C.

    2008-03-01

    Biomass resources hold great promise as renewable fuel sources for the future, and there exists great interest in thermochemical methods of converting these resources into useful fuels. The novel approach taken by the authors uses concentrated solar energy to efficiently achieve temperatures where conversion and selectivity of gasification are high. Use of solar energy removes the need for a combustion fuel and upgrades the heating value of the biomass products. The syngas product of the gasification can be transformed into a variety of fuels useable with today?s infrastructure. Gasification in an aerosol reactor allows for rapid kinetics, allowing efficient utilization of the incident solar radiation and high solar efficiency.

  10. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    in British Columbia and the European Union. While the term `carbon intensity' is popular, it does not include Contact us My IOPscience #12;IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 3 (2008, and (3) a low carbon fuel standard (LCFS). A CO2 charge on life cycle emissions increases production

  11. A Review of the Spider-Mite Problem on Grain Sorghum and Corn in West Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehler, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    indicated spider- mites were developing resistance to pesticides al- though no direct evidence is available to corroborate this conjecture. High Plains grain sorghum is especially in danger of spider-mite outbreaks since the average crop usually... ecological data relative to spider-mites and the factors which affect their population fluctuations. Sampling General aspects of sampling tetranychid popula- tions have been reviewed by Huffaker et al. (1970) who reported numerous techniques...

  12. Vision text International Policy VUB 7-2-2014-Jan Cornelis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    partnerships are extremely important to realize more than just individual in- and outgoing student mobility and exchange, but also to build, next to occasional research synergies, sustainable cooperation structures

  13. Comparative sugar recovery data from laboratory scale application of leading pretreatment technologies to corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    , East Lansing, MI 48824, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA d Texas A support, and economic analyses were provided through Richard Elander of the National Renewable Energy societal benefits, but pretreatment operations essential to economically viable yields have a major impact

  14. Creating Reliable Data and Reporting to Support Strategic Energy Management at Corning Incorporated 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garforth, P.

    2014-01-01

    of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Changing Global Energy Realities ? Unpredictable traditional energy pricing ? Political upheavals like Ukraine ? Rapidly falling renewable costs ? Changing patterns... of imports and supply ? Uncertain impact of climate change ? Under-invested energy infrastructure ? China and India redefining energy markets ? Blackouts, weather events, water shortages.. ? Nuclear rethink impacts natural gas prices? ? Energy innovation...

  15. A conceptual model to estimate the nitrogen requirement of corn (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Collado, Catalino Jorge

    2007-04-25

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate the vegetative parameters used to estimate crop N demand and to estimate the accuracy and precision of the conceptual model of fertilization using an error propagation method. ...

  16. On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions by agriculture. Nutr.1998. Nitrous oxide emission in three years as affected by2008. Soil-surface gas emissions. p.851-861. In: M.R. Carter

  17. Use and productivity of resources in the corn producing area of Argentina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andruchowicz, Eugenio Waldemar

    1970-01-01

    throe different sj. ze f a! . . ", , cross i!. ! o~. e fro. ! c!'ops a!!d livestock are, siren i&n Table 6. is . 'i&&ht be ex;, ected r ro!a t le nigher ?errant=. &&e of I&!!'! ! evoted to clons bv thc . &, ~. aller siz? fai"-. . s (Table 2), p" re... i "ed =t a less . !nte! siv" r'te ?1?en;. a!lid be pl'oi'iteole. 6'nc of the f ecto s ?0. !trib!?ting ?0 the low raCe of i. l?ens ity of 1-". -. d ! . e " i?err s to bc ti". e extre sely hieih & osi; of the:-. , Ost ?0, -'er? tech !010? i eel...

  18. Fractionation of phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract and evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic activities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedreschi, Romina Paola

    2005-08-29

    -IV was the most active as an antimutagen. HPLC-DAD characterization of that sub-fraction revealed mainly the presence of a quercetin derivative with UV-visible spectral characteristics similar to rutin but with a little longer retention time. The mechanism...

  19. Characterization and Combustion Performance of Corn Oil-Based Biofuel Blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savant, Gautam Sandesh

    2012-07-16

    In recent years, the development and use of biofuels have received considerable attention due to the high demand for environmentally acceptable (green) fuels. Most of the recent studies have looked at the processes of converting vegetable oils...

  20. Influence of Subsurface Irrigation and Organic Additions on Top and Root Growth of Field Corn'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    cases enveloped the irrigation lines. Lateral as well as vertical movement of Ca, K, Mg, and P occurred subsoiling, slip plowing, deep plowing, double digging, trenching, and backhoe mix- ing (Mech et al., 1967

  1. The evaluation of corn hybrids and plant populations under adequate moisture and fertility conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham, James Maston

    1954-01-01

    cation@ Pegalatiom drror (o) gphrtdo hqaLtiono x, lybri8o error (S) 4@~12 27132 %5 125 $2 36. $3 317' 36 +021. 60 9oll 0+29 31. 6$ 62. 76 6. 73~ 6. 09 0. 66 13 o22 ocdidoifi~ at tbo lg lorol. 18 20 Q) I 5 R Io 2 LU hC O lK Cl ~O...

  2. Advancing Biorefining of Distiller’s Grain and Corn Stover Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

  3. INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkenberg, Nyland R.

    2010-07-14

    aboveground biomass of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) by 71% (Ghafar and Watson 1983). Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense L.) tillers, aboveground biomass, and interference were reduced by 43% with higher grain sorghum densities (Lopez 1988...

  4. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals: Pilot-Scale Operation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

  5. Influence of Genetic Background on Anthocyanin and Co-Pigment Profile and Stability of Colored Corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collison, Amy Elizabeth

    2014-08-05

    ................................................................................................. 59 Conclusions .................................................................................................................. 88 CHAPTER V SUMMARY .............................................................................................. 90... of these compounds in a limited set of samples (De la Parra et al., 2007; Del Pozo-Insfran 3 et al., 2006; Mora-Rochin et al., 2010). However, no studies have investigated the potential impact of anthocyanin and co-pigment composition on stability of color...

  6. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus on the agronomic characteristics of corn 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, Freddy Gene

    1969-01-01

    weights v!ere not ef Fected by MDMV. Al 1 the i n- bred lines shcwed symptoms oF the virus but there were different degrees of tolerance. in the hybrid test NiDNiV delayed maturity, ; educed plant and ear heigh'ts, reduc d yi lds and also ear widths... and the uninoculated plots . For the inb& ed test. Inbred Lines FD~aays to 5i]k+ Inoculated Uninoculated K64 Tx61M I x585 ; x12/C Tx441 Tx173D Tx203 i'x 303 Tx325 Tx508 Tx601 Tx602 77. 3 g 78. 8 efg 79. 8 def 78. 3 efg 74. 8 h 83. 2 bc 79. 3 def...

  7. Wednesday, July 19, 2006 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , directly run light, heat and equipment or electrolyze water to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher

  8. Effects of barley flour and beta-glucans in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Laura

    2004-09-30

    ordered structures upon cooling, via interchain associations, is a critical step for setting of hydrated three-dimensional gel networks and the development of texture for thermally processed products (McGrane et al. 2000). Staling Limited shelf...); and (4) Incorporation of hydrocolloids for better moisture retention and a softer texture (McGrane et al. 2000). Recrystallization of amylopectin plays a major role in the staling mechanism, resulting in increased rigidity and firmness (Fernandez...

  9. Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    ; (iii) the design consequences for the new generation of high-resolution solar telescopes. Keywords to the open tower design. In section 3 we consider the interaction between the wind and the telescope 15 m and upward when there is some wind. The conclusion from this experience was the open telescope

  10. Vol. 79, No. 2, 2002 261 Tensile Properties of Extruded Corn Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unit of operation than traditional multistep processes. More- over, extrusion is a continuous process exhibited significantly lower tensile properties than those containing zein. Extrusion processing products. Justifications for research in this area have included production of value-added biological

  11. Techno-economic analysis of corn stover fungal fermentation to ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Pimphan A.; Tews, Iva J.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-11-01

    This techno-economic analysis assesses the process economics of ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock by fungi to identify promising opportunities, and the research needed to achieve them. Based on literature derived data, four different ethanologen strains are considered in this study: native and recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the natural pentose-fermenting yeast, Pichia stipitis and the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum. In addition, filamentous fungi are applied in multi-organism and consolidated process configurations. Organism performance and technology readiness are categorized as near-term (<5 years), mid-term (5-10 years), and long-term (>10 years) process deployment. The results of the analysis suggest that the opportunity for fungal fermentation exists for lignocellulosic ethanol production.

  12. Techno-economic analysis of corn stover fungal fermentation to ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Pimphan; Tews, Iva J.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-11-01

    This techno-economic analysis assesses the process economics of ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstock by fungi in order to identify promising opportunities and the research needed to achieve them. Based on literature derived data, four different ethanologen strains are considered in this study: native and recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the natural pentose-fermenting yeast, Pichia stipitis and the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Organism performance and technology readiness are split into three groups: near-term (<5 years), mid-term (5-10 years) and long-term (>10 years) process deployment. Processes classified as near-term could reasonably be developed in this shorter time frame, as suggested by recent literature. Mid-term technology process models are based on lab-scale experimental data, and yields near the theoretical limit are used to estimate long-term technology goals. Further research and economic evaluation on the integrated production of chemicals and fuels in biorefineries are recommended.

  13. A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martelino, Rafael Agcaoili

    1954-01-01

    TABLES Page 20 31 Analysis of variance of silage yields at Temple Analysis of variance of grain yields at Temple . Analysis of varianoe of lodging percentage at Temple. . . ~ 12 o ~ 12 ~ i 13 4, 5 ~ 6, 70 Silage yield, grain yield... and lodging percentage of four oorn bybrids and three spaoings, Temple . Analysis of variance of silage yields at Tyler . Analysis of varianoe of grain yields at Tyler Analysis of variance oi' lodging peroemtage at Tyler 13 16 16 ~ 0 17 Silage yield...

  14. A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spears, Ben Riley

    1953-01-01

    A))'I H. '" C I'I OH ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 40 AILNHIX o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o oo IT 42 1, Ccsibined silage yields grain yield and lodging percentage of the four hybrids for all locations? 2...? Ceabined silage yields grain yield and lodging percentage of the three plant spacdngs for all locations, TABLES Analysis of variance of silage yields at College Station. Analysis of vsr1mme of grain yields at GoUege Statics& 30 4. Analysis...

  15. Studies in feed spoilage: prevention of spoilage in ground corn by gamma radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Billy Dean

    1959-01-01

    xespectively fox complete inactivation, 6 Number of Or anisms- Several studies have been carried out to determine the radiation dose requix'ed to sterilise a food when various concentrations of the spores were present. Kempep Gxaikoski, and Gillies (1954...) reported the dosage of gams- rays requiired to sterilize meat inoculated with vary- 19 *tt 1: P ftl tdi Bt. lt . 11 d 9 *qt d to sterilise the meat incxeased fx'om 2, 5 x 10 to 4. 0 x 10 rep as the con- 6 centration of spox'es of Glostridlum botulinum...

  16. Losing Rice, Saving Corn: Grandparents Raising Grandchildren in the Wake of the AIDS Epidemic in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maradik, Lesley Beth

    2014-01-01

    Affected by HIV/AIDS in Vietnam. The Gerontological Societyby HIV/AIDS: A Focus on Vietnam. CHIPTS HIV Research: TheAffected by HIV/AIDS in Vietnam: How Meaning and Context

  17. Manure P effects on corn growth and changes in soil test levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Sampling Pre-application and post-harvest 0 to 6" Bray 1-P (STP) Water extractable P (WEP) #12;Plant #12;Info. used in P Index Water extractable P (WEP) used in P Index as one factor in estimating

  18. Grass control with DPX-79406 and cultivation in corn (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, James Mitchell

    1990-01-01

    treatments Late treatments Mode of DPX-79406 application rate Mode of DPX-79406 application rate POT (g/ha) 52. 5 POT POT 26. 25 26. 25 POT PD+C 26. 25 26. 25 POT 52. 5 NT BOT+C BOT+C BOT+C BOT+C 52. 5 26. 25 26. 25 52. 5 POT PD...+C NT 26. 25 26. 25 POT 52. 5 PD+C 52. 5 NT NT NT POT 52. 5 NT PD+C 52. 5 NT NT 13 Table 1. Continued 'POT=postemergence broadcast over-the-top; BOT+c=postemergence banded over-the-top plus cultivation; PD+C=postemergence directed plus...

  19. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Aden, A.

    2009-08-01

    An update to the FY 2007 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals, quantified in terms of Minimum Ethanol Selling Price.

  20. A model system for edible vaccination using recombinant avidin produced in corn seed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Michele Renee

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that transgenic plants can be utilized to produce subunit vaccines that are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Expressing these subunits in edible plant tissues gives the potential for edible vaccines...