Sample records for wetlands standard dredge

  1. Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the permits is to protect and preserve submerged lands under tidal and freshwaters and wetlands, both salt and fresh water, from unregulated alteration that would adversely affect...

  2. Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term evaluation of plants and animals colonizing contaminated estuarine dredged material placed in a wetland environment. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Engler, R.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes data collected between 1983 and 1989 that relate to plant and animal communities colonizing the wetland creation site of the US Army Corps of Engineers/Environmental Protection Agency Field Verification Program (FVP). The management of contaminated dredged material and the mobility of contaminants from the dredged material into plants and animals are also described and related to the evaluation of test results by Lee and others (1991). This site will be evaluated through September 1995 under the Long-Term Effects of Dredging (LEDO) Program.

  3. The Role of the Federal Standard in the Beneficial Use of Dredged Material from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    The Role of the Federal Standard in the Beneficial Use of Dredged Material from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New and Maintenance Navigation Projects Beneficial Uses of Dredged Materials U.S. Environmental'sternsinhabitingamarshcreatedbydredgedmaterialonPoplarIsland,Maryland. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The Role of the Federal Standard in the Beneficial Use of Dredged

  4. Environmental effects of dredging. Corps of Engineers` procedures and policies on dredging and dredged material disposal (the federal standard). Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engler, R.M.; Wright, T.; Lee, C.R.; Dillon, T.M.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes the Federal Standard pursuant to Corps` technical considerations and policies with regard to the disposal of dredged material in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA), which provides for selecting the least costly dredged or fill material disposal alternative consistent with sound engineering practices and appropriate environmental quality standards. This approach also generally applies to assessments conducted in accordance with the Ocean Dumping Act, even though the discussion centers on the CWA.

  5. Surgical dredging controls turbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seagren, E.H. [Ellicott Machine Corp. International, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to remove contaminated and uncontaminated sediments located under a column of water is increasing. Small hydraulic dredges offer flexibility in the removal of sediments in industrial lagoons, wetlands, drinking water ponds, and environmentally sensitive areas.

  6. Documentation of the runqual module for ADDAMS: Comparison of predicted runoff water quality with standards. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, P.R.; Gibson, A.C.; Dardeau, E.A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note has a twofold purpose: to describe a technique for comparing the predicted quality of surface runoff from confined dredged material disposal areas with applicable water quality standards and to document a computer program called RUNQUAL, written for that purpose as a part of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS).

  7. Environmental effects of dredging. Documentation of the efqual module for ADDAMS: Comparison of predicted effluent water quality with standards. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Schroeder, P.R.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes a technique for comparison of the predicted quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas with applicable water quality standards. This note also serves as documentation of a computer program called EFQUAL written for that purpose as part of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS).

  8. Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules state the standards for classification of water supply. Each stream in North Carolina has a classification based upon its designated uses. These rules provide the Environmental...

  9. Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their...

  10. DREDGED MATERIAL EVALUATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DREDGED MATERIAL EVALUATION AND DISPOSAL PROCEDURES (USERS' MANUAL) Dredged Material Management 2009) Prepared by: Dredged Material Management Office US Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District #12........................................................................................2-1 2.2 The Dredged Material Evaluation Process

  11. Improvement of operations and maintenance techniques research program: an evaluation of the standard elutriate test as an estimator of contaminant release at the point of dredging. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, D.D.; Sherrad, J.H.; Amende, R.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While release of contaminants during dredged material disposal operations has long been the subject of environmental concern for some projects, the potential release of pollutants during the dredging process has recently come under the scrutiny of Federal and State regulatory agencies. Maintenance of shipping channels may require the removal of sediments suspected to contain high concentrations of contaminants. During any dredging operation, sediments become resuspended to varying degrees according to sediment type, hydrologic conditions, type of dredging equipment used, and operational procedures employed. Contaminants may be released in soluble form directly to the water column, or they may remain adsorbed to the fine resuspended sediment particles. The primary mode of environmental impact is from the soluble fraction, since dissolved forms of pollutants are more available for aquatic biota uptake than those that remain adsorbed to sediment particles.

  12. Environmental effects of dredging: A preliminary evaluation of contaminant release at the point of dredging. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havis, R.N.; Amande, R.A.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this technical note is to present a preliminary evaluation of the standard elutriate test as a predictor of contaminant release (dissolved form) to the water column at the point of dredging. This note is meant to extend previous notes (Hayes 1987, Havis 1987) which dealt with resuspension of sediments due to dredging and the release of adsorbed chemicals which could enter the water phase at the point of dredging. Data collected under the Dredged Material Research Program (DMRP) showed that the standard elutriate test (Keeley and Engler 1974, US Environmental Protection Agency and US Army Corps of Engineers 1977, Environmental Effects Laboratory 1976) predicted, within an order of magnitude, dissolved chemical concentrations in water at dredged material disposal sites (Jones and Lee 1978). The potential for contaminant release also exists, however, at the point of dredging. This source of contaminant release during dredging was investigated by McLellan et al. (in preparation) under the Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) program. Because of the success of the standard elutriate test for simulating dissolved contaminant release at the disposal site it was investigated as a tool for predicting contaminant release at the point of dredging.

  13. Dredging, remediation, and containment of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demars, K.R.; Richardson, G.N.; Yong, R.N.; Chaney, R.C. [eds.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference was held June 23--24, 1994 in Montreal, Canada. One purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on identifying tests, methods, procedures, and materials, used in support of dredging, treatment, and containment of contaminated sediments that are in need of standardization. Another objective was to provide a forum for discussion of past dredging practices and future directions, including the effects of sediment properties and behavior, equipment requirements, and the impact of regulations. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  14. EnvironmentalEffects of Dredging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #~ EnvironmentalEffects of Dredging VOL D-91-2 INFORMATION EXCHANGE BULLETIN OCT 1991 Craney Island Experiment Station Fine-grained dredged material usual- ly enters a confined disposal area in a slurry of the soil matrix. The excess pore-water pressures are induced by the weight of overlying dredged material

  15. Commercializationof Dredged-Material Decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Commercializationof Dredged- Material Decontamination Technologies Keitb U?Jones isa senior Keith375,000 mdmmnentalm@m*ng m3 of dredged material per year. The need to develop public-priuate p r o g r assessmentsand dredged materialmanagemart. He istbe tecbnfcalprogram managerfor tbe WRM NXm Harbor Sediment

  16. Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination Demonstration for the Port of New York and New Jersey Department of Energy Brookhaven National Laboratory Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination Demonstration .............................................................................. 3 3.3 Relation to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District Dredged Material Management

  17. Dredging up old wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, L. (CH2M Hill, Denver, CO (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, Portland General Electric (PGE) donated a parcel of prime riverfront land to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) in Portland, OR, for OMSI's new facility. The site had PCB-Contaminated sediments, which had to be removed before construction could begin. In the face of tight deadlines and public concerns, the remediation project was completed in record time while using a unique combination of treatment methods, including low-volume dredging and capping. Conventional dredging would have resuspended the fine sediments containing PCBs and sent them downriver. Low-volume dredging used a diver-operated suction hose to remove sediment with minimal disturbance. Similar to equipment used for underwater archaeological excavations, the diver vacuums from the river bottom fine sediments, which are then discharged to a treatment facility. The water and sediment mixture was initially discharged to Bakr tanks for primary settling. The water was then pumped through a multimedia filter-system, a bag filter system, and a granular activated carbon system before discharge back into the river. The remaining contaminated sediments were air-dried in a lined containment area, stabilized, and transported to a hazardous waste landfill. PCB Concentrations were reduced to less than 6 mg/L. Although elements of this remedial action have been used before, it is believed that this is the first combined use of low-dredging and this particular water-treatment system in the US.

  18. TENNESSEE'S WETLANDS REGULATORY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    DREDGINGGRAVEL DREDGING STREAM RESTORATIONSTREAM RESTORATION UTILITY LINE CROSSINGSUTILITY LINE CROSSINGS. EXPLORATIONGEOTECH. EXPLORATION MINOR DREDGING ANDMINOR DREDGING AND FILLINGFILLING MAINTENANCEMAINTENANCE PERMITTING TRIGGERED BY DEPOSITION OF DREDGED OR FILLPERMITTING TRIGGERED BY DEPOSITION OF DREDGED OR FILL

  19. Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

  20. A Dredging Knowledge-Base Expert System for Pipeline Dredges with Comparison to Field Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Derek Alan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 42 Dredge C and D parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 43 Dredge C pump parameters for Atchafalaya River on Project 5. . . . 130 44 Dredge D pump parameters for Atchafalaya River on Project 6. . . . 131 45 Savannah and New.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 45 Residual analysis between actual dredge production and theoreti- cal dredge production for Dredge A on Project 1. . . . . . . . . . . . 101 46 Pump 1 curves for Dredge A in Savannah River on Project 2. . . . . . 103 47 Pump 2 curves for Dredge A...

  1. Environmental effects of dredging: Sediment resuspension by selected dredges. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havis, R.N.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The size and concentration of sediment plumes measured in field studies of selected dredging equipment are described. This information is useful when sediment resuspension must be minimized because of adverse environmental impacts which may include the release of sediment-associated chemical contaminants. The information presented here is intended to supplement and update information given in a previous technical note on the same topic (Hayes 1986a). Dredging operations may be required to comply with in-stream State water quality standards based on maximum allowable concentrations of inorganic and organic compounds. Although the majority of materials requiring maintenance dredging in the United States is uncontaminated, the removal of contaminated sediments (estimated to be less than 10 percent of maintenance materials) poses a serious problem. Hence, a project to study the potential for contaminant release during dredging has been initiated through a field studies program. The field studies described here were conducted by the Waterways Experiment Station under the Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) research program and in cooperation with other US Army Engineer Districts to evaluate the sediment resuspension characteristics of selected dredges (McLellan et al., in preparation).

  2. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. I. Dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Dye, L.L.; Turner, R.R.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The small hydroelectric potential (less than or equal to 15-MW capacity) at existing dams in the US has been estimated to be approximately 5000 MW. Development of this resource by retrofitting these dams for hydroelectric generation may require dredging in order to (1) reclaim reservoir storage capacity lost as a result of sediment accumulation; (2) clear intake structures; and/or (3) construct/repair powerhouses, tailraces, and headraces. Dredging and disposal of dredged material at small-scale hydro sites may result in several potential environmental impacts, and their magnitude will depend upon many site-specific factors. The physical and chemical effects of dredging and disposal, their causes, and the biological effects engendered by these physical and chemical changes are discussed. Factors that could affect the severity (magnitude) of these effects (impacts) are emphasized, with the intent of providing guidance to developers of potential sites. A discussion of environmental contraints and mitigation, as well as guidelines for the early evaluation of the environmental feasibility of dredging, are included. A general introduction is provided on dredging equipment and disposal practices, with emphasis on those practices that would be applicable to small reservoirs. Regulations applicable to dredged material disposal and wetlands protection are discussed, and a preliminary analysis of the economic costs associated with dredging and disposal is presented.

  3. Evaluating dredged material placement alternatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooters, Kelly Lynne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but are required in some environmentally sensitive areas. An example of an innovative disposal alternative is the application of oil spill clean-up technology to dredging sites in the form of interim storage. 1. 3 Related Research The environmental impacts... of alternatives, sociopolitical implication, and environmental impact. Specific procedural guidelines are presented for marsh, upland, and island development. Gupta et al. (1978) establish the appropriate agricultural use for the dredged materiaL Dredged...

  4. Forces on laboratory model dredge cutterhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Dustin Ray

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredge cutting forces produced by the movement of the cutterhead through the sediment have been measured with the laboratory dredge carriage located at the Haynes Coastal Engineering Laboratory. The sediment bed that was used for the dredging test...

  5. Environmental effects of dredging. Engineer manual series on dredging and dredged material disposal. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes a series of Engineer Manuals (EMs) on dredging and dredged material disposal being published by the Office, Chief of Engineers, US Army. The note describes the purpose of the manual series, intended audience, major topics covered, availability of published manuals, and the status of future manuals.

  6. Study of national dredging issues: public meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The nation's needs for dredging in the near to mid-term future were assessed. The prospects for alternatives to dredging and the capability for achieving needed dredging were examined. The most efficient and effective ways of handling dredging, both in terms of economics and environmental protection, were identified. (ACR)

  7. Laboratory modeling of hydraulic dredges and design of dredge carriage for laboratory facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Gordon Jason

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hydraulic dredge equipment have proven useful for obtaining qualitative results. The new Coastal Engineering Laboratory at Texas A&M University is equipped with model dredge testing facilities ideal for performing such experiments. The tow/dredge carriage...

  8. A Dredging Knowledge-Base Expert System for Pipeline Dredges with Comparison to Field Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Derek Alan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pipeline Analytical Program and Dredging Knowledge{Base Expert{System (DKBES) determines a pipeline dredge's production and resulting cost and schedule. Pipeline dredge engineering presents a complex and dynamic process necessary to maintain...

  9. Lake restoration by dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorini, R.F.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary overview of the $17 million Vancouver Lake Restoration Project, the largest project of its type ever undertaken through the Federal Clean Lakes Program. It was funded jointly by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the Port of Vancouver. Although the project was conceived in 1965, a nationwide program to help fund such projects did not exist until 1976. Then, final approval was not received until 1981, after many volumes of studies and reviews. Construction was completed in June 1983, after 30 months--6 months ahead of schedule and underbudget. A great deal of time, money, and energy was expended to demonstrate to Federal and state environmental agencies that dredging was a key tool in effecting this lake's restoration.

  10. Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to dredging conducted in a marine environment. The regulations aim to ensure that dredging does not unduly impact groundwater and surface water quality while streamlining...

  11. Evaluating dredged material placement alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooters, Kelly Lynne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) devised an economic methodology to determine land value and associated benefits from dredged material containment. This methodology is designed to provide guidance for a project, not to select appropriate disposal alternatives. The New York District.... , Aurand, D. , Schultz, D. , and Holman, R. (1980). Disposal of Dredged Material Within the New York District, Volume II. MITRE Tech. Report MTR- 7808. News Release II27 (1989). District Engineer Warns of Dangers to State from Interruption to GIWW...

  12. Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno Bokhove, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno navigation channels are maintained by dredging sand and slurries off sea and river removal by dredging. Some progress has already been made, both at Leeds

  13. Dredging/dredged material management risk assessment. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note explains the use of risk assessment to facilitate dredged material management decision-making in navigable waterways by US Army Corps of Engineer (USACE) project managers and field operations personnel. The document does not promote risk assessment as a tool for use in every dredged material management decision. It is likely to be most useful, and most used, in those cases that constitute the exception rather than the rule. The use of risk assessment is intended to supplement the analytical options currently available to dredged material managers by building on the existing technical framework (US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)/USACE 1992) and the existing tiered approaches (USEPA/USACE 1991, 1998).

  14. ReprintedfromDredging and Management of Dredged Material Proceedingsof 3 sessionsheld in conjunction with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    BNL- 64400 ReprintedfromDredging and Management of Dredged Material Proceedingsof 3 sessionsheld Processing of NY/NJ Harbor Estuarine Dredged Material K. W. Jones', E. A. Stern', K. Donato3, N. L. Clesceri of the United States. One attractive solution to processing the dredged material is to remove or stabilize

  15. Forces on laboratory model dredge cutterhead 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Dustin Ray

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredge cutting forces produced by the movement of the cutterhead through the sediment have been measured with the laboratory dredge carriage located at the Haynes Coastal Engineering Laboratory. The sediment bed that was ...

  16. Radiological assessment of dredging application for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological assessment of dredging application for Oldbury power station (2009) Cefas Environment 14 /2009 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER STATION (2009) The Centre material disposal ­ Part II FEPA #12;2 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER

  17. Radiological assessment of dredging application for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological assessment of dredging application for the port of Lancaster (2008) Cefas Environment 21/2008 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR THE PORT OF LANCASTER (2008) The Centre Marine material disposal ­ Part II FEPA #12;2 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION

  18. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional Reduction in Cadmium in Blue Crabs J connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most ofcadmiumsedimentconcentrationswithinthecovefollowing the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup

  19. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urabeck, F.J.; Phillips, K.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future disposal of dredged material in the Puget Sound estuary of the State of Washington is of major interest to Federal, state, and local governmental regulatory agencies, as well as those responsible for maintaining existing waterways and harbors. Elevated levels of toxic chemicals exist in bottom sediments of all the urban bays, with tumors and other biological abnormalities found in bottom fish associated with these water bodies. Public awareness of this situation has been heightened by extensive media coverage of recent government investigations of environmental conditions in Puget Sound. These investigations and public concerns have led to three ongoing regional planning efforts, all of which deal with Puget Sound water quality and marine bottom sediments. This paper reports on the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA), a 3-year joint Federal-state study primarily focusing on unconfined, open-water disposal of material dredged from Federal and non-Federal navigation projects. Study objectives include (a) selection of unconfined, open-water disposal sites; (b) development of sampling, testing, and test interpretation procedures to be used in evaluating the suitability of dredged material for disposal in Puget Sound waters; and (c) formulation of disposal site management plans. Preliminary findings for each of these objectives are discussed for central Puget Sound, which includes the ports of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett.

  20. Development of solidification technique for dredged sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamasaki, Shoichi [Aoki Marine Co., Ltd., Fukushima, Osaka (Japan); Yasui, Hiroshi [San O Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan); Fukue, Masaharu [Tokai Univ., Shimizu (Japan). Marine Science and Technology

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediments deposited on the bottoms of seas, lakes, and rivers can be contaminated with hazardous and toxic substances as a result of the discharge of human activities. Therefore, since the natural remediation process cannot be expected, contaminated or polluted as well as highly organic sediments must be treated as waste and be properly disposed for human health and environmental protection. One method of disposal may be to remove the sediments by dredging and to treat them with a proper technique. The main problems in the dredging method are as follows: (1) since sediments usually have very high water content, it is necessary to decrease the volume and solidify them for the next procedure, e.g., landfill; (2) the leachates from the sediments should be treated also. It is required that the water to be discharged be kept at a quality satisfying the level of standards. This paper describes an experimental study using a solidification system performed for the cleanup of the bottom of a river. To promote the solidification of the system, several agents, such as lime, cement, polymer, resin, etc., were used. The results show that these agents strongly influence the solidification characteristics of the sediments and the quality of the leachate from the sediments.

  1. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols........................................................................... 5 Clam Dredge Construction and Repair

  2. ERDCTR-11-2 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDCTR-11-2 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program and Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology Office Application of Long Distance Conveyance (LDC) of Dredged Sediments 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Dredging Operations and Environmental

  3. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys January 7, 2004 Prepared by: Members..................................................................................................................................... 5 NOAA Fisheries Sea Scallop Dredge Survey Protocols............................................................................................................................. 10 Changes to Regional Scallop Dredge Protocols

  4. Environmental effects of dredging: Predicting and monitoring dredge-induced dissolved oxygen reduction. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, L.; LaSalle, M.W.; Lunz, J.D.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the results of research into the potential for dissolved oxygen (DO) reduction associated with dredging operations. Efforts toward development of a simple computational model for predicting the degree of dredge-induced DO reduction are described along with results of a monitoring program around a bucket dredge operation.

  5. Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term evaluation of plants and animals colonizing contaminated esturaine dredged material placed in an upland environment. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated sediment was dredged from Black Rock Harbor, Connecticut, in October 1983 and placed in aquatic, upland, and wetland environments as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers/Environmental Protection Agency Field Verification Program (FVP), 1981-1986 (Peddicord 1988). Upland tests (plant and earthworm bioassays) were conducted on the sediment before dredging to evaluate potential contaminant mobility under the upland disposal alternative. Laboratory test results were subsequently field verified at the field test site at `Tongue Point,` Bridgeport, Connecticut. The results of the upland disposal portion of the FVP and the changes occurring since the completion of the FVP for the upland disposal environment are summarized herein. This technical note emphasizes the contaminant mobility of heavy metals. Contaminant mobility and the progressive development of the upland ecosystem at this site will be evaluated until September 1995.

  6. Risk-based budgeting for maintenance dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.R.; Moser, D.A. [Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, VA (United States). Inst. for Water Resources

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers must estimate the budget required to conduct maintenance dredging at hundreds of sites across the country. The amount of funds needed to do the maintenance dredging is highly uncertain and there are risks associated with overestimates and underestimates. A risk-based approach to the budgeting process for maintenance dredging can help identify the uncertainty and assess and manage the associated risk. A concept and preliminary plan for a risk-based approach for developing budgets for maintenance dredging is presented.

  7. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND RECOMMENDATIONS . . 55 REFERENCES . . 58 APPENDIX A. . 60 VITA . . 101 LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Diagram of a Cutter Head Dredge Figure 2, Sediment distribution in a pipeline. Figure 3. Velocity at limit of stationary deposition Figure 4... especially for maintenance dredging in more shallow channels, the cutter head dredge transports the dredged material via pipeline to the disposal site. Fundamentals of the Cutter Head Dredge A diagram of a cutter suction dredge is displayed for reference...

  8. Treatment of dredged sludge by mechanical dehydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, T.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge deposits in the water area damage the ecosystems and environments; their elimination has always been an urgent task for human communities. Generally, sludge deposits are dredged out of the bottom of the water area, transported to, and discharged at a large disposal area on land. Recently, however, it has become increasingly difficult to secure disposal areas and routes of speedy transportation for disposal of dredged sludge. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water that can be returned to the water area through mechanical centrifugal dehydration. Sludge deposits are distributed thin and wide on the bottom of the water area, and a pump dredge has been proved effective in many cases for dredging the upper layers of sludge deposits accurately and without creating turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers the following advantages: (a) It requires smaller space for treatment and disposal of dredged sludge than the conventional method. (b) Facilities and costs for transportation can be reduced. (c) Various systems can be adopted for transportation of sludge cakes. (d) This system is transportable and compact and can be constructed anywhere either on land or on water.

  9. The Performance and Environmental Effects of a Hydraulic Clam Dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Performance and Environmental Effects of a Hydraulic Clam Dredge THOMAS L MEYER, RICHARD A to Nantucket, Mass. Hydraulic clam dredges with 0.76 m and 1.2 m (30 and 48 inch) wide blades were used during these surveys (Serchuk et aI., 1979). The efficiency of these dredges and the general effect of dredging

  10. COMPARATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF MOLLUSKS IN DREDGED AND UN-DREDGED PORTIONS OF AN ESTUARY, WITH A SYSTEMATIC LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF MOLLUSKS IN DREDGED AND UN- DREDGED PORTIONS OF AN ESTUARY in dredged canals than In the predominantly sand and shell sediments In undredged This report compares the numbers and vari~ eties of mollusks in fine sediments of dredged canals with those found in undisturbed

  11. Environmental effects of dredging: Guide to selecting a dredge for minimizing resuspension of sediment. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note contains assessments of conventional and special-purpose dredges in removing sediment with minimal sediment resuspension. If sediment resuspension is a critical factor in dredging areas of contaminated material, the following guidance will aid in specifying the dredge and operating conditions. Investigations were conducted as part of the Corps of Engineers Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) Research Program to evaluate the resuspension of sediment into the water column due to dredging operations. Laboratory, field, and literature studies have been used to define the sediment resuspension characteristics of most conventional and several special-purpose dredges. The natural hydrophobic tendency of most organic contaminants and the high sediment-sorptive capacity for inorganic contaminants limits release to the soluble forms and makes the simple measure of sediment resuspension during dredging a relative measure of the potential for contaminant release.

  12. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis: Management plan assessment report. Dredged Material Management Year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) is an interagency program for the management of unconfined, open-water disposal of dredged material into Puget Sound, Washington. The Management Plans for the PSDDA program identify disposal sites, describe dredged material evaluation procedures, and establish site monitoring and management practices. The plans also commit the involved agencies to a cooperative annual review process which evaluates disposal site use and conditions, dredged material testing results, and new scientific information, in order to determine if changes to the evaluation procedures and/or disposal site management practices are needed. Sampling was conducted to determine any chemical/biological contamination.

  13. Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter provides regulations for the disposal of dredged and fill material. Any entity desiring to dispose of such material must first obtain a permit, and the State Engineer has the...

  14. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL USE OF DREDGED MATERIALS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STERN, E.A.; LODGE, J.; JONES, K.W.; CLESCERI, N.L.; FENG, H.; DOUGLAS, W.S.

    2000-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Our group is leading a large-sale demonstration of dredged material decontamination technologies for the New York/New Jersey Harbor. The goal of the project is to assemble a complete system for economic transformation of contaminated dredged material into an environmentally-benign material used in the manufacture of a variety of beneficial use products. This requires the integration of scientific, engineering, business, and policy issues on matters that include basic knowledge of sediment properties, contaminant distribution visualization, sediment toxicity, dredging and dewatering techniques, decontamination technologies, and product manufacturing technologies and marketing. A summary of the present status of the system demonstrations including the use of both existing and new manufacturing facilities is given here. These decontamination systems should serve as a model for use in dredged material management plans of regions other than NY/NJ Harbor, such as Long Island Sound, where new approaches to the handling of contaminated sediments are desirable.

  15. Buffalo river dredging demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.; Zappi, P.A.; Tatem, H.E.; Gibson, A.C.; Tominey, E.A.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corps of Engineers Buffalo District conducted a demonstration of equipment for dredging contaminated sediments. Several thousand cubic yards of sediment were removed from outside the Buffalo River Federal navigation channel limits using three dredge types: (1) open bucket, (2) enclosed bucket, and (3) submersible pump. The effectiveness of a silt screen deployed downstream of the dredge to reduce suspended sediment transport was also evaluated. Extensive sediment and water column monitoring and sampling were conducted during the 2-week demonstration as part of the effort to determine sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases associated with the dredging operations. Water column samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total organic carbon, PCBs, PAHs, metals, ammonia, and pH. A water column bioassay test using Daphnia magna was also performed to assess toxicity effects of the dredging operation. Results of this study were used to assess and refine techniques and laboratory tests that have been previously developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases. In another phase of the study, the Bureau of Mines demonstrated the use of polyelectrolytes for rapid removal of suspended solids from a dilute dredged material slurry.

  16. Dredging elutriate test (DRET) development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiano, F.A.; Miller, C.T.; Yoon, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The removal of contaminated sediments from waterways by dredging generates concern about the release of contaminants to the water column. The ability to predict the magnitude of these potential releases during the project planning process will improve decision making in regard to water quality impacts and controls or mitigation measures for the dredging project. This report describes the development of a simple laboratory test, the dredging elutriate test (DRET), to predict the concentration of contaminants in the water column at the point of dredging. The DRET is procedurally similar to the modified elutriate test developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict the contaminant concentrations in effluent from a confined disposal facility. The test involves mixing sediment and site water, allowing the heavier solid particles to settle, sampling and supernatant, and analyzing for dissolved and particulate bound contaminants. Results of the laboratory test compared well with field data collected while dredging New Bedford Harbor sediment, which was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Most of the contaminated loading was associated with the suspended particles.

  17. Cost Estimation and Production Evaluation for Hopper Dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinberger, Thomas E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging projects are expensive government funded projects that are contracted out and competitively bid upon. When planning a trailing suction hopper dredge project or bidding on the request for proposal for such a project, having an accurate cost...

  18. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative...

  19. Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, Robert Fletcher

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for production and cost estimation for clamshell dredge projects. There are current methods of predicting clamshell dredge production which rely on production curves and constant cycle times. This thesis calculates production estimation...

  20. Cost estimating projects for large cutter and hopper dredges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belesimo, Francesco John

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the cost of a dredging project is the most important part of a project's life cycle. A precise account of the costs associated with performing dredging work begins with the production estimate and ends with the cost estimate...

  1. Hydraulic dredging, a sediment removal technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotts, J.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment was successfully removed from a Peabody Coal Company pond near Macon, Missouri, by a Mud Cat Model SP-810 hydraulic dredge. Previous attempts using land-based equipment had been unsatisfactory. The hydraulic-powered auger and submerged pump easily removed 882 m/sup 3/ (1154 yd/sup 3/) and pumped the slurry a distance of 305 m (1000 ft) to a disposal area. The hydraulic dredge was more effective and cheaper to operate than land-based equipment. The dredge cost was $1.31/m/sup 3/ ($1.00/yd/sup 3/), the dragline cost was $6.54/m/sup 3/ ($5.00/yd/sup 3/) and the front-end loader cost was $15.70/m/sup 3/ ($12.00/yd/sup 3/), under optimum conditions.

  2. Dredging, Bioinvasions and Andrew Cohen and Paul Crozier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dredging, Bioinvasions and Sturgeon Andrew Cohen and Paul Crozier Center for Research on Aquatic & Carlton 1998 #12;Sturgeon Introduction or Establishment of Exotic Organisms Dredging #12;Introduction or Establishment of Exotic Organisms Dredging #12;· Altering ship traffic · Altering ballast practices · Altering

  3. Predicting effects of dredging on a crab population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting effects of dredging on a crab population: An equivalent adult loss approach Thomas C! a University of Washington. seattle. Washington 98 J95 Abstract.-The effect of benthic dredging on coastal entrainment on fishery stocks. Several important dif· ferences between power plant and dredge operations

  4. EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE FINAL REPORT DOE FRAP 1997 the environmental impacts of dredging Burnaby Lake. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential environmental implications of dredging the lake for environmental rejuvenation in order to assist decision

  5. DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ECONOMICS By Jay R. Lund,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ECONOMICS By Jay R. Lund,1 Associate Member, ASCE ABSTRACT: Recent difficulties in siting dredged material disposal facilities are increasing interests in alternative disposal or reuse of dredged material and the possible adverse consequences of any increases in the generation

  6. SOME EFFECTS OF DREDGING ON POPULATIONS OF MACROBENTHIC ORGANISMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOME EFFECTS OF DREDGING ON POPULATIONS OF MACROBENTHIC ORGANISMS EUGENE H. KAPLAN,' J. R. WELKER after a navigation channel was dredged through a small, shallow lagoon. A new sampler which penetrated of certain particulate and dissolved nutrients changed after dredging, but no correlation was observed

  7. Why do we dredge? What is beneficial use?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Why do we dredge? What is beneficial use? Why do we need it? What about contamination? Can my community become involved? Why do we dredge? What is beneficial use? Why do we need it? What about contamination? Can my community become involved? Waste to Resource: Beneficial Use of Great Lakes Dredged

  8. Stratified random dredge surveys have been conducted in Chesapeake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    410 Stratified random dredge surveys have been conducted in Chesapeake Bay yearly since 1989 during large. Nevertheless, catch per unit of effort (CPUE) from the annual dredge surveys gene- rally provides. A method for estimating dredge catching efficiency for blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, in Chesapeake Bay

  9. Experiments to assess the relative dredging performances of research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiments to assess the relative dredging performances of research and commercial vessels RESEARCH FISHERIES RESEARCH TECHNICAL REPORT NUMBER 96 Experiments to assess the relative dredging ............................................................................................................................................. 9 #12;1. INTRODUCTION 4.44I Dredge surveys to assessthe spatial distributionand abundance of scallop

  10. INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P 39180 Paper Published in the Proceedings of: 15th Annual Meeting of Western Dredging Association (WEDA XV) San Diego, CA May 1994 #12;2 INCREASING STORAGE CAPAPCITY OF DREDGED MAERIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS

  11. Example of latest techniques for bottom-sludge dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamasuna, J.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently in Japan, the biggest problems of the bottom sludge dredging are lack of enough room for dumping areas and preventing water contamination during dredging in terms of environmental aspects. The new dredging system introduced at this time has been developed for the above purposes.

  12. Environmental effects of dredging. Implementation approach for thalweg disposal of dredged material. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olin, T.J.; Miller, A.C.; Palermo, M.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note introduces the concept of thalweg disposal and associated considerations for implementation, including disposal site selection, environmental and regulatory considerations, and suitable dredging methods and equipment. Monitoring procedures are also outlined.

  13. Automated dredging and disposal alternatives management system (ADDAMS). Environmental effects of dredging. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes the current capabilities and availability of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS). The technical note replaces the earlier Technical Note EEDP-06-12, which should be discarded. Planning, design, and management of dredging and dredged material disposal projects often require complex or tedious calculations or involve complex decision-making criteria. In addition, the evaluations often must be done for several disposal alternatives or disposal sites. ADDAMS is a personal computer (PC)-based system developed to assist in making such evaluations in a timely manner. ADDAMS contains a collection of computer programs (applications) designed to assist in managing dredging projects. This technical note describes the system, currently available applications, mechanisms for acquiring and running the system, and provisions for revision and expansion.

  14. Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland or wetland buffer zone which is not an allowed use. Activity in Class I or Class II wetland or its associated buffer zone...

  15. Dredging and dewatering sediment containing hazardous and toxic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, R.C. [Hydrometrics, Inc., Helena, MT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging is a common method of remediating ponds containing contaminated wastes. However, dewatering of the dredged solids is usually not well integrated with the dredging phase. As a result, overall project efficiency can be poor. Specifically, since dredges deliver material in a widely varying slurry form and since dewatering presses require the delivered material to be uniform, union of the two systems often results in inconsistent operation of the overall process. In an effort to enhance overall dredging and dewatering process production rates as well as minimize the return of suspended solids in the decant water, a new process was developed to provide a consistent dredged sludge for delivery to the press. This paper discusses modifications made to a conventional dredging and dewatering process to improve production rates and dewatering capabilities. These modifications are applicable to any project where efficient solids dewatering is required and where returning decant water must be visually free of suspended solids. 4 figs.

  16. Management of dredged material at Toledo, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.R.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toledo Harbor, at the mouth of the Maumee River in northwest Ohio, is the second most active port and largest single dredging project on the Great Lakes. Over 770,000 cub. m is dredged each year. material has been confined since 1955. Most of this half of the harbor was declared suitable In 1983, over water disposal. Monitoring of the open-water disposal has not shown any adverse impact on water quality. Studies of the release or bioavailability of phosphorus (P) bound to the sediments indicate that P is released from the sediments at a rate of from 10 to 30 percent per day. On an annual basis, dredging and disposal account for 0.4 to 0.6 percent of the total external loading of P to Lake Erie. High-resolution visible data from the French satellite SPOT were used to demonstrate the total extent of the dredging plume. Efforts will be made in the future to use the satellite for routine monitoring.

  17. Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes regulations regarding the removal, dredging, filling, and altering of land bordering waters, allowing such activity only with permits and in certain situations. Specific...

  18. Environmental effects of dredging. Interim guidance for predicting quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas--data analysis. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Engler, R.M.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following series of technical notes described the functions necessary for predicting the quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas during dredging operations.

  19. Environmental effects of dredging: Building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for bird habitat. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landin, M.C.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes the environmental considerations and techniques that have been developed and tested for building, developing, and managing dredged material islands for use by birds for nesting and other life requirements. The text of this note was taken from lectures presented from 1979 to 1986 at the Dredging Short Courses held each year by the Texas AM University Center for Dredging Studies and from information compiled for Engineer Manual EM 1110-2-5026 entitled `Beneficial Uses of Dredged Material.` One hundred years of dredging and open-water disposal operations by the Corps of Engineers (CE), state agencies, and private enterprise has resulted in the creation of over 2000 man-made islands throughout US coastal waters, riverine waterways, and the Great Lakes. The CE continues to maintain an interest in developing such islands because of its responsibility in using environmentally acceptable disposal methods and sites, the increasing shortage of upland disposal sites, the need for wildlife habitats in waterway areas, and the islands` recreational potential.

  20. Development of dredged ash disposal area, Paradise fossil plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradise Steam-Electric Plant coal-fired facility in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. This project is to construct a dredge pond near the Jacobs Creek ash pond capable of storing fly ash dredged from the ash pond. This will provide approximately 10 years of additional fly ash storage in the fly ash pond. Effluent from the dredge pond will be returned to the Jacobs Creek ash pond for discharge to Jacobs Creek. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON HARD CLAMS OF HAND RAKING AND POWER DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON HARD CLAMS OF HAND RAKING AND POWER DREDGING Marine Biobgical Laboratory DEC7 ........ Bullraking operations ............. Dredging operations .............. Underwater photography in relation to available population for bullraking and dredging (Figure 7) · · 32 Appendix "C

  2. A study of offshore benthic communities in natural areas and in areas affected by dredging and dredged material disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Clyde Allan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY QF OFFSHORE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY e Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Biology A STCDY OF 0-FSHOBE BENTHIC COMKTNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDCFD NATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY Approved...

  3. Environmental effects of dredging. Risk-based testing of dredged material for aquatic disposal evaluations. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, T.M.; Engler, R.M.; Patin, T.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes a risk-based framework for testing and evaluating dredged material scheduled for open-water disposal.

  4. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  5. Seasonal restrictions on dredging operations in freshwater systems. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, L.; Killgore, J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the status of seasonal restrictions on dredging operations in freshwater navigable waterways. The information presented is based on replies received from a questionnaire sent to all US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) District and Division offices that conduct OM dredging operations in freshwater systems.

  6. Innovative technologies for dredging contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zappi, P.A.; Hayes, D.F.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated marine sediments exist in many US waterways. Dredging is often a convenient and economical method of safely removing these sediments. However, significant concern exists over the potential environmental effects resulting from the localized sediment resuspension and contaminant release that may occur during the removal operation. This report synopsizes hydraulic equipment, pneumatic equipment, and mechanical components used for dredging and innovative modifications to their dredgeheads. It also examines previously tested dredging equipment designed to remove fine-grained sediments with a minimum amount of sediment resuspension. Major features of equipment innovations, along with available field testing information, are discussed. From these findings, the most promising innovations and research needs are identified. Since this report focuses on the dredging operations, only dredge sizes and sediment resuspension quantities are reported.

  7. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 10. Evaluation of dredging and dredging control technologies. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Pankow, V.R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of dredging equipment and techniques for removal of highly contaminated sediments from the upper estuary of the Acushnet River, a portion of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project. Site conditions as related to dredge selection and operation, factors considered in selection of equipment, various dredge types considered for use, and operational procedures and controls for sediment resuspension during dredging are described. Each of the dredge types is ranked according to the following criteria: compatibility for full-scale cleanup, availability, safety, potential for sediment resuspension, maneuverability, cleanup precision, cost and production flexibility, required water depth for operation, ability to access the site, and compatibility with disposal options.

  8. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . I was hired into the fledgling Wetlands Re- search Department consisting of Ken Marcellus, George- port with regard to the Wetlands Act. One of my very first assignments was to work with Marcellus

  9. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  10. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical considerations for application of leach tests to sediments and dredged material. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, T.E.; Brannon, J.M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the characteristics of and differences among laboratory leach tests used for preproject evaluation of leachate quality in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) for dredged material. The guidance provided in this note is based on ongoing research conducted under the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program.

  11. ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    MODEL MOA ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING WHERE SUCH DREDGING&M dredging that is a Federal expense; there are no Federal funds available; and the Contributor provides ALL funds needed to perform the dredging and related activities (engineering and design work, environmental

  12. Comparison of Experimental and Theoretical Forces on a Model Dredge Cutterhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permenter, Rusty

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging is a critical part of maintaining the nation’s ports and harbors that play a major role in international trade. The design of dredge equipment requires knowledge of the forces expected on an average dredge. For a cutter suction dredge one...

  13. ERDC/ELTR-13-3 Bayou Segnette Waterway Dredged Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELTR-13-3 Bayou Segnette Waterway Dredged Material Placement Study Preliminary Assessment-13-3 March 2013 Bayou Segnette Waterway Dredged Material Placement Study Preliminary Assessment requires periodic dredging to maintain its navigability. However, traditional dredged material placement

  14. The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North Norfolk Paper 97 #12;The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North and seabed lowering due to dredging off Great Yarmouth. A scenario of extreme dredging was defined and used

  15. SOME EFFECTS OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT IN BOCA CIEGA BAY, FLORIDA 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOME EFFECTS OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT IN BOCA CIEGA BAY, FLORIDA 1 BY JOHN L. PETERSBURG BEACH, FLA. 33706 ABSTRACT Filling of 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of bay by hy- draulic dredging in dredged ItreltS wit.h those in relatively undisturbed ttreas. Hydl'ltulic dredging becmue. ltll ltccepted

  16. Modeling transport of disposed dredged material from placement sites in Grays Harbor, WA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Modeling transport of disposed dredged material from placement sites in Grays Harbor, WA E- to mid- term dredge material management strategies for the Federal Navigation Project at Grays Harbor dredging quantities. However, the most heavily used dredged material placement sites lie in proximity

  17. ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    i MODEL MOA ACCEPTANCE OF CONTRIBUTED FUNDS (33 U.S.C. 701h) FOR O&M DREDGING WHERE SUCH DREDGING be used for O&M dredging that is a Federal expense; there is enough Federal funds for Corps to award a reasonable dredging contract; and the Contributor provides a specified amount to allow additional O

  18. Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Other topics include sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, the disposal of dredged material, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Other topics include sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, the disposal of dredged material, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Environmental effects of dredging technical notes. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of dredged material. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes an approach for assessing the genotoxic potential of dredged material. The use of integrated batteries of rapid and mechanistically interpretable in vitro and in vivo assays in a tiered approach is fundamental to applied toxicology. The research described here brings this approach to the testing of sediments. Work completed to date and future work will mesh to form an advanced and cost-effective methodology. The purpose of this methodology is to increase the accuracy of environmental risk assessments and facilitate making decisions concerning open-water disposal of dredged material. A great number of the contaminants typically found in dredged material are toxic to exposed organisms through effects on DNA. Such effects are usually the result of low-level chronic exposures. These effects can result in reproductive failure of organisms, impaired growth and development of offspring, and tumors (often cancerous) in vertebrates. Collectively, such effects are called `genotoxicity` and result from damage to the genome of a cell. The damage is heritable, that is, passed on to future cell generations upon duplication of the affected cells.

  1. Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Natural Resources

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

  2. Environmental effects of dredging. Interim guidance for predicting quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas--test procedures. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Engler, R.M.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the following series of technical notes describe the functions necessary for predicting the quality of effluent discharged from confined dredged material disposal areas during dredging operations.

  3. Pilot dredging study, New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, Superfund project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreliunas, V.L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of sediment from the northern portion of New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, has revealed that most of the area is contaminated by polychlorinated. biphenyls (PCBs). In August 1984, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a Feasibility Study of Remedial Action Alternatives for this area, which proposed five cleanup alternatives. Four of these dealt specifically with dredging the area to remove the contaminated sediments. In response to comments received, the USEPA asked the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to perform additional studies to better evaluate the engineering feasibility of dredging as a cleanup alternative. This study is a joint effort of the US Army Engineer Division, New England, Waltham, Mass., and the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Miss. This paper describes a proposed pilot study of dredging and dredged material disposal alternatives to support the engineering feasibility study.

  4. Contaminant modeling. Environmental effects of dredging. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, S.L.; Dortch, M.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note provides initial information on contaminant models that are potentially applicable to situations where the presence of toxic materials in sediments complicates Corps of Engineers (CE) dredging activities.

  5. New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Author New...

  6. Effects of Third DredgeUp on the Structure of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    During Dredge­Up : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 16 Envelope Breathing and Initial Abundances : : : : : : 29 3 Physics of Thermal Pulses 31 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 Review of Stellar Evolution and Thermal Pulses : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 Evolution from

  7. A dispersion curve study of dredged spoil basin inlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Male, Robert

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 19 IV. PROCEDURES AND TECHNIOUHS Test Procenures. Interpretation of Dispersion Curves. Data Analysis, 26 26 28 37 V. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS. VI. DISCUSSION. The Model as a Settling Tank Relationship to Dredging Practice. 58 58 70 VII... all the spoil must be confined. The additional costs to be incurred in that region over ten years vary from $2. 62 million to $12. 87 million according to the confinement scheme. In the USA, most of the dredging projects are under the con- trol...

  8. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis, Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2002-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Both interstitial water and plant tissue associated with the DC-A substrate exhibited low metal concentrations. Also in agreement with the previous study, plant performance in the DC-A substrate was found to be comparable to plant performance in the dredge spoil and topsoil substrates. This was extremely important because it indicated that the drill cuttings themselves served as an excellent substrate for wetland plant growth, but that the processing and stabilization techniques and drilling fluid formulations required further refinement.

  9. Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

  10. Sediment pass-through, an alternative to reservoir dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, L.L.; Lee, W.H. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Tu, S. [Pacific and Gas Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is studying an alternative {open_quotes}Sediment Management Plan{close_quotes} (SMP) to control sediments at Rock Creek Reservoir and the downstream Cresta Reservoir on the North Fork Feather River in Plumas County. The reservoirs are part of the 182,000 kW Rock Creek-Cresta Project hydroelectric development. Approximately 5.4 million cubic meters of sediments, deposited in the two reservoirs since they were placed in service in 1949 and 1950, partially obstruct the dams` low level outlets and pipe inlets supplying water for spillway gate operations. The sediments jeopardize the reliable and efficient operation of the dams and powerhouses. The SMP includes retrofitting Rock Creek and Cresta Dams with additional low-level gated outlets and modification of trash racks at the existing low level outlet pipes at each dam to improve sediment pass-through (SPT) capacity during high flows. Also, to enable construction of the dam modifications and to facilitate the initiation of SPT operation, dredging of approximately 46,000 cubic meters at Rock Creek Reservoir and 57,000 cubic meters at Cresta Reservoir can be accomplished using a new slurry pump dredging technology to minimize turbidity and re-suspension of solids during dredging. It is proposed to deposit the sediment on the reservoir bottoms, upstream of the areas to be dredged. The dredged sediments subsequently would be flushed from the reservoirs during SPT operations to ultimately be deposited in the dead storage volume of a large downstream reservoir, Lake Oroville. The SPT management plan supersedes more costly plans for major dredging, and may preclude the need for future maintenance dredging at the reservoirs.

  11. Close to the Dredge: Precise X-ray C and N Abundances in lambda Andromeda and its Precocious RGB Mixing Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, J J; Eldridge, John J; Ness, J -U; Stancliffe, Richard J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chandra LETG+HRC-S and XMM-Newton RGS spectra of H-like C and N formed in the corona of the lambda And primary star, a mildly metal-poor G8 III-IV first ascent giant that completed dredge-up ~50 Myr ago, have been used to make a precise measurement of its surface C/N ratio. We obtain the formal result [C/N]=0.03+/-0.07, which is typical of old disk giants and in agreement with standard dredge-up theory for stars of about 1 M_sun or lower. In contrast, these stars as a group, including lambda And, have 12C/13C ~dredge-up, contrary to current models of extra mixing on the red giant branch.

  12. Ecologically Significant Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agreement 280016 © 1999 Montana Natural Heritage Program State Library Building · P.O. Box 201800 · 1515 on vegeta- tion, documenting the types of wetland communities present, their quality and condition, and rare integrity. Our observations indicate that some types of wetlands, like wet meadows and valley bottom

  13. Modeling air emissions from contaminated sediment dredged materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Thibodeaux, L.J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Reible, D.D. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatilization rates for hydrophobic organic compounds from a confined disposal facility (CDF) containing contaminated dredged material are presently unknown. The primary purpose of this study is to indicate the availability of theoretical models for the evaluation of volatile emission from a CDF. Four emission locales are identified and modeled: the sediment relocation (dredging) locale, the exposed sediment locale, the ponded sediment locale, and the vegetation-covered sediment locale. Rate expressions are derived to estimate the volatile organic chemical (VOC) emission from each locale. Emission rates (in mass of total VOCs per unit time) are primarily dependent on the chemical concentration at the source, the surface area of the source, and the degree to which the dredged material is in direct contact with air. The relative magnitude of these three parameters provides a basis upon which a tentative ranking of emission rates from the different locales can be given. Exposed sediment results in the greatest estimated emissions of volatiles followed by water with high levels of suspended sediments, such as might occur during dredging or during placement in a CDF. Expected to be lower in volatile emissions are dredged materials covered by a quiescent water column or vegetation.

  14. Near-Field Sediment Resuspension Measurement and Modeling for Cutter Suction Dredging Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henriksen, John Christopher

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment resuspension and turbidity created during dredging operations is both an economical and environmental issue. The movement of sediment plumes created from dredging operations has been predicted with numerical modeling, however, these far...

  15. Introduction `...as the dredge cleared the surface, we saw it full and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995 Introduction `...as the dredge cleared the surface, we saw it full and overflowing with every the giant animals obtained from nearshore marine dredging (Laserson, 1947); the organisms collected

  16. Methodology for determining feasibility and cost for converting dredged material to topsoil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graalum, Sara Jo Ann

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year nearly 30 million cubic yards of sediment are dredged from the Texas waterways and ports. A majority of the dredged material is disposed in confined disposal facilities, and these disposal sites are being filled. As these sites reach...

  17. Engineering geology criteria for dredged material disposal in upper Laguna Madre, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, James Edmellaire

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    area showing dredged material islands and channel locations 3 Frequency of wind by direction at Corpus Christi 14 Wind roses compiled from data recorded at the weather monitoring station during field investigation 19 Sketch of drogue used.... The disposal of dredged material next to the channel minimizes handling costs and reduces dredging time. Open water disposal has been used extensively along the Gulf Coast for the dredging of the Gulf intracoastal Waterway and private channels, result- ing...

  18. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 11. Evaluation of conceptual dredging and disposal alternatives. Technical report, August 1985-July 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.; Palermo, M.R.; Otis, M.J.; Rubinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates conceptual dredging and disposal alternatives for the Acushnet River Estuary, a part of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site. Dredging for removal of the highly contaminated sediment and subsequent disposal in upland or nearshore confined disposal facilities or disposal in contaminated aquatic disposal facilities are alternative considered in the Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Sediment testing and sediment-transport modeling performed as earlier tasks of the study form the basis for evaluation of the alternatives. The technical feasibility of conceptual design options is based on site availability, capacity, and characteristics and on sediment physical characteristics and dredged-material settling behavior as defined by laboratory testing. Contamination releases during dredging and disposal operations are estimated for each disposal option. A preliminary cost estimate for implementation of each option evaluated is alo presented.

  19. Mercury-contaminated sludge treatment by dredging in Minamata Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshinaga, Kiyoto [Ministry of Transport, Niigata (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To eradicate Minamata Disease, caused by the discharge of sewage containing methyl mercury and its accumulation in fish and shellfish through the food cycle, a large-scale sediment disposal project was conducted with special care taken to prevent new pollution resulting from the project itself. The basic approach to sediment disposal was to construct a highly watertight revetment to reclaim the inner area of the bay and then confine sediment dredged from the remaining contaminated area in the reclamation area through surface treatment. Before sediment disposal, boundary nets were installed to enclose the work area to prevent the mixing of contaminated and noncontaminated fish. Dredging work was successfully carried out by using four cutterless suction dredgers, newly developed in advance for minimizing resuspension of sediments. Dredged material was discharged into the reclamation area, filled up to sea level, and covered with a sandproof membrane, lightweight volcanic ash earth, and mountain soil.

  20. Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Portable XRF and wet materials: application to dredged contaminated sediments1 from waterways2 7 ABSTRACT: The sustainable management of dredged waterway sediments requires on-site determination8 commonly used for similar applications with contaminated soil, but the high water content of dredged10

  1. Regulatory Guidance Letter 87-08 SUBJECT: Testing Requirements for Dredged Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Regulatory Guidance Letter 87-08 SUBJECT: Testing Requirements for Dredged Material Evaluations that "The district engineer will review applications for permits for the discharge of dredged or fill)." The guidelines at 40 CFR 230.10(c) state in part that ".. no discharge of dredged or fill material shall

  2. ERDC/ELTR-14-11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELTR-14-11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Economical Treatment of Dredged Material to Facilitate Beneficial Use EnvironmentalLaboratory Trudy J. Estes and Christian J. Mc, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. #12;Dredging Operations

  3. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO Patrick L. Barnard1 , Daniel M. Hanes1 , Jamie Lescinski1 and Edwin Elias2 Nearshore dredge toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over

  4. Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) and Supplemental Environmental Impact statement (EIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) and Supplemental Environmental Impact statement (EIS for the management and disposal of dredged material for the Calcasieu River and Pass, Louisiana project. The actions and strategies set forth in the DMMP/SEIS provides for the management of material dredged through operations

  5. Submitted to Conference on Dredged Material Management: Options and Environmental Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Submitted to Conference on Dredged Material Management: Options and Environmental Considerations Cambridge, Massachusetts ­ 3-6 December 2000 Decontamination and Beneficial Use of Dredged Materials* E of dredged material decontamination technologies for the NY/NJ Harbor. The goal of the project is to assemble

  6. Decontamination of Dredged Material from The Port of New York and New Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Decontamination of Dredged Material from The Port of New York and New Jersey .K.W. Jones Brookhaven copyrightcoveringthispaper. #12;Decontamination of Dredged Material from The Port of New York and New Jersey K. W. Jones the dredging operations required for the efficient operation of the Port. Decontamination and beneficial reuse

  7. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED ESTUARINE SEDIMENT: THE WESTINGHOUSE PLASMA VITRIFICATION PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED ESTUARINE SEDIMENT: THE WESTINGHOUSE PLASMA of the New York/New Jersey Harbor requires regular dredging. The offshore dumping facility has been closed, dredged material disposal, demonstration testing, process design. 1 McLaughlin, D. F., Fellow Engineer

  8. COASTAL ENGINEERING 2012 DREDGING OPTIMIZATION OF AN INLET SYSTEM FOR ADJACENT SHORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COASTAL ENGINEERING 2012 1 DREDGING OPTIMIZATION OF AN INLET SYSTEM FOR ADJACENT SHORE PROTECTION of this study is to investigate optimal dredging volumes and intervals, and to determine the beach placement mining at St. Augustine Inlet over 1.4-year simulations. Results determined that dredging scenarios under

  9. Use of phytostabilisation to remediate mtal polluted dredged V Bert', Ch Lors2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Use of phytostabilisation to remediate métal polluted dredged sédiment V Bert', Ch Lors2 scale on dredged sédiments polluted with metals. A sédiment deposit contaminated with metals of waterways générâtes numerous dredged sédiment deposits. Due to the local intensive industrial history

  10. Maintaining Access to America's Intermodal Ports/Technologies for Decontamination of Dredged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Maintaining Access to America's Intermodal Ports/Technologies for Decontamination of Dredged will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from our nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m 3 ) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from U.S. waterways

  11. Green Sturgeon, Longfin smelt, and dredging operations in the San Francisco Estuary FINAL AGENDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Sturgeon, Longfin smelt, and dredging operations in the San Francisco Estuary FINAL AGENDA for Dredged Material 9:15-9:20 Ellen Johnck (Bay Planning Coalition) Welcome 9:20-9:30 Len Cardoza (Weston Solutions) Stakeholder perspective 9:30-9:45 David Woodbury (NMFS) Risk to green sturgeon from dredging

  12. Dredging: Environmental aspects. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning various environmental aspects of dredging and dredge spoil handling. The studies include the use of spoil sites, pollution control, effects on water quality, and sediment transport. Dredging operations at specific sites are discussed. Biological effects are included in a companion bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. ERDC/CHLTR-10-8 Channel Dredging and Geomorphic Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/CHLTR-10-8 Channel Dredging and Geomorphic Response at and Adjacent to Mobile Pass, Alabama for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;ERDC/CHL TR-10-8 September 2010 Channel Dredging, is an extensive natural inlet that has been improved by channel dredging activities since 1904, primarily through

  14. Case Study of Undrained Strength Stability Analysis for Dredged Material Placement Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study of Undrained Strength Stability Analysis for Dredged Material Placement Areas Timothy D perimeter dike at the Craney Island Dredged Material Management Area CIDMMA using an undrained strength of the effective overburden stress of the dredged material and the marine clay underlying the dike. An undrained

  15. DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LIGHTWEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1 DECONTAMINATION AND BENEFICIAL REUSE OF DREDGED MATERIAL USING EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE an environmentally acceptable and economically beneficial reuse option for the management of dredged material is self/UPCYCLE Associates' technological and commercial approach focuses on the utilization of dredged material

  16. ERDC/CHLTR-12-18 Dredged Material Placement Site Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/CHLTR-12-18 Dredged Material Placement Site Capacity Analysis for Navigation Improvement. #12;ERDC/CHL TR-12-18 September 2012 Dredged Material Placement Site Capacity Analysis for Navigation of perfor- ming a dredged material placement (DMP) site capacity analysis for a Navigation Improvement

  17. Settlement of Dredged and Contaminated Material Placement Areas. II: Primary Consolidation, Secondary Compression,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settlement of Dredged and Contaminated Material Placement Areas. II: Primary Consolidation, Secondary Compression, and Desiccation of Dredged Fill Input Parameters Timothy D. Stark 1; Hangseok Choi2, Secondary Compression, and Desiccation of Dredged Fill), which is described in a companion paper

  18. 112 STERN ET AL. Decontamination and BeneficialUse of Dredged Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    112 STERN ET AL. Decontamination and BeneficialUse of Dredged Materials E. A. STERN! U. S";.. ABSTRACT: Our group is leading a large-sale demonstration of dredged material decontamination technologies transformation of contaminated dredged material into an environmentally-benign material used in the manufacture

  19. Environmental effects of dredging. Managing dredged material via thin-layer disposal in coastal marshes. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilber, P.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes how dredged material can be successfully managed in an environmentally sound manner in marshes by placing it in layers of 5 to 15 cm. (Unless otherwise indicated, all layer thicknesses indicated in this report refer to material that has undergone postdisposal consolidation.) Environmental studies of this process and of the regulatory history of thin-layer disposal in marshes are summarized. General planning and monitoring considerations are described, including descriptions of the types of equipment used to place dredged material in thin layers in marshes.

  20. 22c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    22c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2nd C:N:O~0 to the surface. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star

  1. 25c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    25c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1 st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2 nd C:N:O~0. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star from an M

  2. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjacent Wetlands Tidal marsh inventory Navigation and Safety Distance to 2m contour is > 50% creek width- ing ones. The tool is a series of maps of the Virginia coastline shown in seg- ments which are rated

  3. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Locally Important Wetlands Carl H. Hershner Editor's note: The Virginia Coastal Resources Management ............. 7 Peat: Processing and Potential for Restoration .................................. 9 Calendar and by the Virginia Coastal Resources Management Program of the Depart- ment of Environmental Quality through Grant

  4. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetland easement (2000 acres) 3.7 miles 1.4 miles Direction of flow NORTH FM 3039 US 175 Five Major Components ? Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure ? Constructed Wetland ? Conveyance Pump Station ? Electrical Substation... ? Vertical Turbine Pumps 3 ? 3000 Hp 2 ? future 6000 Hp ? Equipped with SCADA system Electrical Substation Electrical Substation ? Provides power to the Conveyance Pump Station ? Power is approximately 60% of annual operating budget ? Power...

  5. Temporal effects of dredging and dredged material disposal on nekton in the offshore waters of Galveston, Texas, with notes on the natural histories of the most abundant taxa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henningsen, Brandt Flynn

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEHPORAL 11FFEC S Ol DREDGING Ki'P3 DREDGED HATERIAL D. SPCSAL ON NEKTON IN THE OFF SHOPCE WATERS OI' GALVESTON, TEXAS, WITH NOTES ON THE NATLTAL HISTORIES OF THE HOST ABUNDANT 1'AXA A Thesis by BRMlDT FLYNN HENNINGSEN Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment or the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Hajor Subject: Biology TEMPORAL EFFECTS OF DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL ON NEKTON IN THE OFFSHORE WATERS...

  6. Environmental effects of dredging. Evaluating environmental effects of dredged material management alternatives - a technical framework. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, M.R.; Francingues, N.R.; Engler, R.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Note presents a brief description of a joint U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Technical Framework for the identification of environmentally acceptable alternatives for the management of dredged material. This Technical Note replaces the earlier Technical Note EEDPA-06-14, which should be discarded.

  7. Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in the State, and state that it is in the public interest to restore and preserve these wetlands and their biological...

  8. Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    / minewater treatment ­ Stormwater management wetlands (SUDS) ­ Reedbeds for "polishing" farmyard runoff of a treatment system · CAR Engineering licence ­ if wetland associated with river/loch ­ Environmental service · Improved riparian habitat Insh Marshes, River Spey #12;23/05/2012 5 Wetlands for Sewage Treatment

  9. Dredging-induced near-field resuspended sediment concentrations and source strengths. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, M.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging in riverine, lacustrine, and estuarine environments introduces bottom sediments into overlying waters because of imperfect entrainment and incomplete capture of sediments resuspended during the dredging process and the spillage or leakage of sediments during subsequent transportation and disposal of the dredged sediments. Resuspension of bottom sediments and resulting dispersal may pose water quality problems in waters near dredging operations. Interest in this issue increases when the sediment being dredged is highly contaminated. Resuspension of sediments by dredging is affected by dredge characteristics, dredge operating conditions, properties of bottom and suspended sediments, and site-specific conditions such as bottom topography, ambient current, and depth. This report summarizes field studies conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess the suspended sediment concentrations in the water column in the vicinity of various dredge types. These concentration data are combined with conceptual models for resuspended sediment source strength geometries and velocity patterns to estimate sediment source strengths for cutterhead and clamshell dredges. Although unverified, these models provide a starting point for a more thorough analytical evaluation of the entire resuspension, transport, and deposition process.

  10. Dredging Operations Technical-Support Program. A framework for assessing the need for seasonal restrictions on dredging and disposal operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaSalle, M.W.; Clarke, D.G.; Homziak, J.; Lunz, J.D.; Fredette, T.J.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal restrictions on dredging and/or disposal operations are based upon concerns about potential dredging- or disposal-induced negative impacts to biological resources. In many cases, however, information on the degree to which either naturally occurring or dredging-induced environmental alterations directly or indirectly affect organisms is poorly quantified, in which case restrictions are based upon a reason to believe notion. This report addresses the general acceptability of seasonal restrictions through a compilation of available information on physical-chemical environmental alterations associated with dredging and disposal operations, and critical information regarding the effects of these alterations on principal biological resources. Based on this information, a method for evaluating existing or proposed seasonal restrictions on dredging and/or disposal operations is presented. This framework reflects the present understanding of effects of dredging- or disposal-induced, as well as naturally occurring, environmental alterations upon biological resources. In many cases, the magnitude of dredging- or disposal-induced alterations falls well within the range of naturally occurring phenomena and imposes little or no additional stress upon resource populations. In some cases, however, the magnitude of alterations may exceed that which occurs naturally, whereby concerns about dredging- or disposal-induced alterations are justified and should be considered when planning a project.

  11. Bioassessment methods for determining the hazards of dredged-material disposal in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, J.H.; Pesch, G.G.; Scott, K.J.; Nelson, W.; Munns, W.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 325 million cu m of sediment are dredged annually for navigation purposes in the United States. Of this, 46 million cu m are disposed of annually in the ocean. Decisions regarding the ocean disposal of dredged material result, in large part, from bioassessment-based estimates of contaminant exposure and ecological impacts. Predictions of impacts for an individual dredging project are estimated from laboratory determinations of the magnitude, bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and hazards (toxicity) of dredged material contaminants. Disposal site management of individual and multiple dredging projects requires monitoring for contaminant transport, availability and accumulation in biota, and the hazards to ecologically and commercially important populations. Because of their importance, suites of bioassessment methods representing several levels of biological organization have been proposed for predicting and assessing the hazards resulting from the ocean disposal of dredged material.

  12. N, P, and heavy metal dynamics in wetlands and lakes of the Danube Delta, Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lajtha, K.; Keller, B.; Jamil, A. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)]|[Boston Univ., MA (United States)]|[Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Danube Delta stands at the interface between the Danube and the western Black Sea. Although it is assumed that such extensive wetlands can effectively filter nutrients and pollutants from surrounding waters, recent anthropogenic factors such as increased loading from upstream sources, dredging, channelization, and engineering impoundments may all serve to decrease the filtering potential of the marshes. We sampled sediments, water, and mussels from lakes, and plants and sediments from marshes along an eastward gradient as well as with distance from a main channel in the Delta to examine controls on filtering efficiency. N and P in water decreased with distance from the western gateway, although the magnitude of this decrease varied among years with changes in hydrology. Heavy metals in roots of Phragmites did not vary predictably over this gradient, although concentrations in roots from dredged channel sediments were significantly higher than in roots from natural marshes. Accumulation in mussels reflected hydrologic flow within the Delta, which may be significantly altered by channelization and dredging.

  13. Eddy pump dredging: Does it produce water quality impacts?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creek, K.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Ramon, CA (United States); Sagraves, T.H. [RESNA Industries, Magalia, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During a prototype demonstration at Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s (PG&E`s) Cresta Reservoir, the feasibility of a new dredging technique was tested for its reported ability to produce only minimal water quality impacts. The technique, developed by PBMK Consultants and Engineers, uses the EDDY Pump, a patented submerged slurry pump system with a higher solids-to-liquid ratio and lower re-suspension of sediment than achieved by conventional suction dredging. Turbidity and total suspended solids concentrations of water samples collected adjacent to and downstream of the pump head were similar to those of samples collected adjacent to and upstream of the pump head. Dissolved oxygen downstream of the pump head remained near saturation. The dredged sediment was pumped 600 m upstream of the pump head and discharged back to the surface of Cresta Reservoir. Increases in turbidity and total suspended solids downstream of the discharge site were minor. Throughout the demonstration, turbidity levels and total suspended solids concentrations remained well below allowable levels set by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board - no more than a 25 NTU turbidity increase over ambient background nor more than 80 mg/I total suspended solids, absolute.

  14. Geological criteria for the selection of unconfined dredged material disposal sites in estuaries and lagoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHam, Robert Michael

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX A DREDGED MATERIAL SEDIMENT DATA. . ~ ~. . . . . . . . 119 APPENDIX B DREDGED MATERIAL ISLAND PHOTOGRAPHIC AND AREA CALCULATION INFORMATION. . . ~ -. . . . ~ - - . 131 ITA e ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e e ~ ~ s o e o ~ ~ ~ o ~ 135 V LIST..., transport and redeposit the dredged sediment. Such a predictive capability would, allow the formulation of a geologically sound, placement criterion. The reduction in shoaling resulting from a placement criterion would reduce maintenance costs...

  15. Measuring the Effects of Cutter Suction Dredge Operating Parameters on Minor Losses due to Fixed Screens Installed at the Suction Inlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joshua Mark

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most efficient and versatile types of modern dredges is the cutter suction dredge. Specific regulations mandate the placement of screens over the suction mouth during dredging operations to prevent ordnance, wildlife, and other debris...

  16. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system of stormwater wetlands and wet ponds is performed to achieve four goals: efficient hydraulic flow and pollutant

  17. Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

  18. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  19. 11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    11/17/11 1 Treatment Wetlands Dr. Andrea Ludwig Biosystems Engineering TerOary) ­ nutrient removal Uses of Treatment Wetlands for Improved Water Wetland Ecology ­ November 17, 2011 Mississippi River Flooding 2011 Gulf

  20. Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

  1. -98 -97 -96 -95 -94 -93 -92 -91 -90 -89 -88 -87 -86 -85 Longitude (median for dredges)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    -85 Nb/Zr Longitude (median for dredges) Existing Data Western GSC Eastern GSC Ingle Investigating -98 -96 -94 -92 -90 -88 -86 -84 -82 -80 K/Ti*100 Longitude (median for dredges) Existing data Western

  2. SIGKDD Explorations. Copyright 2000 ACM SIGKDD, January 2000. Volume 1, Issue 2 page 52 Data Snooping, Dredging and Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, David

    Snooping, Dredging and Fishing: The Dark Side of Data Mining A SIGKDD99 Panel Report David Jensen Computer. A panel at the conference, entitled "Data Snooping, Dredging and Fishing: The Dark Side of Data Mining

  3. ERDC/ELTR-11-1 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , and to estimate full scale implementation costs at a scale compatible with a dredging operation. OverallERDC/ELTR-11-1 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Mass Balance, Beneficial Use Products, and Cost Comparisons of Four Sediment Treatment Technologies Near Commercialization Environmental

  4. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Conveyance Pipeline & Outfall Structure Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure Diversion Structure ? Withdraws and lifts water from the East Fork of the Trinity River into the constructed wetland Diversion Pump Station ? Pumps river... supplied by Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative ? Incoming power 138 kV reduced to 5 kV Conveyance Pipeline Conveyance Pipeline ? Transfers polished water to outfall structure at Lavon Lake ? Pipeline divided into 3 segments ? Northern ? Central...

  5. Recovery of floral and faunal communities after placement of dredged material on seagrasses in Laguna Madre, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recovery of floral and faunal communities after placement of dredged material on seagrasses characteristics and use by fishery and forage organisms were detectable at dredged material placement sites three years after dredging. Clovergrass Halophila engelmannii was the initial colonist, but shoalgrass

  6. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging 31 August 2006; received in revised form 11 January 2007; accepted 11 January 2007 Dredging freshwater marsh was polluted with battery-factory wastes (1953e1979) and dredged in 1994e1995. Eight years

  7. Estuaries Vol. 21, No. 4A, p. 646-651 December 1998 Processing Contaminated Dredged Material From the Port of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Estuaries Vol. 21, No. 4A, p. 646-651 December 1998 Processing Contaminated Dredged Material From environmentaleffectscausedby ocean disposal of the dredged material. Current proposals for solutions to the problem include to produce a complete "treatment train" for processing and decontaminating dredged material is described

  8. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO establishment and de- velopment were monitored for 3 1/2 years on a new, dredged-material island located within elevations when de- signing future levees, dredged-material deposition areas, and fish and wildlife habitat

  9. MOVEMENT OF SEA TURTLES CAPTURED NEAR HOPPER-DREDGED CHANNELS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA: 1993-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MOVEMENT OF SEA TURTLES CAPTURED NEAR HOPPER-DREDGED CHANNELS IN TEXAS AND LOUISIANA: 1993's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) and 4 loggerhead (Caretta caretta) turtles were tracked near hopper dredged. Tracking data will determine short term fidelity to jettied passes, use of hopper dredged channels and long

  10. Applicability of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Regulations to the Management of Navigational Dredged Material from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    to the Management of Navigational Dredged Material from the New York/New Jersey Harbor by Thomas John A thesis.........................................................................7 2.1 Interim Guidance for Freshwater Navigational Dredging...............................7 2 Management of Dredged Material........................................12 2.2 New York State Soil Clean Up

  11. The Amenity Value of Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 50 4.3.1 Chatham County Board of Assessor ................................... 50 4.3.2 Chatham County Metropolitan Planning Council............... 51 4.3.3 National Wetland Inventory................................................ 51 4... 6.3.4 The Implicit Prices of Wetland Attributes .......................... 100 6.4 Hedonic Models in Savannah ................................................... 100 6.4.1 Basic Hedonic Model...

  12. THESIS 2011 26-28 April 2011, Chatou FRANCE Simulation for the convective descent phase of dredged-sediment releases in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THESIS 2011 26-28 April 2011, Chatou FRANCE Simulation for the convective descent phase of dredged in estuaries. It is then necessary to perform dredging to allow ships accessing to the docks. The dredged to the environment. The purpose of this work is to numerically study the process of dredged sediment with the help

  13. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

  14. Dredging: Technology and environmental aspects. May 1978-July 1989 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for May 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and environmental impacts of dredging. Equipment, including semi-submersible cutter platforms, is described. Sediment movement, factors affecting sediment movement, and the disposal of dredged material, are discussed, and computer models predicting the fate of the dredged materials are considered. The environmental impacts of the dredged areas and the effects of ocean dumping of dredged material are also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 352 citations, 22 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Buttermilk Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buttermilk Channel was one of seven waterways that was sampled and evaluated for dredging and sediment disposal. Sediment samples were collected and analyses were conducted on sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. A composite sediment samples, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  16. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.A.; Gardiner, W.W.; Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The navigational channels of Winyah Bay, Georgetown Harbor, South Carolina require dredging to enable normal shipping traffic to use these areas. Before dredging, environmental assessments must be conducted to determine the suitability of this dredged sediment for unconfined, open-water disposal. The Charleston, South Carolina District Office of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requested that the Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) collect sediment samples and conduct the required physical/chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation evaluations as required in the 1991 Implementation Manual. This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the Entrance Channel and Inner Harbor sediments proposed disposal in the ocean.

  17. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  18. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M R; Ward, J A; Mayhew, H L; Word, J Q; Niyogi, D K; Kohn, N P [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of [minus]40 ft MLLW ([minus]38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites.

  19. PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

  20. Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Gordon

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of waterbirds in Aspen Park wetlands. Hydrobiologia, 567(1),introducing small fish into Aspen Parkland pothole wetlands

  1. Environmental effects of dredging. Use of daphnia magna to predict consequences of bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results reported herein represent a portion of the laboratory research evaluating the relationship between mercury and cadmium tissue residues and biological effects in the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna (commonly known as the water flea). Procedures presented here for a 28-day Daphnia magna toxicity test could be used in screening for water-column toxicity resulting from open-water disposal of a specific dredged material. As a part of its regulatory and dredging programs, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers often conducts, or requires to be conducted, an assessment of the potential for bioaccumulation of environmental contaminants from sediment scheduled for dredging and open-water disposal. There is, at present, no generally accepted guidance available to aid in the interpretation of the biological consequences of bioaccumulation. To provide an initial basis for such guidance, the Environmental Laboratory is conducting both literature database analyses and experimental laboratory studies as part of the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program.

  2. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.

  3. Steamship operator's thoughts on national dredging situation. [For coal-exporting ports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J.N.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present depths of US coal-exporting ports are inadequate to permit handling of large, economically-sized bulkers. Because of this, the relative appeal of US coal to importers is considerably lessened. Several solutions are offered: coal-slurry pipelines, draft-assisted delivery systems, land based top-off stations, top-off concept, and a national dredging program. Although the topping-off alternative seems to be a viable means of addressing the problem, it should not be thought of as the ANSWER, but rather as a logical, cost effective interim method. Both top-off and dredging are needed to effectively address this issue. The author concludes that no matter how difficult bringing about a national dredging program may be, it must be done, for only through dredging can we achieve full optimization of our market potential in coal export.

  4. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

  5. Environmental effects of dredging: Alternative dredging equipment and operational methods to minimize sea turtle mortalities. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, D.D.; Nelson, D.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five species of sea turtles occur along the United States coastlines and are listed as threatened or endangered. The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) is listed as threatened, while the Kemp`s ridley (Lepidochelys kenipi), the hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), and the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) are all less abundant and listed as endangered. Florida breeding populations of the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) are listed as endangered, but green turtles in other US waters are considered threatened. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has determined, based on the best available information, that because of their life cycle and behavioral patterns only the loggerhead, the green, and the Kemp`s ridley are put at risk by hopper dredging activities (Studt 1987).

  6. Dredging as remediation for white phosphorus contamination at Eagle River Flats, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, M.R.; Collins, C.M.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eagle River Flats impact area is a Ft. Richardson Superfund site. It is a salt marsh that is contaminated with white phosphorus (WP), and remediation of sediments in permanently ponded areas may require dredging. A remotely piloted dredging system was designed, constructed, and deployed at the Flats as part of the overall site remediation feasibility study. Experience gained over two years of engineering study and contract operation indicates that, although feasible and effective, this alternative is slow, difficult, and very expensive.

  7. Effects in fish during dredging of Lake Jaernsjoen, River Emaan, Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foerlin, L. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoophysiology; Norrgren, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the investigation was to study biochemical, physiological and morphological effects in fish during dredging of sediment in a heavily PCB contaminated lake (Lake Jaernsjoen, River Emaan), and to provide a biological control program employing fish for the lake after dredging and restoration. Dredging of the PCB contaminated sediments in Lake Jaernsjoen took place in 1993 and 1994 (see Helgee and Troedsson, this conference). Three different caging studies were performed with one study each year of 1992, 1993 and 1994. Cages with fish were placed at different sites including sites both upstream and downstream the lake and sites at the lake. The fish were caged for four weeks. In 1992 a parallel study was performed of feral perch from the contaminated area. Caging of rainbow trout in Lake Jaernsjoen during dredging resulted in liver enlargement, induction of liver detoxification enzymes (for example EROD activity) and liver morphological changes such as degeneration and vacualization. Induction of EROD activity was also observed in the caged fish in 1992 study (before start of dredging). However no effect was seen on EROD activity in feral perch. The effects caused by dredging in the caged fish were more pronounced in 1994 study than in 1993 study. In the 1994 study effects were also observed in fish caged at sites downstream the lake. In 1993 the dredging area was closed off by a silt curtain whereas in 1994 no silt curtain was used. Therefore, the results seem to indicate that the more pronounced effect picture in the 1994 study seems to be caused by a higher release of suspended material during dredging without a protecting silt curtain (1994).

  8. An engineering geologic impact analysis of hydraulic dredging for lignite in Texas alluvial valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Erich Donald Luis

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and is the same site used by Cason ( 1982). These two studies exhibit that dredge mining of lignite at the Grimes County site is feasible economically and environmentally. A pilot dredge program is now needed to determine if the studies represent reality... lignite in alluvial valleys is feasible Table 1. Stratigraphic occurrence of Texas lignites (IUodified fram Cason, 1982) . North of the Colorado River OLIGOCENE CATAMOULA FORMATION South of the Colorado River Whitsett Formation Manning Formations...

  9. An engineering geologic impact analysis of hydraulic dredging for lignite in Texas alluvial valleys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Erich Donald Luis

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    floodplain, and the conditions will be conducive for aquifer restoration, soil restoration, revegetation, and wildlife habitat redevelopment. The study site for the present research is in the floodplain of the Navasota River in Grimes County, Texas..., and is the same site used by Cason ( 1982). These two studies exhibit that dredge mining of lignite at the Grimes County site is feasible economically and environmentally. A pilot dredge program is now needed to determine if the studies represent reality...

  10. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Point Frazer Bend Reach, Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Ward, J.A.; Word, J.Q.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The port of Georgetown, South Carolina, is served by navigational channels within Winyah Bay and the lower Sampit River. Dredging is required to maintain these waterways and to facilitate normal shipping traffic. Prior to dredging, ecological evaluations must be conducted to determine the suitability of the proposed dredged material for open-ocean disposal. These evaluations are to be performed under Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and, Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), following the testing protocols presented in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal Testing Manual, hereafter referred to as the 1991 Implementation Manual. The Charleston Intensive Project is a reevaluation of sediments collected from two stations (IH-2 and IH-3) in the Frazier Point Bend reach of the Winyah Bay channel. Reference sediment was also collected from site IH-R2, just south of Hare Island. The results of physical/chemical analyses indicated that some contaminants of concern were present in test treatments representing dredged material when compared with the reference treatment IH-R2. The results of this study indicate that, based on the acute toxicity and chemical analyses, dredged material represented by these test treatments is suitable for open-ocean disposal.

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  12. Data requirements for advancing techniques to predict dredge-induced sediment and contaminant releases -- A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Waterways Experiment Station

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In many areas of the world, contaminated sediments are being considered a major factor in the redistribution of toxic chemicals in the environment. While removal of contaminated sediments from the aquatic environment is often the preferred alternative for reducing the potential impacts of contaminated sediment, regulatory agencies and the public often express concern about contaminant releases during dredging operations. The US Army Corps of Engineers continues to develop techniques for making a priori estimates of the sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases during hydraulic and mechanical dredging activities. However, appropriate field data to verify and refine these techniques for a wide range of conditions are currently limited. Data needs include physical and operational characteristics of the dredge, waterway characteristics, sediment characteristics, sediment contaminant data, and water quality data collected during the dredging activity. This paper discusses key parameters required to improve the current predictive techniques and outlines the type of monitoring program needed to improve the comparability of the techniques to measured releases. The recommended monitoring program is derived from experiences with previous monitoring efforts. Planners of future dredging demonstrations are encouraged to collect similar data in order to advance the state of the art for predicting sediment and contaminant releases associated with dredging.

  13. COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land greatly decreased, the creation of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment has been increasing since

  14. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project: Acushnet River Estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 2. Sediment and contaminant hydraulic transport investigations. Technical report, February 1986-July 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teeter, A.M.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evaluation of hydraulic conditions and sediment migration associated with the dredging and dredged material disposal alternatives proposed for the upper Acushnet River Estuary upstream of New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts. Dredging and onsite disposal is one remedial measure being considered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Assessments of sediment and contaminant migration beyond the upper New Bedford Harbor from proposed dredging and disposal alternatives were made based on field, laboratory, and various model studies. The upper estuary was found to be depositional and a reasonably efficient sediment trap. Total suspended material (TSM) concentrations were very low in the system.

  15. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  16. Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are...

  17. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this  study  the  “treatment  wetland  ”  has  continued  wetland   impoundment,   and   a   treatment   (

  18. Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Land Management (BLM), and numerous county and local governments. The surveys have also involvedColorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland

  19. WETLAND DELINEATION REPORT UMORE MINING AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Project 08-0092 September 29, 2009 #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0. INTRODUCTION Determination Form #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire

  20. Constructed Wetlands for Industry in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Treatment System 2. The Artificially Constructed Wetland System 3. The Grass Filtration System 4. The Red treatment ponds 1 water quality improvement pond #12;23/05/2012 5 The Constructed Wetland System - Shallow wetlands (Natural treatment system) Ubol Ratana #12;23/05/2012 8 Immediate Objectives - Treat community

  1. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. General decision-making framework for management of dredged material: Example application to Commencement Bay, Washington. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.R.; Tatem, H.E.; Brandon, D.L.; Kay, S.H.; Peddicord, R.K.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Navigable waterways of the United States have a vital role in the Nation's economic growth. The US Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for the dredging and disposal of large volumes of sediment each year. Dredging is a process by which sediments are removed from the bottom of streams, rivers, lakes, and coastal waters, transported via ship, barge, or pipeline, and discharged to land or water. The presence of contamination in some locations has generated concern that dredged material disposal may adversely affect water quality and aquatic organisms or terrestrial organisms. Since many of the waterways are located in industrial and urban areas, some sediments may be highly contaminated with hazardous materials. A general decision-making framework based on the results of technically sound tests protocols is described. The decision-making framework includes consideration of sediment chemistry, physical chemistry of disposal site environments, and biological effects of sediment contaminants, as well as comparison of test results from sediments to be dredged with test results from reference sediments and with established criteria. The framework provides the basis for selection of the environmentally preferable disposal alternative and for identification of potentially appropriate control measures to minimize problems associated with the presence of contaminants.

  2. DECONTAMINATING AND PROCESSING DREDGED MATERIAL FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLESCERI,N.L.; STERN,E.A.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem in the Port of New York and New Jersey. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region 2, the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, the US Department of Energy-Brookhaven National Laboratory, and regional university groups that have included Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Stevens Institute of Technology. The project has gone through phased testing of commercial technologies at the bench scale (15 liters) and pilot scale (1.5--500 m{sup 3}) levels. Several technologies are now going forward to large-scale demonstrations that are intended to treat from 23,000 to 60,000 m{sup 3}. Selections of the technologies were made based on the effectiveness of the treatment process, evaluation of the possible beneficial use of the treated materials, and other factors. Major elements of the project are summarized here.

  3. Sampling and analysis of sediments in dredged material from Wilma Uplands Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Granite Reservoir provides slack-water navigation for the Lewiston, Idaho, and Clarkston, Washington area. The levee system associated with the reservoir protects industrial, commercial, and residential areas from inundation of waters impounded behind the dam. Sediment deposition at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers has required frequent dredging events In past years, Including two recent events in 1986 and 1987. Dredged material from the 1986 and 1987 events was placed in three containment ponds located on the north bank of the Snake River, near River Mile 134.7. The ponds were used to hold approximately 400,000 cubic yards of dredged material removed from the port areas at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Prior to dredging, the river sediments were tested and found to be typical of non-contaminated sediment. Since that testing, dioxins and furans have been found in the effluent from a Kraft pulp mill in Lewiston that discharges directly into the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) believed that dredged material placed in the containment ponds may contain contaminated levels of dioxins and furans. At their request, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) sampled sediments from these ponds and performed a chemical analysis.

  4. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Borde, A.B.; Nieukirk, S.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project area consisted of bulk chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation studies. Eleven core samples were analyzed or grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. Other sediments were evaluated for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  5. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and to evaluate for dredging and disposal. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Fifteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Bronx River project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample, representing the entire reach of the area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which was prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Bronx River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  6. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Port Chester, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Port Chester was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Tests and analyses were conducted on Port Chester sediment core samples. Because the Port Chester area is located on the border between New York and southeast Connecticut, its dredged material may also be considered for disposal at the Central Long Island Sound Disposal Site. The sediment evaluation consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and dredged material elutriate preparations, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Port Chester were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. In addition, sediment was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.

  7. PURPOSE: This technical note describes the development of an alternative approach to evaluate chronic toxicity and the significance of contaminant bioaccumulation in dredged material assess-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chronic toxicity and the significance of contaminant bioaccumulation in dredged material assess- ments) require that biological evaluations be conducted to determine the suitability of dredged material sediment, the biological tests are conducted to assess the toxicity and bioaccumulation of contami- nants in dredged

  8. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.10.017 The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged contaminated sediment using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.10.017 The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged large amounts of dredged sediments, which are depos- ited on adjacent land surfaces. These sediments © 2005 Elsevier Ltd 1. INTRODUCTION The regular dredging of sediment from waterways is neces- sary

  9. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental Values, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release CO2

  10. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent Billion in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental) Pesticides, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release

  11. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Effects? Fuel 1.9 Trillion Tons ·Canada (510 bT) ·Russia (770 bT) World Peat Resources 1) Finland 2 After Discharges ·Chemical ·Temperature #12;6 Human Influences on Wetlands Peat Mining Horticulture) Ireland 3) Russia World Peat Mining 16.8 mil tons 6.9 mil tons 23.7 mil tons Fuel= Hort= 70% 30%

  12. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  13. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Tokos, J.J.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water- column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Eighteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Eastchester project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two composite sediment samples, representing the upstream and lower reaches of the area proposed for dredging, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the two Eastchester sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. An additional 1 1 composite samples were created for the USACE-New England Division (USACE-NED) using the same 18 Eastchester core samples but combined into different composites. These composites were analyzed for metals, chlorinated pesticides, PCB congeners, PAHS, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed along with bioaccumulation tests.

  14. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Arthur Kill project areas consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Arthur Kill project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, was used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all Arthur Kill composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. M. bahia did not show statistically significant acute toxicity or a greater than 10% increase in mortality over reference sediment in static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hackensack River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of the Hackensack River Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material with current ammonia reduction protocols. Hackensack River was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were re-collected from the Hackensack River Project area in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hackensack River project area consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Hackensack River project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, were used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all three Hackensack River composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. Statistically significant mortality 10% over reference sediment was observed in the M. bahia static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Environmental effects of dredging. Corps of Engineers initiative to develop long-term management strategies for navigation dredging projects: Overview and framework. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francingues, N.R.; Mathis, D.B.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes a major US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) policy initiative to define an appropriate and effective framework for developing and implementing the concept of a Long-Term Management Strategy (LTMS) within the national navigation dredging program. It presents a five-phase conceptual approach or framework for developing an LTMS with emphasis on lessons learned and a summary of selected field experiences.

  17. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access...

  18. artificial wetlands pilot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A process-based pilot-scale (more) Beebe, Donald 2013-01-01 6 National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: National...

  19. artificial wetland ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source Centre for Climate Change Research) DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF METHANE IN LAKES AND WETLANDS INVITED SPEAKERS...

  20. Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

  1. Framework for real-time decision making: New Bedford Harbor pilot dredging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.G.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Bedford Harbor is located along Buzzards Bay between the cities of New Bedford and Fairhaven, Mass. Since the 1940s, electronics and manufacturing companies in the area have discharged effluents containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into the Acushnet River and the harbor. Over the past 15 years, nearly 18,000 acres of PCB- and heavy metals-contaminated sediment have been identified, with PCB concentrations as high as 100,000 parts per million (ppm) in some areas of the upper harbor. In 1982, the site was added to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites slated for cleanup under the Superfund Act. A feasibility study conducted by EPA in 1984 proposed several alternatives for the remediation of NBH including dredging contaminated sediments out of the harbor. Federal, State, and local officials, as well as the public, expressed concern over dredging. Many believed that sediments resuspended during dredging would cause the release of contaminants that would affect biota inhabiting both the harbor and Buzzards Bay. Others cited potential pollution problems from contaminated water (leachate) leaking from the proposed disposal site. In order to address these concerns, the EPA decided to pre-test dredging and possible disposal options.

  2. Heavy Metal Immobilization Through Phosphate and Thermal Treatment of Dredged Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ndiba,P.; Axe, L.; Boonfueng, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of dredged sediments is expensive and poses a major challenge for harbor dredging projects. Therefore beneficial reuse of these sediments as construction material is highly desirable assuming contaminants such as heavy metals are immobilized and organics are mineralized. In this research, the effect of the addition of 2.5% phosphate, followed by thermal treatment at 700 C, was investigated for metal contaminants in dredged sediments. Specifically, Zn speciation was evaluated, using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), by applying principal component analysis (PCA), target transformation (TT), and linear combination fit (LCF) to identify the main phases and their combination from an array of reference compounds. In dredged sediments, Zn was present as smithsonite (67%) and adsorbed to hydrous manganese oxides (18%) and hydrous iron oxides (15%). Phosphate addition resulted in precipitation of hopeite (22%), while calcination induced formation of spinels, gahnite (44%), and franklinite (34%). Although calcination was previously used to agglomerate phosphate phases by sintering, we found that it formed sparingly soluble Zn phases. Results from the U.S. EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) confirmed both phosphate addition and calcination reduced leachability of heavy metals with the combined treatment achieving up to an 89% reduction.

  3. Bivalve embryo bioassay to assess the potential toxicity of dredged material before dumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiniou, F. [IFREMER Brest, Plouzane (France)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredged harbor sediments frequently contain a wide spectrum of contaminants in addition to a significant percentage of organic matter. Also, dredging and dumping activities into sea water, of these highly contaminated soil may induce a harmful effect on the environment. In France, in accordance with Oslo convention guidelines, a working group on dredging activities and environment (GEODE) created since 1991 decided to set up a pilot research program to assess the intrinsic toxicity of four harbor sludges. Intrinsic toxicity of harbor muds were tested by solid phase (whole sediment) and aqueous extract bioassays (sea water elutriates) using the sublethal toxicity test bivalve embryo bioassay (Crassostrea gigas). Elutriates enable them to detect the toxicity of contaminants which may be released in the soluble form into the water column during dredging operations. While, whole sediment integrate the synergistic effects of all the contaminants (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) including pore water. Bioassays results, correlated to chemical analysis, are compared to contaminant levels determined by French working group GEODE and Canadian sediment quality criteria.

  4. Siting of dredged material islands in bays and estuaries along low-energy coastlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathewson, C.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bays, estuaries, and lagoons along low-energy coastlines are protected shallow water environments, which make them suitable sites for intracoastal transportation routes. Dredging operations often construct disposal islands, which are cost effective and provide protected sites for shore birds. Channel maintenance is often required because sediments are transported from the island to the channel. Studies of dredge material island changes along the Texas coast have shown that the reworking and transport of island sediments is influenced by a number of geologic, geotechnical, biological, and climatic factors. Significant factors are: wind; waves; tides, both astronomic and wind generated; currents produced by wind, fluvial, and tidal processes; physical characteristics of the dredged material; climate, including both prevailing and storm conditions; basin physiography, island design, shape, height, and location within the basin; biology, both flora and fauna; and the activities of man, ship wake, subsidence, etc. Selection of the most effective island location can be based on a process model that incorporates a recognition of the influence and interaction of the physical factors that erode and transport island sediments and those that stabilize the island. This model can be applied early in the site selection process with corresponding improvements in the design and permitting of the dredging program.

  5. Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    .S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) ­ New York District, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE1 Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials Focus: New York / New Jersey Harbor Region In the New York / New Jersey Harbor Region, the effect

  6. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from St. Andrew Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P.; Pinza, M.R.; Karle, L.M.; Ward, J.A. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Mobile District, requested that the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct field sampling and chemical and biological testing to determine the suitability of potential dredged material for open ocean disposal. Sediment from St. Andrew Bay was chemically characterized and evaluated for biological toxicity and bioaccumulation of contaminants. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material). To meet these requirements, the MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, solid-phase toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation testing on sediment representing potential dredged material from Panama City Harbor. Physical and chemical characterization of sediment to support toxicity and bioaccumulation results was also conducted on both the test and reference sediments. The MSL collected sediment samples from five sites in St. Andrew Bay and one reference site near Lands End Peninsula. The five test sediments and the reference sediment were analyzed for physical and chemical sediment characteristics, SPP chemical contaminants, solid-phase toxicity, SPP toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants.

  7. Journal of Hazardous Materials 85 (2001) 127143 Dredged material decontamination demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Hazardous Materials 85 (2001) 127­143 Dredged material decontamination demonstration component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed material; Decontamination; Beneficial use; Commercialization; NY/NJ Harbor Corresponding author. Tel.: +1

  8. Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

  9. Alternatives to deep-draft port dredging for US coal export development: a preliminary assessment. [72 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, K.M.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compares deep-draft port dredging with alternative methods for increasing US coal export capacity. Five basic types of alternatives to port dredging are discussed: (1) coarse-coal pipelines, (2) coal slurry pipelines, (3) vessel-to-ship loading, (4) barge-carrying ships, and (5) extra-wide-beam coal ships. Because more than one approach is investigated for these alternatives, a total of 12 options are discussed. After describing the factors exerting growing pressure on the United States to improve its seaport coal-exporting capabilities, the current status of port dredging is presented. Funding, approval process, implementation time, and physical capability considerations are analyzed; significant uncertainties are found to exist about the financial and time requirements for port dredging. The 12 alternatives to port dredging are next described and compared on the basis of (1) financial considerations, (2) implementation-time requirements, and (3) environmental and technological constraints. At least two-thirds of the approximately 180 million tons of planned expansion by the year 2000 of coal-export capacity is based on the assumption of port dredging taking place. Therefore, it appears that port dredging alone could enable US ports to handle the coal export volumes projected for the year 2000. Dredging is also concluded to improve port efficiency and reduce general transportation costs the most. However, the uncertainties about the financing, the environmental concerns, and the time requirements for deep-draft dredging throw considerable doubt upon its viability as a single means of needed port capacity expansion. It is concluded that all of the alternatives except the barge-carrying-vessel systems would be good supplementary systems.

  10. Tier 1 ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Thorn, R.M.; Walls, B.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99--662) authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) -- San Francisco District, to accommodate larger, deeper draft vessels in Oakland inner and Outer Harbors by deepening and widening the existing navigation channel, and providing turning basins and maneuvering areas in Oakland inner Harbor. The suitability of the resulting dredged material for disposal into ocean waters was subject to the procedures of the 1991 Testing Manual, Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal, known as the ``Green Book``. The Green Book provides a tiered approach for testing the suitability of dredged materials through chemical, physical, and biological evaluations. The first level of investigation, or Tier 1 evaluation, is used to determine whether a decision on LPC compliance can be made on the basis of readily available information. The Tier 1 report primarily summarizes existing information on sediment contamination and toxicity potential, identifies contaminants of concern, and determines the need for further testing. To assist the USACE in determining the suitability of dredged material from Oakland inner and Outer Harbors for ocean disposal, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory prepared this Tier 1 report based upon information and data provided by USACE. Because this Tier 1 report originated well after an LPC determination was made to require testing of project sediments in Tier 3, the primary purpose of this report was to identify contaminants of concern (if any) in that particular dredged material. In addition, this Tier 1 report summarizes available information on chemical, physical, and biological characterization of the sediments in Oakland inner and Outer Harbors.

  11. Management plan report. Unconfined open-water disposal of dredged material. Phase 2. (North and south puget sound)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the findings of Phase II of the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA), a comprehensive study of unconfined dredged material disposal in deep waters of Puget Sound. The study was undertaken as a cooperative effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Ecology (Ecology). A management plan for the Phase II area (North and South Puget Sound) is presented which identifies selected unconfined, open-water disposal sites, evaluation procedures for dredged material being considered for disposal at these sites, and site management considerations including environmental monitoring.

  12. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 3. Characterization and elutriate testing of Acushnet River Estuary sediment. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the alternatives being considered for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project involve dredging of contaminated sediment from the Acushnet River Estuary and placement of the contaminated dredged material in confined disposal areas. Evaluation of these alternatives requires testing sediment from the site to determine chemical and physical characteristics, settling properties, contaminant releases for various migration pathways, and treatment requirements for disposal area effluent. The purpose of this report is to describe the estuary composite sediment sample and the hot-spot-sediment sample tested at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Acushnet River Estuary Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Bulk sediment chemistry, physical characteristics, and elutriate testing for the sediments are included.

  13. 7th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference Utrecht 2004, 25-30 July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    of water and therefore comply with all treatment standards. Water is removed through evaporation from wetlands for on-site treatment of wastewater Hans Brix Aarhus University, Institute of Biological Sciences infiltration, but at many sites soil infiltration is not possible. The Danish EPA has produced guidelines

  14. What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    and Filling of Wetlands Permits Issued by Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Impact Statement and organisms live Substrate is non-soil (H2O depth prevents emergent hydrophyte growth) >2 m (6.6 ft) in Depth (Non-tidal Wetlands) #12;3 What are Hydrophytes? USACE Definition "...macrophytic plant life

  15. Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

  16. Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Flow Field in the Vicinity of the Suction Inlet of a Model Cutter Suction Dredge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dismuke, Colin Patrick

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe the three-dimensional velocity flow field measurements in the vicinity of the inlet mouth of a cutterhead suction dredge. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), an accurate visualization of the velocity...

  18. Environmental effects of dredging, initial comparisons of six assays for the assessment of sediment genotoxicity. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, V.A.; Honeycutt, M.; Jarvis, S.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note reports and compares initial results of six genotoxicity bioassays applied to dredged sediments and describes progress toward development of a testing protocol to aid in regulatory decisionmaking when genotoxic chemicals are an issue of concern. The Long-term Effects of Dredging Operations Program work unit Genotoxicity of Contaminated Dredged Material was initiated in fiscal year 1990 to develop methods for assessing the genotoxic potential of dredged sediments. The impetus driving this new research and development effort was specific regulatory language in section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act (Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) of 1972) prohibiting the open-water discharge of mutagenic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic substances in other than trace amounts, and language less specific but of similar intent in section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  19. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  20. Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, Erin O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

  1. Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

  2. Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of first-order treatment wetland models. EcologicalR. L. Knight. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Lewis Publishers CRCS. D. Wallace. 2008. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press Taylor &

  3. Potential economic impact of sediment quality criteria on the Army Corps of Engineers O and M dredging program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiley, M.C.; Lunz, J.; Thompson, T.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency has requested public comment on the first five sediment quality criteria (SQC) for the protection of benthic organisms. Aquatic sediments are a sink for water column contaminants that become a source of contamination and adverse effects on benthic organisms, aquatic life, and benthic supported food chains. The proposed criteria are an effort to assess the severity and extent of contamination for risk assessment and remediation, predict future contamination, and prevent contamination in uncontaminated sites. An unanswered question has been the potential economic impact of the SQC implementation on federal regulatory programs involved in aquatic resource protection, contaminated sediment remediation, and dredging and disposal of aquatic sediments. The potential costs have been of primary concern for the Corps of Engineers operation and maintenance dredging program which removes 300 million cubic yards of aquatic sediments from harbors, channels, etc. each year. Sediments found to be contaminated may have to undergo special handling/management practices which add costs to both dredging and disposal. EPA`s goal was to determine the increased percentage of dredged material requiring special handling/management if the SQC were applied under several scenarios, and thus the potential cost increase to dredging programs. The report is a basis for dialogue on the most environmentally and economically sound implementation of the SOC in the dredging program.

  4. Restored drill cuttings for wetlands creation: Results of a two year mesocosm approach to emulate field conditions under varying hydrologic regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, G.P.; Hester, M.W.; Miller, S.; DesRoches, D.J.; Souther, R.F.; Childers, G.W.; Campo, F.M.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well documented that Louisiana has the highest rate of wetland loss in the United States. Deep-water channel dredging and leveeing of the Mississippi River since the 1930s have interrupted the natural delta cycle that builds new marshes through sediment deposition. Many of the areas that are subsiding and deteriorating are isolated from riverine sediment sources; therefore alternative methods to deposit sediment and build marshes must be implemented. This project demonstrates that the earthen materials produced when drilling oil and gas wells can be used as a suitable substrate for growing wetland plants. Drilling fluids (muds) are used to lubricate drill bits and stabilize the earth around drill holes and become commingled with the earthen cuttings. Two processes have been reported to restore drill cuttings to acceptable levels by removal of any toxic components found in drilling muds. The main objective of this project was to assess the potential of drill cuttings processed by these two methods in terms of their ability to support wetland vegetation and potential toxicity.

  5. Application of real-time monitoring in decision making: The new Bedford Harbor pilot dredging project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A decision-making framework was established for assessing the impacts of a pilot dredging study at the New Bedford Harbor, MA, Superfund site. Concern over possible environmental impacts due to dredging at the site necessitated that a monitoring program be implemented to ensure that unacceptable water quality impacts did not occur during the project. A committee of environmental managers from Federal and state government was established with the authority to assess and modify the operation on a daily basis. Finally, a 'real-time' monitoring plan was implemented in which water samples were collected, analyzed within 16 hours, and the data supplied to the management committee in order to assess the environmental impact of the previous days' operation. The combined use of site-specific criteria and a real-time' decision making management process allowed for successful completion of the project with a minimal effect on water quality.

  6. Environmental effects of dredging. The value of wing dams for freshwater mussels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, A.C.; Whiting, R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note provides information on the value of wing dams, which reduce dredging requirements in large rivers, for freshwater mussels. Wing dams are longitudinal rock-rubble structures placed in waterways to develop and stabilize channels. Wing dams constrict low flows, which decreases maintenance dredging requirements (Shields 1983). These structures are usually oriented obliquely or at 90 deg to the current. Sediment deposition usually occurs between wing dams where current velocity is reduced relative to that in the unprotected main channel. Wing dams create quiescent areas that are similar to naturally occurring lentic habitats during normal and low flow (Beckett et al. 1983). In addition, wing dams themselves are a coarse-grained substrate used by aquatic insects and fishes (Conner, Pennington, and Bosley 1983; Pennington, Baker, and Bond 1983; and Shields 1983).

  7. A theoretical and experimental study of a dredge suction inlet, sink flow near a boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apgar, William Jack

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accessibility was needed to view the experiment, take data, and adjust the equipment. Low cost was attained by using an inexpen- sive fluid and surplus parts and material when possible. The appara- tus consisted of a tank containing one thousand gallons...A THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF A DREDGE SUCTION INLET& SINK FLON NEAR A SOUNDARY A Thesis by Milliam Jack Apgar Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requ-. 'rement for the degree...

  8. Dredged-material disposal and total suspended matter offshore from Galveston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cool, Thomas Edward

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind speed and direction for the two week period of 11 October to 26 October, 1975 at Buoy D. Map of the bathymetry of the offshore disposal site (run in April, 1975). Erosion, transportation and deposition criteria for different grain sizes...DREDGED-MATERIAL DISPOSAL AND TOTAL SUSPENDED MATTER OFFSHORE FROM GALVESTON, TEXAS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Cool Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  9. Technetium and the third dredge up in AGB stars II. Bulge stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Uttenthaler; Josef Hron; Thomas Lebzelter; Maurizio Busso; Mathias Schultheis; Hans Ulrich Kaeufl

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for Technetium (Tc) in a sample of bright oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars located in the outer galactic bulge. Tc is an unstable element synthesised via the s-process in deep layers of AGB stars, thus it is a reliable indicator of both recent s-process activity and third dredge-up. We aim to test theoretical predictions on the luminosity limit for the onset of third dredge-up. Using high resolution optical spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph at ESO's VLT we search for resonance lines of neutral Tc in the blue spectral region of our sample stars. These measurements allow us to improve the procedure of classification of stars with respect to their Tc content by using flux ratios. Synthetic spectra based on MARCS atmospheric models are presented and compared to the observed spectra around three lines of Tc. Bolometric magnitudes are calculated based on near infrared photometry of the objects. Among the sample of 27 long period bulge variables four were found to definitely contain Tc in their atmospheres. The luminosity of the Tc rich stars is in agreement with predictions from AGB evolutionary models on the minimum luminosity at the time when third dredge-up sets in. However, AGB evolutionary models and a bulge consisting of a single old population cannot be brought into agreement. This probably means that a younger population is present in the bulge, as suggested by various authors, which contains the Tc-rich stars here identified.

  10. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hudson River included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Hudson River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). A composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of Hudson River sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed with three species. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  11. Effect of remedial dredging on bullhead tumor frequency in a recovering river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, P. [National Biological Service, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980 and 1981 high tumor frequencies in brown bullhead from the Black River, Ohio were correlated with high concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in sediment. Surficial sediment levels of PAH dropped after a decline in the steel industry in 1982 followed by closure of the USX coke plant in 1983. By 1987 PAH concentrations had declined to less than one-hundredth of those found in 1980. During this same period liver cancer in age 3+ brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) underwent a significant decline to about one quarter of the 1982 frequency (38.5%) by 1987 (10%). Then in mid to late 1990, in a delayed reaction to a US EPA consent decree, PAH contaminated sediments were dredged from the river. Surveys in 1992 and 1993 revealed that the cancer frequency in age 3+ brown bullhead had increased to more than 45%. Preliminary 1994 data indicates a decline in grossly observable liver tumors (usually diagnosed as biliary cancers), along with declines in external tumors and eye pathology. The data fit the following hypothesis: Contaminated sediments become less bioavailable with time after a point source is removed, possibly due to deposition of cleaner sediment. Dredging temporarily restores bioavailability (and consequent effects). These data support the position that in some locations controlling contaminants in situ may be preferable to dredging on a cost-benefit basis.

  12. DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM THE PORT OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.; STERN,E.A.; DONATO,K.R.; CLESCERI,N.L.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Port of New York and New Jersey ranks first in the United States in volume of petroleum products handled each year. In addition, many refineries are in operation on the New Jersey side of the Port. These activities have led to the discharge of significant amounts of petroleum hydrocarbons into the waters of the New York/New Jersey region. Intense industrial and commercial activities have also brought about major inputs of other organic and inorganic contaminants as would be expected in an industrialized, heavily populated urban port. Sediments that then are contaminated are a major problem for the region since they can no longer be disposed of by the traditional method of ocean disposal following the dredging operations required for the efficient operation of the Port. Decontamination and beneficial reuse of the dredged materials is one component of a comprehensive dredged material management plan being developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers. A demonstration decontamination project extending from bench- to field-scale operations is now in progress in the Port, and its current status and relevance for other regions is summarized.

  13. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from South Brother Island Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Brother Island Channel was one of seven waterways that the US Army Crops of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal. Tests and analyses were conducted on South Brother Island Channel sediment core samples and evaluations were performed. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from South Brother Island Channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Souther Brother Island Channel were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. a composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particle phase of South Brother Island Channel sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  14. DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL FROM THE PORT OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.; STERN,E.A.; DONATO,K.R.; CLESCERI,N.L.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Port of New York and New Jersey ranks first in the US in volume of petroleum products handled each year. In addition, many refineries are in operation on the New Jersey side of the Port. These activities have led to the discharge of significant amounts of petroleum hydrocarbons into the waters of the New York/New Jersey region. Intense industrial and commercial activities have also brought about major inputs of other organic and inorganic contaminants as would be expected in an industrialized, heavily populated urban port. Sediments that then are contaminated are a major problem for the region since they can no longer be disposed of by the traditional method of ocean disposal following the dredging operations required for the efficient operation of the Port. Decontamination and beneficial reuse of the dredged materials is one component of a comprehensive dredged material management plan being developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers. A demonstration decontamination project extending from bench- to field-scale operations is now in progress in the Port, and its current status and relevance for other regions is summarized.

  15. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.024 Zinc mobility and speciation in soil covered by contaminated dredged sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.024 Zinc mobility and speciation in soil covered by contaminated dredged in a pseudogley soil (pH 8.2­8.3) before and after contamination by land-disposition of a dredged sediment ([Zn. This study shows that land deposition of contaminated dredged sediments is a source of Zn for the covered

  16. Environmental effects of dredging. Documentation of the settle module for ADDAMS: Design of confined disposal facilities for solids retention and initial storage. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.; Schroeder, P.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note documents the SETTLE computer program which facilitates the design of a confined disposal facility (CDF) to retain solids, provide initial storage, and meet effluent discharge limitations for suspended solids during a dredged matenal disposal operation. Detailed information can be found in Engineer Manual 1110-2-5027, Confined Dredged Material Disposal. SETTLE is a part of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS).

  17. Jurisdictional wetland delineation in the Texas Gulf Coast Prairie utilizing aerial photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Samuel Jewell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,jurisdictional wetlands, areas of inclusion (wetlands which occurred within the remote sensing and the onsite method), omission (wetlands omitted by the remote sensing method), and commission (upland areas delineated as wetlands by the remote sensing method). An equation...

  18. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

  19. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  20. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  1. COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

  2. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 1. Study overview. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francingues, N.R.; Averett, D.E.; Otis, M.J.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments in the New Bedford Harbor and Acushnet River Estuary have been contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyl compounds and heavy metals. The high levels of contamination have resulted in the New Bedford Harbor being placed on the National Priorities List of the Nation's worst hazardous waste sites. Efforts are under way to develop and implement remedial actions for protection of the environment under the Federal Superfund Program. This report is an introduction to and an overview of a series of reports describing the results of the EFS. It presents the overall study objectives and scope of work, describes the objectives and scope of the 10 EFS tasks, and presents a brief synopsis of the other 11 reports in the series. The EFS technical approach used field data-collection activities, literature reviews, laboratory (bench-scale) studies, and analytical and numerical modeling techniques to assess engineering feasibility and develop conceptual alternatives for dredging and dredged-material disposal. Technical and engineering issues addressed by the EFS included baseline mapping, geotechnical investigations, hydrodynamics, sediment resuspension and transport, contaminant releases to surface and ground water, dredged material settling properties, dredging equipment and controls, effluent treatment, solidification/stabilization of dredged material, confined-disposal-facility design, contained aquatic-disposal-facility design, and cost estimates for the alternatives evaluated.

  3. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  4. Environmental effects of dredging: The use of population modeling to interpret chronic sublethal sediment bioassays. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, T.S.; Dillon, T.M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note provides a brief introduction to population modeling and describes the application and utility of such techniques for dredged material bioassays. The use of population modeling as a source of interpretive guidance for chronic sublethal dredged material bioassays is emphasized. Current laws and regulations governing the discharge of dredged material stress the importance of assessing the chronic (long-term) sublethal effects of dredging operations. Regulations implementing section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act (PL 92-532) state that, `Materials shall be deemed environmentally acceptable for ocean dumping only when . . . no significant undesirable effects will occur due either to chronic toxicity or to bioaccumulation........`. Similar language is used in regulations implementing section 404(b)(1) of the Clean Water Act (FL 92-500) which reads: `The permitting authority shall determine in writing the potential short-term or long-term effects of a proposed discharge of dredged or fill material on the physical, chemical, and biological components of the aquatic environment.........It also stipulates that tests may be required to provide information on the effect of the discharge material on communities or populations of organisms.`

  5. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  6. Comparing Methods for Measuring the Volume of Sand Excaveted by a Laboratory Cutter Suction Dredge Using an Instrumented Hopper Barge and a Laser Profiler 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikantan, Arun

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    value. The tests were conducted in an attempt to pave the way to find spillage from the cutter suction dredge. The development of these methods is useful for evaluating the sediment spillage and residuals during dredging. The more accurate the values...

  7. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  8. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    XII of this Act introduced 3 conservation provisions to address environmental concerns associatedWetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title) Conservation ­ "Sodbuster" provision ­ Wetland Conservation, or "Swampbuster" #12;The Swampbuster provision

  9. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South

  10. Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yu

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

  11. Long-term effects of dredging operations program: Assessing bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms exposed to contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, J.U.; McFarland, V.A.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper synthesizes previous work on bioaccumulation to provide a working document for the environmental impact on the aquatic environment due to bioaccumulation of sediment contaminants resulting from dredging operations and dredged material placement. Emphasis is placed on explanation of basic concepts concerning, and factors influencing, sediment contaminant bioaccumulation and bioavailability. The paper presents several numerical methods for assessing bioaccumulation, including a simple method for estimating theoretical bioaccumulation potential (TBP) from sediment chemistry for neutral organic chemicals. Methods are also given for projecting contaminant concentrations in organism tissues when steady state is achieved, based on laboratory or field exposures to contaminated sediments. These assessments are presented in the context of the US Environmental Protection Agency's tiered testing approach for dredged material evaluation. The various numerical methods for bioaccumulation assessment are illustrated and compared using step-by-step example calculations with hypothetical and actual data.

  12. Figure 1.-The older commercial-type dredge was usually of two-piece con-struction as clammers felt it tended bottom better. It was also easier to handle over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1.-The older commercial-type dredge was usually of two-piece con- struction as clammers felt. NULK Rear cage Chain bag I Basic Concept Development The dredge system in use at the time the choice was made to go to a new survey was a 48- inch (122 em) surface- supplied hydraulic dredge (Fig. 2

  13. Environmental effects of dredging: CE sediment collection and analysis methods. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, T.R.; Lee, C.R.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes responses to a recent survey of US Corps of Engineers (CE) sediment collection and analysis methods used in conjunction with planning dredging and disposal operations. The survey was designed to provide an overview of sediment collection and analysis programs and how these programs are conducted. Information gathered from the survey will be used to generate topics of discussion for a meeting to be held in June 1987 on sediment-analysis cost reduction. The survey and the meeting are part of a multi-year CE effort to reduce the overall costs associated with collecting and analyzing sediment samples.

  14. Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This stream restoration increases water contact with the floodplain and vegetation to remove fertilizer, auto Park SWAMP Duke University Wetland Center The Sandy Creek Stream Channel Restoration Before After.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland native bird species? The effect of stream and wetland restoration can vary depending on the bird species

  15. Characterizing Microclimate and Plant Community Variation in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Jason D.

    Climate . Wetlands . Soil . Temperature . Modeling . Boreal Introduction Groundwater-fed calcareous of Wetland Scientists 2013 Abstract Groundwater-fed calcareous wetlands (fens) sup- port diverse plant developed accurate daily resolution soil temperature models (min and max) from a 29-sensor network

  16. Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

  17. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    .................................... 14 #12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Construction of the H-02 constructed treatment wetlands adjacent to HH-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5

  18. River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

  19. Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term management strategy (LTMS) national forum: Corps of Engineers summary and findings. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathis, D.B.; Francingues, N.R.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Note summarizes the `National Forum on Implementation Strategies of Long-Term Management of Dredged Material` held January 28-31, 1991, at Baltimore, MD. The findings of the Forum have been documented in a report to be published by the Environmental Effects of Dredging Programs (EEDP) in FY 92. The information gained from the Forum participants is also being incorporated into proposed policy and technical guidance to help direct, develop, and implement Long-Term Management Strategy (LTMS) studies and plans by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

  20. Petrology of a dredged cumulate-textured gabboric complex from the mid-Atlantic ridge, latitude 26?N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiezzi, Lawrence James

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETROLOGY OF A DREDGED CUNULATE- '"EXTURED GABI3ROIC COMPLEX FROM THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE, LATITUDE 26 N 0 A Thesis LAWRENCE JAMES Ti'ZZI Submitted to the Graduate Ccilec;e of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Majo- Subject: Geology PETROLOGY OF A DREDGED CUNULATE- TEXTURED GABBROIC CONPLEX FROM o THE NID-ATLANTIC RIDGE, LATITUDE 26 N A Thesis by LAWRENCE JAMES TIEZZI Approved as to style and content by...

  1. White dwarf evolutionary sequences for low-metallicity progenitors: The impact of third dredge-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althaus, Leandro G; Bertolami, Marcelo M Miller; Córsico, Alejandro H; García-Berro, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new white dwarf evolutionary sequences for low-metallicity progenitors. White dwarf sequences have been derived from full evolutionary calculations that take into account the entire history of progenitor stars, including the thermally-pulsing and the post-asymptotic giant branch phases. We show that for progenitor metallicities in the range 0.00003--0.001, and in the absence of carbon enrichment due to the occurrence of a third dredge-up episode, the resulting H envelope of the low-mass white dwarfs is thick enough to make stable H burning the most important energy source even at low luminosities. This has a significant impact on white dwarf cooling times. This result is independent of the adopted mass-loss rate during the thermally-pulsing and post-AGB phases, and the planetary nebulae stage. We conclude that in the absence of third dredge-up episodes, a significant part of the evolution of low-mass white dwarfs resulting from low-metallicity progenitors is dominated by stable H burning. Our study...

  2. Can the third dredge-up extinguish hot-bottom burning in massive AGB stars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Marigo

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Marigo (2002) has highlighted the crucial importance of molecular opacities in modelling the evolution of AGB stars at varying surface C/O ratio. In particular, it has been shown the large inadequacy of solar-scaled opacities when applied to models of carbon stars, and hence the need for correctly coupling the molecular opacities to the current surface chemical composition of AGB stars. The aim of the present follow-up study is to investigate the effects of variable molecular opacities on the evolutionary properties of luminous AGB stars with massive envelopes, i.e. with initial masses from ~3.5 Msun up to 5-8 Msun, which are predicted to experience both the third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning. It is found that if the dredge-up of carbon is efficient enough to lead to an early transition from C/O1, then hot-bottom burning may be weakened, extinguished, or even prevented. The physical conditions for this occurrence are analysed and a few theoretical and observational implications are discussed. Importantly, it is found that the inclusion of variable molecular opacities could significantly change the current predictions for the chemical yields contributed by intermediate-mass AGB stars, with M~3.5 - 4.0 Msun that make as much as ~ 30-50 % of all stars expected to undergo hot-bottom burning.

  3. Molecular opacities for low-mass metal-poor AGB stars undergoing the Third Dredge Up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cristallo; O. Straniero; M. T. Lederer; B. Aringer

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The concomitant overabundances of C, N and s-process elements are commonly ascribed to the complex interplay of nucleosynthesis, mixing and mass loss taking place in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. At low metallicity, the enhancement of C and/or N may be up to 1000 times larger than the original iron content and significantly affects the stellar structure and its evolution. For this reason, the interpretation of the already available and still growing amount of data concerning C-rich metal-poor stars belonging to our Galaxy as well as to dwarf spheroidal galaxies would require reliable AGB stellar models for low and very low metallicities. In this paper we address the question of calculation and use of appropriate opacity coefficients, which take into account the C enhancement caused by the third dredge up. A possible N enhancement, caused by the cool bottom process or by the engulfment of protons into the convective zone generated by a thermal pulse and the subsequent huge third dredge up, is also considered. Basing on up-to-date stellar models, we illustrate the changes induced by the use of these opacity on the physical and chemical properties expected for these stars.

  4. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, John A. (US Forest Service, Pendleton, OR)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  5. Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

  6. The Department of Energy`s floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE`s floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE`s floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE`s requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action`s impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  7. The Department of Energy's floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE's floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE's floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE's requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action's impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  8. Environmental effects of dredging. Literature review for residue-effects relationships with hydrocarbon contaminants in marine organisms. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify potential residue-effects relationships involving hydrocarbon contaminants which are described in the scientific literature. That information will be used to develop guidance for interpreting the results of bioaccumulation experiments conducted in the regulatory evaluation of dredged material.

  9. Sediment chemistry profiles of capped dredged sediment deposits taken 3 to 11 years after capping. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumeri, A.; Fredette, T.J.; Kullberg, P.G.; Germano, J.D.; Carey, D.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes sediment chemistry profile results from coring studies of capped dredged sediment deposits. These studies document the long-term effectiveness of capping for isolating contaminated sediments from the aquatic environment and should serve to broaden the information base for making management decisions.

  10. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Gravesend Bay Anchorage, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gravesend Bay Anchorage was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in February 1994. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses to provide baseline sediment chemistry data on the Gravesend Bay Anchorage. Individual sediment core samples collected at the Gravesend Bay Anchorage were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two samples, one of composited sediment cores representing the southeast corner of the anchorage (COMP GR), and one sediment core representing the northeast corner of the anchorage (Station GR-1 0), were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.

  12. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  13. Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands, Waste Stabilization Ponds, operation and maintenance, sludge management

  14. TECHNICAL REPORTS Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    TECHNICAL REPORTS 1904 Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. Soil Biogeochemical Characteristics Influenced by Alum Application in a Municipal WastewaterTreatmentWetland Lynette M

  15. Comparing Methods for Measuring the Volume of Sand Excaveted by a Laboratory Cutter Suction Dredge Using an Instrumented Hopper Barge and a Laser Profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikantan, Arun

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The research focuses on the various methods that could be used in the laboratory to determine the values of production from a model cutter suction dredge. The values of production obtained from different methods are compared to estimate the best...

  16. Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villeneuve, Julie

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 a. Riverine Wetlands versus Upland Wetlands . . . . 73 b. Large Size Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 c. Ground Truth Data Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . 76 C. Results and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 V... the ArcGIS ?ow accumulation function on the ?ow direction raster : : : 20 6 Line shape?le of high ?ow accumulation (more than 3055) ob- tained from the ?ow accumulation raster : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 21 7 DEM derived from LIDAR data (15cm vertical...

  17. Got Standards? "Got Standards?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    certifications available. Some of these certifications include ISO 9002 1994, ISO 9003 1994 and ISO 9001 in order to bring harmony to global standards for international trade. Enter ISO 9000. The Basics In order to fully understand the concept of ISO 9000, it is very important to have a good idea of what a standard is

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of the deep-draft dredging of coal ports on the East and Gulf Coasts of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, S.C.; Horwitch, M.; Bowman, E.H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study deals with the question of whether US society as a whole should invest in large-scale coal-port development. The analysis takes a total-system perspective with regard to costs and benefits. The analysis does not try to attribute the costs or benefits of dredging to the various parties involved in the coal trade. Rather, the analysis assumes that society, as a whole, will both pay the costs and receive the benefits from dredging. The study lends support to those recommending caution in approaching coal-port development. There was no justification for dredging all deep-draft options simultaneously. In fact, what is very clear is that the concurrent dredging of more than one port is unwise unless one supports the most-optimistic projections for coal-export demand or relatively low real interest rates over the long run. Moreover, under no condition examined does it make sense to dredge either of the Gulf ports - Mobile or New Orleans - before dredging Hampton Roads or Baltimore. 35 references, 30 tables.

  19. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  20. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  1. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

  2. Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

  3. altitude saline wetland: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. A. Zuwerink; Robert J. Gates 107 Functional Assessment for a Proposed Stormwater Treatment Wetland. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Urbanization can...

  4. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

  5. Environmental effects of dredging. Relationship between pcb tissue residues and reproductive success of fathead minnows. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note provides initial guidance for interpreting the biological consequences of bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. Specifically, the relationship between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) tissue residues and reproductive success in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, is examined. The US Army Corps of Engineers often conducts, or requires to be conducted, an assessment of potential bioaccumulation of environmental contaminants from sediments scheduled for dredging and open-water disposal. At present, however, there is no generally accepted guidance to assist in the interpretation of the biological consequences of specific levels of bioacumulation. To provide an initial basis for such guidance, the Environmental Laboratory of the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station is conducting both literature data base analyses and experimental laboratory studies as part of its Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program. This technical note discusses a portion of the laboratory effort.

  6. AGB stars of the intermediate-age LMC cluster NGC 1846 II. Dredge up along the AGB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lebzelter; M. T. Lederer; S. Cristallo; K. H. Hinkle; O. Straniero; B. Aringer

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate the change in the surface abundance of $^{12}$C during the evolution along the AGB, aiming to constrain third dredge-up models. Methods: High-resolution, near-infrared spectra of a sample of AGB stars in the LMC cluster NGC 1846 were obtained. A cluster sample ensures a high level of homogeneity with respect to age, metallicity, and distance. The C/O ratio and the ratio of $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C were measured and compared with our evolutionary models. Results: For the first time, we show the evolution of the C/O and $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratios along a cluster AGB. Our findings allow us to check the reliability of the evolutionary models and, in particular, the efficiency of the third dredge up. The increase in both C/O and $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C in the observed O-rich stars is reproduced by the models well. However, the low carbon isotopic ratios of the two C-stars in our sample indicate the late occurrence of moderate extra mixing. The extra mixing affects the most luminous AGB stars and is capable of increasing the abundance of $^{13}$C, while leaving unchanged the C/O ratio, which has been fixed by the cumulative action of several third dredge-up episodes. We find indications that the F abundance also increases along the AGB, supporting an in situ production of this element.

  7. MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from our nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from U.S. waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect our environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions.

  8. APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    . In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

  9. TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Department of Plant Ecology, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, Nordlandsvej 68, 8240 Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants

  10. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  11. Wetland Ecology in Jericho Town Forest Weston, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    heavy metals and other pollutants by trapping and holding the material in soil and forming insoluble is discussed. What is a wetland? A wetland ecosystem arises when inundation by water produces soils dominated: overstory trees, saplings, shrubs, herbs (ferns, wildflowers, grasses), and ground cover (mosses and lichens

  12. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

  13. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

  14. Effects of burial by the disposal of dredged materials from the Columbia River on Pacific razor clams (Siliqua patula)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavrinec, John; Kohn, Nancy P.; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual maintenance of the Columbia River navigation channel requires the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to dredge sediment from the river and dispose of the sediment in coastal areas at the mouth of the Columbia River. Some of these disposal areas can be as shallow as 12 m deep in waters off the coastal beaches, and dredged material disposal activities have therefore raised concerns of impacts to local razor clam (Siliqua patula) populations that are prevalent in the area. The Corps’ Portland District requested that the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conduct laboratory experiments to evaluate the potential impacts of burial by dredged material to razor clams during disposal. Prior modeling of disposal events indicates three stresses that could have an impact on benthic invertebrates: convective descent and bottom encounter (compression forces due to bottom impact), dynamic collapse and spreading (surge as material washes over the bottom), and mounding (burial by material). Because the razor clam is infaunal, the effects of the first two components should be minimal, because the clams should be protected by substrate that is not eroded in the event and by the clams’ rapid digging capabilities. The mound resulting from the disposal, however, would bury any clams remaining in the footprint under as much as 12 cm of new sediment according to modeling, and the clams’ reaction to such an event and to burial is not known. Although the literature suggests that razor clams may be negatively affected by siltation and therefore perhaps by dredging and disposal activity, as well, impacts of this type have not been demonstrated. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential impacts of dredge material disposal on adult subtidal razor clam populations at the mouth of the Columbia River. Using the parameters defined in a previous model, a laboratory study was created in which a slurry was added to experimental chambers seeded with adult razor clams to produce burial mounds of various thicknesses. The laboratory results presented here have two implications for disposal operations.

  15. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Maintenance Dredging of the Mouth of the Columbia River, Summer 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Williams, Greg D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Skalski, John R.

    2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To address concerns about crab entrainment during maintenance dredging at the Mouth of the Columbia River, direct measurements of crab entrainment rates were conducted during the summer of 2002 from River Mile 3 to River Mile+3. The entrainment rate for all age classes over all sampling in the MCR was 0.0603 crabs per cy. The sex ratio of the older crabs entrained in the MCR was significantly skewed to the females. A modified DIM was used to calculate the entrainment (E), Adult Equivalent Loss (AEL) at Age 2+ and Age 3+ and the Loss to the Fishery (LF) for the dredged volumes accomplished in 2002 and for the five-year average dredged volumes (both for the Essayons and the contractor dredges). For both sets of projections, the coefficients of variation on the E, AEL, and LF were all under 5%. For the MCR total dredged volume (4,600,378 cy) in the summer of 2002, the estimated AEL at age 2+ was 180,416 crabs with 95% confidence limits from 163,549 to 197,283 crabs. The AEL at age 3+ estimated for the summer 2002 in the MCR was 81,187 with 95% confidence limits from 73,597 to 88,777 crabs. The projected LF for summer 2002 in the MCR was 10,471 with 95% confidence limits from 9,537 to 11,405 crabs. For the five-year average total MCR dredged volumes (4,391,872 cy), the estimated AEL at age 2+ was 172,238 crabs with 95% confidence limits from 156,135 to 188,341 crabs. The AEL at age 3+ estimated for the MCR was 77,507 with 95% confidence limits from 70,261 to 84,753 crabs. The projected LF was 9,997 with 95% confidence limits from 9,105 to 10,889 crabs. Because female crabs appeared in the entrainment samples at a higher rate than did males, about 82% of the AEL at Age 2+ in the MCR was comprised of female crabs. Salinity in dredged materials from the MCR was close to that of ocean water for most of the sampling from July to October 2002 with about 82% of the salinity measurements above 32 o/oo. At the high salinities found in the MCR, entrainment rates did not vary significantly with salinity. These results support the concept discussed in Pearson et al. (2002) that where bottom salinities are high most of the time, factors other than salinity are influencing crab distribution and entrainment rates. The results reported here coupled with those in Pearson et al. (2002) indicate that low salinity influences crab entrainment rates.

  16. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS AND AQUATIC SYSTEMS UF-Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus

  17. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448-OnCampus version BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , water quality, carbon sequestration, global climate change, and sea level rise. LEARNING OBJECTIVES of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: To provide students

  18. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Dredging For The Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies reported here focus on issues regarding the entrainment of Dungeness crab related to the proposed Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and provided direct measurements of crab entrainment rates at three locations (Desdomona Shoals, Upper Sands, and Miller Sands) from RM4 to RM24 during summer 2002. Entrainment rates for all age classes of crabs ranged from zero at Miller Sands to 0.224 crabs per cy at Desdemona Shoals in June 2002. The overall entrainment rate at Desdomona Shoals in September was 0.120 crabs per cy. A modified Dredge Impact Model (DIM) used the summer 2002 entrainment rates to project crab entrainment and adult equivalent loss and loss to the fishery for the Channel Improvement Project. To improve the projections, entrainment data from Flavel Bar is needed. The literature, analyses of salinity intrusion scenarios, and the summer 2002 site-specific data on entrainment and salinity all indicate that bottom salinity influences crab distribution and entrainment, especially at lower salinities. It is now clear from field measurements of entrainment rates and salinity during a period of low river flow (90-150 Kcfs) and high salinity intrusion that entrainment rates are zero where bottom salinity is less than 16 o/oo most of the time. Further, entrainment rates of 2+ and older crab fall with decreasing salinity in a clear and consistent manner. More elaboration of the crab distribution- salinity model, especially concerning salinity and the movements of 1+ crab, is needed.

  19. Highly He-Rich Matter Dredged Up by Extra Mixing through Stellar Encounters in Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuma Suda; Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama; Masayuki Y. Fujimoto

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The unveiled main-sequence splitting in omega Centauri as well as NGC 2808 suggests that matter highly-enriched in He (in terms of its mass fraction Y~0.4) was produced and made the color of some main-sequence stars bluer in these globular clusters (GCs). The potential production site for the He-rich matter is generally considered to be massive AGB stars that experience the second dredge-up. However, it is found that massive AGB stars provide the matter with Y~0.35 at most, while the observed blue-shift requires the presence of Y~0.4 matter. Here, we show that extra mixing, which operates in the red giant phase of stars less massive than ~2Msun, could be a mechanism that enhances He content in their envelopes up to Y~0.4. The extra mixing is supposed to be induced by red giant encounters with other stars in a collisional system like GCs. The Y~0.4 matter released in the AGB phase has alternative fates to (i) escape from a GC or (ii) be captured by kinematically cool stars through encounters. The AGB ejecta in omega Cen, which follows the latter case, can supply sufficient He to cause the observed blue-shift. Simultaneously, this scheme generates the extreme horizontal branch, as observed in omega Cen in response to the higher mass loss rates, which is also caused by stellar encounters.

  20. Ecological Modelling 105 (1997) 121 Interaction and spatial distribution of wetland nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Wetland model; Nitrogen cycling; Wastewater treatment 1. Introduction methods of wetland treatment systems. This design ap- proach, referred to as `black box' methodology in wetlands, and (ii) factors affecting N removal from treatment wetlands. A mechanistic model was developed

  1. Suitability of a Constructed Treatment Wetland as Conservation Habitat and the Impact of the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) on the Invertebrate Community and Mosquito Oviposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why, Adena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of treatment wetlands. Environmental ScienceKnight R.L. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press, Boca Raton,in constructed treatment wetlands. Ecological Engineering

  2. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the America¹s WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  3. Brownfield reuse of dredged New York Harbor sediment by cement-based solidification/stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loest, K. [ECDC Environmental L.C., Pembroke, MA (United States). Eastern Operations; Wilk, C.M. [Portland Cement Association, Skokie, IL (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Newly effective federal regulations restrict the ocean disposal of sediments dredged from the harbors of New York and Newark. The New York Port Authority is faced with a critical situation: find land-based disposal/uses for 10`s of millions cubic yards of sediments or lose standing as a commercial port for ocean-going ships. One of the technologies now being employed to manage the sediments is portland cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment. At least 4 million cubic yards of the sediments will undergo cement-based S/S treatment. This treatment will immobilize heavy metals, dioxin, PCBs and other organic contaminants in the sediment. The treatment changes the sediment from a environmental liability into a valuable structural fill. This structural fill is being used at two properties. The first property is an old municipal landfill in Port Newark, New Jersey. The treated sediments are being used as structural fill to cover about 20 acres of the landfill. This will allow planned redevelopment of the landfill property into a shopping mall. The second property called the Seaboard site, was the location of a coal gasification facility and later a wood preservation facility. This 160-acre property has been designated for brownfield redevelopment. Over 4 million cubic yards of treated sediments will eventually cover this site. Portland cement is the selected S/S binding reagent. Nearly 500,000 tons of cement will eventually be used to treat the sediments. Cement was selected for its ability to (a) change the peanut butter-like consistency of the sediments into a structural material and (b) to physically and chemically immobilize hazardous constituents in the sediment.

  4. MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from the nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from US waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect the environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions. The handling of contaminated sediments in the Port of New York/New Jersey (Port) exemplifies this problem. This paper describes a multicultural team that has formed as the result of a Congressional mandate for the development of procedures suitable for the decontamination of sediments in the Port under the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1992 (Section 405C) and 1996 (Section 226).

  5. Whittecar, G.R., Daniels, W.L., and Carter, C.H.III, 2007, Developing a Beneficial Use for Dredged Sediments at Shirley Plantation: Hydrostratigraphy, Groundwater Flow Patterns, and Water Quality Studies In: Bailey, C.M. and Lamoreaux, M.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Whittecar, G.R., Daniels, W.L., and Carter, C.H.III, 2007, Developing a Beneficial Use for Dredged Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference Guidebook. Developing a Beneficial Use for Dredged Sediments Limited Partners (WLLP) constructed sediment disposal basins with the intent of returning dredged

  6. Dungeness Crab Dredging Entrainment Studies in the Lower Columbia River, 2002 – 2004: Loss Projections, Salinity Model, and Scenario Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dungeness crab studies conducted in 2002 for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) constituted a major step forward in quantifying crab entrainment through statistical projections of adult equivalent loss (AEL) and loss to the fishery (LF) from proposed construction and maintenance dredging in the Columbia River navigation channel (Pearson et al. 2002, 2003). These studies also examined the influence of bottom salinity on crab abundance and entrainment rates. Additional sampling was conducted in 2004 to tighten loss projections, further develop the crab salinity model, and apply the model to assess correlations of entrainment rates and projected losses with seasonal salinity changes.

  7. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Materials from the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Miller, Martin C.; Williams, Greg D.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, John R.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister). The overall objectives of this effort are to synthesize what is known about disposal effects on Dungeness crabs (Phase 1) and to offer approaches to quantify the effects, including approaches to gain a population-level perspective on any effects found in subsequent studies (Phase 2). This report documents Phase 1, which included (1) development of a conceptual model to integrate knowledge about crab biology and the physical processes occurring during disposal, (2) application of physics-based numerical modeling of the disposal event to understand the physical forces and processes to which a crab might be exposed during disposal, (3) conduct of a vulnerability analysis to identify the potential mechanisms by which crabs may be injured, and (4) recommendations of topics and approaches for future studies to assess the potential population-level effects of disposal on Dungeness crabs. The conceptual model first recognizes that disposal of dredged materials is a physically dynamic process with three aspects: (1) convective descent and bottom encounter, (2) dynamic collapse and spreading, and (3) mounding. Numerical modeling was used to assess the magnitude of the potentially relevant forces and extent of mounding in single disposal events. The modeling outcomes show that predicted impact pressure, shear stress, and mound depth are greatly reduced by discharge in deep water, and somewhat reduced at longer discharge duration. The analysis of numerical modeling results and vulnerabilities indicate that the vulnerability of crabs to compression forces under any of the disposal scenarios is low. For the deep-water disposal scenarios, the maximum forces and mounding do not appear to be sufficiently high enough to warrant concern for surge currents or burial at the depths involved (over 230 ft). For the shallow-water (45 to 65 ft), short-duration disposal scenarios, the shear force and surge currents estimated from the modeling and observed previously in the field at Palos Verdes, California appear to be sufficiently high to mobilize and transport the bottom sediment and at least juvenile crab. Behavioral response to surge currents probably occurs and may reduce the occurrence and extent of movement and any associated impacts. There evidence that burial by dredged materials can effect crab survival, but confounding factors in previous experiments preclude conclusions about thresholds and extent of effects. We recommend that future studies focus on burial effects during shallow water, short duration disposal events and take into account the potential for behavioral responses to mitigate any effects.

  8. Environmental effects of dredging: Naturally occurring levels of ammonia and sulfide in pore water: An assessment of the literature. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia and sulfide are natural constituents of sediment. Both are very toxic to aquatic organisms. Consequently, their presence may bias dredged material toxicity bioassays that are designed to evaluate the toxicity of persistent contaminants such as heavy metals and petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The purpose of this technical note is to summarize published information on sediment pore water ammonia and sulfide concentrations that occur in situ. In a subsequent technical note, this exposure information will be coupled with ammonia and sulfide toxicity data to estimate the potential influence of these constituents on dredged material toxicity bioassays.

  9. Environmental effects of dredging. Documentation of the dyecon module for ADDAMS: Determining the hydraulic retention and efficiency of confined disposal facilities. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.; Schroeder, P.R.; Engler, R.M.; Patin, T.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes procedures for determining mean hydraulic retention time and efficiency of a confined disposal facility (CDF) from a dye tracer slug test. These parameters are required to properly design a CDF for solids retention and for effluent quality considerations. Detailed information on conduct and analysis of dye tracer studies can be found in Engineer Manual 1110-2-5027, Confined Dredged Material Disposal. This technical note documents the DYECON computer program which facilitates the analysis of dye tracer concentration data and computes the hydraulic efficiency of a CDF as part of the Automated Dredging and Disposal Alternatives Management System (ADDAMS).

  10. Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland types—than was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

  11. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: August 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, C.L.; Dixon, K.L.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds in the Wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E at the Savannah River Plant. Well point samples were collected from seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. Results of the August 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds are outcropping in the Wetlands near the old F-area effluent ditch. Four analytes (1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride) were detected at least once at concentrations above the primary Drinking Water Standards or the Maximum Contaminant Levels. Five analytes (the above chemicals plus tetrachloroethylene) were detected at least once in the near-surface water samples at concentrations greater than the method detection limit.

  12. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York first adopted uniform interconnection standards in 1999 (see history below). The Standard Interconnection Requirements (SIR) have subsequently been amended several times since, most...

  13. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) adopted comprehensive interconnection standards for distributed generation in June 2008. The NCUC standards, which are similar to the Federal Energy...

  14. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) first adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) in September 2003. The original standards provided for 5 levels of...

  15. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission was required to adopt interconnection standards and net-metering rules by the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards Act of 2004.The PUC subsequently...

  16. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  17. Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    populations. #12;7) Be able to describe how global warming may affect amphibians. 8) Know what amphibians, and how (and likely why) it causes malformations in amphibians. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts 1) Know

  18. Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

  19. Abundances in intermediate-mass AGB stars undergoing third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. McSaveney; P. R. Wood; M. Scholz; J. C. Lattanzio; K. H. Hinkle

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High dispersion near-infrared spectra have been taken of seven highly-evolved, variable, intermediate-mass (4-6 Msun) AGB stars in the LMC and SMC in order to look for C, N and O variations that are expected to arise from third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning. The pulsation of the objects has been modelled, yielding stellar masses, and spectral synthesis calculations have been performed in order to derive abundances from the observed spectra. For two stars, abundances of C, N, O, Na, Al, Ti, Sc and Fe were derived and compared with the abundances predicted by detailed AGB models. Both stars show very large N enhancements and C deficiencies. These results provide the first observational confirmation of the long-predicted production of primary nitrogen by the combination of third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning in intermediate-mass AGB stars. It was not possible to derive abundances for the remaining five stars: three were too cool to model, while another two had strong shocks in their atmospheres which caused strong emission to fill the line cores and made abundance determination impossible. The latter occurrence allows us to predict the pulsation phase interval during which observations should be made if successful abundance analysis is to be possible.

  20. Environmental effects of dredging. The k{sub oc} of nonpolar organic compounds in sediment. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, J.M.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.; McFarland, V.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note describes testing conducted to determine the partitioning of contaminants between sediment organic carbon and sediment interstitial water, assess the effects of sediment organic carbon upon K(oc) of selected PCBs and fluoranthene, and investigate the effect of time of contact between contaminants and sediment upon the value of K(oc). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is authorized to develop and implement sediment quality criteria (SQC) under section 304(a) of the Clean Water Act. SQC, when promulgated, will profoundly affect U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) dredging and disposal operations. Aquatic disposal of dredged material and selection of aquatic disposal sites will be based on SQC. Most SQC approaches currently under development involve a determination of the relationship between contaminant concentrations in sediment and biological effects on organisms exposed to the contaminated sediment. The USACE is presently investigating the link between contaminant levels in sediment and sediment geochemistry, as well as contaminant levels and effects in aquatic organisms.

  1. Development and use of site-specific chemical and biological criteria for assessing New Bedford Harbor pilot dredging project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.G.; Hansen, D.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical site-specific chemical and biological criteria were established to assess the impact of a pilot dredging project on water quality at the New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, USA, Superfund site. Because most existing chemical concentrations in the water column and indigenous biota exceeded federal and state water quality limits, the derivation of site-specific criteria was required. Prior to any operational phases of the project (i.e., dike construction, dredging), criteria values were developed from background concentrations of PCBs and metals in water and biota, as well as for the toxic effects of water quality on the biota. During each operational phase of the project, water samples were collected, analyzed within 16 h, and the data supplied to a management committee in order to assess the environmental impact of the previous days operation. The ambient unfiltered water concentration of PCBs and metals were the only chemical or biological criteria exceeded. Modification of the next days' operations resulted in a return of these concentrations to background levels. The combined use of site-specific criteria and a real-time decision making management process allowed for successful completion of the project with a minimal effect on water quality.

  2. WETLANDS. Vol. 18. No.3. September 1998. pp. 329-334 1998. The Society of Wetland Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Fish and Wildlife Service. NOl1h American Waterfowl and Wetlands Office. Patuxent Wildlife Research River and Big Sioux River Watersheds. 1982, typed report on file, USFWS. Pierre. SD, USA), and the USFWS

  3. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tier 1 systems must include an inverter certified to meet the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) 1741 standard

  4. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.; Rogers, V.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1994, well point water and near surface water (bucket) samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E would migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from near surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. Results of the March 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near the old F-Area effluent ditch. Six different analytes were detected in the well points at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit: d 1,2-dichloroethylene, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium. 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium were detected at levels above Primary Drinking Water Standards or Maximum Contaminant Levels list. Four analytes, 1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride, were detected at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit and least once at concentrations above the PDWS or the MCL. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets were negligible.

  5. Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Michael Ray

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been...

  6. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biostimulation for enhanced biodegradation of petroleum in a wetland. The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the performance of two commercial bioaugmentation products for their ability to enhance bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland. Additional...

  7. The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

  8. Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Wesley Richard

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment...

  9. Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

  10. Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

  11. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginia's interconnection standards include two levels of review. The qualifications and application fees for each level are as follows:...

  12. QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

  13. Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

  14. Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

  15. Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment K in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance wetlands are widely used for tertiary wastewater treatment but, although effective for nitrogen removal

  16. Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 121132 Phosphorus removal by wollastonite: A constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    wastewater treatment; Wastewater; Constructed wetlands; Phosphorus removal; Sewage; Water quality; Secondary to those levels. The use of both natural and created wetlands as tools in the treatment of polluted waters). Constructed wet- land ecosystems, offer better opportunities for wastewater treatment than natural wetlands

  17. Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

  18. Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

  19. AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

  20. ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr. Heath Hagy (hhagy@utk.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    (all day workshop) Biebighauser (USFS) 17 Treatment Wetlands Ludwig (UT) 22 Optional Field TripWFS 536 ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Fall 2011 Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition, Wiley (www.wiley.com, ISBN 047129232X) or Wetlands, 2007, 4th

  1. Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    (CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

  3. The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

  4. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The interconnection standards approved by the PUC also updated Nevada's net-metering policy, originally enacted in 1997. Previously, Nevada Revised Statute 704.774 addressed basic interconnection...

  5. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's interconnection standards apply statewide to all electric distribution utilities, but not to the small number of municipal utilities and electric cooperatives in the state. The rules,...

  6. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia has two interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems and one for systems that are not net-metered.

  7. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2005, the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) adopted standards for net metering and interconnection, as required by Amendment 37, a renewable-energy ballot initiative approved...

  8. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2007, the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) adopted interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG) systems up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity. The...

  9. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  10. The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

  11. ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to anthropological stress, via industrial, domestic and agricultural wastewater. Europe assumes its responsibility chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment, and the implantation of buffer zones like artificial wetland at the outlet of the agricultural watershed. A PhD thesis

  12. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006 of new tools produced by the Center for Coastal Resources Managment (CCRM) and other programs) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop

  13. SOIL MICROBIAL ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF A WETLAND RECOVERING FROM PHOSPHORUS EUTROPHICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ) with background soil P contents (698 mg kg21 ). Nutrient loading to this wetland was terminated in 1994. Microbial profiles at the enriched site did not change appreciably over the two year period. The results obtained marshlands. However, once the external load has been divert

  14. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  15. Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

  16. Preprints of the 8 International Conference on Wetland Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Preprints of the 8 th International Conference on Wetland Systems Arusha ­ Tanzania ­ 16 th to 19 th Spetember 2002 1 DESIGN CRITERIA AND PERFORMANCES OF REED BED FILTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF WASHING.houdoy@inst-elevage.asso.fr ABSTRACT Initially designed for the treatment of domestic wastewater, Vertical Flow Reed Bed Filters [VFRBF

  17. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PUC standards generally apply to investor-owned utilities (IOUs) with 40,000 or more customers and all electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities with 5,000 customers or more are required to ...

  18. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah’s interconnection rules are based on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) interconnection standards for small generators, adopted in May 2005 by FERC Order 2006. Utah's rules for...

  19. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon has three separate interconnection standards: one for net-metered systems, one for small generator facilities (non-net metered systems) and one for large generator facilities (non-net...

  20. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In Feb 2014, the PUC proposed changes to the State’s Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard, Interconnection, and Net-metering rules. The documents associated with the case can be accessed at...

  1. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont has adopted separate interconnection standards for net-metered energy systems that are 150 kW or less, and for all other distributed-generation (DG) systems.

  2. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report, [February 12, 1992--April 30, 1994]- Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Costanza, R.

    1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  3. Environmental effects of dredging: Methods for the assessment of the genotoxic effects of environmental contaminants. Glossary and references. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honeycutt, M.E.; Jarvis, A.S.; McFarland, V.A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note is the third in a series of three that outline and describe the principal methods that have been developed to test the potential of environmental contaminants to cause mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. The first in this series (EEDP-04-24) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the sub cellular level, while the second (EEDP-04-25) describes methods used to discern genotoxic effects at the cellular and organ/organism level. Recent literature citations for each topic referenced in this series of technical notes are provided in this technical note, in addition to a glossary of terms. The information in these technical notes is intended to provide Corps of Engineers personnel with a working knowledge of the terminology and conceptual basis of genotoxicity testing. To develop an improved understanding of the concepts of genotoxicity, readers are encouraged to review A Primer in Genotoxicity (Jarvis, Reilly, and Lutz 1993), presented in Volume D-93-3 of the Environmental Effects of Dredging information exchange bulletin.

  4. Physical oceanographic processes at candidate dredged-material disposal sites B1B and 1M offshore San Francisco

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, C.R.; Denbo, D.W.; Downing, J.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Coats, D.A. (Marine Research Specialists, Ventura, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, has identified two candidate sites for ocean disposal of material from several dredging projects in San Francisco Bay. The disposal site is to be designated under Section 103 of the Ocean Dumping Act. One of the specific criteria in the Ocean Dumping Act is that the physical environments of the candidate sites be considered. Toward this goal, the USACE requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct studies of physical oceanographic and sediment transport processes at the candidate sites. Details of the methods and complete listing or graphical representation of the results are contained in this second volume of the two-volume report. Appendix A describes the methods and results of a pre-disposal bathymetric survey of Site B1B, and provides an analysis of the accuracy and precision of the survey. Appendix B describes the moorings and instruments used to obtain physical oceanographic data at the candidate sites, and also discussed other sources of data used in the analyses. Techniques used to analyze the formation, processed data, and complete results of various analyses are provided in tabular and graphical form. Appendix C provides details of the sediment transport calculations. Appendix D describes the format of the archived current meter data, which is available through the National Oceanographic Data Center. 43 refs., 54 figs., 58 tabs.

  5. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  6. The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Daniel Ian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 wetland treatment Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inventory for Research and Education Network Collection: Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 5 Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Park has been completed. In Spring 2009, DUWC undertook nearly 18 months... restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West...

  9. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

  10. Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

  11. Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

  12. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  13. Under the Boardwalk – Case History – St. John’s Sideroad at the McKenzie Wetland, Aurora, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Ian D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is located in the Town of Aurora, Ontario, Canada and liesWetland (also known as Aurora Wetland or McKenzie Marsh), anwith a connection to the Aurora Pumping Station. This $20

  14. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and cheaper. Before...

  15. Regulation No. Department of the Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    AREAS IN CONNECTION WITH DREDGING Distribution Restriction Statement Approved for public release ESTABLISHMENT OF WETLAND AREAS IN CONNECTION WITH DREDGING 1. Purpose. This regulation provides guidance for the establishment of wetland areas in connection with dredging required as part of water resources development

  16. Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena Maria

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  17. Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  18. Evaluation of treatment, disposal, and managerial options for dredged sediments from Newark Bay, Arthur Kill, and Newton Creek of New York/New Jersey Harbor and proposed design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, A. [New York State Dept. of Energy Center, Albany, NY (United States); Clesceri, N.; Preiss, I. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Stern, E. [Environmental Protection Agency, New York, NY (United States); Jones, K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Donato, K. [NYD/USACE, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bay areas surrounding New York/New Jersey Harbor are naturally shallow, acting as catchments for river-transported sediments and solids from surface point and nonpoint sources. Dredging is required to maintain navigability for large cargo ships. Annually more than 5 million yd{sup 3} of sediments has been dredged to maintain harbors and waterways for New York and New Jersey Harbor. Currently about 80% of dredge sediments are considered clean and ocean disposed of at the designated Mud Dump site, located approximately 6 nautical miles south of Rockaways. In order to be disposed of at the Mud Dump site, the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA) requires the evaluation of the environmental impact using criteria developed by the USEPA and published through 40 CFR Parts 220 to 228. Based on the results of the evaluation, the sediments are assigned one of three categories which defines their potential disposal method--Category 1 sediments (acceptable for ocean disposal), Category 2 sediments (acceptable for ocean disposal with specific mitigation), and Category 3 sediments (not permitted for ocean dumping). A growing public concern over the impacts of contaminated sediments, in addition to a more stringent set of criteria having been established, is expected to significantly increase the volume of sediments requiring special handling or disposal, due to the inability to dispose of Category 3 sediments at the Mud Dump Site. Hence, the objective of this project is to study the contaminant characteristics of sediments in the Newark Bay, Arthur Kill, and Newtown Creek area and identify and evaluate alternative methods for managing or decontaminating sediments that are practical, cost-effective, and protective of human health and the environment.

  19. 1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1michigan state university brand STandardS BRAND STANDARDS VERSION 4, APRIL 30, 2012 #12;2michigan state university brand STandardS TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 brand baSicS 5 The Michigan STaTe UniverSiTy brandUrTher gUidance #12;3michigan state university brand STandardS 1. BrANd BASICS 1a whaT iS a brand? We build

  20. USE OF NITROGEN BUDGETS AND N2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE ROLE OF DENITRIFICATION IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS Monica M. Palta 1, Peter Groffman2, Stuart Findlay2 1 School of Life Sciences in inorganic nitrogen cycling and removal in urban brownfield wetlands INTRODUCTION · Urban areas are net BROWNFIELD SITES SUPPORTING SEMI-PERMANENTLY FLOODED WETLANDS. White outlines delineate low-lying semi

  1. Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs, glacial, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), methane (CH4), peatland, wetland. Summary · Wetlands were the largest (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH4 flux, pore water dissolved CH4 and volatile fatty acid

  2. Observations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licciardi, Joseph M.

    constructed treatment wetland in Augusta, Georgia were used to quantify the size, distribution, velocity). In treatment wetlands, such heterogeneity nearly always results in reduced contaminant removal (WoObservations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U

  3. APPLIANCE STANDARDS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral20ALSNewstt^APPLIANCE STANDARDS How they

  4. The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Virginia, and examining the effects of disking during wetland creation. Replicate multiscale tangentially-extractable NH4­N and NO3­N, and Mehlich-3 extractable P, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Fe, and Mn. Means and variances of soil and Fe, lower Mn than cre- ated wetlands, and comparatively high variability in nutri- ent concentrations

  5. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories or TMIs. This issue of the Virginia Wetlands Report highlights this research by describing the process and why these inventories are important for management and sustainability of the Commonwealth's tidal wetland resources. What are they? Tidal Marsh Inventories contain maps and information about

  6. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    , to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

  7. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  8. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  9. REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

  10. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  11. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  12. CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

  13. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System  for  Real-­?Time  Management  of  Water  Quality  Management  of  hydrologic  systems  for  water  quality  system  development  for  seasonal  wetland  salt   management  in  a  river  basin  subjected  to  water  quality  

  14. Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    , perhaps only a few square miles, one is apt to find wetlands that fall all along this hydroperiod that are "good" for bullfrogs are not suitable for spadefoot toads, and a marbled salamander would only be caught

  15. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  16. An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

  17. UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    2014­2015 UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS #12;Wesleyan University does not discriminate STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

  18. UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    2013­2014 UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS #12;Wesleyan University does not discriminate STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

  19. OSP WEEKLY FUNDING BULLETIN Volume 5, Issue 19 May 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    for conducting research in the broad fields of hydraulics, dredging, coastal engineering, instrumentation plants, water quality, dredged material, treatment of hazardous waste, wetlands, physical that rapidly enter into service at low fiscal and environmental costs. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (DOED

  20. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  1. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified.

  2. December 2006 Standards Forum and Standards Actions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -9 Cancellations in Progress - 0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http:tis.eh.doe.govtechstds December 2006 The Standards Forum and Standards...

  3. Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  5. Environmental effects of dredging: Residue effects data base on the relationship between dioxin and biological effects in aquatic animals. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, A.; Reilly, F.J.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this note is to present residue-effects data involving dioxins that are presented in the scientific literature. The information will be useful in developing regulatory guidance applicable to dioxin contamination. Work Unit 31771, `Environmental Interpretation of Consequences from Bioaccumulation,` of the Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations (LEDO) Program is designed to provide interpretive guidance for evaluating data generated by Corps field offices for their permit applicants. This guidance results from identifying residue-effects relationships through laboratory experiments and literature reviews. Previous literature reviews conducted under this work unit have concentrated on heavy metals and chlorinated contaminants (Dillon 1984, Dillon and Gibson 1985). The present effort examines residue-effects relationships with dioxins as reported in the published literature.

  6. Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubh, Archis Robert

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed a seasonal pattern of dry, major wet, and minor wet seasons. The hydrology...

  7. Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

  8. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  9. Analysis of the efficacy of a constructed wetland in treating human fecal contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondepudi, Kathyayani Shobhna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of a system of constructed wetlands in treating non-point source pollution, particularly, human fecal contamination, was evaluated by collecting and analyzing water samples using both conventional culture-based ...

  10. Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions...

  11. Evaluation of a shoreline cleaner for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzell, Cydney Jill

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and bioaugmentation. This latest phase of research (1998) is a continuation of studies to evaluate non-invasive oil removal techniques from sensitive wetland environments. For this controlled oil release experiment, 21 plots were divided into three treatment regimes...

  12. Potential for N pollution swapping from riparian buffer strips and an instream wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boukelia, Willena Esther

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse agricultural pollution is a major contributor to poor water quality in many parts of the world. Consequently agri-environment policy promotes the use of riparian buffer strips and/or denitrifying wetlands to ...

  13. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

  14. Wetland Model in an Earth Systems Modeling Framework for Regional Environmental Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June, 2011 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology All rights reserved variations. Wetlands play an important role in the storage and regulation of the global water budget so

  15. The Importance of Emergent Vegetation in Reducing Sediment Resuspension in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,-Resuspension in Wetlands, USA 57007 r I .. ABSTRACT Wind-induced resuspension of bottom sediment was measured with sediment traps in Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota. Resuspension was significantly greater

  16. Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siems-Alford, Susan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site...

  17. Establishment of submergent vegetation and invertebrates in a wetland constructed on mine soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water depths (20, 50, and 80 cm) within an experimental wetland on Texas Utilities' Big Brown Mine in eastern Texas. Percent cover was determined during both seasons, and above-ground biomass (AGB) and associated macroinvertebrates were sampled at all...

  18. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  19. Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvel, Tracey W

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Constructed wetlands are one of the newest wastewater treatment technologies. They should reduce the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and utilize a large amount of the influent. The BOD determines how much oxygen is used bymicro organisms while...

  20. The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing amphibians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing. Larval amphibian growth and development were affected by carbaryl and the amphibian assemblage treatment effects among the treatments on amphibian growth and development. 4. We encourage future research

  1. Phosphorus water quality model evaluation and comparison for natural and constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paasch, Mary Margaret

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Kadlec and Knight, 1996). Basins with great areal extent of wetlands produce lower phosphorus loads and mcreased wetland areas could reduce phosphorus loading (Boggess et al. , 1995). One of the many consequences of elevated phosphorus concentrations... may be considered as upper boundaries on phosphorus concentrations. Phosphorus loads are typically greatest from urban land, with lower loading from agricultural land, and the least phosphorus loading occurring from forests (Boggess et al. , 1995...

  2. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  3. Appendix C. Part 303 Wetland Permit Application, Wetland Impact Assessment and Compensatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3 TableimpurityAppeals8 STANDARD TERMS4C6, 2012

  4. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  5. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  6. Nematode ?Ecological Study ?of ?a ?Wetland? Restoration?In?Progress? at? Bolsa? Chica, California:? Implications? for? Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  7. Nematode Ecological Study Of A Wetland Restoration-In-Progress At Bolsa Chica, California: Implications For Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  8. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  9. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  10. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Commencement Bay nearshore/tideflats Superfund site, Tacoma, Washington remedial investigations. Evaluation of alternative dredging methods and equipment, disposal methods and sites, and site control and treatment practices for contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, K.E.; Malek, J.F.; Hammer, W.B.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative technologies and techniques for dredging, disposal, and treatment of contaminated sediments are reviewed. Implications of alternative technologies for management of contaminated sediments are discussed. Selection of appropriate technologies for contaminated sediments management depends on the physical and chemical profile of the sediments, and particularly on the physical state (liquid, solid, or gaseous) of contaminants of concern and changes in state that may occur at different phases of dredging, disposal, control, and treatment. Determination of acceptable criteria governing concentrations of contaminants in water, sediments, and soils, and air is the major requirement for selecting specific technologies for managing contaminated sediments. Technologies should be used which ensure that criteria will be met at all phases in the handling operations. Cost is most variable for disposal-site effluent-treatment options.

  12. Communication Standards and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication Standards and Recommendations Introduction & Purpose 3 Standards & Recommendations Communication 4 Training 10 Evaluation 11 PMO Workgroup Participation 12 Staffing 12 Communications-related Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations 13

  13. August 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2007 1.5 DOE Technical Standards Published No entries were received in August 2007 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  14. July 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in June 2007 1.5 DOE Technical Standards Published No entries were received in June 2007 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  15. October 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project No. SAFT-0109 Continued on next page Standards Actions Page 2 October 2006 2.0 NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS ACTIONS 2.1 American National Standards Institute American...

  16. July 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    were received in June 2006. Continued on next page Standards Actions Page 2 July 2005 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  17. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of...

  18. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, Minnesota legislation modified the state's existing non-mandated renewable energy objective, creating a mandatory renewable portfolio standard (RPS) called the Renewable Energy Standard ...

  19. November 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  20. October 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  1. May 2008 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  2. May 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  3. February 2001 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technical Standards Program Document Status Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http:tis.eh.doe.govtechstds Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation...

  4. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ?2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore »the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  5. A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

  6. Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

  7. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  8. The Newsletter of the Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment onstruction on three separate pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality and stream habitat across 210 acres of watershed in Durham County. The restoration of an unnamed is connected with SWAMP's three earlier phases built between 2004 and 2007: (1) a stream/wetland restoration restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West Campus. The most recent

  9. Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

  10. Examining the Effects of Ecotourism Involvement and Tourism Benefits on Florida Tour Operators' Conservation Contributions to Wetland Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Li-Pin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on wetland ecosystems attracted relatively less academic attention than rainforests and coral reefs. Florida, listed as one of the states with the greatest share of wetland loss in the U.S. due to rapid growth in agriculture, tourism, and urban development...

  11. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Avignon, France, 26-30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    wetland systems for onsite treatment of domestic sewage Hans Brix Department of Biological SciencesProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control environment. Therefore official guidelines for a number of onsite treatment solutions have been produced

  12. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. Admin Chg 1 dated 3-12-13.

  13. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technical Standards Program (TSP) promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Department of Energy (DOE), provides DOE with the means to develop needed technical standards, and manages overall technical standards information, activities, issues, and interactions. Cancels DOE O 1300.2A. Canceled by DOE O 252.1A

  14. Standard 90, the planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the current proposed ANS/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 Energy Efficient Design of New Non-Residential Buildings and New High-Rise, Residential Buildings, this article offers background on the initial Standard, the organization of the Standard committee, and the objectives established for the proposed Standard 90.1.

  15. Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 2, 2002 DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk table Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding...

  16. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; cummins, C.L.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1994, well point water and bucket samples were collected for tritium and volatile organic compounds in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The well point samples were collected from seven locations and the bucket samples from four locations. Results support that T and VOCs originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near this ditch. Based on differences in tritium contents at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths; however, when VOCs were normalized, based on differences in T, resulting well point and bucket VOCs were comparable in most cases.

  17. April 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Injury Surveillance Program Guidelines, 03222007; DOE-STD-1190-2007, OCSH-0005 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  18. Puerto Rico- Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, the Autoridad de Energía Electrica de Puerto Rico (PREPA*) adopted interconnection standards based on the standard contained in the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. PREPA promulgated...

  19. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning EngineersLBNL 4591E Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide

  20. WETwin: a structured approach to evaluating wetland management options in data-poor contexts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .P. Uyttendaelec a International Water Management Institute (IWMI);b University of Geneva, enviroSPACE Laboratory; c ANTEA Group, Belgium; d Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK);e Irstea, UMR G-eau; f and structured approach to evaluate wetland management interventions and integrate impact, feasibility

  1. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  2. Closing the carbon budget of estuarine wetlands with tower-based measurements and MODIS time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Closing the carbon budget of estuarine wetlands with tower-based measurements and MODIS time series, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China, wDepartment of Environmental have distinct carbon flux dynamics ­ the lateral carbon flux incurred by tidal activities, and methane

  3. Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

  4. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  5. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  6. WETLAND FUNCTIONS and VALUES Adapted from National Science Foundation, 1995, and Mitch, William J., 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Maintenance of nutrient stocks within wetland, production of dissolved and partially decayed organic matter Timber production, food for fish and shellfish downstream, support of recreational and commercial fishing of water quality, clear water, high quality fish populations in streams Habitat and Food Web Support

  7. Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    . To reduce these negative impacts, a variety of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been have on the temperature of storm- water runoff. With the wide implementation of storm- water BMPs Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands, Wet

  8. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an oil spill response tool. The research is conducted at a facility established following an accidental oil spill on the San Jacinto River in October 1994. Previous research evaluated the intrinsic repudiation of petroleum in a wetland, as well as the use...

  9. DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes.

  10. Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Andrea Melissa

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    minerals are important controls on iron reduction in natural systems. For the first phase of this research a series of sequential chemical extractions was performed on a core taken from a landfill-leachate-contaminated wetland-aquifer system at the Norman...

  11. DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

  12. Nitrogen cycling, plant biomass, and carbon dioxide evolution in a subsurface flow wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Jeffrey J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to ascertain the fate of nitrogen in a constructed wetland and the rate of bioremediation as indicated by carbon dioxide evolution. Research included a study of nitrogen uptake by plants and nitrification. A tracer isotope of nitrogen,¹?N, was used to follow...

  13. f " International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control. Vienna 1996 XIII/4 -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    96/0852 f í " International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control. Vienna 1996 XIII/4 - 1 TREATMENT OF SLUDGE FROM SEPTIC TANKS IN A REED-BED FILTERS PILOT PLANT. Alain Liénard and treatment of wastewater. Zones of collective and individual (on-site) treatment have to be defined. Local

  14. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

  15. The attitude and knowledge relationships between secondary agriculture and science students' participation in multidisciplinary education and environmental/wetland restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Amy Noelle

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to test student knowledge and attitude changes towards wetland ecosystems, Environmental Science and Horticulture after the completion of an interdisciplinary mini-unit and ...

  16. Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations assert the Department of Environmental Management's authority to administer and enforce the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (R.I. Gen. Laws, ch. 2-1-18 through 2-1-25), and describe...

  17. CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards

  18. Distributed Generation Standard Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The second enrollment period for standard contracts in 2013 closed June 28. The third is scheduled to begin in September.'''''

  19. ORISE: Standards development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of industry standards that provide guidance and support to decontamination and decommissioning projects across the United States. Because of our extensive experience...

  20. Particulate Matter Standards (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency sets the standards for particulate emissions from a variety of sources, including facilities that generate power. ...