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Sample records for wetlands standard dredge

  1. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brothers, age 12), the well-dressed project manager representing Alterland Development Company, made his formal request to develop a parcel locally known as "Tillage Farm." Insisting that his company would into 14 single-family lots, filling in wetlands and dredging a pond. "You are not losing a past, you

  2. Environmental effects of dredging: Sediment resuspension by selected dredges. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havis, R.N.

    1988-03-01

    The size and concentration of sediment plumes measured in field studies of selected dredging equipment are described. This information is useful when sediment resuspension must be minimized because of adverse environmental impacts which may include the release of sediment-associated chemical contaminants. The information presented here is intended to supplement and update information given in a previous technical note on the same topic (Hayes 1986a). Dredging operations may be required to comply with in-stream State water quality standards based on maximum allowable concentrations of inorganic and organic compounds. Although the majority of materials requiring maintenance dredging in the United States is uncontaminated, the removal of contaminated sediments (estimated to be less than 10 percent of maintenance materials) poses a serious problem. Hence, a project to study the potential for contaminant release during dredging has been initiated through a field studies program. The field studies described here were conducted by the Waterways Experiment Station under the Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) research program and in cooperation with other US Army Engineer Districts to evaluate the sediment resuspension characteristics of selected dredges (McLellan et al., in preparation).

  3. Evaluating dredged material placement alternatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooters, Kelly Lynne

    1989-01-01

    , but are required in some environmentally sensitive areas. An example of an innovative disposal alternative is the application of oil spill clean-up technology to dredging sites in the form of interim storage. 1. 3 Related Research The environmental impacts... of alternatives, sociopolitical implication, and environmental impact. Specific procedural guidelines are presented for marsh, upland, and island development. Gupta et al. (1978) establish the appropriate agricultural use for the dredged materiaL Dredged...

  4. CHAPTER SIX: OFFSHORE DREDGING AND DISPOSAL Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005a). Mineral extraction is usually conducted with hydraulic dredges by vacuuming or, in some cases severe but localized impact on the seabed and benthic biota, whereas hydraulic dredges may result in less

  5. A Dredging Knowledge-Base Expert System for Pipeline Dredges with Comparison to Field Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Derek Alan

    2011-02-22

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 B. Dredge Pump Cavitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 C. Pumps in Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 D. Pump Performance Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 E. Pipeline Hydraulics Summary...

  6. SEDIMENT ENGINEERING THRU DREDGING AND WITH NATURE (SETDWN) FATE OF FINES IN THE DREDGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 SEDIMENT ENGINEERING THRU DREDGING AND WITH NATURE (SETDWN) ­ FATE OF FINES IN THE DREDGING.Coor@dep.state.fl.us Abstract: The SETDWN initiative is positioned to develop a better understanding of sediment behavior engineered actual risk based set of permit requirements. Introduction The Sediment engineering thru dredging

  7. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

  8. Environmental effects of dredging: Guide to selecting a dredge for minimizing resuspension of sediment. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.

    1986-12-01

    This technical note contains assessments of conventional and special-purpose dredges in removing sediment with minimal sediment resuspension. If sediment resuspension is a critical factor in dredging areas of contaminated material, the following guidance will aid in specifying the dredge and operating conditions. Investigations were conducted as part of the Corps of Engineers Improvement of Operations and Maintenance Techniques (IOMT) Research Program to evaluate the resuspension of sediment into the water column due to dredging operations. Laboratory, field, and literature studies have been used to define the sediment resuspension characteristics of most conventional and several special-purpose dredges. The natural hydrophobic tendency of most organic contaminants and the high sediment-sorptive capacity for inorganic contaminants limits release to the soluble forms and makes the simple measure of sediment resuspension during dredging a relative measure of the potential for contaminant release.

  9. Buffalo river dredging demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.; Zappi, P.A.; Tatem, H.E.; Gibson, A.C.; Tominey, E.A.

    1996-02-01

    The Corps of Engineers Buffalo District conducted a demonstration of equipment for dredging contaminated sediments. Several thousand cubic yards of sediment were removed from outside the Buffalo River Federal navigation channel limits using three dredge types: (1) open bucket, (2) enclosed bucket, and (3) submersible pump. The effectiveness of a silt screen deployed downstream of the dredge to reduce suspended sediment transport was also evaluated. Extensive sediment and water column monitoring and sampling were conducted during the 2-week demonstration as part of the effort to determine sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases associated with the dredging operations. Water column samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total organic carbon, PCBs, PAHs, metals, ammonia, and pH. A water column bioassay test using Daphnia magna was also performed to assess toxicity effects of the dredging operation. Results of this study were used to assess and refine techniques and laboratory tests that have been previously developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases. In another phase of the study, the Bureau of Mines demonstrated the use of polyelectrolytes for rapid removal of suspended solids from a dilute dredged material slurry.

  10. Cost and production estimation for a cutter suction dredge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miertschin, Michael Wayne

    1997-01-01

    The need for accurate cost estimates is well recognized in the dredging industry. In order for a dredging contractor to efficiently execute a project from its conception to its completion, an accurate estimate of the final cost is imperative...

  11. Predicting effects of dredging on a crab population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fisheries has been of concern for several decades, but little work quantifying direct population impacts has prevent direct ap- plication of these models to dredge problems: Entrainment by dredges is short-term, has and disposal of dredged material are concerned with changes in in- faunal species assemblages and com- munity

  12. Laboratory modeling of hydraulic dredges and design of dredge carriage for laboratory facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Gordon Jason

    2002-01-01

    The deepening and maintenance of the world's ports and navigable waterways has been an integral part of the world economy for centuries. In recent years, cutterhead and draghead hydraulic suction dredges have performed a ...

  13. Instrumentation of dredge spoil for landfill construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byle, M.J.; McCullough, M.L.; Alexander, R.; Vasuki, N.C.; Langer, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Delaware Solid Waste Authority's Northern Solid Waste Management Center is located outside of Wilmington Delaware at Cherry Island, a former dredge disposal site. Dredge spoils, of very low permeability, range in depths up to 30 m (100 feet) which form a natural liner and the foundation for the 140 ha (350-acre) municipal solid waste landfill. The soils beneath the landfill have been extensively instrumented to measure pore pressure, settlement and deflections, using inclinometer casings, standpipe piezometers, vibrating wire piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, settlement plates, liquid settlement gages, total pressure cells and thermistors. The nature of the existing waste and anticipated settlements (up to 6 m (19 feet)) have required some unique installation details. The instrumentation data has been integral in planning the landfilling sequence to maintain perimeter slope stability and has provided key geotechnical parameters needed for operation and construction of the landfill. The performance of the instrumentation and monitoring results are discussed.

  14. Innovative technologies for dredging contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zappi, P.A.; Hayes, D.F.

    1991-09-01

    Contaminated marine sediments exist in many US waterways. Dredging is often a convenient and economical method of safely removing these sediments. However, significant concern exists over the potential environmental effects resulting from the localized sediment resuspension and contaminant release that may occur during the removal operation. This report synopsizes hydraulic equipment, pneumatic equipment, and mechanical components used for dredging and innovative modifications to their dredgeheads. It also examines previously tested dredging equipment designed to remove fine-grained sediments with a minimum amount of sediment resuspension. Major features of equipment innovations, along with available field testing information, are discussed. From these findings, the most promising innovations and research needs are identified. Since this report focuses on the dredging operations, only dredge sizes and sediment resuspension quantities are reported.

  15. New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface...

  16. The CNO Isotopes: Deep Circulation in Red Giants and First and Second Dredge-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold I. Boothroyd; I. -Juliana Sackmann

    1998-06-16

    It is demonstrated that deep circulation mixing below the base of the standard convective envelope, and the consequent "cool bottom processing" (CBP) of the CNO isotopes, can reproduce the trend with stellar mass of the C-12/C-13 observations in low mass red giants. (This trend is opposite to what is expected from standard first dredge-up.) Our models assume that extra mixing always reaches to the same distance in temperature from the H-burning shell, and that CBP begins when the H-burning shell erases the molecular weight discontinuity ("mu-barrier") established by first dredge-up. For Pop I stars, none of the other CNO isotopes except N-15 are expected to be altered by CBP. (If O-18 depletion occurs on the AGB, as some observations suggest, it would require that extra mixing reach closer to the H-burning shell on the AGB than on the RGB --- and should also result in a much lower C-12/C-13 ratio than is observed.) CBP increases as one reduces the stellar mass or metallicity --- roughly as 1/M^2 on the RGB, due to the longer RGB of low mass stars, and as 1/Z, due to higher H-shell burning temperatures at low metallicity. In low mass Pop II stars, all the CNO isotopes are expected to be altered by CBP. Field Pop II stars exhibit RGB abundances consistent with the predictions of our CBP models that have been normalized to reproduce the Pop I RGB abundances, but globular cluster stars are observed to encounter much more extensive processing; also, CBP is observed to start near the base of the globular cluster RGB (overcoming any "mu-barrier"). Standard first and second dredge-up are also presented, and enrichment of the interstellar medium, relative to SN. For light elements, see astro-ph/9512122.

  17. Flume experiments on sediment mixtures from the offshore dredged material disposal site, Galveston Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moherek, Anthony Joseph

    1977-01-01

    dredged material discharge sites and two reference areas (Block 15 and Block 27) which served as control sites for sediment sampling operations. The G. O. M, D. S. was divided into 28 individual 0. 8 km square blocks in order to facilitate sample..., from Folk (1974) are as follows: M = Graphic Mean z ~16 + 58 84 3 (6) 4 = Inclusive Graph1c Standard Dev1ation I ~84 - 16 ~495 - 5 4 6. 6 Sk = Inclusive Graph1c Skewness I 16+ 84-2 50 i 5+ 95-2'50 2 484 ? 416 2 495 - 45 (8) Justification...

  18. Methodology for determining feasibility and cost for converting dredged material to topsoil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graalum, Sara Jo Ann

    1997-01-01

    ). The purpose of this thesis is to discuss the applicability of converting dredged material to topsoil as a beneficial use of dredged material. The site selection in terms of location, material, and marketing are paramount in determining the most economically...

  19. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stabilization ·Sediment and Nutrient Retention & Export ·Wetland-dependent Wildlife Habitat ·Aquatic million /year Deforestation Channelization Levees 10 m ½ energy dissipated 1 ac wetland 1 ac. Wetland 4 Environmental Values Sediment & Nutrient Retention & Export Climate Control Water Quality Chemical & Nutrient

  20. Chapter 16 Wetlands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    could affect these wetlands. Related information can be found in Chapter 14, Geology and Soils; Chapter 15, Water; Chapter 17, Vegetation, Chapter 27, Consultation,...

  1. EVALUATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAPCT OF DREDGING BURNABY LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal and hydrocarbon contaminants originating from the urbanized areas around the lake. The sediments water quality, enhanced fish and wildlife habitat, and recreation opportunities. Dredging Burnaby Lake of the contaminant levels, namely copper, lead and zinc, in the sediments are greater than the urban park

  2. Dredging the Depths of Maths -Mathematics of Dredging By Prof. Onno Bokhove, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Bokhove, School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK o.bokhove@maths.leeds removal by dredging. Some progress has already been made, both at Leeds-Shaw experiments: http://www1.maths.leeds.ac.uk/~obokhove/dredgingtrial.m4v #12;a) b) Fig

  3. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that impact tidal wetlands, subaqueous bottom and coastal pri- mary sand dunes and beaches. Each project The VIMS Center for Coastal Re sources Management has main- tained a database since 1988 to track authorized in 2003. The permitted impacts include 24 acres of vegetated tidal wetlands and 112 acres of non-vegetated

  4. Ecologically Significant Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agreement 280016 © 1999 Montana Natural Heritage Program State Library Building · P.O. Box 201800 · 1515 on vegeta- tion, documenting the types of wetland communities present, their quality and condition, and rare integrity. Our observations indicate that some types of wetlands, like wet meadows and valley bottom

  5. Dredging-induced near-field resuspended sediment concentrations and source strengths. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    Dredging in riverine, lacustrine, and estuarine environments introduces bottom sediments into overlying waters because of imperfect entrainment and incomplete capture of sediments resuspended during the dredging process and the spillage or leakage of sediments during subsequent transportation and disposal of the dredged sediments. Resuspension of bottom sediments and resulting dispersal may pose water quality problems in waters near dredging operations. Interest in this issue increases when the sediment being dredged is highly contaminated. Resuspension of sediments by dredging is affected by dredge characteristics, dredge operating conditions, properties of bottom and suspended sediments, and site-specific conditions such as bottom topography, ambient current, and depth. This report summarizes field studies conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess the suspended sediment concentrations in the water column in the vicinity of various dredge types. These concentration data are combined with conceptual models for resuspended sediment source strength geometries and velocity patterns to estimate sediment source strengths for cutterhead and clamshell dredges. Although unverified, these models provide a starting point for a more thorough analytical evaluation of the entire resuspension, transport, and deposition process.

  6. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Locally Important Wetlands Carl H. Hershner Editor's note: The Virginia Coastal Resources Management ............. 7 Peat: Processing and Potential for Restoration .................................. 9 Calendar and by the Virginia Coastal Resources Management Program of the Depart- ment of Environmental Quality through Grant

  7. Idaho Dredge and Fill Permits Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro| OpenWaterStorage TanksDredge

  8. Wetland Mapping Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) Emergency Wetlands Resources Act (1986) Map all U.S. wetlands by 2001 (95%, WI, NM, MT) and provide distance; perpendicular to contour gradient S N W E ·Transect lower end: permanent water or cardinal 10 m apart = shrub 5 m apart = herbaceous/vine (use the midpoint distance)Linear Wetlands? ·Secure

  9. >.........standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the multimedia research and product development industry Planned Accomplishments MPEG Standards: ·Establishing 2D. ......... IETF standard protocols Collaborators / Customers Standards Groups: MPEG, SMPTE NIST Collaborators: ATP Other Collaborators: Academic

  10. Figure 1.-The older commercial-type dredge was usually of two-piece con-struction as clammers felt it tended bottom better. It was also easier to handle over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was made to go to a new survey was a 48- inch (122 em) surface- supplied hydraulic dredge (Fig. 2 the need for an improved standard survey to measure distribution and production potential of both the surf islandica. surveys along the northeast coast ofthe United States in wate, deptllS to 100 m. The ].200 kg. 5

  11. CLOSE TO THE DREDGE: PRECISE X-RAY C AND N ABUNDANCES IN {lambda} ANDROMEDA AND ITS PRECOCIOUS RED GIANT BRANCH MIXING PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Ball, B. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS-3, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Eldridge, John J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ness, J.-U. [European Space Agency, XMM-Newton Observatory SOC, SRE-OAX, Apartado 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Stancliffe, Richard J., E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jje@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: Jan-Uwe.Ness@sciops.esa.int, E-mail: richard.stancliffe@monash.edu [Centre for Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Chandra LETG+HRC-S and XMM-Newton RGS spectra of H-like C and N lines formed in the corona of the primary star of the RS CVn-type binary {lambda} And, a mildly metal-poor G8 III-IV first ascent giant that completed dredge-up {approx}50 Myr ago, have been used to make a precise measurement of its surface C/N ratio. We obtain the formal result [C/N] = 0.03 {+-} 0.07, which is typical of old disk giants and in agreement with standard dredge-up theory for stars {approx}< 1 M{sub sun}. In contrast, these stars as a group, including {lambda} And, have {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C {approx}< 20, which is much lower than standard model predictions. We show that the abundances of the old disk giants are consistent with models including thermohaline mixing that begins at the red giant branch luminosity function 'bump'. Instead, {lambda} And indicates that the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C anomaly can be present immediately following dredge-up, contrary to current models of extra mixing on the red giant branch. In the context of other recent C and N abundance results for RS CVn-type binaries it seems likely that the anomaly is associated with either strong magnetic activity, fast rotation, or both, rather than close binarity itself.

  12. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  13. INTERIOR WETLANDS PROGRAM STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;INTERIOR WETLANDS PROGRAM STRATEGIC PLAN 1993 -1997 July 1993 FRASER RIVER ACTION PLAN CANADA'S GREEN PLAN ENVIRONMENT CANADA DUCKS UNLIMITED CANADA GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA #12;Table

  14. ERDC/ELTR-14-12 Dredging Operations Technical Support Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    on a number of factors. Risk factors include: avoidance of or attraction to the presence of an active dredge intermittently pumped sediment through a pipeline to an open-water placement site. Movements were monitored using

  15. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  16. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    American Wetlands Peatlands of Alaska and Canada Playa Lakes MAV Prairie Potholes Coastal Wetlands mil ha (89 mil) ·Alaska =69 mil ha United States: =127 mil haCanada: =111 mil ha Manitoba (22.5) Ontario (29.2) = 51.7 mil ha 41% 53% Loss** =238 mil ha Canada 53% Alaska 29% Lower US 18%Lower US 29

  17. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stabilization ·Sediment and Nutrient Retention & Export ·Wetland-dependent Wildlife Habitat ·Aquatic million /year Deforestation Channelization Levees 10 m ½ energy dissipated 1 ac. Wetland 4 ac-ft water Sediment & Nutrient Retention & Export Climate Control Water Quality Chemical & Nutrient Update by Plants

  18. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    1 Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds Stormwater management practices must be kept maintenance guidelines for stormwater wetlands and wet ponds, two stormwater prac- tices that are being constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system

  19. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  20. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

  1. Measuring the Effects of Cutter Suction Dredge Operating Parameters on Minor Losses due to Fixed Screens Installed at the Suction Inlet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joshua Mark

    2014-12-04

    dredge production, including: pump power, the cavitation limit, storage capacity (for hopper dredges or confined disposal facilities), and the amount of head loss in the system (Basco, 1975a). Pump Power Limitation First, the pump head determines... by the amount of system head loss that the pump needs to overcome. In short, the system head loss and operating point compose another limit of the system flow rate and overall dredged material production. Cavitation Limitation Cutter suction dredge...

  2. Generalized Conceptual Models Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to re-suspension of tidal flat sediments by wind-generated waves (Krone 1979, Schoellhamer and Burau Wetlands as Transitional Environments (larger arrows represent larger fluxes of materials or energy WETLAND ECOLOGY The evolution and natural maintenance of tidal wetlands depen

  3. Field study of an unconfined dredge spoil disposal area in Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassi, David Edward

    1973-01-01

    or workboats. The bucket may be either s clamshell, orangepeel or dragline type. Spoil disposal is usually accomplished by dumping the spoil into a hopper barge along- side to be carried away or pumped out to some disposal area. These dredges...

  4. Enhancing Water Quality and Dredged Material for the Port of Harlingen (Phase I) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, A.

    2012-01-01

    are partially the result of the placement of dredged spoil material on the banks of the stream. In the upper portions of the tidal segment, the steep banks are thought to occasionally impede the flow of air across the surface of the stream, which can reduce...

  5. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  6. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  7. Wetlands and Aquatic Processes Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils used for Treated Wastewater Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    to evaluate likely mechanisms of P removal in the soils. Intact soil cores (0-40 cm) and bulk soil samples (0Wetlands and Aquatic Processes Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils used for Treated Wastewater were to (i) determine the P retention capacity of representative wetland soils being used for disposal

  8. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full...

  9. WETLAND RESOURCES of Eastern South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -in lies the controwrsy \\\\ c have expcricm:cd 0\\ CT wetlands on the prairie-a rCSIllIrec which provide

  10. EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this wetland assessment in...

  11. What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /or Mitigation may be Required Food Security Act 1985 (Swampbuster Provision) CWA 1972 CWA 1975 "Navigable waters Regulation History Jurisdictional Definition Clean Water Act of 1977: Section 404 Regulates Dredging systems where the water table is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by shallow water

  12. 7th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference Utrecht 2004, 25-30 July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    of water and therefore comply with all treatment standards. Water is removed through evaporation from wetlands for on-site treatment of wastewater Hans Brix Aarhus University, Institute of Biological Sciences infiltration, but at many sites soil infiltration is not possible. The Danish EPA has produced guidelines

  13. Vermont Wetlands Contact and Inquiry Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas:Standards Jump to: navigation,Wetlands Contact and

  14. Constructed Wetlands for Industry in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Establish in 1998 - Research focuses in ­ Management/Treatment/Disposal ­ Bioremediation / Phytoremediation treatment ponds 1 water quality improvement pond #12;23/05/2012 5 The Constructed Wetland System - Shallow

  15. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging a well-recognized case of heavy metal pollution at Foundry Cove (FC), Hudson River, New York. This tidal on metal con- centrations in Foundry Cove (FC), in the Hudson River, just south of Cold Spring, NY. Waste

  16. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO Planners, Sacramento District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, CA. Abstract: Natural vegetation the breached lev- ees at Donlon Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Vegetation measurements

  17. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  18. Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yu

    2013-07-01

    The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

  19. Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villeneuve, Julie

    2006-04-12

    During the last century wetlands have considerably decreased. The principal cause is urbanization, especially in large urban regions such as the Houston area. In order to protect the remaining wetlands, they have to be ...

  20. Investigations into Wetland Carbon Sequestration as Remediation for Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, Ronald M.; Blanton, Susan L.; Borde, Amy B.; Williams, Greg D.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Huesemann, Michael H.; KW Nehring and SE Brauning

    2002-01-01

    Wetlands can potentially sequester vast amounts of carbon. However, over 50% of wetlands globally have been degraded or lost. Restoration of wetland systems may therefore result in increased sequestration of carbon. Preliminary results of our investigations into atmospheric carbon sequestration by restored coastal wetlands indicate that carbon can be sequestered in substantial quantities in the first 2-50 years after restoration of natural hydrology and sediment accretion processes.

  1. San Francisco Estuary Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan: Version 1 Framework and Protocols Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Steering Committee Compiled and Edited by Joshua N. Collins, PhD San ................. 91 #12;#12;Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan 2002 Executive Summary i San Francisco Estuary

  2. STUDY QUESTIONS WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    of jurisdictional wetlands. 2) Know the provision of the Food Security Act that penalizes farmers for cultivating wetland. 2) Know low-water depth that defines the beginning of the deepwater (aquatic) system. 3) Know of aerenchyma. Wetland Regulation 1) Know the Federal legislative act that prevents the filling

  3. del Moral--Primary Successional Wetland--1 PREDICTABILITY OF PRIMARY SUCCESSIONAL WETLANDS ON PUMICE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Moral, Roger

    % Salix cover were internally more similar than those with less than 10% Salix cover, suggesting wetlands examined by Titus et al. (1999). The purposes are to deter- mine if increasing Salix dominance has

  4. Advances in Wetland Status and Trends Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and natural factors (Atkin, 1977). Section 404 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (as amended in 1972) and the 1985 Food Security Acts swampbuster pro- visions required that all wetlands and associ- ated boundaries val- ues. To combat these problems, in 1972, Congress passed the Coastal Zone Management Act. The law

  5. An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , · evaluate the biological, economic and social impacts of the program components. The evaluation of the IWP, economic and social impacts of the program. Actual results are evaluated against the anticipated benefits#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Executive

  6. An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) in relation to the objectives established in the Strategic Plan; and, · evaluate the biological, economic of the program. (b) Program Impacts: The evaluation examines the ecological, economic and social impacts#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Prepared

  7. Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment concentration Pollutants & pond size Land take for pond treatment Suspended solids P oil PAHs Source control

  8. Highly He-Rich Matter Dredged Up by Extra Mixing through Stellar Encounters in Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuma Suda; Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama; Masayuki Y. Fujimoto

    2007-10-28

    The unveiled main-sequence splitting in omega Centauri as well as NGC 2808 suggests that matter highly-enriched in He (in terms of its mass fraction Y~0.4) was produced and made the color of some main-sequence stars bluer in these globular clusters (GCs). The potential production site for the He-rich matter is generally considered to be massive AGB stars that experience the second dredge-up. However, it is found that massive AGB stars provide the matter with Y~0.35 at most, while the observed blue-shift requires the presence of Y~0.4 matter. Here, we show that extra mixing, which operates in the red giant phase of stars less massive than ~2Msun, could be a mechanism that enhances He content in their envelopes up to Y~0.4. The extra mixing is supposed to be induced by red giant encounters with other stars in a collisional system like GCs. The Y~0.4 matter released in the AGB phase has alternative fates to (i) escape from a GC or (ii) be captured by kinematically cool stars through encounters. The AGB ejecta in omega Cen, which follows the latter case, can supply sufficient He to cause the observed blue-shift. Simultaneously, this scheme generates the extreme horizontal branch, as observed in omega Cen in response to the higher mass loss rates, which is also caused by stellar encounters.

  9. Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    on water supply and allocation, water quality management, aquatic toxicology and bioremediation, stormwater in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Water, Wetlands want scientific training in the multi-disciplinary field of water, wetlands and watershed conservation

  10. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  11. Phosphorus water quality model evaluation and comparison for natural and constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paasch, Mary Margaret

    1998-01-01

    model, and the detailed ecosystem model, were evaluated at three wetland sites across the U.S. The three sites included: Boney Marsh Experimental Area, Florida; Jackson Bottom Experimental Wetlands, Oregon; and the Des Plaines River Wetland Demonstration...

  12. Brownfield reuse of dredged New York Harbor sediment by cement-based solidification/stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loest, K. [ECDC Environmental L.C., Pembroke, MA (United States). Eastern Operations; Wilk, C.M. [Portland Cement Association, Skokie, IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Newly effective federal regulations restrict the ocean disposal of sediments dredged from the harbors of New York and Newark. The New York Port Authority is faced with a critical situation: find land-based disposal/uses for 10`s of millions cubic yards of sediments or lose standing as a commercial port for ocean-going ships. One of the technologies now being employed to manage the sediments is portland cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment. At least 4 million cubic yards of the sediments will undergo cement-based S/S treatment. This treatment will immobilize heavy metals, dioxin, PCBs and other organic contaminants in the sediment. The treatment changes the sediment from a environmental liability into a valuable structural fill. This structural fill is being used at two properties. The first property is an old municipal landfill in Port Newark, New Jersey. The treated sediments are being used as structural fill to cover about 20 acres of the landfill. This will allow planned redevelopment of the landfill property into a shopping mall. The second property called the Seaboard site, was the location of a coal gasification facility and later a wood preservation facility. This 160-acre property has been designated for brownfield redevelopment. Over 4 million cubic yards of treated sediments will eventually cover this site. Portland cement is the selected S/S binding reagent. Nearly 500,000 tons of cement will eventually be used to treat the sediments. Cement was selected for its ability to (a) change the peanut butter-like consistency of the sediments into a structural material and (b) to physically and chemically immobilize hazardous constituents in the sediment.

  13. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  14. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  15. TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Jensen& Aat Barendregt 7. Animal communities in North American tidal fresh- water wetlands Christopher W Struyf, Tom Maris, Tom Cox & Patrick Meire 12. Carbon flows, nutrient cycling, and food webs in tidal

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Evaluating the effects of upstream lakes and wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and recalculated downstream lake phosphorus concentra- tions. We found that upstream lakes decreased the phosphorusRESEARCH ARTICLE Evaluating the effects of upstream lakes and wetlands on lake phosphorus of these inputs. In addition, the presence, connectivity, and configuration of upstream lakes and wetlands likely

  17. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title. · Developed to streamline wetland delineation process and promote consistency between the Clean Water Act and the Food Security Act. #12;1994 National Food Security Act Manual Procedures · Provided NRCS staff policy

  18. Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    of jurisdictional wetlands. 2) Know the provision of the Food Security Act that penalizes farmers for cultivating) Know low-water depth that defines the beginning of the deepwater (aquatic) system. 3) Know the 5 USACE of aerenchyma. Wetland Regulation 1) Know the Federal legislative act that prevents the filling

  19. Percentage of Wetlands Acreage Lost, 1780s1980s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    or impaired wetlands where possible. United States Office of Water EPA 843-F-01-002d Environmental Protection Office of Wetlands, September 2001 Agency Oceans and Watersheds (4502T) What Is the Status of Our Nation from urban, agricultural, silvicultural, and mining areas. ! Air pollution from cars, factories

  20. DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Methane Production and Emissions from Four Reclaimed and Pristine Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Methane Production and Emissions from Four Reclaimed and Pristine% of the plant-mediated emissions. Potential CRi production rates were measured as a function of depth using soil samples obtained at 2-cm increments. Methane production rates were the same order of magni- tude at all

  1. Revising 10 CFR Part 1022 “Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements”

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revising 10 CFR Part 1022 “Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements”

  2. Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers Wetlands Research Program identify the area under which the report was prepared: Task Task CP Critical Processes RE;Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 January 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation

  3. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the America¹s WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  4. Alaska ADEC Wetlands Regulation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 - Applications Jump to:Wetlands Regulation Jump to:

  5. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.024 Zinc mobility and speciation in soil covered by contaminated dredged sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sediment using micrometer-scale and bulk-averaging X-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction in a pseudogley soil (pH 8.2­8.3) before and after contamination by land-disposition of a dredged sediment ([Zn and the laboratory using state-of-the-art synchrotron- based techniques. Sediment disposition on land caused

  6. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.10.017 The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged contaminated sediment using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminated sediment using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, EXAFS spectroscopy, and principal large amounts of dredged sediments, which are depos- ited on adjacent land surfaces. These sediments-containing phases induced by two graminaceous plants (Agrostis tenuis and Festuca rubra) in a contaminated sediment

  7. Thermal Mediation in a Natural Littoral Wetland: Measurements and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andradottir, Hrund O.

    As a river flows through shallow littoral regions such as wetlands, forebays, and side arms, the temperature of the water is modified through atmospheric heat exchange. This process, which we call thermal mediation, can ...

  8. Conservation and Management of Vernal Pools/Temporary Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Jargon · Temporary ponds · Ephemeral pools · Springs pools · Woodland pools · Semi-permanent ponds · Fishless ponds · Salamander ponds · Intermittent woodland pools · Seasonal forest ponds · Seasonally astatic waters · Geographically isolated wetlands · Vernal pools · Specifics- Carolina Bays, Karst ponds

  9. Coiled tubing flowline cuts wetlands disturbance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, E.A.; Marinello, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    Operators in environmentally sensitive wetland areas of South Louisiana have used jointed, or stickpipe flowlines to transmit oil and gas to and from wellsites and production facilities. Recently, a new method featuring coiled tubing was introduced, using it as a recyclable gas flowline. The coiled tubing method eliminates potential environmental damage that could occur when stickpipe is used and it allows the tubing to be easily recovered and reused when the well is taken out of service. This article describes economic advantages of using coiled tubing and how its use simplified environmental constraints encountered in swamps. It is an expanded version of the authors` presentation to World Oil`s Coiled Tubing Conference, Houston, March, 1993.

  10. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  11. Comparing Methods for Measuring the Volume of Sand Excaveted by a Laboratory Cutter Suction Dredge Using an Instrumented Hopper Barge and a Laser Profiler 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikantan, Arun

    2010-07-14

    studies were reviewed, such as model dredge 10 studies, flow visualization studies, model cutterhead studies, flow field studies and sediment pick up behavior, cavitations and cutterhead dynamics. The scaling laws for modeling the hydraulic... similarity. This would mean if the cutterhead speeds and the swing speeds are increased, so as to obtain similarity with respect to cavitation, then, the similarity due to sediment pick up behavior would have to be compromised. Burger, Vlasbom and Talmon...

  12. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. )

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  13. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F.

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  14. A Rapid Assessment Method Examining the Ecological Health of Tidal Marine Wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staszak, Lindsey Ann

    2011-10-21

    Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, housing diverse biota and serving important functions as nursery habitat and feeding grounds. However, nearly 70% of coastal wetlands, including 21% of the salt marshes in Texas, have...

  15. The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

  16. Evaluation and integration of ancillary datasets for coastal wetland landcover classification using Landsat TM Imagery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinson, James Mithland

    1993-01-01

    Ancillary data were compared with ground-truth data for use in separating saline and fresh wetland-landcover classes exhibiting similar spectral signatures. Two ancillary datasets, United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Wetland...

  17. Sunlight inactivation of fecal indicator bacteria in open-water unit process wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Mi T.

    2015-01-01

    water wetlands, utilizes geotextile fabrics on the wetlandwas lined with concrete and geotextile fabric to prevent the

  18. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  19. Zn speciation in a soil contaminated by the deposition of a dredged sediment by synchrotron X-ray techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Manceau, Alain; Laboudigue, Agnes; Tamura, Nobumichi; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2003-09-01

    The nature and proportion of Zn species present in an agricultural soil overlaid by a dredged contaminated sediment have been untangled by the novel combination of three non-invasive synchrotron-based x-ray techniques: x-ray microfluorescence ({mu}SXRF), microdiffraction ({mu}XRD), and absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). One primary (franklinite) and two secondary (phyllomanganate and phyllosilicate) Zn-containing minerals were identified in the initial soil, and another primary (ZnS) and a new secondary (Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide) Zn species in the covered soil. The quantitative analysis of EXAFS spectra recorded on bulk samples indicated that ZnS and Zn-Fe (oxyhydr)oxides amounted to 71+-10 percent and 27+-10 percent, respectively, and the other Zn species to less than 10 percent. The two new Zn species found in the covered soil result from the gravitational migration of ZnS particles initially present in the sediment, and from their further oxidative dissolution and fixation of leached Zn on F e (oxyhydr) oxides.

  20. Conservative and reactive solute transport in constructed wetlands Steffanie H. Keefe,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    ] Constructed wetlands are increasingly being used to provide supplemental treatment of wastewater treatment wastewater-dependent wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, using a solute transport model with transient storage in constructed wetlands. Solutes are transported through primary flow conveying pathways in the main channel

  1. STUDY QUESTIONS FOR LECTURE EXAM WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    of jurisdictional wetlands. 2) Know the provision of the Food Security Act that penalizes farmers for cultivating wetland. 2) Know low-water depth that defines the beginning of the deepwater (aquatic) system. 3) Know of aerenchyma. Wetland Regulation 1) Know the Federal legislative act that prevents the filling

  2. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    .uk/our-work/wetland-habitats/wetlands-in-my-backyard). 3. Presentations and discussion Seven presentations were made to the group on various aspects1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office of the group Kate Heal welcomed the participants and summarised the history and original aims of the CWRG

  3. Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

  4. Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and tower flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and Structure: Biosphere/atmosphere interactions; 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: Ecosys, methane emissions, wetlands, modeling Citation: Grant, R. F., and N. T. Roulet, Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory

  5. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

  6. Got Standards? "Got Standards?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    or organization chooses to manage their activities. Obtaining ISO 9000 Certification Implementing the ISO 9000, assuming the company complies with the standard of ISO 9000. The ISO 9000 certificate will usually expire 9000 While many companies try to obtain ISO 9000 certification, there are many other different ISO

  7. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  8. Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    plant classifications, which are related to flood tolerance. 4) Know which USACE plant classifications plant fibers. 7) Know percent composition of organic C required to be classified as an organic soil with respect to growing season flooding duration. Also, know which zones qualify as "wetland hydrology." 13

  9. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes influenced while the rest are considered uninfluenced by human impact. Impacts are mainly from machines used or successional shifts to other vegetation types are more evident in such habitats. The main threats

  10. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop Comprehensive Coastal Inventory has produced several GIS tools for the tidal shoreline management trade

  11. Comment on "Wetland Sedimentation from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    Comment on "Wetland Sedimentation from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita" Torbjörn E. Törnqvist,1 * Chris. (Reports, 20 October 2006, p. 449) measured sedimentation from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in coastal, their annualized hurricane deposition rate is overestimated, whereas riverine deposition is underestimated

  12. Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a regulatory perspective, to understand the surface water pathways that connect such wetlands to each other communities surrounded by terrestrial plant communities or undrained hydric soils surrounded by hydric soils hydrologically isolated as well; however, many are in fact connected, via subsurface pathways, with nearby water

  13. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19

    or installer may know where to buy them. If not, the Texas Commission for Environmental Quality maintains a list of tire-chip processors on its Web site at: http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/assets/pub lic/comm_exec/pubs/sfr/069_03.pdf Configuration Wetland beds can...

  15. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas associated with global warming. Wetland plants improve water quality by remov- ing fertilizers such as nitrogen and phosphorus and, by doing so, help control algal in Florida and spread extensively into natural areas. Non-native plants that spread into natural areas

  16. SEWAGE LAGOON DESIGN USING WETLANDS AND OTHER UPGRADING TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that a total ammonia concentration of 5 mg/L-N be used as a design criteria. In additionto presenting design#12;L L llF L L L SEWAGE LAGOON DESIGN USING WETLANDS AND OTHER UPGRADING TECHNOLOGIES TO ACHIEVE effluents are typically non-toxic. Using an arbitrary factor of safety of two, it is recommended

  17. APPLIANCE STANDARDS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPLIANCE STANDARDS How they interact with energy efficiency programs Alas, those mercurial baselines. Since 2005, 45 mandatory Department of Energy (DOE) efficiency standards have...

  18. Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvel, Tracey W

    2013-02-22

    point of many current studies. They are designed to mimic natural wetlands, leaving the majority of wastewater cleanup to wetlands plant life. The use of plant life to remove or reduce environmental contaminants is known as phytoremediation (Anderson..., 1996). The environmental contaminants present in wastewater include nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) levels, suspended solids, and pathogens. These constructed wetlands have many advantages such as; energy efficiency...

  19. Vermont Wetland Rules | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas:Standards Jump to: navigation,

  20. Terrestrial and Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages as a Function of Wetland Type across a Mountain Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Jones, Jennifer R; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Pierotti, Lyra F; Love, Jason P

    2011-01-01

    the spatial complexity of mountain habitats. Global Ecologyof Wetland Type across a Mountain Landscape Jeffrey G.Jason P. Love* *White Mountain Research Station, University

  1. Wetland Permit Application Fees 2015 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland: Energy ResourcesVermont:Westway,NewWetland Permit

  2. Carbon cycling in boreal wetlands: A comparison of three approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trumbore, Susan E. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, California (United States)] [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, California (United States); Bubier, Jill L. [Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States)] [Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Harden, Jennifer W. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States); Crill, Patrick M. [Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States)] [Complex Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States)

    1999-11-27

    Three independent methods were used to measure net ecosystem production (NEP) in four wetlands near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. The first method calculated NEP by subtracting heterotrophic respiration from net primary productivity, using both measurements and estimates derived from the literature. The second method used radiocarbon data from cores to derive long-term NEP averaged over the past several decades. The third method used direct measurement of NEP combined with a model to fill in for days with no data. The three methods, with their independently derived uncertainties, all show the same magnitude and pattern of NEP variation across four different wetland types. However, direct measurement yielded distinctly lower estimates of NEP in the most productive sites. Highest NEP (31-180 gC m-2 yr-1) was observed in the two wetlands with the highest proportion of sedge vegetation. A bog collapse scar and a nutrient-rich fen had NEP values not significantly different from zero. The maximum NEP at sites with intermediate nutrient status is due to slower overall decomposition and is likely associated with greater allocation of production below ground by sedges. The three methods for estimating NEP differ in the effort required, the sources of error, and in the timescale over which they apply. Used in combination, they allow estimation of parameters such as below-ground production and the contribution of heterotrophic decomposition to total soil respiration. Using the radiocarbon method, we also derived estimates of the rate of N accumulation in the four wetland types. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  3. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  4. An Archaeological Survey of an Alternate Dredge Decant Line and Drop Structure in Northern Calhoun County, Texas for the Alcoa World Alumina LLC, Point Comfort Operations Located in Point Comfort, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-07

    An archaeological survey of the location of the site of a proposed dredge decant line and drop structure in northern Calhoun County, Texas was performed by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA) on April 30, 2003 and May 22, 2003 under United...

  5. Interconnection Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Virginia's interconnection standards include two levels of review. The qualifications and application fees for each level are as follows:...

  6. Structural and Functional Loss in Restored Wetland David Moreno-Mateos1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Power1 , Francisco A. Comi´n3 , Roxana Yockteng4 1 Integrative Biology Department, University and wetlands restored in cold climates. Also, wetlands experiencing more (riverine and tidal) hydrologic function and structure will spread. Citation: Moreno-Mateos D, Power ME, Comi´n FA, Yockteng R (2012

  7. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  8. A synthesis of methane emissions from 71 northern, temperate, and subtropical wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A synthesis of methane emissions from 71 northern, temperate, and subtropical wetlands M E R R I of atmospheric methane. Here, we assess controls on methane flux using a database of approximately 19 000 latitude regions. Our analyses confirm general controls on wetland methane emissions from soil temperature

  9. POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE CYCLE UNDER FUTURE the available scientific literature on how natural sources and the atmospheric fate of methane may be affected by future climate change. We discuss how processes governing methane wetland emissions, per- mafrost thawing

  10. Nitrogen cycling, plant biomass, and carbon dioxide evolution in a subsurface flow wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Jeffrey J

    2000-01-01

    ? volatilization likely was responsible for most of the nitrogen loss. The amount of CO? flux from the wetland was measured from the influent end to the effluent end. Carbon dioxide evolution decreased as water passed through the wetland. The average CO? flux level...

  11. Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan 2002 Part 2: Data Collection Protocols Sediment Contaminants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan 2002 Part 2: Data Collection Protocols Sediment Contaminants WRMP Version 1 June 2002 1 Data Collection Protocol Tidal Wetland Sediment Contamination Joshua N Concerns about intertidal sediment contamination are increasing in the Bay Area. There is concern

  12. APPLICATION OF 3S TECHNIQUES IN THE STUDY OF WETLAND ENVIRONMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -731-85551337, Email: xbcyyhn@163.com Abstract: Wetland is a multifunctional ecosystem in the earth, wetlands possess route are introduced. The beach and water area information were gained.the dynamic changes of water were Lake. Key words: Remote sensing system,Geographic information system,global position system Monitor

  13. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to support new protection for coastal sand dunes and non-vegetated wetlands. The regulatory program was alsoVirginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 30, Issue. This process continues to be as important now and for the future of the Commonwealth's coastal resources

  14. The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Virginia, and examining the effects of disking during wetland creation. Replicate multiscale tangentially-extractable NH4­N and NO3­N, and Mehlich-3 extractable P, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Fe, and Mn. Means and variances of soil and Fe, lower Mn than cre- ated wetlands, and comparatively high variability in nutri- ent concentrations

  15. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  16. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  17. A survey of the wetlands and floodplains of the borrow area and wetland/shorebird complex for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.; Yin, S.; Hlohowskyj, I.

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy is conducting cleanup operations at the Weldon Spring site, St. Charles, Missouri, that will include development of a 77-ha (191-acre) soil borrow area. Eight wetlands, including riverine and palustrine emergent wetland types and totaling 0.9 ha (2.2 acres), will be eliminated during excavation of the borrow area. A 23-ha (57-acre) wetland/shorebird complex will be created at the Busch Conservation Area. The complex will include 2 ha (5 acres) of palustrine emergent wetland as mitigation for wetland losses in the borrow area.

  18. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  19. # ###### SQL # ``standard'' ###### ### ######### ###### #########.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitoura, Evaggelia

    ' & $ % # ###### SQL # ``standard'' ###### ### ######### ###### #########. ###### Sequel #### IBM ## ##### ### System R, #### SQL (Stuctured Query Language) SQL--89, SQL--92 H SQL #### ####### #######: ffl ############# (authentication) ffl ########### ffl ###### ########## ###### ####### 1 #12; ' & $ % # ###### SQL 1. ###### #### 2

  20. Wetland survey of selected areas in the K-24 Site Area of responsibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Awl, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    In accordance with DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, wetland surveys were conducted in selected areas within the K-25 Area of Responsibility during the summer of 1994. These areas are Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, the K-770 OU, Duct Island Peninsula, the Powerhouse area, and the K-25 South Corner. Previously surveyed areas included in this report are the main plant area of the K-25 Site, the K-901 OU, the AVLIS site, and the K-25 South Site. Wetland determinations were based on the USACE methodology. Forty-four separate wetland areas, ranging in size from 0.13 to 4.23 ha, were identified. Wetlands were identified in all of the areas surveyed with the exception of the interior of the Duct Island Peninsula and the main plant area of the K-25 Site. Wetlands perform functions such as floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, sediment and toxicant retention, nutrient transformation, production export, and support of aquatic species and wildlife diversity and abundance. The forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands identified in the K-25 area perform some or all of these functions to varying degrees.

  1. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  2. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  3. The effect of bioremediation on microbial populations in an oil-contaminated coastal wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Richard Todd

    1999-01-01

    A series of controlled, crude oil applications was carried out in a Texas coastal wetland near the Houston Ship Channel to determine the effectiveness of bioremediation in these sensitive areas. The first application, conducted in 1996...

  4. Saltwater Incursion into Micro Tidal Wetlands: Case Studies from Matagorda, Texas and Humacao, Puerto Rico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colon, Ricardo J.

    2013-08-27

    Global climate change threatens the survival of microtidal wetlands by altering fundamental hydrological aspects such as precipitation patterns and tidal exchange. The combination of these stressors results in increased flooding period and soil...

  5. The Importance of Emergent Vegetation in Reducing Sediment Resuspension in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,-Resuspension in Wetlands, USA 57007 r I .. ABSTRACT Wind-induced resuspension of bottom sediment was measured with sediment traps in Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota. Resuspension was significantly greater

  6. Potential for N pollution swapping from riparian buffer strips and an instream wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boukelia, Willena Esther

    2012-11-29

    Diffuse agricultural pollution is a major contributor to poor water quality in many parts of the world. Consequently agri-environment policy promotes the use of riparian buffer strips and/or denitrifying wetlands to ...

  7. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  8. Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobos, Douglas Russell

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide exchange rate (CER) is an indicator of an ecosystem's response to changing environmental conditions. Long-term measurements of CO? exchange between coastal wetlands and the atmosphere will improve our understanding of daily...

  9. Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, Erin O.

    2006-01-01

    stage, the facultative algal ponds, to the west edge of thewater from the facultative algal ponds, one of the stages ofof the channel, the Algal Ponds, to its end, the wetlands,

  10. Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubh, Archis Robert

    2002-01-01

    Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed a seasonal pattern of dry, major wet, and minor wet ...

  11. The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subalusky, Amanda Lee

    2009-05-15

    populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found...

  12. Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siems-Alford, Susan

    1994-01-01

    To improve and develop my professional skills, a wetland assessment and delineation was performed for Lakewood Heights, a proposed residential subdivision consisting of 133 hectares, more or less, located in northeast Harris County, Texas...

  13. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  14. Regular Inspection and Maintenance Guidance for Gravel Wetland Stormwater Management Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Regular Inspection and Maintenance Guidance for Gravel Wetland Stormwater Management Device and not a criterion for cleaning. Rather, stormwater access to subsurface treatment is by way of inlet standpipes

  15. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located ...

  16. Climate change and restoration factors affecting fecal pathogen dynamics in wetland systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Woutrina A.; Watson, Fred

    2011-01-01

    the fate and transport of protozoa in coastal Californiathe transport of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Californiaand transport of fecal pathogens in wetland systems on the central coast of California

  17. Analysis of the efficacy of a constructed wetland in treating human fecal contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondepudi, Kathyayani Shobhna

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of a system of constructed wetlands in treating non-point source pollution, particularly, human fecal contamination, was evaluated by collecting and analyzing water samples using both conventional culture-based ...

  18. Evaluation of a shoreline cleaner for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzell, Cydney Jill

    2000-01-01

    releasing petroleum products that impacted the shoreline. Since 1994, three controlled oil applications (1996 and 1997) were conducted to evaluate proposed remediation strategies for wetland environments including nutrient additions, oxidant additions...

  19. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  20. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  1. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  2. Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Wesley Richard

    2009-06-02

    OF A GALVESTON BAY WETLAND AT PINE GULLY, SEABROOK, TEXAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BEACH RENOURISHMENT A Thesis by WESLEY RICHARD CULVER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2007 Major Subject: Geology UNUSUAL SEDIMENTATION OF A GALVESTON BAY WETLAND AT PINE GULLY, SEABROOK, TEXAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BEACH RENOURISHMENT A Thesis by WESLEY RICHARD CULVER...

  3. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  4. Hydrology of a Forested Wetland Complex in an Urbanizing Area of the Texas Gulf Coast and Clean Water Act Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Dex Daniel

    2014-12-15

    . ................................................................ 28 Fig. 5. Monthly precipitation and runoff for 2005–2009.. ............................................... 31 Fig. 6. Annual hydrographs (2005–2008) of daily precipitation and runoff data (axes plotted at different scales for clarity... methods (e.g. Smith et al. 1995, Johnson 2005, Reif et al. 2009, Lane and D’Amico 2010), nation-wide wetland extent (see the National Wetlands Inventory, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, available at 6 http://www.fws.gov/wetlands), and impacts...

  5. Patterns in wetland microbial community composition and functional gene repertoire associated with methane emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; McFarland, Jack W.; Anderson, Frank E.; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Tremblay, Julien; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Waldrop, Mark P.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; et al

    2015-05-19

    Wetland restoration on peat islands previously drained for agriculture has potential to reverse land subsidence and sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide as peat accretes. However, the emission of methane could potentially offset the greenhouse gas benefits of captured carbon. As microbial communities play a key role in governing wetland greenhouse gas fluxes, we are interested in how microbial community composition and functions are associated with wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and methane emission, which is critical to modeling the microbial component in wetland methane fluxes and to managing restoration projects for maximal carbon sequestration. Here, we couple sequence-based methods with biogeochemical and greenhousemore »gas measurements to interrogate microbial communities from a pilot-scale restored wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, revealing considerable spatial heterogeneity even within this relatively small site. A number of microbial populations and functions showed strong correlations with electron acceptor availability and methane production; some also showed a preference for association with plant roots. Marker gene phylogenies revealed a diversity of major methane-producing and -consuming populations and suggested novel diversity within methanotrophs. Methanogenic archaea were observed in all samples, as were nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria, indicating that no single terminal electron acceptor was preferred despite differences in energetic favorability and suggesting spatial microheterogeneity and microniches. Notably, methanogens were negatively correlated with nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria and were most abundant at sampling sites with high peat accretion and low electron acceptor availability, where methane production was highest. Wetlands are the largest nonanthropogenic source of atmospheric methane but also a key global carbon reservoir. Characterizing belowground microbial communities that mediate carbon cycling in wetlands is critical to accurately predicting their responses to changes in land management and climate. Here, we studied a restored wetland and revealed substantial spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemistry, methane production, and microbial communities, largely associated with the wetland hydraulic design. We observed patterns in microbial community composition and functions correlated with biogeochemistry and methane production, including diverse microorganisms involved in methane production and consumption. We found that methanogenesis gene abundance is inversely correlated with genes from pathways exploiting other electron acceptors, yet the ubiquitous presence of genes from all these pathways suggests that diverse electron acceptors contribute to the energetic balance of the ecosystem. These investigations represent an important step toward effective management of wetlands to reduce methane flux to the atmosphere and enhance belowground carbon storage.« less

  6. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

  7. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  8. Energy Standard

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2003 Detailed Tablesof1998 and195 0Standard

  9. WETCHIMP-WSL: Intercomparison of wetland methane emissions models over West Siberia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bohn, T. J.; Melton, J. R.; Ito, A.; Kleinen, T.; Spahni, R.; Stocker, B. D.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, X.; Schroeder, R.; Glagolev, M. V.; et al

    2015-06-03

    Wetlands are the world's largest natural source of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. The strong sensitivity of methane emissions to environmental factors such as soil temperature and moisture has led to concerns about potential positive feedbacks to climate change. This risk is particularly relevant at high latitudes, which have experienced pronounced warming and where thawing permafrost could potentially liberate large amounts of labile carbon over the next 100 years. However, global models disagree as to the magnitude and spatial distribution of emissions, due to uncertainties in wetland area and emissions per unit area and a scarcity of in situ observations.more »Recent intensive field campaigns across the West Siberian Lowland (WSL) make this an ideal region over which to assess the performance of large-scale process-based wetland models in a high-latitude environment. Here we present the results of a follow-up to the Wetland and Wetland CH4 Intercomparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP), focused on the West Siberian Lowland (WETCHIMP-WSL). We assessed 21 models and 5 inversions over this domain in terms of total CH4 emissions, simulated wetland areas, and CH4 fluxes per unit wetland area and compared these results to an intensive in situ CH4 flux data set, several wetland maps, and two satellite surface water products. We found that (a) despite the large scatter of individual estimates, 12-year mean estimates of annual total emissions over the WSL from forward models (5.34 ± 0.54 Tg CH4 yr?¹), inversions (6.06 ± 1.22 Tg CH4 yr?¹), and in situ observations (3.91 ± 1.29 Tg CH4 yr?¹) largely agreed; (b) forward models using surface water products alone to estimate wetland areas suffered from severe biases in CH4 emissions; (c) the interannual time series of models that lacked either soil thermal physics appropriate to the high latitudes or realistic emissions from unsaturated peatlands tended to be dominated by a single environmental driver (inundation or air temperature), unlike those of inversions and more sophisticated forward models; (d) differences in biogeochemical schemes across models had relatively smaller influence over performance; and (e) multiyear or multidecade observational records are crucial for evaluating models' responses to long-term climate change.« less

  10. WETCHIMP-WSL: Intercomparison of wetland methane emissions models over West Siberia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, T. J.; Melton, J. R.; Ito, A.; Kleinen, T.; Spahni, R.; Stocker, B. D.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, X.; Schroeder, R.; Glagolev, M. V.; Maksyutov, S.; Brovkin, V.; Chen, G.; Denisov, S. N.; Eliseev, A. V.; Gallego-Sala, A.; McDonald, K. C.; Rawlins, M. A.; Riley, W. J.; Subin, Z. M.; Tian, H.; Zhuang, Q.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2015-06-03

    Wetlands are the world's largest natural source of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. The strong sensitivity of methane emissions to environmental factors such as soil temperature and moisture has led to concerns about potential positive feedbacks to climate change. This risk is particularly relevant at high latitudes, which have experienced pronounced warming and where thawing permafrost could potentially liberate large amounts of labile carbon over the next 100 years. However, global models disagree as to the magnitude and spatial distribution of emissions, due to uncertainties in wetland area and emissions per unit area and a scarcity of in situ observations. Recent intensive field campaigns across the West Siberian Lowland (WSL) make this an ideal region over which to assess the performance of large-scale process-based wetland models in a high-latitude environment. Here we present the results of a follow-up to the Wetland and Wetland CH4 Intercomparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP), focused on the West Siberian Lowland (WETCHIMP-WSL). We assessed 21 models and 5 inversions over this domain in terms of total CH4 emissions, simulated wetland areas, and CH4 fluxes per unit wetland area and compared these results to an intensive in situ CH4 flux data set, several wetland maps, and two satellite surface water products. We found that (a) despite the large scatter of individual estimates, 12-year mean estimates of annual total emissions over the WSL from forward models (5.34 ± 0.54 Tg CH4 yr?¹), inversions (6.06 ± 1.22 Tg CH4 yr?¹), and in situ observations (3.91 ± 1.29 Tg CH4 yr?¹) largely agreed; (b) forward models using surface water products alone to estimate wetland areas suffered from severe biases in CH4 emissions; (c) the interannual time series of models that lacked either soil thermal physics appropriate to the high latitudes or realistic emissions from unsaturated peatlands tended to be dominated by a single environmental driver (inundation or air temperature), unlike those of inversions and more sophisticated forward models; (d) differences in biogeochemical schemes across models had relatively smaller influence over performance; and (e) multiyear or multidecade observational records are crucial for evaluating models' responses to long-term climate change.

  11. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore »the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  12. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  13. 1988 National List of Plant Species that Occur in Wetlands The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1988 National List of Plant Species that Occur in Wetlands The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for the National Wetland Plant List from the U plant lists from their National Wetland Inventory (NWI) web site. The web pages and associated files

  14. The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitzman, Stephanie

    1999-01-01

    In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals...

  15. Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Executive Order 11988, "Floodplain Management" EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering...

  16. December 2006 Standards Forum and Standards Actions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -9 Cancellations in Progress - 0 Inside This Issue Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http:tis.eh.doe.govtechstds December 2006 The Standards Forum and Standards...

  17. Questioning Copyright in Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuelson, Pam

    2006-01-01

    of privately drafted industry standards). Antitrust problems40, at 308. Thus, industry standards such as the AMA and ADAprotection for industry standards is the claim SSOs make

  18. DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes.

  19. STUDY QUESTIONS FOR LECTURE EXAM WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    the 5 USACE plant classifications, which are related to flood tolerance. 4) Know which USACE plant plant fibers. 7) Know percent composition of organic C required to be classified as an organic soil with respect to growing season flooding duration. Also, know which zones qualify as "wetland hydrology." 13

  20. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01

    as an oil spill response tool. The research is conducted at a facility established following an accidental oil spill on the San Jacinto River in October 1994. Previous research evaluated the intrinsic repudiation of petroleum in a wetland, as well as the use...

  1. Linkage of MIKE SHE to Wetland-DNDC for carbon budgeting and anaerobic biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction Increasing emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) are believed 2004 Key words: Biogeochemical modeling, Carbon dynamics, Forest wetland, Greenhouse gases emission and forest management practices on GHGs emissions and carbon dynamics to test the capabilities of the models

  2. New Orleans: Loss of wetlands opens floodgates to disaster By David Usborne Independent 01 September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    such as the one generated by Katrina. But, according to the US Geological Survey, Louisiana has lost 1,900 square Louisiana's coast. "With that loss of wetlands ... we had to build hurricane protection. I think a longer hurricanes and disastrous floods that the levees and dams have been built. There are thousands of miles

  3. Drought-induced mosquito outbreaks in wetlands Jonathan M. Chase1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are vectors for several important human diseases, such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and West NileREPORT Drought-induced mosquito outbreaks in wetlands Jonathan M. Chase1 * and Tiffany M. Knight2 1 Mosquitoes are not only a nuisance, but also vector many important human and animal diseases. Here

  4. Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity pond sizes (diameter 750 m=large), and two habitat types (pond, adjacent marsh) in the Barataria Bay Estuary, Louisiana. Nekton assemblages of ponds and the adjacent marsh

  5. WETLAND USE AND FEEDING BY LESSER SCAUP DURING SPRING MIGRATION ACROSS THE UPPER MIDWEST, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    bordering the Gulf of Mexico and migrates along the Mississippi River valley and through the upper MidwestWETLAND USE AND FEEDING BY LESSER SCAUP DURING SPRING MIGRATION ACROSS THE UPPER MIDWEST, USA reserves of lesser scaup (Aythya affinis; hereafter scaup) during spring migration in the upper Midwest may

  6. Evaluation of the nutrient removal efficiency of a constructed wetland system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Kimberly Ann

    2006-10-30

    In north central Texas, USA, free-water surface wetlands have been constructed to treat pre-treated wastewater effluent from the Trinity River. Water quality and vegetation data from the first two years of operation (June 2003 to May 2005) were used...

  7. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Causeway, Miami, FL 33149-1098, United States b Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5­10 cm, 2006; Dai et al., 2002; Kimura & Yamaguchi, 2000), mining and large-scale geotechnical projects (e

  8. Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    , Courtney Flint, Lowell Gentry, Robert Hudson: Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences Richard Cooke concentrations and loads for this watershed and have used it for many past studies on water quality, so we have as measure wetland greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CH4, and CO2) (research objective). 2. Determine

  9. Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands, Wet that the effects of stormwater runoff and urbanization are detrimental to organisms living in streams and rivers. To reduce these negative impacts, a variety of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been

  10. Subsurface Gravel Wetlands for the T t t f St tTreatment of Stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subsurface Gravel Wetlands for the T t t f St tTreatment of Stormwater ThomasThomas P. Ballestero Puls, University of New Hampshire Stormwater CenterUniversity of New Hampshire Stormwater Center NJASLA://www.unhsc.unh.edu effective stormwater management · Research and development of stormwater treatment systems· Research

  11. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic ...

  12. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron essential GIS support when it was most needed, and for that we are very grateful. Thanks also to Michael Geographic Information System (GIS) as a pilot application of this technology; the use of the methodology

  13. Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

  14. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  15. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  16. CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY higher than river water quality targets. Its ecological value is poor due to its high pollution and low, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment

  17. Development of a deterministic and stochastic computer model for phosphorus retention in a surface flow wetland system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Rahul

    1999-01-01

    (water, soil, and biomass) and a mass balance for phosphorus. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted for cell 1 of the Stephenville system to quantify variability of the system. The model was calibrated and validated using two wetland systems...

  18. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01

    spray application, wetland effluent must be disinfected (traditionally by chlorine). This study determines the treatment efficiency of SFCWs filled with gravel or tire chip media to treat domestic wastewater and the effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV...

  19. The attitude and knowledge relationships between secondary agriculture and science students' participation in multidisciplinary education and environmental/wetland restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Amy Noelle

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to test student knowledge and attitude changes towards wetland ecosystems, Environmental Science and Horticulture after the completion of an interdisciplinary mini-unit and propagation experiment...

  20. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

  1. Floodplain/wetlands assessment for the remediation of Vicinity Property 9 at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lonkhuyzen, R.A. Van [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to excavate contaminated soil at Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), a 0.64-ha (1.6-acre) parcel near the Weldon Spring Site in Missouri. A palustrine wetland approximately 0.10 ha (0.25 acre) in size within VP9 would be excavated. Site restoration should allow palustrine wetland to become reestablished. No long-term impacts to floodplains are expected.

  2. Physical and chemical dynamics of the hydrogeologic system in wetlands along the southern shore of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doss, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Miller Woods wetland system is established in the progradational beach deposits along the shore of Lake Michigan in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Long-term study of a detailed monitoring network has identified the large and small scale characteristics of the physical and chemical hydrogeology of the wetland system. The wetlands and related ground water display a complex hydrogeologic behavior, the transient nature of which is a function of stresses imposed by climatic factors and evapotranspiration. Transient hydrogeologic features vary in their scale and include mobile hydrologic boundaries that shift through time and space, and individual wetlands that regularly change their hydrologic regime and function within the whole wetland system. A conceptual model is developed that links different types of hydrologic behavior with different physical characteristics imposed by the progradational nature of the wetland system. Most waters in Miller Woods are near neutral pH, calcium bicarbonate type. Smaller-scale variations in the chemistry of bicarbonate, sulfate, and some metals result from micro and macrobiological influences. Observable impacts on water chemistry have occurred in some parts of the study area as a result of a nearby industrial landfill. Concentrations of essentially all ions are enriched, and found at their maximum values in the vicinity of the landfill.

  3. Communication Standards and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication Standards and Recommendations Introduction & Purpose 3 Standards & Recommendations Communication 4 Training 10 Evaluation 11 PMO Workgroup Participation 12 Staffing 12 Communications-related Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations 13

  4. Environmental Standardization for Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bagby, John

    Environmental Standardization for Sustainability by Professor John W. Bagby College of Information that environmental controls are expressed as environmental standards, a traditional driver of investment in pollution control. Environmental standards spur investment in green technologies that promise to stimulate

  5. Energy Efficiency Product Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, which were preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. Future standards, if...

  6. Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkey, P.L.; Sundell, R.C.; Bailey, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.

  7. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  8. Organic Carbon and Disinfection Byproduct Precursor Loads from a Constructed, Non-Tidal Wetland in California's Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Jacob A.; Fram, Miranda S.; Fujii, Roger

    2007-01-01

    California District Sacramento Laboratory - Determination offrom agricultural peat soils, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta,wetland on Twitchell Island, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta,

  9. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Washington voters passed Initiative 937 in 2006, creating a renewable energy standard and an energy efficiency resource standard for the state's electric utilities. Initiative 937, enacted as th...

  10. Vermont Wetland General Permit (3-9025) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas:Standards Jump to: navigation, searchGeneral Permit

  11. Vermont Wetland Permit/Determination Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas:Standards Jump to: navigation, searchGeneral

  12. Vermont Wetland Program Individual Permit Application Instructions | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas:Standards Jump to: navigation, searchGeneralEnergy

  13. Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Directives Crosswalk DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk table Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk More Documents &...

  14. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-19

    The Technical Standards Program (TSP) promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Department of Energy (DOE), provides DOE with the means to develop needed technical standards, and manages overall technical standards information, activities, issues, and interactions. Cancels DOE O 1300.2A. Canceled by DOE O 252.1A

  15. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23

    The Order promotes DOE's use of Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCS) as the primary method for application of technical standards and establishes and manages the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP) including technical standards development, information, activities, issues, and interactions. Admin Chg 1 dated 3-12-13.

  16. Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland J O H N T . C R A W F O R D 1 , 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Emily

    (CO2) emissions are recognized as an important component of the global carbon (C) cycle (Cole et al of emissions, particularly in wet- lands, with a potential `missing' wetland CH4 source of ~87 Tg C yrÀ1Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams J O H N T . C R A W F O R D 1 , 2 , E

  17. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  18. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes the responsibilities of persons who are charged with implementing the DOE Technical Standards Program. 

  19. TECHNICAL STANDARDS COMMENT RESOLUTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure provides guidance for resolving comments on DOE Technical Standards that are received during the coordination process. 

  20. Surface Water Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Standards Team. This advisory group, with representation from water asso- ciations, the agricultural industry, engineering firms, environmental organizations, consumer groups and government entities, is working with TCEQ staff to review and possibly...SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards...

  1. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  2. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  3. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  4. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

  5. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Avignon, France, 26-30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    The Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy has passed a new legislation that require the wastewater from. Keywords Constructed wetland, horizontal flow, Phragmites, Salix, vertical flow, willow. INTRODUCTION nitrogen (Ministry of Environment and Energy, 1997) . In step with the reduction in discharges from

  6. GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal Wetland Hydrology, and Deep Well Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    GROUNDWATER FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODELING Application to Submarine Groundwater Discharge, Coastal, but is also lost to surface water drainage and potential submarine groundwater discharge. There are also to deal with issues such as submarine groundwater discharge and coastal wetland hydrology. SEAWAT also has

  7. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Avignon, France, 26-30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    of water pollutants and as such are widely used for the treatment of wastewaters in Europe (Vymazal et alProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, has extended rapidly as a choice for treatment of water discharged from single households and small

  8. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Congress August 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Conservation Standards Activities Report to Congress | Page i Message from the Assistant...

  9. STANDARD REVIEW PLAN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Safety Design Strategy January 2015 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT...

  10. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: H.B. 40, enacted in June 2015, created Vermont's Renewable Energy Standard and repeals the Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development program's renewable energy goals. The Renewable...

  11. SSL Standards and Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-04-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet that reviews the key performance and safety standards applicable to SSL-based lighting products.

  12. The Standard Model

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12

    Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the Standard Model of particle physics, covering both the particles that make up the subatomic realm and the forces that govern them.

  13. Standard Subject Classification System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1979-08-14

    The order establishes the DOE Standard Subject Classification System for classifying documents and records by subject, including correspondence, directives, and forms.Cancels DOE O 0000.1.

  14. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23

    The order establishes the DOE Technical Standards Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-13 supersedes DOE O 252.1A.

  15. Law as a Network Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burk, DL

    2006-01-01

    benefits of uniform technical standards, and the problemsparallel to those in the analysis of technical standards.Uniform standards, whether technical or legal, give rise to

  16. Standard version Advanced version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Standard version Advanced version Xpress case study: Margaret Oil 26 June 2014 NATCOR Case study #12;Standard version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (1) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be: Gasoline Jet fuel Heating oil

  17. DOE technical standards list. Department of Energy standards index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listing of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  18. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standards list (TSL) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31) on the basis of currently available technical information. Periodic updates of this TSL will be issued as additional information is received on standardization documents being issued, adopted, or canceled by DOE. This document was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-Government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other standards-related documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and canceled DOE technical standards. Information on new DOE technical standards projects, technical standards released for coordination, recently published DOE technical standards, and activities of non-Government standards bodies that may be of interest to DOE is published monthly in Standards Actions.

  19. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  20. Selective depredation of planted hardwood seedlings by wild pigs in a wetland restoration area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.J.

    1999-12-17

    Following the planting of several thousand hardwood seedlings in a 69-ha wetland restoration area in west-central South Carolina, wild pigs (Sus scrofa) depredated a large percentage of the young trees. This planting was undertaken as part of a mitigation effort to restore a bottomland hardwood community in the corridor and delta of a third order stream that had been previously impacted by the discharge of heated nuclear reactor effluent. The depredated restoration areas had been pretreated with both herbicide and control burning prior to planting the hardwood seedlings. After discovery of the wild pig damage, these areas were surveyed on foot to assess the magnitude of the depredation on the planted seedling crop. Foraging by the local wild pigs in the pretreatment areas selectively impacted only four of the nine hardwood species used in this restoration effort. Based on the surveys, the remaining five species did not appear to have been impacted at all. A variety of reasons could be used to explain this phenomenon. The pretreatment methodology is thought to have been the primary aspect of the restoration program that initially led the wild pigs to discover the planted seedlings. In addition, it is possible that a combination of other factors associated with odor and taste may have resulted in the selective depredation. Future wetland restoration efforts in areas with wild pigs should consider pretreatment methods and species to be planted. If pretreatment methods and species such as discussed in the present study must be used, then the prior removal of wild pigs from surrounding lands will help prevent depredations by this non-native species.

  1. Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2012-01-01

    The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

  2. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  3. U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS HEADQUARTERS 441 G. Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20314-1000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of dredged or fill material into waters of the United States for surface coal mining activities. USACE also, mining activities, wetland and stream restoration activities, and commercial shellfish aquaculture

  4. West Shore Lake Pontchartrain Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction Project, LA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . There is a potential for direct, indirect and cumulative impacts to wetlands, wildlife, fisheries, and water quality of lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations, and dredged or excavated material disposal areas (LERRD

  5. Drinking Water Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  6. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  7. Active DOE Technical Standards

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports James O'Brien All Ac ve DOE Technical Standards Document Number Document Title Responsible SLM A-1 As of: 12-May-15...

  8. Standardization of Firearms

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-03-02

    Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for the standardization of firearms and limitations of firearms inventories maintained in support of safeguards and security activities. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Building Energy Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) took effect on March 1, 2015. The code is based on the 2015 IECC, with amendments to incorporate ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The new guidelines ...

  10. Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: H.B. 40, enacted in June 2015, changes the name of the Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Program to the Standard Offer Program and replaces the associated state...

  11. EPCglobal : a universal standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Juan Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the likelihood of EPCglobal becoming the universal RFID standard by presenting a framework of ten factors used to analyze and determine if EPCglobal is moving in the right direction. The ten factors ...

  12. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  13. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.; Van Dyke, G.D. |

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

  14. SAE Standards Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes PNNL activities in FY 2012 in support of the following two vehicle communication standards activities: • Technical support to SAE, ANSI and NIST technical working groups. PNNL actively contributed to the use case development, harmonization, and evaluation of the SAE standards activities for vehicle to grid communication • Tested and validated a set of potential technologies for meeting SAE communication requirements and provided recommendations for technology choices.

  15. Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations Standards and Recommendations Table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations April 2009 Standards and Recommendations Table Tracking Network Standards Provide both public and secure grantee portals. Provide a link to the Tracking Network's National Portal from individual state portals. Maintain visual consistency among pages

  16. Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations Standards and Recommendations Table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracking Grantee Portal Standards and Recommendations April 2009 Standards and Recommendations Table Tracking Network Standards Provide both public and secure grantee portals. Provide a link on a grantee's portal. Organize contents of pages to facilitate the identification of detailed information

  17. Department of Energy Standards Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This TSL, intended for use in selecting and using DOE technical standards and other Government and non-Government standards, provides listing of current and inactive DOE technical standards, non-Government standards adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and cancelled DOE technical standards.

  18. The Muzzi marsh: a case study and analysis of wetland restoration decision-making in San Francisco Bay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brah, William Joseph

    1982-01-01

    were subject to the requirements of the Act. As to these, the wildlife agen- cies can recommend that the requested permit be denied or that app1icants develop mitigation plans to prevent or lessen damage to wetland habitat and to improve habitat... have learned that they have a better chance in securing approval of a permit if they propose mitigation or restoration programs. Others coun- ter that it is not fair to impose extensive restoration requirements on permit applicants when...

  19. DOE technical standards list: Department of Energy standards index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This technical standards list (TSL) was prepared for use by personnel involved in the selection and use of US DOE technical standards and other government and non-government standards. This TSL provides listings of current DOE technical standards, non-government standards that have been adopted by DOE, other government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and cancelled DOE technical standards. Standards are indexed by type in the appendices to this document. Definitions of and general guidance for the use of standards are also provided.

  20. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan. Topical report, October 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastorfer, J.R.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zellmer, S.D.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1995-04-01

    This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth wetland sites mapped Lenawee soils were selected in Midland County, Michigan: Site 1, a younger stand subjected to recent selective logging, and Site 2, a more mature stand. The collection of ecological data to analyze plant succession on the right-of-way (ROW) and the effects of the developing ROW plant communities on adjacent forest communities was initiated in 1989. Cover class estimates were made for understory and ROW plant species on the basis of 1 {times} 1{minus}m quadrats. Individual stem diameters and species counts were recorded for overstory plants in 10{minus}m quadrats. Although long-term studies have not been completed, firm baseline data were established for comparative analyses with future sampling. Current data indicate that vegetation became well-established on the ROW within one year and subsequently increased in coverage. About 65% of the species were wetland indicators, and the dominants included seeded and natural invading species; nevertheless, some elements of the original flora regenerated and persist. The plants of the ecotone understories of both sites changed from their original composition as a result of the installation of the gas pipeline. Although some forest species persist at both sites, the ecotone of Site I was influenced more by the seeded species, whereas the natural invaders were more important at Site 2.

  1. COORDINATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure provides guidance on the formal coordination of DOE Technical Standards in the DOE Technical Standards Program (TSP). The purpose of coordination of draft technical standards...

  2. Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Beyond the Standard Model 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues submit Physics Beyond the Standard Model...

  3. ISO 50001 Energy Management Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-08-12

    This powerful standard from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) provides an internationally recognized framework for organizations to voluntarily implement an energy management system.

  4. MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    financial assistance from the Bonneville Power Administration and the region's utilities. In addition of the plan by the Administrator, are directly attributable to such measure or resource. [Northwest Power ActMODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION As directed by the Northwest Power Act, the Council has

  5. Model conservation standards bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This bibliography is divided into sections dealing with building design (superinsulation, solar houses, earth sheltered houses, heat loss calculation, lighting, retrofitting); heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; windows; doors; walls; roofs; floors; air leakage/infiltration; insulation materials; indoor air quality; moisture; performance; codes, laws, standards; economics; and program description. (DLC)

  6. Clothing Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01

    stream_source_info pdf_2298.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 20810 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_2298.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Clothing Quality Standards E-403...

  7. Derived Concentration Technical Standard

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-05

    This standard supports the implementation of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. It also establishes the numerical values of DCSs in a manner reflecting the current state of knowledge and practice in radiation protection

  8. Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

  9. UCIT Data Network Standards Campus Wireless Network Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    UCIT Data Network Standards Campus Wireless Network Standard Classification IT Infrastructure Table.1. Standardization of the U of C's 802.11 wireless networks and frequency bands is required to insure availability of the wireless network to the campus community. Standards of use will improve the wireless service and help

  10. The Evolution of Vertical IS Standards: Electronic Interchange Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinfield, Charles

    on the technical details of IT-related standards, surprisingly little empirical research addresses the development from horizontal standards, not only in their narrower applicability, but also in their technical conteThe Evolution of Vertical IS Standards: Electronic Interchange Standards in the US Home Mortgage

  11. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  12. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    and nickel hydroxide suspended solid waste between 1953 and 1979 into Foundry Cove, which is tidally of the cadmium from the sediment from within Foundry Cove. Here, we demonstrate that the cleanup reduced cadmium Callinectes sapidus near Foundry Cove, but also across a broad reach of the Hudson River. Before the cleanup

  13. Forces on laboratory model dredge cutterhead 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Dustin Ray

    2010-07-14

    coefficients (non-cavitating) - D, z = water depth ft d1, d2 = Cutting force coefficients (cavitating) - d50 = Mean grain diameter mm Dc = Depth of Cut in Dcutter = Diameter of cutterhead in ????1???? = Distance between cell1 to center of mass... redesigned cell1 to center of mass of cutter in z direction in ? = Phase shift rad ?c = Cavitation transition angle rad ???? = Axial cutting force lb ??? = Horizontal cutting force (F#nc represents non-cavitating) lb ???? = Vertical cutting...

  14. BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    experience. It addresses the look and feel of the physical environment by focusing on design elements1 BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS STANDARDS AND DESIGN GUIDELINES 1 CAMPUS STANDARDS AND DESIGN Standards and Design Guidelines are standard and enforceable design guidelines for all design

  15. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  16. Standard Scenarios Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), that aims to document and implement an annual process designed to identify a realistic and timely set of input assumptions (e.g., technology cost and performance, fuel costs), and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios), initially for electric sector analysis.

  17. Standard interface file handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  18. Standard Review Plan Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2Standard Method of Test

  19. Seminar on Software Engineering Software Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    APIs and protocols Process standards Quality standards Software engineering terminology Lifecycle- operability Certification, guidelines Assurances #12;Software Standards Quality standards are rare - HardSeminar on Software Engineering Software Standards #12;"the good thing about standards

  20. Standards Panel: 1. Stephen Diamond, General Manager, Industry Standards Office and Global Standards Officer, EMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standards Panel: 1. Stephen Diamond, General Manager, Industry Standards Office and Global was President of the IEEE Computer Society. Steve is General Manager of the Industry Standards Office at EMC Standards Officer, EMC Corporation, Office of the CTO Steve Diamond has 30 years of management, marketing

  1. Standards of Conduct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsorJurczynski and HansStanStandards

  2. Title Standards 2001

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Laclede GasEfficiency| Department of Energy TheMeeksStandards 2001 A

  3. Standards | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartmentSpecialCode of Record Standard

  4. ORISE: Standards development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHow ORISE is MakingScience EducationStandards

  5. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system field acceptance testprocedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E) installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas are constructed as intended by the design.

  6. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  7. A discussion SuStainability StandardS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A discussion SuStainability StandardS in China­latin ameriCa trade and inveStment Emma Blackmor@iied.org, www.iied.org/pubs Citation Blackmore, E. Li, D., and Casallas, S. (2013). Sustainability standards.regent-typesetting.co.uk Photo credit Simon Lim Edited by Nina Berhman Series Editor Emma Blackmore Shaping Sustainable Markets

  8. New standard exceeds expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, M.J. (Environmental Data Resources Inc., Southport, CT (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The new ASTM environmental due diligence standard is delivering far more than expected when it was conceived in 1990. Its use goes well beyond the relatively narrow legal liability protection that was the primary goal in its development. The real estate industry, spearheaded by the lending community, was preoccupied with environmental risk and liability. Lenders throughout the concept's evolution have been at the forefront in defining environmental due diligence. The lender liability rule is intended to protect property owners from CERCLA liability for property they own or companies they manage (for example, as a result of foreclosure). The new site assessment standard increasingly is considered a benchmark for prudent environmental due diligence in the interest of risk management, not legal liability. The focus on risk management, including collateral devaluation and corporate credit risk, are becoming dominant areas of policy focus in the lending industry. Lenders now are revising their policies to incorporate transactions beyond issues of real estate, in which a company's economic viability and ability to service debt could be impacted by an environmental problem unrelated to property transfers.

  9. Standard Templates Adaptive Parallel Library 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzu, Francisco Jose

    2000-01-01

    STAPL (Standard Templates Adaptive Parallel Library) is a parallel C++ library designed as a superset of the C++ Standard Template Library (STL), sequentially consistent for functions with the same name, and executed on uni- or multi- processor...

  10. Energy Standards for State Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The State is still required by statute to adopt planning and construction standards for state buildings that conserve energy and optimize the energy performance of new buildings. The standards mu...

  11. Energy Efficiency Standards for Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007 the District of Columbia (D.C.) enacted legislation, entitled the Energy Efficiency Standards Act of 2007, which created efficiency standards for six products, four of which were...

  12. Energy Efficiency Standards for Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards:...

  13. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM TOPICAL COMMITTEES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes how topical committees are organized and recognized under the Technical Standards Program. 

  14. Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 National Center for Environmental Health Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services #12;#12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (Version 2.0) Updated May 2014 #12;Environmental Public Health Performance Standards

  15. AN UPDATE ON CRYPTOGRAPHIC STANDARDS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    has worked actively with other government and industry organizations to develop standards government and industry organizations to develop standards and guidelines for the cost-effective usesMay 2006 AN UPDATE ON CRYPTOGRAPHIC STANDARDS, GUIDELINES, AND TESTING REQUIREMENTS AN UPDATE

  16. China Cools with Tighter RAC Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang; Rosenquist, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    standards on energy savings, electric generation capacity,standards on energy savings, electric generation capacity,

  17. Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2004 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - September 2004 Inside this issue: TSP Manager's Note... 1 Pollution...

  18. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Biedermann, Grant (Albuquerque, NM); Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stick, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, III, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  19. Non standard neutrino interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, O G

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have become well-known phenomenon; the measurements of neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences are continuously improving. Future oscillation experiments will eventually determine the remaining unknown neutrino parameters, namely, the mass ordering, normal or inverted, and the CP-violating phase. On the other hand, the absolute mass scale of neutrinos could be probed by cosmological observations, single beta decay as well as by neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Furthermore, the last one may shed light on the nature of neutrinos, Dirac or Majorana, by measuring the effective Majorana mass of neutrinos. However, the neutrino mass generation mechanism remains unknown. A well-motivated phenomenological approach to search for new physics, in the neutrino sector, is that of non-standard interactions. In this short review, the current constraints in this picture, as well as the perspectives from future experiments, are discussed.

  20. ARM Standards Policy Committee Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cialella, A; Jensen, M; Koontz, A; McFarlane, S; McCoy, R; Monroe, J; Palanisamy, G; Perez, R; Sivaraman, C

    2012-09-19

    Data and metadata standards promote the consistent recording of information and are necessary to ensure the stability and high quality of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility data products for scientific users. Standards also enable automated routines to be developed to examine data, which leads to more efficient operations and assessment of data quality. Although ARM Infrastructure agrees on the utility of data and metadata standards, there is significant confusion over the existing standards and the process for allowing the release of new data products with exceptions to the standards. The ARM Standards Policy Committee was initiated in March 2012 to develop a set of policies and best practices for ARM data and metadata standards.

  1. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1996 annual report wetlands research related to the Pen Branch restoration effort on the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Kolka, R.K. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States); Trettin, C.C. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service and their collaborators (SRTC, SREL, and several universities) in wetlands monitoring and research on the Savannah River Site. This report describes the rationales, methods, and results (when available) of these studies and summarizes and integrates the available information through 1996.

  2. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  3. Comments of the Independent Peer-Review Team for the Interim Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region Submitted August 10, 2007 Initials: Reviewer: HC Norman, Frank, PWS Development Center (ERDC) and the Midwest Working Group are JP Pagliara, Joe, PWS. Recommend replacing "abundant" with "adequate" or add "with periodic or prolonged wet periods or droughts

  4. A Long-Term, High-Resolution Wetland Dataset over the Amazon Basin, Downscaled from a Multiwavelength Retrieval Using SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Long-Term, High-Resolution Wetland Dataset over the Amazon Basin, Downscaled from Matiere en Astrophysique, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France FABRICE PAPA Laboratoire d'Etude en Rayonnement et de la Matiere en Astrophysique, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, France (Manuscript received 29

  5. Temporal patterns of methane emissions from wetland rice fields treated by different modes of N application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wassmann, R.; Neue, H.U.; Lantin, R.S.; Aduna, J.B.; Alberto, M.C.R.; Andales, M.J.; Tan, M.J.; Hoffmann, H.; Papen, H.; Gon, H.A.C. D. van der

    1994-08-20

    Methane emission rates from wetland rice fields were determined in Los Banos (Philipppines) using an automatic system that allows continuous measurements over time. Methane emission was monitored in an irrigated Aquandic Epiaqualf planted to rice cultivar IR72. Urea fertilizer was applied using four modes: (1) broadcast 10 days after transplanting, (2) broadcast at transplanting, (3) broadcast and incorporated at final harrowing, and (4) deep placement as sulfur-coated granules. The treatments were laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. Measurements were done in the 1991 wet season, 1992 dry season (four treatments), and the 1992 wet season (only treatment 3). Methane emission rates from the experimental plots showed pronounced season and diel variations. The diel pattern of methane emission rates followed a consistent pattern, with highest rates observed in the early afternoon and lowest rates in the early morning. Methane emission rate was generally highest at the ripening stage. The average methane emission rate during the 1992 dry season (190 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}) exceeded the average flux rates of the 1992 wet season (79 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}) by a factor of 2.4. The total methane emitted from these flooded rice fields amounted to 19 g CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} in the dry season with rice yields of 5.2-6.3 ha{sup {minus}1} and 7 g CH{sub 4} m{sup {minus}2} in the wet season with rice yields of 2.4-3.3 t ha{sup {minus}1} regardless of the mode of N application. Significant amounts corresponding to 20% of the methane released under waterlogged conditions were released when the soil was drained after harvest. Emission rates increased sharply when the floodwater receded and macropores started to drain. Emission of methane stopped only when the soil became fully aerated. 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Environmental standards provide competitive advantage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chynoweth, E.; Kirshner, E.

    1993-04-28

    Quality organizations are breaking new ground with the development of international standards for environmental management. These promise to provide the platform for chemical companies wanting to establish their environmental credibility with a global audience. [open quotes]It will be similar to auditing our customers to ISO 9000[close quote], says the environmental manager for a European chemical firm. [open quote]We will only want to deal with people who have got their environmental act together. And we'll be in a better competitive positions[close quote]. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO;Geneva) has set up a taskforce to develop an environmental management standard, which is expected to be completed by the mid-1990s. Observers think the ISO standard will draw heavily on the British Standard Institute's (BSI;London) environmental management standard, BS7750, which will likely be the first system adopted in the world. Published last year, BS7750 has been extensively piloted in the UK (CW, Sept. 30, 1992, p. 62) and is now set to be revised before being offically adopted by BSI. The UK's Chemical Industries Association (CIA;London) is anxious to prevent a proliferation of standards, and its report on BS7750 pilot projects calls for an approach integrating quality, environment, and health and safety. But standard setters, including ISO, appear to be moving in the opposite direction. In the US, the American national Standards Institute (ANSI;Washington) has started work on an environmental management standard.

  7. Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP) Issued by Office of Acquisition and Project Management MA-63 March 12, 2014 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Acquisition and Project...

  8. web identity standards introduction .............................................................................................................87

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    web identity standards sectionten 86 contents introduction............................................................................................................... 89-90 tagline and the web .................................................................................................91 tagline and the web: improper use

  9. Modeling Gaps and Overlaps of Sustainability Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Alessio, Anna E.; Witherell, Paul; Rachuri, Sudarsan

    2012-01-01

    the standards and an understanding of the technical analysisSustainability Standards Modeling Results of Technicalfor the technical analysis of sustainability standards.

  10. Time Series Photometry Data: Standard Access, Standard Formats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, András

    Time Series Photometry Data: Standard Access, Standard Formats Andr#19; as Holl Konkoly Observatory a discussion on data access and #12;le format aspects of photometry. Introduction Presently there is time series photometry data available in public databases, but the access to these varies from one collection

  11. Standard and non standard ideas for the Higgs boson sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbondandolo, Alberto

    Standard and non standard ideas for the Higgs boson sector Riccardo Barbieri Johns Hopkins Workshop as the Higgs boson is in their low-energy spectrum We only know of approximate symmetries that can explain synoptic table Supersymmetric The SM Higgs boson TC-like Minimally extended Higgsless "Composite" 5

  12. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system shop acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-10-02

    The purpose of this report is to document that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E), fabricated by Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) for installation on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas, are constructed as intended by the design. The ATP performance will verify proper system fabrication.

  13. Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 197

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    controls. Exports of cryptographic modules implementing this standard and technical data regarding themFederal Information Processing Standards Publication 197 November 26, 2001 Announcing the ADVANCED ENCRYPTION STANDARD (AES) Federal Information Processing Standards Publications (FIPS PUBS) are issued

  14. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issuance Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) - Central Air Conditioner Regional Standards Enforcement Working Group; Notice of Open...

  15. BIOASSESSMENT OF SILVICULTURAL IMPACTS IN STREAMS AND WETLANDS OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchens, John

    , thermal, and chemical regimes, and changing the base of food webs. Biotic impacts of logging on streams that maintaining water quality (i.e., water chemistry) standards alone does Water, Air, and Soil Pollution: Focus 4-source pollution (i.e., that from a defined location such as a pipe) has been amelior- ated greatly. Today, however

  16. How to align field guides and standards to the Standard Work Specifications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation demonstrates how to align field guides and standards to the Standard Work Specifications.

  17. National Green Building Standard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-07-01

    DOE's Building America Program is a research and development program to improve the energy performance of new and existing homes. The ultimate goal of the Building America Program is to achieve examples of cost-effective, energy efficient solutions for all U.S. climate zones. Periodic maintenance of an ANSI standard by review of the entire document and action to revise or reaffirm it on a schedule not to exceed five years is required by ANSI. In compliance, a consensus group has once again been formed and the National Green Building Standard is currently being reviewed to comply with the periodic maintenance requirement of an ANSI standard.

  18. Functional design criteria for standard hydrogen monitoring system portable platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-01-17

    Functional design description for a Standard-E cabinet arrangement Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System Portable Platform.

  19. Commercial Building Codes and Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building...

  20. Technical Standards Newsletter - May 2001 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Standards Newsletter - May 2001 Technical Standards Newsletter - May 2001 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - May 2001 INSIDE THIS ISSUE: DOE Technical Standards...

  1. Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Technical Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Diagnostic Medical Sonography Clinical Technical Standards Listed below are the technical standards identified for students in the Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) clinical program. Review each standard and think about your ability to meet the standard 100% or if you are unable to meet the standard, what

  2. Nuclear Data Verification and Standardization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karam, Lisa R.; Arif, Muhammad; Thompson, Alan K.

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction verification and standardization data for the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Nuclear Physics programs which include astrophysics, radioactive beam studies, and heavy-ion reactions. The measurements made in this program are also useful to other programs that indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. These include homeland security, personnel health and safety, nuclear waste disposal, treaty verification, national defense, and nuclear based energy production. The work includes the verification of reference standard cross sections and related neutron data employing the unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; and the preservation of standard reference deposits. An essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data standards including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  3. George Mason University Architecture Standards Committee Charter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and maintain technology architecture standards; · Establish, publish and maintain software development, testing bodies; · Assess periodically technology architecture standards; · Assess periodically the proceduresGeorge Mason University Architecture Standards Committee Charter Page 1 of 3 12/2/2013 Purpose

  4. An overview of software safety standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    The writing of standards for software safety is an increasingly important activity. This essay briefly describes the two primary standards-writing organizations, IEEE and IEC, and provides a discussion of some of the more interesting software safety standards.

  5. Information Technology: American National Standard for Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Technology: American National Standard for Information Systems-- Data Format-271 Information Technology: American National Standard for Information Systems-- Data Format for the Interchange Sponsored by Information Access Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards

  6. An Estoppel Doctrine for Patented Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merges, Robert P; Kuhn, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    to defend suit over industry standards, but the patenteesThrough the Capture of Industry Standards, 17 B ERKELEY Tin the face of an industry standard that infringes a patent

  7. The standard model and colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated. (LEW)

  8. Technical Standards, Program Project Justification Statement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 29, 2012 DOE Technical Standards Program Project Justification Statement As part of the new justification process for developing or revising DOE Technical Standards,...

  9. Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear facilities. DOE-STD-1150-2013, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard Type: Invoked Technical Standards Status: Current Approved Date: Dec 02, 2013...

  10. Developing Integrated National Design Standards for Offshore...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Developing Integrated National Design Standards for Offshore Wind Plants Developing Integrated National Design Standards for Offshore Wind Plants January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis...

  11. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy...

  12. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States. 76 FR 37408. DOE has initiated a...

  13. Cooperation on Sustainability Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooperation on Sustainability Standards Cooperation on Sustainability Standards Keith Kline, ORNL, presentation at the December 5, 2012, Biomass Program-hosted International...

  14. Standards Increase Market Confidence in SSL Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that reviews current and future SSL standards developed by DOE and other standards-setting organizations to effectively measure and characterize SSL lighting products.

  15. Furniture Standards Contract Price Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    1 Furniture Standards Contract Price Guide Issue 1 - July 2007 www.broadstock.co.uk University of Sussex #12;2 Contents Office 5 1600 x 1600 Universal workstations 6 Double wave desks 7 Fixed tables 7 Circular tables 7 Bench 8 Screens 10 Electrics 12 Storage 13 Pedestals 14 Magnus wooden storage 15 Metrix

  16. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  17. Nanoscale Stress Measurements and Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Nanoscale Stress Measurements and Standards SEMICONDUCTORS Our objective is to develop accurate and lifetime, and address a critical measurement need in the MEMS industry, i.e., 90 % of MEMS customers and Customers · The semiconductor microelectronics industry is a $250B worldwide market with 9% cumulative

  18. International Standards in Forensic DNA and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    documentary (technical) standards physical (measurement) standards Certified reference material to aidInternational Standards in Forensic DNA and Recent Forensic Science Activities in the United States John M. Butler, Ph.D. National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Fellow & Special Assistant

  19. Title 24, Part 6 2013 Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -rulemaking industry meetings · Workshops on proposed standards · Notice of Proposed Action and "45-day language 24 2013 Standards Convened more than 45 Industry stakeholder groups over the last year to inform themTitle 24, Part 6 2013 Standards 2013 Building Standards Update Mazi Shirakh, PE Martha Brook, PE

  20. Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer

    2009-08-19

    I present a brief overview of some exciting possibilities for physics Beyond the Standard Model. I include short discussions of neutrino physics, the strong CP problem and axions, GUTs, large and warped extra dimensions, Little Higgs models and supersymmetry. The chances appear excellent that in the next few years-- as the LHC era gets underway-- data from a bevy of experiments will point the way to a new paradigm for the laws of physics as we know them.

  1. DOE limited standard: Operations assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

  2. Furnace Standard Analysis Discussion Document

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathyEnergydetailsof EnergyStandard *

  3. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-18

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr?1, with wetlandmore »methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr?1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 were in the range of 14.6–30.4 Tg yr?1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr?1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr?1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.« less

  4. 1998 federal technical standards workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The theme for the 1998 workshop was Standards Management -- A World of Change and Opportunities. The workshop`s goal was to further the implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) through the sharing of standards management success stories, lessons learned, and emerging initiatives within the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The target audience for this workshop included agency/department and contractor personnel and representatives of standards developing organizations that either used technical standards in their work for the Federal Government of participated in standards writing/management activities in support of the missions and programs of Federal agencies/departments. As with previous standards workshops sponsored by the DOE, views on the technical subject areas under the workshop theme were solicited from and provided by agency Standards Executives and standards program managers, voluntary standards organizations, and the private sector. This report includes vugraphs of the presentations.

  5. Standards & Testing NIST has a long history of advancing standards and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry health IT standards and the development of standards needed for the future, such as those provides technical expertise and leverages industry-led, consensus-based standards developmentStandards & Testing NIST has a long history of advancing standards and the use of technology

  6. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  7. Beyond the Standard Model Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERTWaterSharingBeyond the Standard

  8. Standard Terms and Conditions | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2, 2014ApplicationLanceStaff DeputyStandard Terms

  9. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Standards Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit TheCompetitiveMatt PageEnergyStandards Development

  10. Clear Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal Technologies Place:Standards Jump to: navigation, search

  11. Social Responsibility Standards: A Quick Glimpse Although efforts to establish measurements, standards and certifications related to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    to establish measurements, standards and certifications related to various areas of social: ISO Standard 24000--Social Responsibility: The International Organization't be a certification standard. FOOD LABELING Fairtrade Labelling Organizations

  12. Information Technology: American National Standard for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Technology: American National Standard for Information Systems-- Data Format Publication 500-245 Information Technology: American National Standard for Information Systems-- Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint, Facial, & Scar Mark & Tattoo (SMT) Information Sponsored by Information Technology

  13. JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD DISCLOSURE STATEMENT FOR EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS CASB DS-2 March 23, 2010 #12;COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD DISCLOSURE STATEMENT REQUIRED BY PUBLIC LAW 100-679 EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS INDEX JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERISTY GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS

  14. A Pragmatic Standard of Legal Validity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, John

    2012-07-16

    American jurisprudence currently applies two incompatible validity standards to determine which laws are enforceable. The natural law tradition evaluates validity by an uncertain standard of divine law, and its methodology relies on contradictory...

  15. Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Montana Department of Labor must also develop and adopt high performance building standards, along with the Montana university system and other state agencies. These standards must take into...

  16. Late standardization and technological catch-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratanawaraha, Apiwat, 1972-

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine the process of "late standardization," in which latecomers engage in standards activities in order to move towards and beyond the technological frontier. Based on case studies of latecomers in the ...

  17. Information Technology: American National Standard for Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Technology: American National Standard for Information Systems-- Data Format 500-275 Information Technology: American National Standard for Information Systems-- Data Format Coleman, and Patrice Yuh, Editors Sponsored by Information Access Division Information Technology

  18. New and revised standards for coke production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  19. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01

    National Standards Institute (ANSI), it has received littleversion of the Georgia Tech/ANSI energy management standard.developed by Georgia Tech/ANSI, was based on ISO management

  20. Measurements and Standards for Thermoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurements and Standards for Thermoelectric Materials CERAMICS Our goal is to develop standard, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity) for thin film and bulk thermoelectric materials to enable approach will facilitate comparison of thermoelectric data between leading laboratories, and accelerate

  1. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  2. The Building Standard (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1964 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael

    1964-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1964 No. 802 (S. 50) BUILDING AND BUILDINGS The Building Standards (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1964

  3. EPA's Renewable Fuels Standard Web page

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-30

    The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program regulations were developed in collaboration with refiners, renewable fuel producers, and many other stakeholders.

  4. ANS Standards to Support DOE NPH Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ANS Standards to Support DOE NPH Design DOE NPH Workshop, Germantown, MD Carl Mazzola, CFS October 22, 2014

  5. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Communication Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Communication Standards site by fiscal year.

  6. 1996 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The workshop theme is `The Strategic Standardization Initiative - A Technology Exchange and Global Competitiveness Challenge for DOE.` The workshop goal is to inform the DOE technical standards community of strategic standardization activities taking place in the Department, other Government agencies, standards developing organizations, and industry. Individuals working on technical standards will be challenged to improve cooperation and communications with the involved organizations in response to the initiative. Workshop sessions include presentations by representatives from various Government agencies that focus on coordination among and participation of Government personnel in the voluntary standards process; reports by standards organizations, industry, and DOE representatives on current technology exchange programs; and how the road ahead appears for `information superhighway` standardization. Another session highlights successful standardization case studies selected from several sites across the DOE complex. The workshop concludes with a panel discussion on the goals and objectives of the DOE Technical Standards Program as envisioned by senior DOE management. The annual workshop on technical standards has proven to be an effective medium for communicating information related to standards throughout the DOE community. Technical standards are used to transfer technology and standardize work processes to produce consistent, acceptable results. They provide a practical solution to the Department`s challenge to protect the environment and the health and safety of the public and workers during all facility operations. Through standards, the technologies of industries and governments worldwide are available to DOE. The DOE Technical Standards Program, a Department-wide effort that crosscuts all organizations and disciplines, links the Department to those technologies.

  7. Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? Americanto Implement the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta?Paper Series Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel

  8. Living up to standards Margaret King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to record my thanks to Nigel Bevan, technical editor of the ISO standards discussed for much interestingLiving up to standards Margaret King TIM/ISSCO ETI University of Geneva Margaret reusable" by arguing that a set of ISO standards developed for the evaluation of software in general

  9. NISTIR 7977 NIST Cryptographic Standards and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by providing technical leadership for the Nation's measurement and standards infrastructure. ITL develops tests of management, administrative, technical, and physical standards and guidelines for the cost-effective securityNISTIR 7977 NIST Cryptographic Standards and Guidelines Development Process (Second Draft

  10. Improving the Security of Cryptographic Protocol Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    for their implementation. This generality is enabled by standards and technical documents such as Request for CommentsImproving the Security of Cryptographic Protocol Standards David Basin Cas Cremers Kunihiko Miyazaki Sasa Radomirovic Dai Watanabe May 1, 2014 Keywords: Standards, Network Protocols, Security

  11. NIST Cryptographic Standards and Guidelines Development Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Ronald L.

    as technical experts in the review of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cryptographicNIST Cryptographic Standards and Guidelines Development Process Report and Recommendations of the Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology July 2014

  12. NIST Standards in Trade Workshops Increase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Standards in Trade Workshops Increase Trade Opportunities and Exports for U.S. Industry Since 1995, U.S. industry has looked to the NIST Standards in Trade (SIT) Workshop Program to provide opportunities for cooperation on topics related to standards, conformity assessment and trade that are important

  13. A new standard pulsar magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece); Kalapotharakos, Constantinos [University of Maryland, College Park (UMDCP/CRESST), College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kazanas, Demosthenes, E-mail: icontop@academyofathens.gr [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    In view of recent efforts to probe the physical conditions in the pulsar current sheet, we revisit the standard solution that describes the main elements of the ideal force-free pulsar magnetosphere. The simple physical requirement that the electric current contained in the current layer consists of the local electric charge moving outward at close to the speed of light yields a new solution for the pulsar magnetosphere everywhere that is ideal force-free except in the current layer. The main elements of the new solution are as follows: (1) the pulsar spindown rate of the aligned rotator is 23% larger than that of the orthogonal vacuum rotator; (2) only 60% of the magnetic flux that crosses the light cylinder opens up to infinity; (3) the electric current closes along the other 40%, which gradually converges to the equator; (4) this transfers 40% of the total pulsar spindown energy flux in the equatorial current sheet, which is then dissipated in the acceleration of particles and in high-energy electromagnetic radiation; and (5) there is no separatrix current layer. Our solution is a minimum free-parameter solution in that the equatorial current layer is electrostatically supported against collapse and thus does not require a thermal particle population. In this respect, it is one more step toward the development of a new standard solution. We discuss the implications for intermittent pulsars and long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that the physical conditions in the equatorial current layer determine the global structure of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  14. National Agenda for Hydrogen Codes and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, C.

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of hydrogen codes and standards with an emphasis on the national effort supported and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the help and cooperation of standards and model code development organizations, industry, and other interested parties, DOE has established a coordinated national agenda for hydrogen and fuel cell codes and standards. With the adoption of the Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap and with its implementation through the Codes and Standards Technical Team, DOE helps strengthen the scientific basis for requirements incorporated in codes and standards that, in turn, will facilitate international market receptivity for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  15. 1993 DOE technical standards managers workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This workshop is focused on the benefits of the DOE technical standards program, which is focused toward the preferred use of non-Government standards for DOE activities and the development of DOE technical standards when non-Government standards are not available or are inappropriate. One goal of the program is to replace redundant site-specific standards with more universally accepted documents that have been scrutinized by experts. This replacement is discussed at the workshop along with the problems encountered and solutions found. The workshop provided an opportunity for geographically dispersed people to meet and advance their standards knowledge and efforts to support the program. Safety issues have been the driving force behind the program to date. Several companies offer products and services that support the development, processing, and retrieval of standards. This document mostly comprise vugraphs.

  16. voluntary product standard ps 1-07 National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and review as is required to assure the technical soundness of the standard, and seek satisfactory adjustment initiate and participate in the development of the standards, provide technical or other counselStructural Plywood voluntary product standard ps 1-07 National Institute of Standards

  17. Standards for Serials Metadata and for Terms of Availability 1 Descriptive Standards for Serials Metadata and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Leslie

    by UKOLN David Martin Mark Bide Book Industry Communication AUGUST 1997 #12;Standards for Serials MetadataStandards for Serials Metadata and for Terms of Availability 1 Descriptive Standards for Serials Metadata and Standards for Terms of Availability Metadata Two related eLib Supporting Studies commissioned

  18. Economical standard quantum process tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaohua Wu; Ke Xu

    2011-05-12

    Recently, Bendersky \\emph{et al.} developed a method to complete the task of characterizing an arbitrary $\\chi$ matrix element in a scalable way, Phys. Rev. Lett. Vol. \\textbf{100}, 190403(2008), where an auxiliary system was needed. In present work, we shall show that the same task can also be completed within the scheme of standard quantum process tomography (SQPT) where there is no requirement for ancilla. Our method depends on two observations: With the elaborately chosen operators basis, the SQPT may have an economical form where a single run of experiment, in which we measure the expectation value of a chosen operator in the outport of the quantum channel with a known input, is sufficient to characterize a selected $\\chi$ matrix element; With the progress recently achieved in quantum entanglement detection, we also find that the number of the experimental settings to realize the experiment for the selected $\\chi$ matrix element does not exceed 2N for the N-qubits system. For practice, our scheme can be applied for the cases where the controlled two-body interaction is neither available nor desirable.

  19. Vacuum Stability of Standard Model^{++}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Taylor, Tomasz R; Vlcek, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The latest results of the ATLAS and CMS experiments point to a preferred narrow Higgs mass range (m_h \\simeq 124 - 126 GeV) in which the effective potential of the Standard Model (SM) develops a vacuum instability at a scale 10^{9} -10^{11} GeV, with the precise scale depending on the precise value of the top quark mass and the strong coupling constant. Motivated by this experimental situation, we present here a detailed investigation about the stability of the SM^{++} vacuum, which is characterized by a simple extension of the SM obtained by adding to the scalar sector a complex SU(2) singlet that has the quantum numbers of the right-handed neutrino, H", and to the gauge sector an U(1) that is broken by the vacuum expectation value of H". We derive the complete set of renormalization group equations at one loop. We then pursue a numerical study of the system to determine the triviality and vacuum stability bounds, using a scan of 10^4 random set of points to fix the initial conditions. We show that, if there...

  20. STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

    2002-02-25

    Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

  1. Beyond the Cosmological Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin Joyce; Bhuvnesh Jain; Justin Khoury; Mark Trodden

    2014-12-15

    After a decade and a half of research motivated by the accelerating universe, theory and experiment have a reached a certain level of maturity. The development of theoretical models beyond \\Lambda, or smooth dark energy, often called modified gravity, has led to broader insights into a path forward, and a host of observational and experimental tests have been developed. In this review we present the current state of the field and describe a framework for anticipating developments in the next decade. We identify the guiding principles for rigorous and consistent modifications of the standard model, and discuss the prospects for empirical tests. We begin by reviewing attempts to consistently modify Einstein gravity in the infrared, focusing on the notion that additional degrees of freedom introduced by the modification must screen themselves from local tests of gravity. We categorize screening mechanisms into three broad classes: mechanisms which become active in regions of high Newtonian potential, those in which first derivatives become important, and those for which second derivatives are important. Examples of the first class, such as f(R) gravity, employ the familiar chameleon or symmetron mechanisms, whereas examples of the last class are galileon and massive gravity theories, employing the Vainshtein mechanism. In each case, we describe the theories as effective theories. We describe experimental tests, summarizing laboratory and solar system tests and describing in some detail astrophysical and cosmological tests. We discuss future tests which will be sensitive to different signatures of new physics in the gravitational sector. Parts that are more relevant to theorists vs. observers/experimentalists are clearly indicated, in the hope that this will serve as a useful reference for both audiences, as well as helping those interested in bridging the gap between them.

  2. OSHA`s process safety management standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morelli, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    On February 24, 1992, OSHA published the final rule for its Process Safety Management Standard (PSM) mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. (see Federal Register 57 FR 6356-6417). This standard imposes several responsibilities upon employers whose processes can cause large accident releases that could result in processes can cause large accident releases that could result in catastrophes. In contrast to OSHA`s Hazard Communication standard which focuses on routine daily exposures to hazardous materials, the PSM Standard is concerned with processes whereby the use, storage, manufacturing, handling or on-site movement of highly hazardous chemicals which exceed threshold quantities, provides potential for a catastrophic release. The PSM Standard requires: a written program, plans, training, hazard analysis and compliance auditing. This paper outlines the provisions under this Standard pursuant to OSHA regulation 29 Code of Federal Regulation 1910.119.

  3. An alternative to the standard model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seungwon Baek; Pyungwon Ko; Wan-Il Park

    2013-10-23

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark $U(1)_X$ symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken $U(1)_X$ case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if $U(1)_X$ is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  4. Nuclear Physics and the New Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States) and Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    Nuclear physics studies of fundamental symmetries and neutrino properties have played a vital role in the development and confirmation of the Standard Model of fundamental interactions. With the advent of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, experiments at the high energy frontier promise exciting discoveries about the larger framework in which the Standard Model lies. In this talk, I discuss the complementary opportunities for probing the 'new Standard Model' with nuclear physics experiments at the low-energy high precision frontier.

  5. Codes and Standards Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Codes and Standards Tech Team (CSTT) mission is to enable and facilitate the appropriate research, development, & demonstration (RD&D) for the development of safe, performance-based defensible technical codes and standards that support the technology readiness and are appropriate for widespread consumer use of fuel cells and hydrogen-based technologies with commercialization by 2020. Therefore, it is important that the necessary codes and standards be in place no later than 2015.

  6. Sharyland Utilities- Commercial Standard Offer Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sharyland Utilities offers the Residential and "Hard-to-Reach" Standard Offer Programs, which encourage residential customers to pursue energy saving measures and equipment upgrades in their homes....

  7. Gene Calling Standards (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology Program, DOE JGI

    2011-04-28

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Nikos Kyrpides of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses gene calling standards at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 10, 2009.

  8. Technical Standards, Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes - November...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    report, Selection of Computer Codes for DOE Safety Analysis Applications, (August, 2002). Technical Standards, Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes More Documents & Publications DOE G...

  9. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment to Cut Businesses' Energy Bills and Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment to Cut...

  10. Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Council - Comments in response to DOE solicitation of views on the implementation of test procedure waivers for large capacity clothes washers Earthjustice, Appliance Standards...

  11. Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

  12. Energy Conservation Standards Rulemaking Peer Review Report ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Review Report ISSUANCE 2015-06-30: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Packaged Terminal Heat Pumps, Final Rule...

  13. Control Systems Security Standards: Accomplishments And Impacts...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    that need to be made toward meeting the priority strategies defined in the DOEDHS Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector. Control Systems Security Standards:...

  14. Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards, June 9, 2011.

  15. HANFORD MISSION SUPPORT CONTRACT Hanford Integrated Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Hanford Site Hoisting and Rigging Manual, DOE-LR-92-36, Revision 1 * Hanford Site LockoutTagout Procedure, DOE-0336 * Hanford Standardized HAZWOPER Training Program...

  16. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NREL. Historic Energy Efficiency Rules Would Save Consumers Money and Cut Carbon Emissions New Energy Efficiency Standards to Help Americans Save Money by Saving Energy, Cut...

  17. Implementation Guide of Medical Standards for Firefighters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These guidelines were prepared to assist the DOE contractor site occupational medical programs in developing NFPA-based firefighter standards that comply with the ADA.

  18. DOE Approved Technical Standards | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    04232001 DOE-STD-3028-2000 Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials This Standard establishes the criteria for the packaging and safe storage of...

  19. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01

    Netherlands has an Energy Management System, not a standard,LTAs and must use the Energy Management System. The 150 mostinvolvement. The energy management system (introduced as a

  20. Webinar: Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization," originally presented on September 11, 2014.

  1. Denton Municipal Electric- Standard Offer Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Within the GreenSense program, Denton Municipal Electric's Standard Offer Program provides rebates to large commercial and industrial customers for lighting retrofits, HVAC upgrades and motor...

  2. Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    1991. The Potential for Electricity Efficiency Improvementswww.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html>. FigureA STANDARD METRIC FOR ELECTRICITY SAVINGS Jonathan Koomey*,

  3. Energy Management Standards (EnMS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thailand, Korea) * Energy management standards are under development in China, Spain, Brazil, and European Union * ISO has initiated work on an international energy management...

  4. IEC 61850 Industrial Communication Standards under Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilaro, F M; Gonzalez-Berges, M

    2014-01-01

    IEC-61850, as part of the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) Technical Committee 57 (TC57), defines an international and standardized methodology to design electric power automation substations.

  5. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity & Fuel Lighting New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 Common lightbulbs now sold in the...

  6. Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Personnel Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating Personnel DOE Technical Standards Ownership APPENDIX B: Non-Government Standards (NGS) Committee...

  7. Legal and technical standards in digital rights management technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burk, DL

    2005-01-01

    18, 1124. LEGAL AND TECHNICAL STANDARDS reinterpretation99 (1995). LEGAL AND TECHNICAL STANDARDS attempting self-at 1171-73. LEGAL AND TECHNICAL STANDARDS Blizzard sued the

  8. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  9. Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, Robert Fletcher

    2005-02-17

    the actual cost. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author would like to thank his committee chair Dr. Robert Randall for all of his input and comments on this report and guidance throughout my graduate studies. He is also grateful for the recommendations................................................................................. 30 Introduction to Clamshell Cost Estimation................................................................... 30 Regional Cost Factors ................................................................................................... 30...

  10. Cost Estimation and Production Evaluation for Hopper Dredges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinberger, Thomas E.

    2010-07-14

    stream_source_info HOLLINBERGER-THESIS.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 86071 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name HOLLINBERGER-THESIS.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 COST... 254 295 10000 146 178 213 251 292 12000 143 175 210 248 289 14000 140 172 207 245 286 16000 138 169 204 242 283 18000 132 165 200 238 279 20000 130 162 196 234 275 22000 127 157 192 230 271 24000 122 153 188 225 266 26000 118 148 182 220 260 28000 113...

  11. Montana Portable Suction Dredging General Permit - Example Authorization |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett,GroundwaterEnergy Information PollutantOpen

  12. Montana Suction Dredge General Permit Application Information | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett,GroundwaterEnergy.10

  13. EPA - Section 404 Dredge and Fill Permitting webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)askDoubleEERE - EnergySPCC FAQs webpage

  14. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into three categories: criteria mostly related to marina design, criteria mostly related to water qualityVirginia, through the Virginia Marine Resources Commission, has developed detailed criteria for siting of marina facilities (VMRC, 1993) (Table 1).This project uses these VMRC marina siting criteria to develop a map

  15. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01

    ? diameter pipeline ? Cement-mortar lined steel with polyurethane coating ? Pipe protection is galvanic anode cathodic system ? Joints have full circumferential internal welds Conveyance Pipeline ? 43.5 miles long ? Travels north through Kaufman...

  16. TENNESSEE'S WETLANDS REGULATORY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    SectionNatural Resources Section Division of Water Pollution ControlDivision of Water Pollution Control to unpolluted water DefinesDefines ""waterswaters"" of the stateof the state Defines pollutionDefines pollution 1200-4-7) "Pollution" means such alteration of...properties of the waters that will...result in harm

  17. Chemical Transformations in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) as a byproduct. Methane "Swamp gas" Natural Greenhouse Gas CH4 Release (mg C/m2 d) Bogs (150) Marshes (90 associated with breakdown of organic C and nitrogenous waste and for respiration! NOTE: Microbial populations. CO2 + H2O H2CO3 Reduction of Ferric Iron Hydroxides #12;3 Nitrogen Transformations First e- Acceptor

  18. Wetland (peat) Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentat LENA|UpcomingVisit12/10/15WeeklyTechnologies |

  19. Keep Wetland from Eroding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet) Sold toKeeler-Pennwalt-Wood-Pole-Removal

  20. DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards- August 1, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards.

  1. DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards- July 1, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards.

  2. National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Campus Gaithersburg, MD NET ZERO ENERGY Campus Gaithersburg, MD NET ZERO ENERGY RESIDENTIAL TEST FACILITY PROJECT: CONSULTANT: SHEET TITLE: SCALE Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Campus Gaithersburg, MD NET ZERO ENERGY RESIDENTIAL TEST FACILITY

  3. Impacts of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This service report addresses the renewable portfolio standard provision of S. 1766. At Senator Murkowski's request it also includes an analysis of the impacts of a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) patterned after the one called for in S. 1766, but where the required share is based on a 20% RPS by 2020 rather than the 10% RPS called for in S. 1766.

  4. NBS HANDBOOK 137 NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NBS HANDBOOK 137 #12;NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS The National Bureau of Standards1 was established) scientific and technological services for industry and government, (3) a technical basis for equity in trade, and (4) technical services to promote public safety. The Bureau's technical work is performed

  5. Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure Original Approval Date: October 27, 2014 of the Radiation Therapy Program. 1 #12;Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure accurately observe, as well as competently and independently complete complex technical procedures in a reasonable amount

  6. University of Edinburgh Feedback Standards & Guiding Principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    1 University of Edinburgh Feedback Standards & Guiding Principles Feedback plays a vital role out the standards required of feedback at Edinburgh, together with a framework of guiding principles within timetabled classes (tutorials, practicals, lectures) as well as more informally. And feedback

  7. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standard Guidelines #12;© Crown Copyright 2011 You may re-use this information (not including logos) free, visit: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence or write to the Information Policy Team; ecosystem services; environment; forestry; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL002/FC

  8. -Standard -PS 3.18-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumolo, Giovanni

    , or inspect products, designs, or installations for safety or health purposes. Any certification or other.18-2008 Page 3 - Standard - FOREWORD This part of the DICOM standard was developed jointly with ISO TC 215 and is published by both organizations. The text is identical to that published by ISO as ISO DIS 17432, though

  9. Webinar: Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization" on Thursday, September 11. The webinar will provide an overview of the SAE Standards SAE J2601 and J2799 and how they are applied to hydrogen fueling for fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs).

  10. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  11. Glueballs, Hybrids and the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonn, Universität

    Glueballs, Hybrids and the Standard Model: Hadron '97 Summary (Experiment) Eberhard Klempt views. 1 Introduction The role of gluons in hadron spectroscopy is the continuing theme of the HADRON news on the possibilty that the frontiers of the Standard Model may have been reached or surpassed

  12. NHA HYDROGEN SAFETY CODES AND STANDARDS ACTIVITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;putting U.S. manufacturers of hydrogen energy systems and components at risk of competitive disadvantage activity to develop and write new standards for hydrogen technologies. This includes such items as storage needed to move hydrogen into the energy sector. The NHA supports the development of codes and standards

  13. Experimental Measurement of a Model Pipeline Dredge Entrance Loss Coefficient and Modification of a Spreadsheet for Estimating Model Dredge Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girani, Joseph

    2014-04-17

    _rr, showing a suction vacuum increase throughout the test. ........................................................................................... 44 Figure 20. Photo sequence showing the effects of slowing the pump and closing discharge valve to clear... River and the Red Sea (Herbich, 1992). Since then, this process has been developed to use a multitude of hydraulic and mechanical systems. Specifically, a cutter at the end of the suction pipe loosens or cuts the sediment and the centrifugal pump...

  14. COMPARATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF MOLLUSKS IN DREDGED AND UN-DREDGED PORTIONS OF AN ESTUARY, WITH A SYSTEMATIC LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , WITH A SYSTEMATIC LIST OF SPECIESl BY JAMES E. SYKES AND JOHN R. HALL, FISHERY BIOLOGISTS BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL in the lagoon included studies of sediments (Goodell and Gorsline, 1961; Taylor and Saloman, 1969); hydrology (Saloman and Taylor, 1968); submerged vegetation (Pomeroy, 1960; Phillips, 1960) ; fishes (Springer

  15. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

  16. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  17. Appliance Efficiency Standards and Price Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spurlock, Cecily Anna

    2013-05-08

    I explore the effects of two simultaneous changes in minimum energy efficiency and ENERGY STAR standards for clothes washers. Adapting the Mussa and Rosen (1978) and Ronnen (1991) second-degree price discrimination model, I demonstrate that clothes washer prices and menus adjusted to the new standards in patterns consistent with a market in which firms had been price discriminating. In particular, I show evidence of discontinuous price drops at the time the standards were imposed, driven largely by mid-low efficiency segments of the market. The price discrimination model predicts this result. On the other hand, in a perfectly competition market, prices should increase for these market segments. Additionally, new models proliferated in the highest efficiency market segment following the standard changes. Finally, I show that firms appeared to use different adaptation strategies at the two instances of the standards changing.

  18. Progress and Effect of Energy-Saving Standards in China

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the development of energy-saving standards in China, results of standards, and work highlights.

  19. Quality Control, Standardization of Upgrades, and Workforce Expectatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Control, Standardization of Upgrades, and Workforce Expectations Quality Control, Standardization of Upgrades, and Workforce Expectations Better Buildings Residential...

  20. 16.6 Building Design Standards Page 1 of 8 Building Design Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    16.6 Building Design Standards Page 1 of 8 Building Design Standards Original Implementation: July 21, 2009 Last Revision: July 28, 2015 1. Statement of purpose This standard provides the building designer with general guidance regarding the university's intent to develop a campus of buildings having

  1. ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, M.

    2000-01-01

    . The standard is an attempt by the Society to address concerns over indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local...

  2. Issues in the Next Generation of Dependability Standards Existing IEEE software reliability standards do not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    systems. The extant software reliability standards and practices, using IEEE 982 [1] and AIAA R013 [2Issues in the Next Generation of Dependability Standards Abstract Existing IEEE software, these standards do not consider both hardware and software reliability nor do they include availability

  3. Construction Standards and Costs UC Irvine new construction pursues performance goals and applies quality standards that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Construction Standards and Costs UC Irvine new construction pursues performance goals and applies quality standards that affect the costs of capital projects. Periodic re-examination of these goals and standards is warranted. Construction costs are not "high" or "low" in the abstract, but rather in relation

  4. Incorporating Experience Curves in Appliance Standards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Chan, Peter; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Kantner, Colleen; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Stephen; Rosenquist, Gregory; Buskirk, Robert Van; Yang, Hung-Chia; Desroches, Louis-Benoit

    2011-10-31

    The technical analyses in support of U.S. energy conservation standards for residential appliances and commercial equipment have typically assumed that manufacturing costs and retail prices remain constant during the projected 30-year analysis period. There is, however, considerable evidence that this assumption does not reflect real market prices. Costs and prices generally fall in relation to cumulative production, a phenomenon known as experience and modeled by a fairly robust empirical experience curve. Using price data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and shipment data obtained as part of the standards analysis process, we present U.S. experience curves for room air conditioners, clothes dryers, central air conditioners, furnaces, and refrigerators and freezers. These allow us to develop more representative appliance price projections than the assumption-based approach of constant prices. These experience curves were incorporated into recent energy conservation standards for these products. The impact on the national modeling can be significant, often increasing the net present value of potential standard levels in the analysis. In some cases a previously cost-negative potential standard level demonstrates a benefit when incorporating experience. These results imply that past energy conservation standards analyses may have undervalued the economic benefits of potential standard levels.

  5. 1997 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy held its annual Technical Standards Program Workshop on July 8--10, 1997, at the Loews L`Enfant Plaza Hotel in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on aspects of implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 [Public Law (PL) 104-113] and the related revision (still pending) to OMB Circular A119 (OMB A119), Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Standards. It also addressed DOE`s efforts in transitioning to a standards-based operating culture, and, through this transition, to change from a developer of internal technical standards to a customer of external technical standards. The workshop was designed to provide a forum to better understand how the new law is affecting Department activities. Panel topics such as ``Public Law 104-113 and Its Influence on Federal Agency Standards Activities`` and ``Update on Global Standards Issues`` provided insight on both the internal and external effects of the new law. Keynote speaker Richard Meier of Meadowbrook International (and formerly the Deputy Assistant US Trade Representative) addressed the subject of international trade balance statistics. He pointed out that increases in US export figures do not necessarily indicate increases in employment. Rather, increased employment results from product growth. Mr Meier also discussed issues such as the US migration to the sue of the metric system, the impact of budget limitations on Government participation in voluntary standards organizations, international standards ISO 9000 and ISO 14000, and DOE`s role in the worldwide transition from weapons production to cleanup.

  6. CAFE Standards (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Pursuant to the Presidents announcement of a National Fuel Efficiency Policy, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EPA have promulgated nationally coordinated standards for tailpipe Carbon Dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions and fuel economy for light-duty vehicles (LDVs), which includes both passenger cars and light-duty trucks. In the joint rulemaking, the Environmental Protection Agency is enacting CO2-equivalent emissions standards under the Clean Air Act (CAA), and NHTSA is enacting companion Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  7. Standards and Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2Standard Method of TestStandardStandards

  8. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

  9. Assorted QCI Tips and Standards Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains a list of tips for taking the Quality Control Inspector (QCI) Home Energy Professional Certification Exam and a review of standards, provided by the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign's Indoor Climate Research & Training.

  10. Florida State University Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Document developed by: Information Technology Services Network Infrastructure Division #12;Florida State University ­ ITS Telecommunications Infrastructure Standards 2 INTRODUCTION ........3 REVISION HISTORY Information Technology Services Network & Communications Technology Division 644 W. Call Street Tallahassee

  11. China Cools with Tighter RAC Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang; Rosenquist, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy ConservationRoom Air-Conditioning Heat Pumps: An Engineering and Life-W EER W/W B A Split Heat pump Heat pump Where the standards

  12. The standard model and the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz

    1998-04-15

    I discuss some of the difficulties with formulating chiral symmetry on the lattice and review a recently proposed scheme for a fully finite and exactly gauge invariant lattice regularization of the standard model.

  13. Raising the Standard of AI Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Alan; Clutterbuck, R.

    1985-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the promotion of high-standards in commercial Artificial Intelligence products, namely an association of companies which would regulate their own membership using a code of practice and the ...

  14. Phonetic transcription standards for european names (onomastica). 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Mark; Fitt, Susan; Scott, Christina; Jack, Mervyn A

    1993-01-01

    This paper details the standards identified for phonetic transcription of names as part of the ONOMASTICA project, a European-wide research initiative for the construction of a multi-language pronunciation lexicon ...

  15. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01

    Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

  16. Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

  17. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

  18. Tissue sampling and standards for vertebrate genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    and standards for vertebrate genomics. GigaScience 2012 1:8.transition to conservation genomics. TIG 2010, 26:177–187.Siemens DH: Ecological genomics––changing perspectives on

  19. Status of Revisions to ASHRAE Standard 62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, F. M.

    1998-01-01

    The American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62- 1989 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor air Quality", adopted in 1989, is widely used by HVAC engineers to determine ventilation rates for various...

  20. Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    17 Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model By the early 1980s there were persuasive arguments the default future of international high energy physics. The LHC project calls for two multipurpose detectors

  1. The UK Woodland Assurance Standard Second Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes. Seven years on, it is clear that the working group which prepared the standard produced a first Kingdom. This second edition has again been developed by a multi-stakeholder steering group whose work

  2. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Gripaios

    2015-03-09

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  3. Moving Forward With Fuel Economy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Council. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go? (Lee Schipper. Automobile Fuel. Economy and CO 2 Emissions inGraham. The Effect of Fuel Economy Standards on Automobile

  4. Moving Beyond Prevailing Street Design Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    12 The California Fire Code and other state laws 12 Local policies and design standards 14 Case law like to thank the Fresno and Sacramento city officials who took the time to share valuable information

  5. Impacts of a 15% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring that 15% of U.S. electricity sales be derived from qualifying renewable energy resources.

  6. Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. DOE Hosts LED Industry Standards Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy hosted an LED Industry Standards Workshop on March 1, 2006 in Washington, D.C. The Workshop provided a forum to encourage greater cooperation and coordination among...

  8. CAVIAR Hardware Interface Standards, Version P. Hafliger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Häfliger, Philipp

    to the extent that ensures the compat- ibility of all participants' devices, e.g. AER-PCBs, AER-chips, and AER A For issue 2.0: · Pin out of the 100 pin AER chip standard for a PGA100 packaging in section 2.1 has replaced this 100 pin AER chips can be found in section 3. 1 #12;AER signal name description ATA standard pin number

  9. State Appliance Standards (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    State appliance standards have existed for decades, starting with Californias enforcement of minimum efficiency requirements for refrigerators and several other products in 1979. In 1987, recognizing that different efficiency standards for the same products in different states could create problems for manufacturers, Congress enacted the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), which initially covered 12 products. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT92), EPACT2005, and EISA2007 added additional residential and commercial products to the 12 products originally specified under NAECA.

  10. Effect of noise on the standard mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karney, C.F.F.; Rechester, A.B.; White, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    The effect of a small amount of noise on the standard mapping is considered. Whenever the standard mapping possesses accelerator models (where the action increases approximately linearly with time), the diffusion coefficient contains a term proportional to the reciprocal of the variance of the noise term. At large values of the stochasticity parameter, the accelerator modes exhibit a universal behavior. As a result the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on stochasticity parameter also shows some universal behavior.

  11. An alternative to the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, Pyungwon; Park, Wan-Il

    2014-06-24

    We present an extension of the standard model to dark sector with an unbroken local dark U(1){sub X} symmetry. Including various singlet portal interactions provided by the standard model Higgs, right-handed neutrinos and kinetic mixing, we show that the model can address most of phenomenological issues (inflation, neutrino mass and mixing, baryon number asymmetry, dark matter, direct/indirect dark matter searches, some scale scale puzzles of the standard collisionless cold dark matter, vacuum stability of the standard model Higgs potential, dark radiation) and be regarded as an alternative to the standard model. The Higgs signal strength is equal to one as in the standard model for unbroken U(1){sub X} case with a scalar dark matter, but it could be less than one independent of decay channels if the dark matter is a dark sector fermion or if U(1){sub X} is spontaneously broken, because of a mixing with a new neutral scalar boson in the models.

  12. DOE-TSPP-8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards DOE-TSPP-8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards Technical Standards...

  13. PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF STANDARD AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-10-10

    The X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission revealed the occurrence, in polar coronal holes, of much more numerous jets than previously indicated by the Yohkoh/Soft X-ray Telescope. These plasma ejections can be of two types, depending on whether they fit the standard reconnection scenario for coronal jets or if they include a blowout-like eruption. In this work, we analyze two jets, one standard and one blowout, that have been observed by the Hinode and STEREO experiments. We aim to infer differences in the physical parameters that correspond to the different morphologies of the events. To this end, we adopt spectroscopic techniques and determine the profiles of the plasma temperature, density, and outflow speed versus time and position along the jets. The blowout jet has a higher outflow speed, a marginally higher temperature, and is rooted in a stronger magnetic field region than the standard event. Our data provide evidence for recursively occurring reconnection episodes within both the standard and the blowout jet, pointing either to bursty reconnection or to reconnection occurring at different locations over the jet lifetimes. We make a crude estimate of the energy budget of the two jets and show how energy is partitioned among different forms. Also, we show that the magnetic energy that feeds the blowout jet is a factor of 10 higher than the magnetic energy that fuels the standard event.

  14. Safety, codes and standards for hydrogen installations :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Aaron P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-04-01

    Automakers and fuel providers have made public commitments to commercialize light duty fuel cell electric vehicles and fueling infrastructure in select US regions beginning in 2014. The development, implementation, and advancement of meaningful codes and standards is critical to enable the effective deployment of clean and efficient fuel cell and hydrogen solutions in the energy technology marketplace. Metrics pertaining to the development and implementation of safety knowledge, codes, and standards are important to communicate progress and inform future R&D investments. This document describes the development and benchmarking of metrics specific to the development of hydrogen specific codes relevant for hydrogen refueling stations. These metrics will be most useful as the hydrogen fuel market transitions from pre-commercial to early-commercial phases. The target regions in California will serve as benchmarking case studies to quantify the success of past investments in research and development supporting safety codes and standards R&D.

  15. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, Radoslav; McLean, Thomas

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 ± 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  16. Overview of ATLAS Standard Model Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buttinger, William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The precise measurement of known Standard Model processes is an important part of the ATLAS physics programme. A wide spectrum of final states is covered ranging from the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section down to very rare processes like the production of same-sign W pairs. These measurements serve to constrain phenomenological models of the strong interaction, provide precision tests of perturbative QCD calculations up to the next-to-next-to-leading order, improve our knowledge on the proton structure, measure fundamental Standard Model parameters to high precision or test the Electroweak gauge structure, providing model-independent constraints on new physics. Recent highlights of Run-1 measurements are reported, including new results on multi-differential jet and photon production, precision measurements with single W and Z bosons and multiboson production. The ATLAS Standard model group is also committed to perform several measurements with the data collected in the early Run 2 of the LH...

  17. A derivative standard for polarimeter calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulhollan, G.; Clendenin, J.; Saez, P. [and others

    1996-10-01

    A long-standing problem in polarized electron physics is the lack of a traceable standard for calibrating electron spin polarimeters. While several polarimeters are absolutely calibrated to better than 2%, the typical instrument has an inherent accuracy no better than 10%. This variability among polarimeters makes it difficult to compare advances in polarized electron sources between laboratories. The authors have undertaken an effort to establish 100 nm thick molecular beam epitaxy grown GaAs(110) as a material which may be used as a derivative standard for calibrating systems possessing a solid state polarized electron source. The near-bandgap spin polarization of photoelectrons emitted from this material has been characterized for a variety of conditions and several laboratories which possess well calibrated polarimeters have measured the photoelectron polarization of cathodes cut from a common wafer. Despite instrumentation differences, the spread in the measurements is sufficiently small that this material may be used as a derivative calibration standard.

  18. Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-09-13

    This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  19. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

  20. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-23

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  1. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-25

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  2. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-21

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  3. NBS SPEC. PUBL. 260 -16 Standard Reference Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NBS SPEC. PUBL. 260 - 16 Standard Reference Materials: HOMOGENEITY CHARACTERIZATION OF NBS Materials: Homogeneity Characterization of NBS Spectrometric Standards IV: Preparation and Microprobe. L. Vieth Institute for Materials Research National Bureau of Standards Washington, D.C. 20234

  4. Worldwide Status of Energy Standards for Buildings - Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, K.B.

    2008-01-01

    for the Israeli Standard- Technical Instibltion for BuildingJ 1982 Thermo-Technical Standards (In Czech ''TepelneRehanek J 1982 Thermo-Technical Standards (In Czech "Tepelne

  5. Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-5217-P2 Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues Administration and the Texas Department of Transportation. Abstract: In this research product, industry standards functions. Keywords: Tolling, electronic vehicle identification, DSRC, standards, performance, electronic

  6. Department of Energy Labor Relations and Standards

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-02-06

    The change would be to remove Chapter I, Labor Relations, and Chapter II Labor Standards from DOE O 350.1 and develop DOE O DOE O 350.3, which will cancel and supersede Chapters I and II in DOE O 350.1. Content of the two chapters will be updated to reflect the Secretarial determination transferring functions for contractor labor relations and labor standards from the Office of Legacy Management to the Office of General Counsel. CRDs for those chapters will also be removed.

  7. Standard Review Plan - Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2Standard Method of Test forStandard

  8. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2Standard Method of TestStandard

  9. Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 6: Generic standards - Section 4: Emission standard for industrial environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1997-01-01

    This standard for emission requirements applies to electrical and electronic apparatus intended for use in the industrial locations (both indoor and outdoor, or in proximity to industrial power installations) for which no designed product or product-family emission standard exists. Disturbances in the frequency range 0 Hz to 400 GHz are covered.

  10. Library Web Standards Recommendations of the SCIS Web Standards Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Library Web Standards Recommendations of the SCIS Web Standards Working Group Prepared by L. Jacobs, J. Head, L. Steinke (1997 February 8) Revised by Web Page Working Group, a sub of the Library. Goals of Library Web Pages: To facilitate access to Library resources To supplement access

  11. Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 The...

  12. Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Fuel...

  13. The New Gold Standard: Environmental Management Introduces the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The New Gold Standard: Environmental Management Introduces the First LEED Gold Industrial Facility The New Gold Standard: Environmental Management Introduces the First LEED Gold...

  14. Technical Standards, Guidance on MELCOR computer code - May 3...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standards, Guidance on MELCOR computer code - May 3, 2004 Technical Standards, Guidance on MELCOR computer code - May 3, 2004 May 3, 2004 MELCOR Computer Code Application Guidance...

  15. Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRs/DEAR Crosswalk...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRsDEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 Technical Standards, DOE Orders and Applicable CFRsDEAR Crosswalk - February 2, 2002 February...

  16. ISSUANCE 2015-11-05: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools, Notice of Data Availability ISSUANCE 2015-11-05: Energy Conservation Standards for...

  17. Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) Platform - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data (SEED) Platform - 2014 BTO Peer Review Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED) Platform - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Objective The Standard Energy Efficiency Data (SEED)...

  18. Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Standard Assessment of Mitigation...

  19. Results...National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Standards and Technology (NIST) Workshop on Materials Test Procedures for Hydrogen Pipelines Results...National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Workshop on...

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection - Building America Top Innovation California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection - Building...