Sample records for wetlands involvement san

  1. Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

  2. Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

  3. Examining the Effects of Ecotourism Involvement and Tourism Benefits on Florida Tour Operators' Conservation Contributions to Wetland Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Li-Pin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on wetland ecosystems attracted relatively less academic attention than rainforests and coral reefs. Florida, listed as one of the states with the greatest share of wetland loss in the U.S. due to rapid growth in agriculture, tourism, and urban development...

  4. Organic Carbon and Disinfection Byproduct Precursor Loads from a Constructed, Non-Tidal Wetland in California's Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Jacob A.; Fram, Miranda S.; Fujii, Roger

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    peat soils, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California: Implications for drinking-water quality: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources

  5. Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Land Management (BLM), and numerous county and local governments. The surveys have also involvedColorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland

  6. The role of the school social worker in family involvement as identified by family specialists and parents in selected title I schools in North East Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada, Gloria Lou

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    variables influence parental involvement as reported by parents and family specialists, who are participants of the Parent Academy at the selected Title I elementary schools in the North East ISD, in San Antonio, Texas?” The results of this study strongly... parents have on determining the classes set forth for the Parent Academy, as reported by the parents and family specialists who are partici- pants of the Parent Academy at the selected Title I elementary campuses in the North East ISD in San Antonio...

  7. Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leik, Jason Allan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop an effective petroleum repudiation ics. strategy, the interaction between surface and shallow subsurface water was determined for the San Jacinto River Oi1 Spill Remediation Research site. The ten-acre wetland is located...

  8. Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland or wetland buffer zone which is not an allowed use. Activity in Class I or Class II wetland or its associated buffer zone...

  9. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  10. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . I was hired into the fledgling Wetlands Re- search Department consisting of Ken Marcellus, George- port with regard to the Wetlands Act. One of my very first assignments was to work with Marcellus

  11. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  12. Organ Trade : sea level rise adaptation strategies for the San Francisco Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungureanu, Cristina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is not only coastal conditions, but inland ones, that can inform an approach to and process of wetland adaptation in the face of sea level rise. A particular watershed clip in Alameda County, located in South San Francisco ...

  13. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise to address some of the problems described earlier in the paperthat have limited past efforts to improve Basin water qualitymanagement.

  14. Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

  15. Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

  16. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  17. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  18. Ecologically Significant Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agreement 280016 © 1999 Montana Natural Heritage Program State Library Building · P.O. Box 201800 · 1515 on vegeta- tion, documenting the types of wetland communities present, their quality and condition, and rare integrity. Our observations indicate that some types of wetlands, like wet meadows and valley bottom

  19. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  20. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

  1. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjacent Wetlands Tidal marsh inventory Navigation and Safety Distance to 2m contour is > 50% creek width- ing ones. The tool is a series of maps of the Virginia coastline shown in seg- ments which are rated

  2. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Locally Important Wetlands Carl H. Hershner Editor's note: The Virginia Coastal Resources Management ............. 7 Peat: Processing and Potential for Restoration .................................. 9 Calendar and by the Virginia Coastal Resources Management Program of the Depart- ment of Environmental Quality through Grant

  3. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetland easement (2000 acres) 3.7 miles 1.4 miles Direction of flow NORTH FM 3039 US 175 Five Major Components ? Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure ? Constructed Wetland ? Conveyance Pump Station ? Electrical Substation... ? Vertical Turbine Pumps 3 ? 3000 Hp 2 ? future 6000 Hp ? Equipped with SCADA system Electrical Substation Electrical Substation ? Provides power to the Conveyance Pump Station ? Power is approximately 60% of annual operating budget ? Power...

  4. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS AND AQUATIC SYSTEMS UF-Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus

  5. Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their...

  6. Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in the State, and state that it is in the public interest to restore and preserve these wetlands and their biological...

  7. Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    / minewater treatment ­ Stormwater management wetlands (SUDS) ­ Reedbeds for "polishing" farmyard runoff of a treatment system · CAR Engineering licence ­ if wetland associated with river/loch ­ Environmental service · Improved riparian habitat Insh Marshes, River Spey #12;23/05/2012 5 Wetlands for Sewage Treatment

  8. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an oil spill response tool. The research is conducted at a facility established following an accidental oil spill on the San Jacinto River in October 1994. Previous research evaluated the intrinsic repudiation of petroleum in a wetland, as well as the use...

  9. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system of stormwater wetlands and wet ponds is performed to achieve four goals: efficient hydraulic flow and pollutant

  10. Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

  11. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  12. 11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    11/17/11 1 Treatment Wetlands Dr. Andrea Ludwig Biosystems Engineering TerOary) ­ nutrient removal Uses of Treatment Wetlands for Improved Water Wetland Ecology ­ November 17, 2011 Mississippi River Flooding 2011 Gulf

  13. Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

  14. A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

  15. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Conveyance Pipeline & Outfall Structure Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure Diversion Structure ? Withdraws and lifts water from the East Fork of the Trinity River into the constructed wetland Diversion Pump Station ? Pumps river... supplied by Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative ? Incoming power 138 kV reduced to 5 kV Conveyance Pipeline Conveyance Pipeline ? Transfers polished water to outfall structure at Lavon Lake ? Pipeline divided into 3 segments ? Northern ? Central...

  16. The Amenity Value of Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 50 4.3.1 Chatham County Board of Assessor ................................... 50 4.3.2 Chatham County Metropolitan Planning Council............... 51 4.3.3 National Wetland Inventory................................................ 51 4... 6.3.4 The Implicit Prices of Wetland Attributes .......................... 100 6.4 Hedonic Models in Savannah ................................................... 100 6.4.1 Basic Hedonic Model...

  17. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  18. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

  19. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California, to global warming. Water Resources Research 26(Journal of the American Water Resources Association Loarie96:269–278. Mall RC. 1969. Soil-water-salt relationships of

  20. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

  1. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  2. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  3. The role of the school social worker in family involvement as identified by family specialists and parents in selected title 1 schools in north east independent school district in san antonio, texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada, Gloria Lou

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    as reported by parents and family specialists, who are participants of the Parent Academy at the selected Title I elementary schools in the North East ISD, in San Antonio, Texas?” The results of this study strongly supported that the variables of open...

  4. PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

  5. Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Gordon

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of waterbirds in Aspen Park wetlands. Hydrobiologia, 567(1),introducing small fish into Aspen Parkland pothole wetlands

  6. San Diego Bay Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Bay Power Plant, San Diego, California. Woodward-Station B Power Plant in San Diego, California, operated byPower Plant Receiving Water Monitoring Program. Prepared for the California

  7. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

  8. COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land greatly decreased, the creation of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment has been increasing since

  9. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  10. Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are...

  11. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this  study  the  “treatment  wetland  ”  has  continued  wetland   impoundment,   and   a   treatment   (

  12. WETLAND DELINEATION REPORT UMORE MINING AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Project 08-0092 September 29, 2009 #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0. INTRODUCTION Determination Form #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire

  13. Constructed Wetlands for Industry in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Treatment System 2. The Artificially Constructed Wetland System 3. The Grass Filtration System 4. The Red treatment ponds 1 water quality improvement pond #12;23/05/2012 5 The Constructed Wetland System - Shallow wetlands (Natural treatment system) Ubol Ratana #12;23/05/2012 8 Immediate Objectives - Treat community

  14. The San Joaquin Valley Westside Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Linneman, J. Christopher; Tanji, Kenneth K.

    2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Salt management has been a challenge to westside farmerssince the rapid expansion of irrigated agriculture in the 1900 s. Thesoils in this area are naturally salt-affected having formed from marinesedimentary rocks rich in sea salts rendering the shallow groundwater,and drainage return flows discharging into the lower reaches of the SanJoaquin River, saline. Salinity problems are affected by the importedwater supply from Delta where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Riverscombine. Water quality objectives on salinity and boron have been inplace for decades to protect beneficial uses of the river. However it wasthe selenium-induced avian toxicity that occurred in the evaporationponds of Kesterson Reservoir (the terminal reservoir of a planned but notcompleted San Joaquin Basin Master Drain) that changed public attitudesabout agricultural drainage and initiated a steady stream ofenvironmental legislation directed at reducing non-point source pollutionof the River. Annual and monthly selenium load restrictions and salinityand boron Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) are the most recent of thesepolicy initiatives. Failure by both State and Federal water agencies toconstruct a Master Drain facility serving mostly west-side irrigatedagriculture has constrained these agencies to consider only In-Valleysolutions to ongoing drainage problems. For the Westlands subarea, whichhas no surface irrigation drainage outlet to the San Joaquin River,innovative drainage reuse systems such as the Integrated Farm DrainageManagement (IFDM) offer short- to medium-term solutions while morepermanent remedies to salt disposal are being investigated. Real-timesalinity management, which requires improved coordination of east-sidereservoir releases and west-side drainage, offers some relief toGrasslands Basin farmers and wetland managers - allowing greater salinityloading to the River than under a strict TMDL. However, currentregulation drives a policy that results in a moratorium on all drainagereturn flows.

  15. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental Values, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release CO2

  16. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent Billion in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental) Pesticides, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release

  17. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Effects? Fuel 1.9 Trillion Tons ·Canada (510 bT) ·Russia (770 bT) World Peat Resources 1) Finland 2 After Discharges ·Chemical ·Temperature #12;6 Human Influences on Wetlands Peat Mining Horticulture) Ireland 3) Russia World Peat Mining 16.8 mil tons 6.9 mil tons 23.7 mil tons Fuel= Hort= 70% 30%

  18. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  19. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access...

  20. artificial wetlands pilot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A process-based pilot-scale (more) Beebe, Donald 2013-01-01 6 National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: National...

  1. artificial wetland ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source Centre for Climate Change Research) DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF METHANE IN LAKES AND WETLANDS INVITED SPEAKERS...

  2. Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

  3. What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    and Filling of Wetlands Permits Issued by Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Impact Statement and organisms live Substrate is non-soil (H2O depth prevents emergent hydrophyte growth) >2 m (6.6 ft) in Depth (Non-tidal Wetlands) #12;3 What are Hydrophytes? USACE Definition "...macrophytic plant life

  4. Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

  5. Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

  6. Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, Erin O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

  7. Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

  8. Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of first-order treatment wetland models. EcologicalR. L. Knight. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Lewis Publishers CRCS. D. Wallace. 2008. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press Taylor &

  9. San Jose State + Athletic Facilities Plan San Jose State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Connectivity Adjacent Programs 2.1 Happy Hollow Park & Zoo Leninger Park San Jose Municipal Stadium Ice Rink

  10. San Diego County- Wind Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has established zoning guidelines for wind turbine systems of varying sizes in the unincorporated areas of San Diego County. Wind turbine systems can be classified as small,...

  11. San Francisco QER Meeting Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watch videos from the June 19, 2014, Quadrennial Energy Review public stakeholder meeting in San Francisco, California.

  12. Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collette. Sébastien

    CH8 Divers Agenda · Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS · Déploiement · VLAN ­ 802.1Q · Gestion d · Sécurisation de Windows · Sécurisation de UNIX · Qu'est-ce que... ­ Firewall, VPN, IDS/IPS, PKI Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN #12;Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN · Direct Attached Storage · Network Attached Storage · Storage

  13. Solar Policy Environment: San Francisco

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City and County of San Francisco’s “Solar San Francisco” Initiative will strive to remove barriers to the deployment of solar technologies in San Francisco as part of its effort to reduce its overall greenhouse gas emissions to 20% below 1990 levels by the year 2012.

  14. Jurisdictional wetland delineation in the Texas Gulf Coast Prairie utilizing aerial photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Samuel Jewell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,jurisdictional wetlands, areas of inclusion (wetlands which occurred within the remote sensing and the onsite method), omission (wetlands omitted by the remote sensing method), and commission (upland areas delineated as wetlands by the remote sensing method). An equation...

  15. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

  16. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  17. San Diego County Reservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Solar Energy Study Areas in California Map Prepared July 21, 2009 Surface Management Agency As of 3 California State Line County Boundary Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6/5/2009) Existing Designated Corridor Cathedral City Bullhead City Lake Havasu City East Hemet Temecula Escondido Ramona Poway San Jacinto Bonita

  18. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

  19. COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

  20. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  1. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  2. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    XII of this Act introduced 3 conservation provisions to address environmental concerns associatedWetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title) Conservation ­ "Sodbuster" provision ­ Wetland Conservation, or "Swampbuster" #12;The Swampbuster provision

  3. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South

  4. Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yu

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

  5. Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This stream restoration increases water contact with the floodplain and vegetation to remove fertilizer, auto Park SWAMP Duke University Wetland Center The Sandy Creek Stream Channel Restoration Before After.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland native bird species? The effect of stream and wetland restoration can vary depending on the bird species

  6. Characterizing Microclimate and Plant Community Variation in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Jason D.

    Climate . Wetlands . Soil . Temperature . Modeling . Boreal Introduction Groundwater-fed calcareous of Wetland Scientists 2013 Abstract Groundwater-fed calcareous wetlands (fens) sup- port diverse plant developed accurate daily resolution soil temperature models (min and max) from a 29-sensor network

  7. Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

  8. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    .................................... 14 #12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Construction of the H-02 constructed treatment wetlands adjacent to HH-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5

  9. River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

  10. Parent Involvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To be successful, a 4-H program must have parent involvement. Although 4-H leaders and Extension agents may interest young people in becoming members, they need the parents' goodwill and support to keep them interested, enthusiastic and active. Here...

  11. COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO Energy Upgrade San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    homeowners with initiatives; multifamily energy audit program; extended HERS II audit, field verification a multi-family energy audit program, and will extend HERS II audit and field verification and diagnosticCOUNTY OF SAN DIEGO Energy Upgrade San Diego Summary Sheet ARRA EECBG Discretionary Funding

  12. Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

  13. San Francisco Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8B100B100WWNASCUBA80 'San

  14. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality Impacts Due to Dredging and Disposal on Sensitive Fish Species in San Francisco Bay Prepared Figure 3-1. Chemical processes upon resuspension caused by dredging. ...............................................................19 Figure 3-2. Location of sediment sampling at San Francisco Estuary dredging projects (1993 ­ 2003

  15. The Department of Energy`s floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE`s floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE`s floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE`s requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action`s impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  16. The Department of Energy's floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE's floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE's floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE's requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action's impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  17. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

  18. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  19. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  20. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  1. Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands, Waste Stabilization Ponds, operation and maintenance, sludge management

  2. TECHNICAL REPORTS Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    TECHNICAL REPORTS 1904 Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. Soil Biogeochemical Characteristics Influenced by Alum Application in a Municipal WastewaterTreatmentWetland Lynette M

  3. Two Milling Stone Inventories from Northern San Diego County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    True, D. L; Beemer, Eleanor

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1982). Two Milling Stone Inventories from Northern San DiegoRincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SAN DIEGO COUNTYRincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SAN DIEGO COUNTY

  4. SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY As a city that experiences seasonal...

  5. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at seven RMP sites samples over seven years (66 samples) and from one BPTCP sample collected in San Leandro Phase 2 currently underway in the Delta. Others are included in the RMP Exposure and Effects Work Group

  6. San Diego County- Solar Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has established [http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/dplu/zoning/formfields/DPLU-316.pdf zoning guidelines] for solar electric systems of varying sizes in the unincorporated areas of...

  7. Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villeneuve, Julie

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 a. Riverine Wetlands versus Upland Wetlands . . . . 73 b. Large Size Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 c. Ground Truth Data Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . 76 C. Results and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 V... the ArcGIS ?ow accumulation function on the ?ow direction raster : : : 20 6 Line shape?le of high ?ow accumulation (more than 3055) ob- tained from the ?ow accumulation raster : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 21 7 DEM derived from LIDAR data (15cm vertical...

  8. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  9. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  10. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

  11. Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

  12. altitude saline wetland: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. A. Zuwerink; Robert J. Gates 107 Functional Assessment for a Proposed Stormwater Treatment Wetland. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Urbanization can...

  13. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

  14. Solar America City - San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet highlights San Diego, California, as a DOE Solar America City. Through various collaborations at the local level, San Diego has a goal of 50 megawatts of solar installed by 2010.

  15. San Bernardino County- Green Building Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    San Bernardino's Board of Supervisors launched Green County San Bernardino in August 2007. The program includes a number of incentives to encourage residents, builders, and businesses to adopt more...

  16. San Diego County- Wind Regulations (California)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has established zoning guidelines for wind turbine systems of varying sizes in the unincorporated areas of San Diego County. Wind turbine systems can be classified as small,...

  17. APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    . In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

  18. TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Department of Plant Ecology, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, Nordlandsvej 68, 8240 Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants

  19. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  20. Wetland Ecology in Jericho Town Forest Weston, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    heavy metals and other pollutants by trapping and holding the material in soil and forming insoluble is discussed. What is a wetland? A wetland ecosystem arises when inundation by water produces soils dominated: overstory trees, saplings, shrubs, herbs (ferns, wildflowers, grasses), and ground cover (mosses and lichens

  1. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

  2. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

  3. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Public Safety Funding). RESOLVED That the San José State University (SJSU) commend the CSU BoardSAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE SAN JOSE, CA 95192 SS-F12-2, Sense of the Senate Resolution, Urging that California Voters Become Well Informed About the Current State of Funding

  4. Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

  5. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448-OnCampus version BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , water quality, carbon sequestration, global climate change, and sea level rise. LEARNING OBJECTIVES of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: To provide students

  6. Ecological Modelling 105 (1997) 121 Interaction and spatial distribution of wetland nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Wetland model; Nitrogen cycling; Wastewater treatment 1. Introduction methods of wetland treatment systems. This design ap- proach, referred to as `black box' methodology in wetlands, and (ii) factors affecting N removal from treatment wetlands. A mechanistic model was developed

  7. Suitability of a Constructed Treatment Wetland as Conservation Habitat and the Impact of the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) on the Invertebrate Community and Mosquito Oviposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why, Adena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of treatment wetlands. Environmental ScienceKnight R.L. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press, Boca Raton,in constructed treatment wetlands. Ecological Engineering

  8. San Angelo Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Angelo Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    : City of San Angelo Tom Green County Concho Valley Transit District Texas Department of Transportation U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Federal Transit Administration Approved... Director Concho Valley Council of Governments * Elected Non-Voting Members Drew Darby* State Representative, State of Texas Robert Duncan* State Senator, State of Texas Peggy Thurin Statewide Planning Coordinator...

  9. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the America¹s WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  10. Solar Policy Environment: San Diego

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this project is to support the City’s Green Vision, which is to ultimately ensure that 100% of the city’s electricity needs are met by renewable resources. Over a 24-moth period, the City will implement strategies to achieve a 15% increase in solar installations in San Jose, a 50% increased awareness and knowledge in the community, and more opportunities to purchase or invest in green power.

  11. Solar Policy Environment: San José

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this project is to support the City’s Green Vision, which is to ultimately ensure that 100% of the city’s electricity needs are met by renewable resources. Over a 24-moth period, the City will implement strategies to achieve a 15% increase in solar installations in San José, a 50% increased awareness and knowledge in the community, and more opportunities to purchase or invest in green power.

  12. Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland types—than was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

  13. Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the permits is to protect and preserve submerged lands under tidal and freshwaters and wetlands, both salt and fresh water, from unregulated alteration that would adversely affect...

  14. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  15. Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    populations. #12;7) Be able to describe how global warming may affect amphibians. 8) Know what amphibians, and how (and likely why) it causes malformations in amphibians. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts 1) Know

  16. Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

  17. City of San Francisco- Green Building Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    San Francisco adopted a mandatory green building code for new construction projects in September 2008, establishing strict guidelines for residential and commercial buildings according to the...

  18. WETLANDS. Vol. 18. No.3. September 1998. pp. 329-334 1998. The Society of Wetland Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Fish and Wildlife Service. NOl1h American Waterfowl and Wetlands Office. Patuxent Wildlife Research River and Big Sioux River Watersheds. 1982, typed report on file, USFWS. Pierre. SD, USA), and the USFWS

  19. Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San...

  20. Environmental Innovation Center Solar Site Evaluation: San José...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources Environmental Innovation Center Solar Site Evaluation: San Jos Environmental Innovation Center Solar Site Evaluation: San Jos This report describes the...

  1. San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Bernardino District Heating Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating...

  2. EECBG Success Story: New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power EECBG Success Story: New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power January 27, 2011 - 2:03pm Addthis The new...

  3. EECBG Success Story: Bike Sharing in Texas: San Antonio Rolls...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Public Health Riding to Sustainability: Bike Sharing Takes Off The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. EECBG Success Story: New San Antonio...

  4. Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy Efficiency Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing Energy Efficiency April 15, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis...

  5. John Shalf Gives Talk at San Francisco High Performance Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Shalf Gives Talk at San Francisco High Performance Computing Meetup John Shalf Gives Talk at San Francisco High Performance Computing Meetup September 17, 2014 XBD200503 00083...

  6. City of San Francisco- Solar Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City and County of San Francisco, through the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC), are providing incentives to residents and businesses who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on...

  7. Better Buildings Program San Jose - Serving Moderate Income Residents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program San Jose - Serving Moderate Income Residents Better Buildings Program San Jose - Serving Moderate Income Residents Provides an overview of the program components and goals,...

  8. An Economic Evaluation of a Water-Based Urban Tourist Attraction in San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trock, W. L.; Lacewell, R. D.

    The importance of an economic study of the Paseo del Rio (a highly developed portion of the San Antonio River) has greatly increased with the proposal of many extensions, each of which will involve large investment. That developmental plan which has...

  9. Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Michael Ray

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been...

  10. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biostimulation for enhanced biodegradation of petroleum in a wetland. The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the performance of two commercial bioaugmentation products for their ability to enhance bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland. Additional...

  11. The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

  12. Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Wesley Richard

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment...

  13. Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

  14. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Green Building Standards Code not pertain to energy) Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;139 Chapter 13C GREEN BUILDING REQUIREMENTS shall be known as the California San Francisco Green Building Standards Code and may be cited

  15. City of San Carlos Building Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Green Building Ordinance: Updated Ordinance Submittal Dear Commissioners, Attached, please find the amended San Carlos Green Building Ordinance recently adopted by City Council. Similar to the prior version of the Ordinance, it is our full intention that the City of San Carlos Green Building Ordinance requires Energy

  16. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Building Standards Code 2010 California Residential Code Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;2 #121 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Building Code 2010 California;3 CHAPTER 1 SCOPE AND ADMINISTRATION DIVISION I CALIFORNIA ADMINISTRATION No San Francisco Building Code

  17. City of San Carlos Building Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -595-6761 San Carlos Green Building Ordinance Compliance Matrix 1 of 1 Updated: December 17, 2012 Building-residential uses. E. Verification: GreenPoint verification from GreenPoint rater certified through Build It Green.S. Green Building Council. CALGreen verification may be by design professional of record or San Carlos

  18. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of N isotope enrichment to resolve ambiguities intechniques and stable isotope enrichment experiments.characterization and isotope enrichment studies within San

  19. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of 14 N isotope enrichment to resolve ambiguitiestechniques and stable isotope enrichment experiments.characterization and isotope enrichment studies within San

  20. QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

  1. Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

  2. Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

  3. Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment K in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance wetlands are widely used for tertiary wastewater treatment but, although effective for nitrogen removal

  4. Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 121132 Phosphorus removal by wollastonite: A constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    wastewater treatment; Wastewater; Constructed wetlands; Phosphorus removal; Sewage; Water quality; Secondary to those levels. The use of both natural and created wetlands as tools in the treatment of polluted waters). Constructed wet- land ecosystems, offer better opportunities for wastewater treatment than natural wetlands

  5. Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

  6. AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

  7. TERC Research in the Chilean Patagonia TERC is involved in a collaborative research effort with the EULA Center of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    TERC Research in the Chilean Patagonia TERC is involved in a collaborative research effort of the Chilean Patagonia. The lakes, rivers, glaciers, wetlands and other aquatic environments of the Chilean Patagonia offer a globally unique opportunity for science. They represent the most undisturbed aquatic

  8. Contaminant Concentrations in Fish SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Fish and Game) arranged for age determination of largemouth bass. Henry Lee (U.S. EPA) reviewed a draftContaminant Concentrations in Fish from the Sacramento­San Joaquin Delta and Lower San Joaquin ......................................................................................... 45 Contaminant Concentrations in Fish from the Sacramento­San Joaquin Delta and Lower San Joaquin

  9. ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr. Heath Hagy (hhagy@utk.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    (all day workshop) Biebighauser (USFS) 17 Treatment Wetlands Ludwig (UT) 22 Optional Field TripWFS 536 ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Fall 2011 Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition, Wiley (www.wiley.com, ISBN 047129232X) or Wetlands, 2007, 4th

  10. Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

  11. Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    (CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

  12. The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

  13. San Francisco Community Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSanBiodieselSanSan

  14. San Bernardino County- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2007, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors approved a policy requiring that all new county buildings and major renovations be built to LEED Silver standards. The decision was...

  15. San Diego County- Green Building Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has a Green Building Incentive Program designed to promote the use of resource efficient construction materials, water conservation and energy efficiency in new and...

  16. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    -tenure Professional Renewal Retreat, the Pre-Retirement Base and Faculty Early Retirement Program Calculator, the SJSU; and Resolved, that the Academic Senate of San Jose State University wishes her a happy and healthy retirement

  17. The San Joaquin Valley Westside Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Linneman, J. Christopher; Tanji, Kenneth K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004). Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grasslandof “real-time water quality management” and invest in thefor real-time water quality management in the San Joaquin

  18. City of San Francisco- Residential Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Single family homeowners in San Francisco's PG&E territory can receive Green Home Assessments, providing detailed reports showing energy loss, heat tests, and a list of improvements that will...

  19. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Valley, One Hundred Most Influential Latinos in Silicon Valley, and the TWIN (Tribute to Women, that the Academic Senate of San José State University wishes her a happy, healthy and busy retirement. Approved: May

  20. City of San Antonio- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009 San Antonio announced [http://www.sanantonio.gov/oep/SustainabilityPlan.asp Mission Verde], which outlines eleven initiatives for a sustainable economy. As part of this plan, the City...

  1. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  2. The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

  3. ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to anthropological stress, via industrial, domestic and agricultural wastewater. Europe assumes its responsibility chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment, and the implantation of buffer zones like artificial wetland at the outlet of the agricultural watershed. A PhD thesis

  4. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006 of new tools produced by the Center for Coastal Resources Managment (CCRM) and other programs) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop

  5. SOIL MICROBIAL ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF A WETLAND RECOVERING FROM PHOSPHORUS EUTROPHICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ) with background soil P contents (698 mg kg21 ). Nutrient loading to this wetland was terminated in 1994. Microbial profiles at the enriched site did not change appreciably over the two year period. The results obtained marshlands. However, once the external load has been divert

  6. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  7. Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

  8. Preprints of the 8 International Conference on Wetland Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Preprints of the 8 th International Conference on Wetland Systems Arusha ­ Tanzania ­ 16 th to 19 th Spetember 2002 1 DESIGN CRITERIA AND PERFORMANCES OF REED BED FILTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF WASHING.houdoy@inst-elevage.asso.fr ABSTRACT Initially designed for the treatment of domestic wastewater, Vertical Flow Reed Bed Filters [VFRBF

  9. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report, [February 12, 1992--April 30, 1994]- Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Costanza, R.

    1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  10. U.S. Navy - San Clemente Island, California | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    San Clemente Island, California U.S. Navy - San Clemente Island, California Photo of Wind Turbine on San Clemente Island, California San Clemente Island is one of the Channel...

  11. angle diffractometer sans: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 SANS -Small Angle Neutron Scattering Tcnica de difrao Chemistry Websites Summary: SANS - Small Angle Neutron...

  12. IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION anthropogenic climate change on residential electricity consumption for the nine San Francisco Bay Area counties with different meant temperatures on households' electricity consumption. The estimation uses a comprehensive

  13. LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley June 26, 2013 - 4:52pm Addthis Installing a rooftop solar...

  14. The Muzzi marsh: a case study and analysis of wetland restoration decision-making in San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brah, William Joseph

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commission therefore suggested that state coastal zone authorities should he voluntarily formed with the Federal Government supporting some of their operating costs. The Commission proposed that the key responsibility of tl&ese new state authorities... of state programs with federal agencies, the federal agencies had to exercise their authority in conformance with the state programs. This new state ability to affect federal resource decisions was the major incentive tor state participation...

  15. Magnetotelluric survey of San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furgerson, R.B. (Phoenix Geoscience Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, consisting almost entirely of Tertiary volcanic rocks, are bounded on the southwest by the mature oil and gas province of the San Juan basin and on the east by the San Luis basin, continuation of the sediments from the San Juan basin eastward beneath the volcanics was suspected based on the reported presence of seeps and the evaluation of regional gravity and magnetic data. The probability greatly increased when Milestone drilled Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments beneath 3,000 ft of volcanics, 37 mi northeast of the nearest Cretaceous outcrop. The MT (magnetotellurium) program described in this presentation is part of a nonexclusive survey that included magnetotelluric soundings, time-domain electromagnetic soundings, gravity stations, and geochemical sampling. MT data were acquired at 20 sites along an east-west profile centered on the Milestone 1 AMF well, five sites along a north-south cross profile, and three more sites around the wells northeast of the Milestone well. Site spacing was of the order of 1 to 3 mi except for the cross line. The program was designed to map the thickness of the surface volcanics and the thickness and resistivity of the underlying sediments. The MT data acquired near the Milestone well indicated that the Cretaceous sedimentary rocks are characterized by an average resistivity of the order of 4-12 ohm-meters. The MT data acquired in the San Luis basin east of Del Norte also shows 4-12 ohm-meter rocks in the subsurface, correlated in this case with Tertiary volcanics, volcaniclastics, and continental sediments. The MT data show that the low-resistivity 4-12 ohm-meter section extends continuously beneath the more resistive surface volcanics from the San Luis Valley to at least 16 mi west-northwest of Del Norte.

  16. The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Daniel Ian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 wetland treatment Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inventory for Research and Education Network Collection: Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 5 Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Park has been completed. In Spring 2009, DUWC undertook nearly 18 months... restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West...

  19. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

  20. San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program The goal from current citizen science groups (such as Audubon and SD Tracking Team

  1. San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District Best Available Control Technology.4.2 #12;San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control Distri RECEIVED ~ 2 ED ECEIVED www.valleyalr.org SJVAPCD-2370·(661)326-6900"FAX(661)326-6985 #12;San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District TITLE V MODIFICATION

  2. San Gorgonio Pass wind energy project, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and operation of large-scale wind-turbine fields on approximately 12,780 acres of public land in the San Gorgonio Pass of Palm Springs, California are proposed. The wind farm systems would be operated by Windfarms Limited, U.S. Windpower, Southern California Edison Company, PanAero Corporation, the city of Riverside, and San Gorgonio Farms, Inc. Implementation of the preferred scheme would allow development of wind turbines on public lands except in those areas that have been identified as having resources that are extremely sensitive to development. Positive and negative impacts of the project are discussed.

  3. San Marino: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSanSan

  4. San Francisco Biofuels Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSanBiodieselSan

  5. Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

  6. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  7. Under the Boardwalk – Case History – St. John’s Sideroad at the McKenzie Wetland, Aurora, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Ian D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is located in the Town of Aurora, Ontario, Canada and liesWetland (also known as Aurora Wetland or McKenzie Marsh), anwith a connection to the Aurora Pumping Station. This $20

  8. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and cheaper. Before...

  9. Career Resources from UC San Diego Page 1 Career Resources provided by UC San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    th Avenue · San Diego · CA · 92101 · (619) 3085044 HighTech Professionals HTP is one, quality assurance, testers, technical writers and other positions in the hightech field. HTP has

  10. Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena Maria

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  11. Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  12. San Antonio, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Antonio, TX, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. San Jose, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Jose, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  14. San Diego, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Diego, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  15. Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    compressor technology for carbon capture and sequestration. 2 Seeing Sea Ice SwRI scientists analyzeSouthwest Research Institute® San Antonio, Texas Winter 2011 TECHNOLOGY today® #12;COvEr Technology Research Institute. The materials in Technology Today may be used for educational and informational

  16. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Francisco, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  17. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY San Francisco, CA 94117

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY San Francisco, CA 94117 Website : http://www.usfca.edu/law/ Phone : 415 Employment status unknown 7 Unemployed - not seeking 5 Employed 156 78 64 Pursuing graduate degree FT 1 EMPLOYMENT STATUS NUMBER LONG TERM SHORT TERM Of employed - # law school funded 30 1 29 EMPLOYMENT BY LAW

  18. Population density of San Joaquin kit fox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCue, P.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.; Evans, B.G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, vulpes macrotis mutica, are known to occur on the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1. This study assess the impact of intensified petroleum exploration and production and associated human activities on kit fox population density. (ACR)

  19. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    ; CSSA and the editorial board of the San José Mercury News. RATIONALE: In Education Code section 66602) five ex-officio members, including the Governor, three other elected officials and the Chancellor, (b code section 66602 specifically and explicitly requires that the Governor must appoint a faculty

  20. SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY Geol 324: Petrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camp, Vic

    SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY Geol 324: Petrology Lecture: Mondays and Wednesdays from 10:00-10:50 AM Sciences OFFICE: GMCS-228K OFFICE HOURS: MTWTh 11:00-11:50 AM E-MAIL: vcamp@mail.sdsu.edu PETROLOGY to the fundamental principles of modern petrology. Although sedimentary petrology will be discussed in this course

  1. Discriminating between west-side sources of nutrients and organiccarbon contributing to algal growth and oxygen demand in the San JoaquinRiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wstringfellow@lbl.gov

    2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Salt and Mud Slough tributaries as sources of oxygen demanding materials entering the San Joaquin River (SJR). Mud Slough and Salt Slough are the main drainage arteries of the Grasslands Watershed, a 370,000-acre area west of the SJR, covering portions of Merced and Fresno Counties. Although these tributaries of the SJR are typically classified as agricultural, they are also heavily influenced by Federal, State and private wetlands. The majority of the surface water used for both irrigation and wetland management in the Grassland Watershed is imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta through the Delta-Mendota Canal. In this study, they measured algal biomass (as chlorophyll a), organic carbon, ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and other measures of water quality in drainage from both agricultural and wetland sources at key points in the Salt Slough and Mud Slough tributaries. This report includes the data collected between June 16th and October 4th, 2001. The objective of the study was to compare agricultural and wetland drainage in the Grasslands Watershed and to determine the relative importance of each return flow source to the concentration and mass loading of oxygen demanding materials entering the SJR. Additionally, they compared the quality of water exiting our study area to water entering our study area. This study has demonstrated that Salt and Mud Sloughs both contribute significant amounts of oxygen demand to the SJR. Together, these tributaries could account for 35% of the oxygen demand observed below their confluence with the SJR. This study has characterized the sources of oxygen demanding materials entering Mud Slough and evaluated the oxygen demand conditions in Salt Slough. Salt Slough was found to be the dominant source of oxygen demand load in the study area, because of the higher flows in this tributary. The origins of oxygen demand in Salt Slough still remain largely uninvestigated and the seasonal oxygen demand loading pattern remains unexplained. An expanded investigation of the Salt Slough watershed is warranted, because of the importance of this watershed to the oxygen demand load entering the SJR.

  2. USE OF NITROGEN BUDGETS AND N2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE ROLE OF DENITRIFICATION IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS Monica M. Palta 1, Peter Groffman2, Stuart Findlay2 1 School of Life Sciences in inorganic nitrogen cycling and removal in urban brownfield wetlands INTRODUCTION · Urban areas are net BROWNFIELD SITES SUPPORTING SEMI-PERMANENTLY FLOODED WETLANDS. White outlines delineate low-lying semi

  3. Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs, glacial, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), methane (CH4), peatland, wetland. Summary · Wetlands were the largest (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH4 flux, pore water dissolved CH4 and volatile fatty acid

  4. Observations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licciardi, Joseph M.

    constructed treatment wetland in Augusta, Georgia were used to quantify the size, distribution, velocity). In treatment wetlands, such heterogeneity nearly always results in reduced contaminant removal (WoObservations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U

  5. The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Virginia, and examining the effects of disking during wetland creation. Replicate multiscale tangentially-extractable NH4­N and NO3­N, and Mehlich-3 extractable P, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Fe, and Mn. Means and variances of soil and Fe, lower Mn than cre- ated wetlands, and comparatively high variability in nutri- ent concentrations

  6. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories or TMIs. This issue of the Virginia Wetlands Report highlights this research by describing the process and why these inventories are important for management and sustainability of the Commonwealth's tidal wetland resources. What are they? Tidal Marsh Inventories contain maps and information about

  7. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    , to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

  8. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  9. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  10. REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

  11. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  12. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  13. CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

  14. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System  for  Real-­?Time  Management  of  Water  Quality  Management  of  hydrologic  systems  for  water  quality  system  development  for  seasonal  wetland  salt   management  in  a  river  basin  subjected  to  water  quality  

  15. Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    , perhaps only a few square miles, one is apt to find wetlands that fall all along this hydroperiod that are "good" for bullfrogs are not suitable for spadefoot toads, and a marbled salamander would only be caught

  16. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  17. An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

  18. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  19. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified.

  20. Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results vtaprelimevalresults.pdf More...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration...

  2. area san juan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in computer science declined by 10 Akl, Robert 147 Monitoring, modeling and predicting timber plantations dynamics. The case of San Juan de la Costa (Chile) Physics Websites...

  3. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Acoustic Daylight: passive acoustic imaging using ambient noise ............................................................................................... xviii SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION Chapter 1: Acoustic Daylight......................................................................... 1 1.2 Acoustic Daylight

  4. San Diego County- Design Standards for County Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The San Diego County Board of Supervisors established design standards for county facilities and property. Among other requirements,  the policy requires that all new county buildings or major...

  5. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  6. Urban Form, Wind, Comfort, and Sustainability: The San Francisco Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyungkoo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    59 Figure 46. Measurement of windDesigning for an Acceptable Wind Environment. Transportation1989). Developing the San Francisco wind ordinance and its

  7. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

  8. Autonomous Robotic Sensing Experiments at San Joaquin River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous Robotic Sensing Experiments at San Joaquin Riverof an autonomous, high-resolution robotic spatial mapping ofinsights for similar robotic investigations in aquatic

  9. T-588: HP Virtual SAN Appliance Stack Overflow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in HP StorageWorks P4000 Virtual SAN Appliance Software, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system.

  10. Opening the Door: San Diego R&D Workshop Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video from Jim Brodrick's opening presentation at the February 2011 DOE SSL R&D Workshop in San Diego, California.

  11. San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secretary for Energy Efficiency met with Macy's and the San Antonio Housing Authority (SAHA), learning how each organization is meeting their commitments to improve the energy use...

  12. Mercury-Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouse, Robin M; Fuller, Christopher C; Luoma, Sam; Hornberger, Michelle I; Jaffe, Bruce E; Smith, Richard E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated Hydraulic Mining Debris in San Francisco BayAbstract The hydraulic gold-mining process used during thecreated by hydraulic gold mining in the Sierra Nevada,

  13. San Jose, California, Partners With Established Community Groups...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Partners With Established Community Groups to Win Over Homeowners San Jose, California, Partners With Established Community Groups to Win Over Homeowners A photo of a...

  14. Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Natural Resources

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home, San Marcos, CA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    KB Home, San Marcos, CA, Production Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home, San Marcos, CA, Production Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in San Marcos,...

  17. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS AND AQUATIC SYSTEMS UF-Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon of these biogeochemical processes as they relate to elemental cycling, water quality, elemental sequestration, climate

  18. Characterization of the Neutron Detector Upgrade to the GP-SANS and BIO-SANS Instruments at HFIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Kevin D [ORNL; Bailey, Katherine M [ORNL; Beal, Justin D [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hicks, J Steve [ORNL; Jones, Amy Black [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Summers, Randy [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Vandergriff, David H [ORNL; Johnson, Nathan [GE Energy Services; Bradley, Brandon [GE Energy Services

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past year, new 1 m x 1 m neutron detectors have been installed at both the General Purpose SANS (GP-SANS) and the Bio-SANS instruments at HFIR, each intended as an upgrade to provide improved high rate capability. This paper presents the results of characterization studies performed in the detector test laboratory, including position resolution, linearity and background, as well as a preliminary look at high count rate performance.

  19. Involvement and Communication Committee.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | NationalCurriculum IntroductionInvestor andPublic Involvement

  20. Lateral Snow Transport, Fire and Changing Treelines in Mount San Gorgonio, California, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Charles Dustin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ridge (TFR), Charlton Peak (CHP) and San Gorgonio Summit (JST). B. Charlton Peak (CHP). C. Ten Thousand Foot Ridge (JST), Charlton Peak (CHP), San Gorgonio (SGR), and Ten

  1. Upland groundwater pumping and stream flow, San Jose Creek, Monterey County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Alexander

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Field Meeting, Las Garzas Creek Water Rights, Balanceand 23, 1991 San Jose Creek, Williams Canyon, Van Winkleysunnamed tributary to San Jose Creek. Monterey County General

  2. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  3. EIS-0496: San Luis Transmission Project, Alameda, Merced, San Joaquin and Stanislaus Counties, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration, with the Bureau of Reclamation as a cooperating agency, is preparing a joint EIS and environmental impact report (under the California Environmental Quality Act) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed interconnection of certain San Luis Unit facilities to Western’s Central Valley Project Transmission System.

  4. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  5. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  6. Landslide oil field, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, B.P.; March, K.A.; Caballero, J.S.; Stolle, J.M.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Landslide field, located at the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 by a partnership headed by Channel Exploration Company, on a farm out from Tenneco Oil Company. Initial production from the Tenneco San Emidio 63X-30 was 2064 BOPD, making landslide one of the largest onshore discoveries in California during the past decade. Current production is 7100 BOPD from a sandstone reservoir at 12,500 ft. Fifteen wells have been drilled in the field, six of which are water injectors. Production from the Landslide field occurs from a series of upper Miocene Stevens turbidite sandstones that lie obliquely across an east-plunging structural nose. These turbidite sandstones were deposited as channel-fill sequences within a narrowly bounded levied channel complex. Both the Landslide field and the larger Yowlumne field, located 3 mi to the northwest, comprise a single channel-fan depositional system that developed in the restricted deep-water portion of the San Joaquin basin. Information from the open-hole logs, three-dimensional surveys, vertical seismic profiles, repeat formation tester data, cores, and pressure buildup tests allowed continuous drilling from the initial discovery to the final waterflood injector, without a single dry hole. In addition, the successful application of three-dimensional seismic data in the Landslide development program has helped correctly image channel-fan anomalies in the southern Maricopa basin, where data quality and severe velocity problems have hampered previous efforts. New exploration targets are currently being evaluated on the acreage surrounding the Landslide discovery and should lead to an interesting new round of drilling activity in the Maricopa basin.

  7. Petroleum geochemistry of San Juan sag, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L.; Gries, R.R. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil and gas shows have been reported in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks of the San Juan sag, and minor oil production has been established from volcanic rocks (Kirby Petroleum 1 Jynnifer well, Sec. 9, TT40N, R5E). Potential source rocks present in the San Juan sag are the upper and lower (including the Niobrara Member) Mancos Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The combined upper and lower Mancos Shale is about 660 m thick and contains between about 0.5 and 5.5% organic carbon, although most values are between about 1.5 and 2.0%. The Niobrara Member of the lower Mancos Shale has the highest overall organic matter content in the section (organic carbon averages > 2.0%). Pyrolysis and solvent extraction yields (typically 2,000-6,000 and 1,000-4,000 ppm, respectively) indicate that the upper and lower Mancos Shale and the Niobrara Member are all good potential source rocks for oil and gas. Oil-source rock correlations using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and stable carbon isotope ratios indicate that the upper Mancos Shale is the most likely source for the oil produced from the 1 Jynnifer discovery well. The source of the oil produced from the nearby Gramps field is less certain but may be the lower Mancos Shale or Niobrara Member. The hydrocarbon generation history of the San Juan sag is complex because of highly variable heat flow in the area caused by Oligocene volcanism. Sills have caused thermal alteration of organic matter in shales on a local scale, and larger volcanic bodies may have produced proportionally larger thermal effects. Localized heating may have caused thermal decomposition of carbonate minerals and generation of high CO{sub 2} gas deposits. Higher regional heat flow associated with volcanism was important in the source rock maturation of this area and maturation was relatively recent (Oligocene to present).

  8. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  9. San Gorgonio Farms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire)Gabriel, California:San

  10. San Jacinto Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire)Gabriel,Jacinto County,San

  11. Pueblo de San Ildefonso | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo. 195 -Pueblo de San Ildefonso Pueblo de

  12. San Francisco Biodiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSanBiodiesel

  13. San Jacinto Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWind Farm Jump

  14. Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubh, Archis Robert

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed a seasonal pattern of dry, major wet, and minor wet seasons. The hydrology...

  15. Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

  16. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  17. Analysis of the efficacy of a constructed wetland in treating human fecal contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondepudi, Kathyayani Shobhna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of a system of constructed wetlands in treating non-point source pollution, particularly, human fecal contamination, was evaluated by collecting and analyzing water samples using both conventional culture-based ...

  18. Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions...

  19. Evaluation of a shoreline cleaner for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzell, Cydney Jill

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and bioaugmentation. This latest phase of research (1998) is a continuation of studies to evaluate non-invasive oil removal techniques from sensitive wetland environments. For this controlled oil release experiment, 21 plots were divided into three treatment regimes...

  20. Potential for N pollution swapping from riparian buffer strips and an instream wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boukelia, Willena Esther

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse agricultural pollution is a major contributor to poor water quality in many parts of the world. Consequently agri-environment policy promotes the use of riparian buffer strips and/or denitrifying wetlands to ...

  1. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

  2. Wetland Model in an Earth Systems Modeling Framework for Regional Environmental Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June, 2011 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology All rights reserved variations. Wetlands play an important role in the storage and regulation of the global water budget so

  3. The Importance of Emergent Vegetation in Reducing Sediment Resuspension in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,-Resuspension in Wetlands, USA 57007 r I .. ABSTRACT Wind-induced resuspension of bottom sediment was measured with sediment traps in Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota. Resuspension was significantly greater

  4. Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siems-Alford, Susan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site...

  5. Establishment of submergent vegetation and invertebrates in a wetland constructed on mine soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water depths (20, 50, and 80 cm) within an experimental wetland on Texas Utilities' Big Brown Mine in eastern Texas. Percent cover was determined during both seasons, and above-ground biomass (AGB) and associated macroinvertebrates were sampled at all...

  6. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  7. Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvel, Tracey W

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Constructed wetlands are one of the newest wastewater treatment technologies. They should reduce the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and utilize a large amount of the influent. The BOD determines how much oxygen is used bymicro organisms while...

  8. The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing amphibians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing. Larval amphibian growth and development were affected by carbaryl and the amphibian assemblage treatment effects among the treatments on amphibian growth and development. 4. We encourage future research

  9. Water Pollution Control Plant Solar Site Evaluation: San José

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the findings of a solar site evaluation conducted at the San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (Site) in the City of San Jose, California (City). This evaluation was conducted as part of a larger study to assess solar potential at multiple public facilities within the City.

  10. San Francisco Bay Map Collection / Neal Harlow (collector)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    San Francisco Bay Map Collection / Neal Harlow (collector) Last revised October 2011 University / Physical Description o Collector's Biographical Sketch o Scope and Content o Notes Catalogue entry (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Collection Description San Francisco Bay Map Collection / Neal Harlow (collector

  11. ASBESTOS PROJECT MANAGEMENT University of California, San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    in advance if the renovation and demolition project with friable asbestos-containing materials is over 1601 ASBESTOS PROJECT MANAGEMENT University of California, San Diego UC San Diego project managers to maintenance, repair, and construction of UC-owned and leased buildings where asbestos-containing materials

  12. Monitoring and Managing Contamination in the San Francisco Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000Update Monitoring and Managing Contamination in the San Francisco Estuary of the Estuary Pulse status of chemical contamination in the Estuary and efforts by environmental managers to reduce and prevent contamination problems. Most of the monitoring results in the report are a product of the San

  13. Role of magnetotellurics in exploration of San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orange, A.; Schofield, J. (Emerald Exploration Consultants, Austin, TX (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, consisting almost entirely of Tertiary volcanic rocks, are bounded on the southwest by the mature oil and gas province of the San Juan basin and on the east by the San Luis basin. Continuation of the sediments from the San Juan basin eastward beneath the volcanics was suspected based on the reported presence of seeps and the evaluation of regional gravity and magnetic data. The objective of applying MT to the exploration of the San Juan sag area was to determine, through the measurement of subsurface resistivity, whether the hydrocarbon-rich sedimentary rocks of the San Juan basin indeed extended eastward beneath the San Juan volcanics and, if so, to what extent. The MT program the authors describe was a reconnaissance profile, one of the initial investigations of the area. MT data were acquired at 12 sites extending from Pagosa Springs east across Wolf Creek Pass to Del Norte on the western margin of the San Luis basin. Data were acquired for calibration at well sites near Pagosa Springs and northeast of Del Norte. Site spacing was 4-8 mi. The 12-site program was designed to test the geologic concept and evaluate for a minimum expenditure the feasibility of applying MT to the problem.

  14. Manganese Oxidation In A Natural Marine Environment- San Antonio Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyin, Rosemary Ogheneochuko

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................. 24 REFERENCES .................................................................................................................. 25 vii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Study Area in ANWR, San Antonio Bay, Texas... by microorganisms, colloidal matter, mineral surfaces, or all three; and (3) is superoxide a significant proximal oxidant? 4 STUDY AREA The area chosen for this study was located in the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in San Antonio...

  15. SAN JOS STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    ­ digital, audio, video, print and beyond. As the library's role as a repository for the print book the King Library also support Spartan Pride and Helping and Caring. San José State University is a national1 SAN JOSÉ STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY VISION-STRATEGY STATEMENT

  16. Phosphorus water quality model evaluation and comparison for natural and constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paasch, Mary Margaret

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Kadlec and Knight, 1996). Basins with great areal extent of wetlands produce lower phosphorus loads and mcreased wetland areas could reduce phosphorus loading (Boggess et al. , 1995). One of the many consequences of elevated phosphorus concentrations... may be considered as upper boundaries on phosphorus concentrations. Phosphorus loads are typically greatest from urban land, with lower loading from agricultural land, and the least phosphorus loading occurring from forests (Boggess et al. , 1995...

  17. San Diego Area San Diego was founded in 1769 as the first of 21 California missions. It is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    industries in the county are Defense, Manufacturing (high technology, electronics), and Tourism. San Diego is the site of one of the largest naval fleets in the world. In addition, San Diego's economy focuses, electronics manufacturing, defense-related manufacturing, financial and business services, ship

  18. Wind resource assessment: San Nicolas Island, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Olsen, T.L. [Timothy L. Olsen Consulting, (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    San Nicolas Island (SNI) is the site of the Navy Range Instrumentation Test Site which relies on an isolated diesel-powered grid for its energy needs. The island is located in the Pacific Ocean 85 miles southwest of Los Angeles, California and 65 miles south of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), Point Mugu, California. SNI is situated on the continental shelf at latitude N33{degree}14` and longitude W119{degree}27`. It is approximately 9 miles long and 3.6 miles wide and encompasses an area of 13,370 acres of land owned by the Navy in fee title. Winds on San Nicolas are prevailingly northwest and are strong most of the year. The average wind speed is 7.2 m/s (14 knots) and seasonal variation is small. The windiest months, March through July, have wind speeds averaging 8.2 m/s (16 knots). The least windy months, August through February, have wind speeds averaging 6.2 m/s (12 knots).

  19. PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in the future.

  20. Nematode ?Ecological Study ?of ?a ?Wetland? Restoration?In?Progress? at? Bolsa? Chica, California:? Implications? for? Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  1. Nematode Ecological Study Of A Wetland Restoration-In-Progress At Bolsa Chica, California: Implications For Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  2. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  3. Airborne particles in the San Joaquin Valley may affect human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics for nonreaders, created for the event. The San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control

  4. San Miguel Power Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSanSanMiguelSan

  5. San Diego Renewable Energy Society | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSan DiegoSanSan

  6. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  7. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded: ? The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA"). ? Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization. ? An intern program. ? Staff training. ? Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  9. Distribution and Invasion Potential of Limonium ramosissimum subsp. provinciale in San Francisco Estuary Salt Marshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archbald, Gavin; Boyer, Katharyn E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on identification of Limonium spp. in the Carpinteria SaltMarsh Reserve (Carpinteria, CA). Traut BH. 2005. The role ofclimate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plant

  10. City of San Jose to host Renewable Energy From Waste Conference 2014 November 18-20, 2014, Double Tree by Hilton, San Jose, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    City of San Jose to host Renewable Energy From Waste Conference 2014 for the second Renewable Energy From Waste Conference, to be hosted by the City of San, California. Following the overwhelming success of the 2013 event, Renewable Energy

  11. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - San Diego, CA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by San Diego Gas & Electric Tuesday, November 27, 2007 8:00 - 5:00 Utility Energy Service Contract (UESC) 5:30 pm Steering Committee Meeting - Pacific Ballroom 6:30 pm Networking...

  12. City of San Diego- Sustainable Building Expedited Permit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2002, the City of San Diego passed a Resolution R-298001, which amended the [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA42R&re=1&ee=1 Sustainable Building Policy] to...

  13. Local Impact, National Influence, Global Reach UC San Diego's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Impacting the Economy Research and Funding · Magnet for state & federal funding · Annual research UC San Diego Is an Economic Engine · Education is key to the economy. Research universities create

  14. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    __________________ Criteria: 1. Student must have a declared major in the SFSU College of Science & Engineering - Departments), Engineering, Geography & Environment, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy, Psychology. 2. Student mustSan Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering BRUCE A. ROSENBLATT COMMUNITY

  15. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Engineering, Geography & Environment, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy, Psychology. 2. Student mustSan Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering COSE ADVISORY BOARD SCHOLARSHIP) College of Science & Engineering (COSE) permission to check SFSU's records to verify these facts

  16. City of San Jose- Private Sector Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, the City of San Jose enacted the Private Sector Green Building Policy (Policy No. 6-32). The policy was adopted in Ordinance No. 28622 in June, 2009. All new buildings must meet...

  17. Demonstration Home Program-San Diego | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presents the California Center for Sustainable Energy's communications strategies for, challenges of, and lessons learned from its Home Tour event in San Diego. d3-coleman.pdf More...

  18. City of San Marcos- Distributed Generation Rebate Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of San Marcos offers a Distributed Generation Rebate Program for the installation of grid-tied renewable energy systems. The Distributed Generation Rebate Program is offered on a first...

  19. Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in San Diego County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugan, Jenifer E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in San Diego County // Jeniferfrom the region’s giant kelp forests and rocky reefs. Muchclean the beach by eating kelp and, along with other tiny

  20. San Diego, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Outreach October 2011 Solar in Action San Diego was designated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on June 20, 2007, as a Solar America City. The city had previously faced...

  1. then UC is for you! UC San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    businesses of the Silicon Valley, pursuing my passion in a place I love. International Student Services of California with new technology, innovative approaches and energy-saving sustainable practices. UC SAN DIEg

  2. Communication and Collaboration Keep San Francisco VA Medical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Francisco The VAMC is located on the historic site of Fort Miley, overlooking the Pacific Ocean and the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. With 28 buildings and 1 million...

  3. City of San Marcos- Energy Efficient Home Rebate Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of San Marcos offers an Energy Efficient Home Rebate Program for the installation of HVAC equipment, insulation types/levels, duct leakage, windows and doors. A homeowner or tenant with...

  4. San Antonio City Public Service (CPS Energy)- Renewables Portfolio Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003 San Antonio's municipal electric utility, City Public Service (CPS Energy) established a goal of meeting 15% of its electrical peak demand with renewable energy by 2020 under its Strategic...

  5. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ?2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore »the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  6. Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

  7. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  8. Retrofit Analysis of Older, Single Family Housing in San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashed-Ali, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of San Antonio has 28 historic districts, • Potential energy savings from retrofit of older homes are substantial and undisputed. However: • Historic homes need thoughtful attention to the details and features that cause society to give them protected... listings due to their cultural heritage value. Front porch of case study home 1 ESL-KT-13-12-05 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Background • An energy efficient and sustainable building can reduce...

  9. Meeting Energy Reduction Requirements at Joint Base San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dschuden, B.; Thomas, F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One Team, One Mission: Your Success! The Premier Joint Base in the Department of Defense! Joint Base San Antonio and Energy Program 18 December 2013 Bruce Dschuden, Frank Thomas JBSA Resource Efficiency Managers ESL-KT-13-12-25 CATEE 2013...: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 One Team, One Mission: Your Success! The Premier Joint Base in the Department of Defense! Presenters • Bruce Dschuden, CEM, CSDP, CEA – Sain Engineering Associates • REM...

  10. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  11. The Newsletter of the Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment onstruction on three separate pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality and stream habitat across 210 acres of watershed in Durham County. The restoration of an unnamed is connected with SWAMP's three earlier phases built between 2004 and 2007: (1) a stream/wetland restoration restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West Campus. The most recent

  12. Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

  13. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Avignon, France, 26-30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    wetland systems for onsite treatment of domestic sewage Hans Brix Department of Biological SciencesProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control environment. Therefore official guidelines for a number of onsite treatment solutions have been produced

  14. The San Andreas Fault System Paul Withers Wallace RE, The San Andreas Fault System, California, USGS Professional Paper 1515,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    mainland Mexico. The San Andreas fault is commonly referred to as the boundary between the Pacific is correlated with the local geological setting. CO2 lubrication, #12;increased pore pressure, and decreased

  15. Energy geothermal; San Emidio Geothermal Area; 3D Model geothermal; San

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science, and technology-- Energy, science, andD Model of the San Emidio

  16. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; cummins, C.L.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1994, well point water and bucket samples were collected for tritium and volatile organic compounds in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The well point samples were collected from seven locations and the bucket samples from four locations. Results support that T and VOCs originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near this ditch. Based on differences in tritium contents at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths; however, when VOCs were normalized, based on differences in T, resulting well point and bucket VOCs were comparable in most cases.

  17. Case Files of the California Poison Control System, San Francisco Division: Blue Thunder Ingestion: Methanol, Nitromethane, and Elevated Creatinine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin; Rowley, Freda; Olson, Kent R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Files of the California Poison Control System, San FranciscoK. R. Olson California Poison Control System, San Franciscoreported to the Drug and Poison Information Center in Izmir,

  18. Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part II: A Preliminary Analysis of Yosemite Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brooke Ray

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or purchased properties) to daylight the stream? Or is itrestoration (Smith 2007). Why Daylight in San Francisco? Inof San Francisco to daylight Yosemite Creek, how and where

  19. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT Student Involvement Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    STUDENT EMPLOYMENT Student Involvement Outcomes reflective assessment High impact practices. Employment Structure ASI employs approximately 645 staff, interns, and volunteers on average during the fall and spring semesters. In spring 2013, ASI employed: · 42 Interns · 59 Professional Staff Members · 162

  20. The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Abstract Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been...

  1. EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern...

  2. EIS-0458: First Solar Topaz Solar Farm Project in San Luis Obispo...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8: First Solar Topaz Solar Farm Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA EIS-0458: First Solar Topaz Solar Farm Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA Documents Available for Download...

  3. Optimizing resilience : performance based assessment of retrofits for wood-frame housing in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiyed, Zahraa Nazim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prevalent seismic hazards in the San Francisco Bay Area region require the building stock to be able to withstand frequent ground accelerations while maintaining life-safety standards. Most housing in the City of San ...

  4. Disaster debris management and recovery of housing stock in San Francisco, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiyed, Zahraa Nazim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the potential effects of a 7.2 magnitude earthquake in San Francisco City, particularly the implications on San Francisco's residential housing stock and impacts on the construction and demolition ...

  5. ILLEGAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY San Diego State University recognizes a responsibility to provide a safe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    ILLEGAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY San Diego State University recognizes a responsibility to provide policy regarding illegal substance abuse. 1.0 Prohibitions San Diego State University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, promotion, sale, or use of illegal drugs

  6. DOCUMENTATION OF A TORNADIC SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCUMENTATION OF A TORNADIC SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA A thesis read Documentation of a Tornadic Supercell Thunderstorm in the San Joaquin Valley, California ___________________________________________ Erwin Seibel Professor of Oceanography #12;iv DOCUMENTATION OF A TORNADIC SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM

  7. WETwin: a structured approach to evaluating wetland management options in data-poor contexts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .P. Uyttendaelec a International Water Management Institute (IWMI);b University of Geneva, enviroSPACE Laboratory; c ANTEA Group, Belgium; d Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK);e Irstea, UMR G-eau; f and structured approach to evaluate wetland management interventions and integrate impact, feasibility

  8. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  9. Closing the carbon budget of estuarine wetlands with tower-based measurements and MODIS time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Closing the carbon budget of estuarine wetlands with tower-based measurements and MODIS time series, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China, wDepartment of Environmental have distinct carbon flux dynamics ­ the lateral carbon flux incurred by tidal activities, and methane

  10. Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

  11. 7th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference Utrecht 2004, 25-30 July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    of water and therefore comply with all treatment standards. Water is removed through evaporation from wetlands for on-site treatment of wastewater Hans Brix Aarhus University, Institute of Biological Sciences infiltration, but at many sites soil infiltration is not possible. The Danish EPA has produced guidelines

  12. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  13. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  14. WETLAND FUNCTIONS and VALUES Adapted from National Science Foundation, 1995, and Mitch, William J., 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Maintenance of nutrient stocks within wetland, production of dissolved and partially decayed organic matter Timber production, food for fish and shellfish downstream, support of recreational and commercial fishing of water quality, clear water, high quality fish populations in streams Habitat and Food Web Support

  15. Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    . To reduce these negative impacts, a variety of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been have on the temperature of storm- water runoff. With the wide implementation of storm- water BMPs Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands, Wet

  16. DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes.

  17. Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Andrea Melissa

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    minerals are important controls on iron reduction in natural systems. For the first phase of this research a series of sequential chemical extractions was performed on a core taken from a landfill-leachate-contaminated wetland-aquifer system at the Norman...

  18. DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

  19. Nitrogen cycling, plant biomass, and carbon dioxide evolution in a subsurface flow wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Jeffrey J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to ascertain the fate of nitrogen in a constructed wetland and the rate of bioremediation as indicated by carbon dioxide evolution. Research included a study of nitrogen uptake by plants and nitrification. A tracer isotope of nitrogen,¹?N, was used to follow...

  20. f " International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control. Vienna 1996 XIII/4 -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    96/0852 f í " International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control. Vienna 1996 XIII/4 - 1 TREATMENT OF SLUDGE FROM SEPTIC TANKS IN A REED-BED FILTERS PILOT PLANT. Alain Liénard and treatment of wastewater. Zones of collective and individual (on-site) treatment have to be defined. Local

  1. Foraminifera and paleoenvironments in the Etchegoin and lower San Joaquin Formations, west-central San Joaquin valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagoe, M.B.; Tenison, J.A.; Buehring, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations preserve a rich stratigraphic record of paleoenvironments, deposition, and tectonics during the late Miocene-Pliocene development of the San Joaquin basin. The distribution of foraminifera within these formations can help constrain this record, which includes final filling of the basin, facies responses to sea level changes, and active movement on the San Andreas fault system. The distribution of foraminifera in core samples is analyzed from seven wells along the west-central San joaquin basin - four from Buena Vista oil field, one from western Elk Hills oil field, and two from an area just south of South Belridge oil field. A model of modern, shallow- to marginal-marine foraminiferal biofacies is used to interpret the Etchegoin-San Joaquin faunal distributions. This modern model distinguishes marsh, tidal channel, intertidal, lagoonal, littoral, and shallow sublittoral environments. Ongoing work calibrating this foraminiferal record to the lithologic and macrofossil records in addition to interpreted depositional systems within these formations will further define relationships between paleoenvironments, relative sea level, and tectonics.

  2. Agricultural Losses from Salinity in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Howitt, Richard E.; Hanak, Ellen; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrodynamic and salinity transport modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: sea level rise and water diversion effects.

  3. Geographic and Temporal Variability of Middle Holocene Red Abalone Middens on San Miguel Island, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braje, Todd J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    survey of the south coast of San Miguel Island as part of Chaimel Islands National Park's cultural resource management plan (

  4. SANS study of understanding mechanism of cold gelation of globular proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinchalikar, A. J., E-mail: akshayc@barc.gov.in; Kumar, Sugam, E-mail: akshayc@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: akshayc@barc.gov.in; Wagh, A. G. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory of Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH - 5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to probe the evolution of interaction and the resultant structures in the cold gelation of globular proteins. The cold gelation involves two steps consisting of irreversible protein deformation by heating followed by some means (e.g. increasing ionic strength) to bring them together at room temperature. We have examined the role of different salts in cold gelation of preheated aqueous Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein solutions. The interactions have been modeled by two Yukawa potential combining short-range attraction and long-range repulsion. We show that in step 1 (preheated temperature effect) the deformation of protein increases the magnitude of attractive interaction but not sufficient to induce gel. The attractive interaction is further enhanced in step 2 (salt effect) to result in gel formation. The salt effect is found to be strongly depending on the valency of the counterions. The gel structure has been characterized by the mass fractals.

  5. SECTION 42 Table of Contents 42 San Poil Subbasin Management Plan ..........................................................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Subbasin Work Teams and the process used to develop and adopt the management plan can be found in Section 142-1 SECTION 42 ­ Table of Contents 42 San Poil Subbasin Management Plan .........................................................................22 #12;42-2 42 San Poil Subbasin Management Plan The San Poil Subbasin Management Plan was developed

  6. Nitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    as 25.0%) at the Sacramento­San Joaquin River delta region give rise to a wide range of d18ONO3 valuesNitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition18O) within the estuarine system of San Francisco (SF) Bay, California, to explore the utility

  7. Agricultural Losses from Salinity in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; Howitt, Richard E.; Hanak, Ellen; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrodynamic and salinity transport modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic and salinity transport modeling to provide irriga- tion water salinity levels for various locations in California’s Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic, water salinity, and eco- nomic models can provide insights into controversial management issues. KEY WORDS Sacramento–San Joaquin

  8. Rcifs, trottoirs et autres biolithosores du bassin de San Miguel de Salinas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    " and others "biolithosores" of the San Miguel de Salinas Basin GARCIN M.1, VACHARD D.2 1 BRGM SGN/UPE/RNG Av courante Vermets-stromatolithes est discutée. Abstract The San Miguel de Salinas basin, located in SE Spain1 Récifs, trottoirs et autres biolithosores du bassin de San Miguel de Salinas Reefs, "trottoirs

  9. Survey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest--are in the process of revising their management plan. Since one of their missions has beenSurvey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and Montezuma Counties, Colorado Colorado #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The San Juan Public Lands agencies--Bureau of Land Management and San Juan

  10. Holistic Housing-Lewis Chatham Community, San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth, Keel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems (SAWS), and Build San Antonio Green (BSAG) ESL-KT-11-11-27 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 BSAG ? Local Green rating system ? Based on Energy, Water, Recycling, and Environment ? Easy to use checklist format ? Must have a...HOLISTIC HOUSING SAN ANTONIO HOUSING AUTHORITY Lewis Chatham ESL-KT-11-11-27 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Entrance to Lewis Chatham ESL-KT-11-11-27 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Points of Interest...

  11. San Emidio II Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) Geothermal FacilitySanSan

  12. San Diego Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySam HoustondataSanSan

  13. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSan JoseSan

  14. San Luis Valley R E C, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSanSan Luis

  15. San Miguel Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSanSanMiguel

  16. San Diego Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSan DiegoSan Diego

  17. San Diego Regional Clean Fuels Coalition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSan DiegoSan

  18. The attitude and knowledge relationships between secondary agriculture and science students' participation in multidisciplinary education and environmental/wetland restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Amy Noelle

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to test student knowledge and attitude changes towards wetland ecosystems, Environmental Science and Horticulture after the completion of an interdisciplinary mini-unit and ...

  19. Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations assert the Department of Environmental Management's authority to administer and enforce the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (R.I. Gen. Laws, ch. 2-1-18 through 2-1-25), and describe...

  20. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2001-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study builds upon earlier research conducted by Southeastern Louisiana University concerning the efficacy of utilizing processed drill cuttings as an alternative substrate source for wetland rehabilitation (wetland creation and restoration). Previous research has indicated that processed drill cuttings exhibit a low degree of contaminant migration from the process drill cuttings to interstitial water and low toxicity, as tested by seven-day mysid shrimp chronic toxicity trials.

  1. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendell

    for the protection of personnel. #12;RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION DESCRIPTION PAGE` #12;#12;UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL SEPTEMBER, 1996 This information is being provided in accordance with the following State requirements: CALIFORNIA RADIATION

  3. California Public Utilities Commission 505 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISCUSSION ON UTILIZING ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA TO IMPROVE EFFECTIVENESS OF POLICIES AND PROGRAMS SAN Thought Leaders Speaker Series will address the issue of utilizing energy consumption data to evaluate, California Energy Commission WHY: Currently, access to energy consumption data is difficult and sometimes

  4. Information Science in Europe Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information Science in Europe Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan University of Lyon 3 4, cours Albert Thomas and Information Science Birketinget 6, Copenhagen, Denmark PI@db.dk Tatjana Aparac-Jelusi University of Zadar aims at giving an overview on the situation of information science in a few selected European countries

  5. Re-Positioning Information Science Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Re-Positioning Information Science Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan ELICO - University of Lyon 3, Lyon, to move from librarianship, bibliography, and documentation to an information science. In 1968 the American Documentation Institute was renamed American Society for Information Science. By the twenty

  6. San Francisco Mayor's Solar Founders' Circle Workshop for Assessors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These slides were developed to train site assessors for the City and County of San Francisco. The presentation includes information on how to perform a site assessment for PV and SWH technologies, how to size a system, roof and electrical safety, and tools to use on a site assessment.

  7. SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, David L.

    SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY GEOL 508 Advanced Field Geology Course Syllabus Spring 2011 Instructor: Professor David L. Kimbrough email: dkimbrough@geology.sdsu.edu, Phone: 594-1385 Office: GMCS-229A; Office Necessary: Field notebook similar to "Rite in the Rain" all-weather Geological Field Book No., 540F J

  8. SAN LUIS OBISPO COU NTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    95814-5514 Re: Application for Approval of the San Luis Obispo County Green Building Ordinance the Green Building Ordinance and the Energy Cost Effective Study. The Board of Supervisors received the Green Building Ordinance which will ensure that residential and non-residential buildings in the County

  9. SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT Re: Application for Approval of the San Luis Obispo County Green Building Ordinance the Green Building Ordinance and the Energy Cost Effective Study. The Board of Supervisors received the Green Building Ordinance which will ensure that residential and non-residential buildings in the County

  10. EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION STUDENT UNION, INC. AT SAN JOS STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION STUDENT UNION, INC. AT SAN JOSÉ STATE UNIVERSITY www.union.sjsu.edu One) Telephone ( ) Telephone ( ) Area Code Area Code Email Address Fax ( ) General Information If employed and you are under 18, can you furnish a work permit? Yes No Have you ever been employed here before? Yes

  11. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2011 GRADUATES San Francisco, CA 94117

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2011 GRADUATES San Francisco, CA 94117 Website : http - Start Date Deferred 0 Total graduates 222 Unemployed - Not Seeking 8 Employment Status Unknown 13 Unemployed - Seeking 26 Employed - Undeterminable * 0 0 0 0 0 Employed - Bar Passage Required 76 3 6 26 111

  12. Sustainability of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    productivity and sustainability. Currently, there is a good understanding of the fundamental soil hydrological scale and at the long term, so that the sustainability of alternative management strategies canSustainability of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, California Gerrit Schoups* , Jan

  13. CASH SETTLEMENT & ACCOUNT TERMINATION FORM University of California, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    CASH SETTLEMENT & ACCOUNT TERMINATION FORM University of California, San Francisco Complete TITLE (Please Print) Date I am decreasing a petty cash/change fund acct. I am terminating a petty cash account. I am terminating a change fund account. I am terminating a special cash account. 1. Cash Returned

  14. SANS -Small Angle Neutron Scattering Tcnica de difrao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    SANS - Small Angle Neutron Scattering Técnica de difração informações sobre tamanho e forma de- Neutrons are created in the centre of the target station when the beam of high energy protons collides by evaporating nuclear particles, mainly neutrons, in all directions. Each proton produces approximately 15

  15. CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO REGION A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012042 Prepared for: California possible changes in regional climate over California. To accomplish this, the model simulations were

  16. Sediment Transport in the Lower Guadalupe and San Antonio Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holley, Edward R.

    regions. This study was undertaken to analyze existing data and to collect field data for the lower part of the Guadalupe River and the San Antonio River. The primary sampling locations were at the U. S. Highway 59 bridges in Victoria for the Guadalupe...

  17. EIS-0395: San Luis Rio Colorado Project, AZ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to construct and operate a proposed transmission line originating at the proposed San Luis Rio Colorado (SLRC) Power Center in Sonora, Mexico, interconnect with Western's existing Gila Substation, and continue to Arizona Public Service Company’s (APS) North Gila Substation

  18. Story Road Landfill Solar Site Evaluation: San Jose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the findings of a solar site evaluation conducted at the Story Road Landfill (Site) in the City of San Jose, California (City). This evaluation was conducted as part of a larger study to assess solar potential at multiple public facilities within the City.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of three-dimensional salinity simulations in North San Francisco Bay using the unstructured-grid SUNTANS model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fringer, Oliver B.

    and the confluence of the Sacramento­San Joaquin Rivers and comprises San Pablo Bay, Suisun Bay and Central Bay and San Joaquin rivers, while high inflows result in enhanced salinity stratification and gravitationalSensitivity analysis of three-dimensional salinity simulations in North San Francisco Bay using

  20. Restoration potential of diked estuarine wetlands in Washington and Oregon. Phase 2: Identification of candidate sites in puget sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the Clean Water Act, Section 404, one of the missions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to enhance and protect wetland resources. In EPA Region 10, specifically in the Puget Sound area, there is opportunity to enhance aquatic resources by restoring some of the thousands of acres of wetlands that have been historically diked. The objectives of Work Assignment 24 is to field identify and prioritize areas in Puget Sound and the Straits of Juan de Fuca that were tidally influenced wetlands which are now either not functioning as wetlands or are providing limited wetland functions due to dike construction. This report is the field confirmation of the non-field data compiled in Phase I. The objective of the Phase I study was to identify areas in Washington and Oregon that: (1) once were estuarine wetlands but are not currently functioning as such due to dike construction; (2) were greater than five acres in size; and (3) may be suitable for restoration.

  1. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448-DE version KSInglett Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: To provide will also be described in relation to elemental cycling, water quality, carbon sequestration, global climate students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon, nitrogen

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    efficiency and environmental protection can be achieved together. As a homeowner with a solar array on my and environmental conservation, San Franciscans passed the historic solar revenue bond measures in 2001 (measures B roof-top, I can also speak on a personal level about the very real environmental and now economically

  3. Ancient Maya Cultivation in a Dynamic Wetland Environment: Insights into the Functions of Anthropogenic Rock Alignments at El Edén Ecological Reserve, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chmilar, Jennifer Andrea

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System of Calakmul, Campeche, Mexico. Ancient MesoamericaPeninsula within wetlands of Campeche, Yucatán, and Quintanathe states of Tabasco, Campeche, and Veracruz. Freshwater

  4. Environmental assessment for the A-01 outfall constructed wetlands project at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed A-01 outfall constructed wetlands project at the Savannah River site (SRS), located near aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action would include the construction and operation of an artificial wetland to treat effluent from the A-01 outfall located in A Area at SRS. The proposed action would reduce the outfall effluent concentrations in order to meet future outfall limits before these go into effect on October 1, 1999. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended; the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508); and the DOE Regulations for Implementing NEPA (10 CFR Part 1021).

  5. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  6. Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkey, P.L.; Sundell, R.C.; Bailey, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.

  7. Experimental Study on Wave Transformation and Nearshore Circulation on a Variable Bathymetry in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Melanie Khanh Phuong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    by vegetation. The presence of the mounds induced an important de- crease in the wave height, in addition to the damping of the waves by the vegetation stems. The variation in spatial coverage of the wetland model has been shown to highly a ect the ow... local coordinate system. All distances measured in meters. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 192 57 List and classi cation of discarded time series for Test 101. Npts = number of points in the truncated time series. L = Lost, NR...

  8. Burial and decomposition of particulate organic matter in a temperate, siliciclastic, seasonal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, Lisa Williamson

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the net primary productivity (NPP) of terrestrial ecosystems depends on nutrients recycled through the decomposition of plant detritus (Swift et al. 1979, Vargo et al. 1998). Thus, a better understanding of organic decomposition in wetland sediments... was then transported to the site in an anaerobic chamber constructed of PVC and maintained 12 under deoxygenated conditions until insertion into the slough sediments. The peeper was positioned in the slough for 2 weeks to allow equilibration and diffusion...

  9. Pavement Through the Prairie, Wheels in the Wetlands: The battle over a road in Lawrence, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiman, Kelly

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Haskell-Baker Wetlands and the South Lawrence Trafficway." Genuine Kansas. No date. http://www.genuinekansas.com/history_baker_w etlands_controversy_timeline_kansas.htm 113 contemporaneous with the initial release of the Draft Environmental Impact...." Environmental History. (2010) 15 (2): 194. that recognized the environment as a critical national issue, historian Ann Vileisis argues, "... citizen activists in their communities dealt with broad choices facing the society at large: to embrace boundless...

  10. JOB DESCRIPTION: Intern in Laguna San Ignacio, Baja, Mexico The Philanthropiece Foundation is seeking an intern to live and work in Laguna San Ignacio, Baja, Mexico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOB DESCRIPTION: Intern in Laguna San Ignacio, Baja, Mexico The Philanthropiece Foundation is seeking an intern to live and work in Laguna San Ignacio, Baja, Mexico. Please see below for further Biosphere Reserve, Mexico's largest protected area. A designated UNESCO World Heritage site, the lagoon

  11. PDC bits find application in San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.P.; Wood, J.E.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits have been successfully and economically used to drill sand and shale sections in the oilfields of the Southern San Joaquin Valley of California. ''Successful'' refers to reducing the number of days to drill a well by four to six days, and ''Economical'' refers to reducing the cost per foot for the sand and shale intervals drilled with PDC bits. Enhancements of design variables including variations in back rake and side rake angles, and improved selection (numbers and sizes) of nozzles have helped PDC bits be economical in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. In addition to conventional vertical wells, PDC bits used in conjunction with mud motors and steering tools have also been successfully used to directionally drill wells in this area.

  12. San Jose Accord: energy aid or petroleum-marketing strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Jose Accord was signed in San Jose, Costa Rica on August 3, 1980 by the Presidents of Venezuela and Mexico, whereby the two countries mutually committed to supply the net imported domestic oil consumption of several Central American and Caribbean countries. Countries initially participating in the program are: Barbados, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Seven eastern Caribbean countries were to meet on October 7 to petition for inclusion in the Accord, namely: Antigua, St. Kitt/Nevis, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Grenada. The official language of the Accord is presented, and the operative status of the Accord two years after signing is discussed. Specific briefs about some of the individual countries in the Accord are included. The fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries is updated.

  13. The Value of Distributed Solar Electric Generation to San Antonio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Nic [Solar San Antonio, TX (United States); Norris, Ben [Clean Power Research, Napa, CA (United States); Meyer, Lisa [City of San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of value provided by grid-connected, distributed PV in San Antonio from a utility perspective. The study quantified six value components, summarized in Table ES- 1. These components represent the benefits that accrue to the utility, CPS Energy, in accepting solar onto the grid. This analysis does not treat the compensation of value, policy objectives, or cost-effectiveness from the retail consumer perspective.

  14. Solar Survey of PV System Owners: San Diego

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the survey was to understand the motivation, challenges and benefits perceived by individuals who decided to install solar systems in the City of San Diego. Approximately 2000 surveys were sent, and 641 surveys were completed. The primary response was from the residential sector. Individuals had the option to reply electronically, using Survey Monkey, or to complete a paper survey. All responses were combined and checked to ensure that there were no duplicates.

  15. Operational analysis of the Union Stockyards, San Antonio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond Arthur

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stcckyards) San Antonio y 1946 55 ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Stockyard tour for fermi and ranch goupo a ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 100 Telephone booths are located throughout the yard. . . . . . . . . 100 OPERATIONAL ANALISIS...- gestions on important decisions. The assistant to the president also helps maintain public relations by working with farmersp ranchers, farm and ranch organisat1ons and youth organisations. The yard personnel ars supervised by a superintendent who has...

  16. City of San Antonio, Texas Better Buildings Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Liza C.

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Antonio Better Buildings Program is a unified single?point?of?service energy efficiency delivery mechanism targeting residential, commercial, institutional, industrial and public buildings. This comprehensive and replicable energy efficiency program is designed to be an effective demand side management initiative to provide a seamless process for program participants to have turn?key access to expert analysis, support and incentives to improve the performance of their in?place energy using systems, while reducing electrical energy use and demand.

  17. Reproductive patterns of San Joaquin kit fox. [Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, B.G.; O'Farrell, T.P.; McCue, P.; Kato, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, are known to occur on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Elk Hills, California. In order to ascertain that the maximization of oil production and associated human activities do not jeopardize the continued existence of the kit fox or its essential habitat the reproductive patterns of the kit fox were investigated. (ACR)

  18. California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric andIndustrialSan Onofre Nuclear Generating

  19. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix] [Parametrix; Duncan, Ken [San Carlos Apache Tribe] [San Carlos Apache Tribe; Albert, Steve [Parametrix] [Parametrix

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  20. As was hypothesized, annual ET water losses appears to be driven by seasonal variations in the total aboveground biomass of the treatment wetland. We found that only air temperature and PAR were significant climatic drivers of ET. However, unlike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    in the total aboveground biomass of the treatment wetland. We found that only air temperature and PAR were budget of an aridland" urban wastewater treatment wetland" Experimental Design and Field Sampling! · 10.T.A. 2003. Water and mass budgets of a vertical=-flow constructed wetland used for wastewater treatment

  1. Benthic Assemblage Variability in the Upper San Francisco Estuary: A 27-Year Retrospective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Heather A; Vayssieres, Marc

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which lead from the Pacific Ocean to an inland river delta,San Joaquin River Pacific Ocean 10 m 16 km Water Export

  2. Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LINKED TO TRANSIT: LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE SAN FRANCISCOmonth on average. Key lessons learned include that it wouldof the field test, and lessons learned. Key Words: Smart

  3. Coulomb stress accumulation along the San Andreas Fault system Bridget Smith and David Sandwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Coulomb stress accumulation along the San Andreas Fault system Bridget Smith and David Sandwell deformation, SCEC velocities, crustal stress Citation: Smith, B., and D. Sandwell, Coulomb stress accumulation

  4. San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks to San Diego's ambitious solar energy program, the Otay Water Treatment Plant may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption.

  5. Shelter Use, Movement, and Home Range of Spiny Lobsters in San Diego County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovel, Kevin; Lowe, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sheephead Black Sea Bass Kelp Bass Potential Predator Figureand sea urchins that consume kelp, thereby promoting thelandscapes in the Pt. Loma kelp forest near San Diego for

  6. OMAE2014 June 8-13, 2014, San Francisco, California, USA OMAE2014...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2014 June 8-13, 2014, San Francisco, California, USA OMAE2014-24175 Hydrodynamic Module Coupling in the Offshore Wind Energy Simulation...

  7. Text-Alternative Version: San Diego R&D Workshop Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following is a text version of Jim Brodrick's opening presentation video from the February 2011 DOE SSL R&D Workshop in San Diego, California.

  8. Open Water Processes of the San Francisco Estuary: From Physical Forcing to Biological Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmerer, Wim

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal, Residual, Intertidal Mudflat hydrodynamic model USGSTidal, residual, intertidal mudflat (TRIM) model and itsPersistence of an introduced mudflat community in south San

  9. Potential Inundation Due to Rising Sea Levels in the San Francisco Bay Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Noah

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AL=Alameda, HP=Hunters Point, OAK=Oakland Internationalareas (in red) run from Hunters Point to Fort Point in San

  10. The City Feeds the Poor: The Struggle for Sustainable Food Systems in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Paula Kay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    building in Bayview Hunters Point. As the national advocacy,by the City in Bayview Hunters Point in San Francisco Figure

  11. Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gunnison, Colorado, abandoned uranium mill site is one site being cleaned up by the DOE under UMTRCA authority. This site`s contaminated material is being transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities have temporarily disturbed 0.8 acre (ac) (0.3 hectares [ha]) of wetlands and permanently eliminated 4.3 ac (1.7 ha). As required by the Clean Water Act, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) prepared a Section 404 Permit that addresses the loss of wetlands as a result of remedial action at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The 404 permit includes this report as an attachment and it describes the wetland mitigation and monitoring plan. The DOE formulated this plan in consultation with the BLM and the USACE. This report represents a revised version of the mitigation and monitoring plan (DOE, 1992b).

  12. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  13. The integration of engineering and architecture: A perspective on natural ventilation for the new San Francisco Federal Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConahey, Erin; Haves, Philip; Christ, Tim

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A description of the in-progress design of a new Federal Office Building for San Francisco is used to illustrate a number of issues arising in the design of large, naturally ventilated office buildings. These issues include the need for an integrated approach to design involving the architects, mechanical and structural engineers, lighting designers and specialist simulation modelers. In particular, the use of natural ventilation, and the avoidance of air-conditioning, depends on the high degree of exposed thermal mass made possible by the structural scheme and by the minimization of solar heat gains while maintaining the good daylighting that results from optimization of the fagade. Another issue was the need for a radical change in interior space planning in order to enhance the natural ventilation; all the individual enclosed offices are located along the central spine of each floorplate rather than at the perimeter. The role of integration in deterring the undermining of the design through value engineering is discussed. The comfort criteria for the building were established based on the recent extension to the ASHRAE comfort standard based on the adaptive model for naturally ventilated buildings. The building energy simulation program EnergyPlus was used to compare the performance of different natural ventilation strategies. The results indicate that, in the San Francisco climate, wind-driven ventilation provides sufficient nocturnal cooling to maintain comfortable conditions and that external chimneys do not provide significant additional ventilation at times when it when it would be beneficial.

  14. Proc. International Conference on Manufacturing Education, SME, San Diego, CA Proceedings of the SME Int. Conf. on Manufacturing Education for the 21st Century, San Diego CA, March 1996 Page1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamancusa, John S.

    Proc. International Conference on Manufacturing Education, SME, San Diego, CA March 1996 Proceedings of the SME Int. Conf. on Manufacturing Education for the 21st Century, San Diego CA, March 1996

  15. Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part I: A Synthesis of Lessons Learned from Existing Urban Daylighting Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brooke Ray

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Leonardson 2004). Why Daylight? In San Francisco, creekof San Francisco to daylight historical urban creeks withincity governments to daylight urban creeks, with successful

  16. Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquinhydrodynamic and salinity transport mod- eling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin

  17. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1992---August 24, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to extend the knowledge base for wetland treatment to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well waste water. Collection of data on the sorption of heavy metals and the degradation of toxic organics is one of the key tasks. The toxic organics phenolics and anthracene, and chromium and copper have been selected as target adsorbates. An information search was performed on oil refinery waste treatment wetland systems.

  18. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.; Rogers, V.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1994, well point water and near surface water (bucket) samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E would migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from near surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. Results of the March 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near the old F-Area effluent ditch. Six different analytes were detected in the well points at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit: d 1,2-dichloroethylene, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium. 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium were detected at levels above Primary Drinking Water Standards or Maximum Contaminant Levels list. Four analytes, 1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride, were detected at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit and least once at concentrations above the PDWS or the MCL. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets were negligible.

  19. State versus federal mechanisms of regulating uses of wetlands in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nachtsheim, Henry John

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and storm damaoe. They also serve as natural pollution control areas and prevent land erosion from inland v!aters. Although the value of wetlands is priceless in maintain1no water qua'iity and marine life, they are disappearing at a rate of 300, 000 acres... traditionally has monitored activities in the navigable waters of the U. S. under the auspices of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899, has been attacked by some as not being the agency with the competence to do so. The Corps of Engineers has itself been...

  20. Evaluation and integration of ancillary datasets for coastal wetland landcover classification using Landsat TM Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinson, James Mithland

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    %, thereby meeting the NOAA C-CAP objective. iv ACKNOWIEDGMENT I would like to thank Warren Pulich and Al Green of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department for providing the resources and oversight for this project. I am especially grateful to Doug Slack... are to be made (Kean et al. , 1988). For this reason, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has launched a cooperative interagency effort to map coastal wetlands and landcover on I-5-year intervals (Thomas and Ferguson, 1990). The Texas...

  1. Fiscal Analysis and Land Use Policy in California: A Case Study of the San Jose Employment Land Conversion Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Vicki; Thorne-Lyman, Abigail; Belzer, Dena

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    San Jose at a Glance. 2005-06 Proposed Operating Budget.City of San Jose, 2005-06 Adopted Budget Message. 2005,on April 6, 2004. ———. 2005. 2005-06 Adopted Budget Message.

  2. Field imaging spectroscopy and inferring a blind thrust earthquake history from secondary faulting : 1944 San Juan Earthquake, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragona, Daniel Eduardo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harrington, H. J. , (1944), El sismo de San Juan; del 15 deHarrington, H. J. , (1944), El sismo de San Juan; del 15 deconla magnitud maxima del sismo probable en la zona de la

  3. Chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of the San Saba Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Larry Alan

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? San Saba an4 Victoria Clay s 1 ST SOS UCT I OS Ssseawh 4oslgsed to stagy ihe basks pwperikes of ihe sells of ihe Oread Prakrle ef oeniral Tense ls generally Laehkng Consegaontly, there ls lktile soil data aeaklablo fer reselvkng ~ageaesi as4 fer..., Slash are deeply appreelaisd, Maap ihashs also are das io Xa ~ Earrep Qehos~ Senior Corrolaior~ Sell Cessor@a ilos Serrfoo~ sho located ihe ssapllsS elise asd also edNed iho profile de earl pilose. TABLE (~ QOSTXSTS ISTBDDUGTIES Li TXS4TUDZ BKV IX...

  4. San Antonio's Save for Tomorrow Energy Plant (STEP) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Solar PV & Solar Water Heaters • Solar PV – Must use CPS Energy listed Contractor – System must be approved prior to installation – Maximum Rebate = $25k residential and $100k... commercial/schools • Current Rates – $1.60 /watt for Schools (local installer) – $1.60/watt for Residential and Commercial (local installer) • Solar Water Heaters – The one-time rebate @$0.60 per kWh based on Solar Rating Certification Corporation’s rated...

  5. Subenvironments of deposition in San Antonio Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Gary Lynn

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the Muddy Sandstone at Bell Creek Field, Montana. CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES CITED VITA 107 108 108 ill 117 117 121 122 123 124 124 126 128 128 128 132 135 138 142 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1 Mineralogical Composition of Montmori lloni tie.... The usual source of high salinity water enters from the Gulf of Mexico through Pass Cavallo and mixes with Matagorda Bay waters. This water passes westward through Espiritu Santo Bay into San Antonio Bay, where it appears to turn and move northwestward...

  6. PV Validation and Bankability Workshop: San Jose, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granata, J.; Howard, J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). The report provides feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Program PV Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California on August 31, 2011. It focuses on the current state of PV in the United States, private funding to fund U.S. PV industry growth, roles and functions of the regional test center program, and ways to improve the current validation and bankability practices.

  7. The 2005 - 2030 Harlingen-San Benito Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harlingen-San Benito Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    construction program for the MPO. It lists what projects will be constructed in the MPO urbanized area and in what fiscal year they will be let. (Let means when the contract will be awarded.) The TIP is updated every two fiscal years (FY 1999, 2001, 2003... the MPO study area experienced significant increases in population, and increased population and growth are projected to continue through the 25-year study period for the Harlingen-San Benito MPO and the Lower Rio Grande Valley as a whole. 1...

  8. San Bernard Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal Area JumpPlanAugustineSan Bernard

  9. San Bernardino District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal Area JumpPlanAugustineSan

  10. San Carlos, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal Area JumpPlanAugustineSanCarlos,

  11. San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) Geothermal FacilitySan

  12. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton Sea Geothermal(Empire) GeothermalFernando,San

  13. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation,EnergySan Juan

  14. San Leandro, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation,EnergySan

  15. San Leanna, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation,EnergySanLeanna,

  16. Sans Souci, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasinSandusky,Sanpete County, Utah:Sans

  17. San Angelo, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySam HoustondataSan Angelo,

  18. San Bernardino County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySam HoustondataSan

  19. San Isabel Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectric HomeCA)San

  20. San Jose Energia y Medio Ambiente | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSan Jose

  1. San Luis Obispo County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource HistorySamElectricSan

  2. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - San Diego Workshop |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancy Sutley AboutDepartment of Energy San

  3. San Diego County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSan Diego County,

  4. San Diego Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSan Diego

  5. San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to:SamsungSan

  6. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco Volcanic Field

  7. San Gorgonio Farms (repower) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco Volcanic

  8. San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco VolcanicI Jump

  9. San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco VolcanicI

  10. San Gorgonio Farms Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan Francisco

  11. San Joaquin County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWind Farm

  12. San Joaquin, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWind FarmSolar

  13. San Juan Capistrano, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWind

  14. San Juan Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWindMesa Wind

  15. San Luis, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWindMesa

  16. San Mateo County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan FranciscoWindMesaMateo

  17. San Mateo, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSan

  18. San Miguel, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSanMiguel, California: Energy

  19. San Rafael, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project JumpSanMiguel, California:

  20. San Antonio's City Lights program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment of Energy Sampling Report forSan

  1. San Antonio, Texas Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment of Energy Sampling Report forSanData

  2. City of San Marcos, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity of Okolona,Plummer, IdahoCityCityCity ofSan Marcos,

  3. Mora-San Miguel Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah)Mora-San Miguel

  4. South San Gabriel, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiver Elec MemberSan

  5. East San Gabriel, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: Energy ResourcesRutherford, New Jersey:San Gabriel,

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduceNewPropaneEVsFacilityPowersSan

  7. City of San Antonio, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCity of Holyoke,Monroe,City ofCity of San

  8. University of California, San Diego (Scripps) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAGUnitil EnergyBerkeley Jump to:San

  9. Real Goods Solar San Rafael | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRay County, Missouri:ReSunReal Goods Solar San

  10. City of San Antonio, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach, FloridaCityRuston, LouisianaCity ofSan

  11. City of San Augustine, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach, FloridaCityRuston, LouisianaCity ofSanCity of

  12. City of San Diego Environmental Services Department | Open Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation Smyrna Beach, FloridaCityRuston, LouisianaCity ofSanCity

  13. New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREof EnergyBulbs |Reactors | Department ofEnergy San

  14. Application for Locally Adopted Energy Standards by the City of San Rafael in Accordance With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ADDING CHAPTER 12.46 CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION DEBRIS; 6) DELETING SECTION 14.16.365 (GREEN BUILDING Review), Program CON-18c (Use of Alternative Building Materials), Policy CON-21 (Waste Reduction for the San Rafael Green Building Ordinance The San Rafael Council adopted their Green Building Ordinance

  15. Shallow soil CO2 flow along the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilley, George

    Shallow soil CO2 flow along the San Andreas and Calaveras Faults, California J. L. Lewicki,1,2 W. C soil CO2 survey along the San Andreas fault (SAF) in Parkfield, and the Calaveras fault (CF) in Hollister, California, in the context of spatial and temporal variability, origin, and transport of CO2

  16. The Return On Investment for Taxi Companies Transitioning to Electric A Case Study in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    ) is profitable for the company. Fur- thermore, given that gasoline prices in San Francisco are only 5.4% higher process to a major taxi corporation, Yellow Cab San Francisco (YCSF). Using current prices, we find than the rest of the United States, but electricity prices are 75% higher; taxi companies with similar

  17. Taller de Ciencia para Jvenes para alumnos de bachillerato San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bor, Gil

    Taller de Ciencia para Jóvenes para alumnos de bachillerato San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas 3-7 agosto, 2009 CONVOCATORIA El "Taller de Ciencia para Jóvenes" en San Cristobal de las Casas (Chiapas), está dirigido a los alumnos de escuelas de nivel bachillerato que se sienten atraidos a las ciencias

  18. University of California, San Diego UCSD-ENG-077 Fusion Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    , heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, injecting particles and extracting of "ash" of the fusionUniversity of California, San Diego UCSD-ENG-077 Fusion Division Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 Advances in Fusion Technology Charles C. Baker

  19. 2007 WTE Conference San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 14, 2007 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    2007 WTE Conference San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 14, 2007 1 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION San Juan, Puerto Rico March 14, 2007 Location: Inter American University, Metropolitan Campus' Main and (MC) Carl Soderberg, Director, USEPA R2, CEPA The management of solid waste in Puerto Rico presents

  20. The influence of oceanic swell on flows over an estuarine intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talke, Stefan

    The influence of oceanic swell on flows over an estuarine intertidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay S mudflat. The observations indicate that long-period (10­20 s) ocean waves are a potentially important, we deployed an autonomous SonTek Hydra system on a mudflat in Central San Francisco Bay, and measured